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PEGGY ZONE FISHER AND THE DIVERSITY CENTER OF NORTHEAST OHIO

PUZZLE PIECE BY PUZZLE PIECE A family’s journey with

AUTISM

FASHION BEYOND BORDERS

UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS

GOING FURTHER WITH DIVERSITY

DR. ALFREDA BROWN $ 3.00 USD

JULY-AUGUST 2013

Making COLLABORATION, INCLUSION AND

ENGAGEMENT KEY TO DIVERSITY AT KENT STATE


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From the Editor Happy Summer! This month we are focusing on diversity and to start our conversation I would like to offer you a challenge! It's not hard and there is no test at the end, this is just between you and me. Over the course of the next thirty (30) days, I challenge you to broaden your horizon by being more inclusive. I'm not asking you to necessarily make a new friend, although that would be great! Instead I want you to open your heart and begin to see the world as this vast place that it is. When making decisions at work – are you thinking about the impact it will have on everyone? This means not just the managers if you are a manager, but the front line staff and even the janitorial staff. Is there a way for you to include everyone in the dialogue about this new decision? As you're watching the evening news, don't rush to judgment about the actions of the principals in the story. Instead I would like you to try and place yourself in their shoes and make an honest assessment of how you believe you would have handled the situation. I hear you asking, why am I doing this? The reason behind the challenge is that I think, we (myself included) tend to view the world with rose colored glasses that only focus and see what has become our norm. We don't think about the world outside of our tiny little boxes, and this leads to misconception, racism and just an overall ignorance about where we are from. Recently we sat down and talked with Dr. Alfreda Brown, Vice President of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Kent State University and she truly enlightened me, helped me to look at diversity beyond the skin color. As a world community, there are many differences that exist and they do not all begin and end with the color of one's skin. Aside from skin color, we must think about including people with developmental disabilities or other disabilities – this is a sign of diversity. The fact that there are still so many women who are not advancing in the work place is a sign of a lack of diversity. When we begin to be more inclusive, we begin to have dialogue and through this conversation we will have a better understanding of other cultures. Many speak of these times we are living in as “Post- racial” America, but they are only focusing on the issue of skin color. They are not thinking about gender, physical or emotional distress or any of the myriad differences that exist in this world. So I hope you will take the challenge and broaden your horizon within the next 30 days! If you decide to take the challenge a little further; please read R. Lee Gamble's “One Life Comes Full Circle” where she shines the spotlight on Peggy Zone Fisher and The Diversity Center of Northeast Ohio. The mission of the Center is “to work towards eliminating bias, bigotry and racism through education advocacy.” As we learn about each other and come to understand that our differences are minimal we will become a better community. Further evidence of the importance of educating ourselves about others is “Get in to Fit in,” by Michelle Phillips Fay. Fay describes how her college education went much further than the classroom and how Hispanic Americans are increasingly becoming a majority among undergraduate minority students. Probably the most difficult thing a parent experiences is when they are told their child is different from others, and that the task of raising them will bring more challenges than they could ever imagine. That is the reality for parents of children diagnosed with Autism spectrum disorder – a diagnosis that affects one in eighty-eight children. Michele Garrett enlightens us in “Puzzle piece by puzzle piece,” sharing the personal journey of her family. So please take a seat and join us on a journey of inclusion, enlightenment and diversity. It is my hope that you read something within these pages that opens your eyes and causes you to act.

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Shelley M. Shockley Managing Editor Writers Shelley M. Shockley Ruby Lee Gamble A. Michele Garrett Kim Brown Graphics / Art Bele’ Wondwossen On the Cover Photo: Lee Harris, Drew Imagery Photography Background photo & Story Shelley Shockley Design – Bele’ Wondwossen

Guest Writers / Contributors Michelle Phillips Fay Marjorie Clark Advertising Sales ads@phenomenalwoman.me 216.702.0845 Phenomenal Woman Magazine A subsidiary of Atlantic Creative Productions 5247 Wilson Mills Road #141 Cleveland, OH 44143 © 2013 Phenomenal Woman Magazine. All rights reserved ISSN 2330-2534 (Print) ISSN 2330-2550 (Online) Material may not be reproduced in whole or in part in any form of this publication without prior permission from the publisher. Printed in OHIO, U.S.A.

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Beletu (Bele') Wondwossen Founder / Publisher

Thank you for choosing Phenomenal Woman. Until next issue,

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COVER

CONTENTS

FEATURE Peggy Zone Fisher, One Life Comes Full Circle

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DR. ALFREDA BROWN ON DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION AT KENT state university

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CEO Nichelle McCall

Will help you navigate your college application with

BOLD Guidance

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DIVERSE FASHION FROM BEYOND OUR BORDERS

Get In, Diversity and Inclusion To Fit In in higher education

12 Puzzle piece by puzzle piece A personal look at one family’s journey with

autism

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DELICIOUS RECIPES

GOING FURTHER WITH DIVERSITY AT THE CORE

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SIMPLE WAYS TO IMPROVE

Personal Finances

(Family Feature) As more Americans make strides towards responsible spending and debt management, there are still ways to improve the control of family finances. According to a survey recently conducted by Bank of America, less than half of cardholders always pay their entire credit card balance. With more than half of individuals carrying credit card debt, Jason Gaughan, card products executive for Bank of America, said to think about personal spending before taking on a credit card. “Credit cards provide consumers an efficient and protected way to make purchases,” said Gaughan. “They are more convenient than cash and they are incredibly useful in an emergency. The key to successfully managing your credit card account is to understand your budget and stick to a plan that works for you when borrowing. You want a card with a rewards program that fits your lifestyle and how you manage your finances. If you typically carry a balance, look for a card that has low interest and reinforces good payment practices.” Along with these practices, there are other ways to promote good spending and personal finance habits, such as: Limit Number of Credit Cards Limiting the number of cards you own can help limit your spending and increase the likelihood you can pay above the minimum balance. Before you start cutting up your plastic, remember having more than one credit card can have merits. One idea is to have three cards: one in a safe place at home for emergencies and two with you at all times. Reap the Rewards Use the rewards programs available to credit card holders to cash in on things your family really needs. Some cards, such as the BankAmericard Cash Rewards credit card, let you earn more cash back where you spend the most money, like gas stations and grocery stores. The BankAmericard Better Balance Rewards credit card helps customers responsibly manage their credit card balance. Whatever rewards you are seeking, there is likely to be a card suitable for you. Evaluate All Debts Many carry debts beyond credit cards, including student loans, car payments and mortgages. Evaluate your debts and decide which ones have the highest interest rates. Making it a priority to pay down these debts first will save you more money in the long run. Create a Budget It's never too soon to put yourself in control of your money and stop letting it control you. A budget will give you financial peace of mind and it can help you stretch the income you have. Calculate your income and expenses and set your monthly budget. Though you may not be on-point every month, the simple act of tracking your spending will be a huge step forward in your quest towards responsible spending. For more information, visit www.bankofamerica.com/creditcard.

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Take a Break from Technology Tips to Enhance Family Togetherness (Family Features) As access to technology increases, families may find they are spending more time on their devices and less time together. Some psychologists worry our growing attachment to technology may result in social isolation. “We're getting used to a new way of being alone together,” said Sherry Turkle, Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor, psychologist and author of “Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other.” “People want to be with each other, but also elsewhere, connected to all the different places they want to be.” In her book, “Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other,” Turkle explores the idea that this constant need for virtual connection is leading to a gap in communication between families, and a new generation of children is unable to actually communicate and relate to their peers or parents.

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Ready for a Tech Timeout? Foresters™, a life insurance provider committed to the well-being of families, recently launched the Tech Timeout™ challenge in response to a growing awareness that our attachment to digital devices may contribute to a sense of social isolation among families. Tech Timeout encourages families across North America to take a pledge to turn off their digital devices (including TVs, smartphones, video games and computers) for an hour each day for one week and connect with each other in a more meaningful way. The idea is not to eliminate technology, but to create awareness of the dependence on technology, and ultimately improve personal bonds within families.

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To take the Tech Timeout pledge, and for more tips on building stronger bonds w i t h i n y o u r f a m i l y, v i s i t w w w.Te c h T i m e o u t . c o m a n d www.facebook.com/TechTimeout. Foresters™ is the trade name and a trademark of The Independent Order of Foresters, 789 Don Mills Road, Toronto, Canada M3C 1T9; its subsidiaries are licensed to use this mark.

Easy Ways to Unplug Carving out space and time for each other can start the channels of communication flowing. Here are some activities families can do together: · ·

Volunteer – Volunteering can help strengthen community connections and avoid a sense of social isolation. Find a cause your family is passionate about and volunteer with a local organization. Cook Together – Dig out your favorite recipes and try cooking as a family. Assign each person a role in meal preparation. You will not only have plenty of time to interact, your children can pick up some valuable life skills along the way. Take a Tech-free Holiday – Family vacations are a great time to recharge and bond with your kids, but connecting can be tough if you are each plugged into your electronic devices. Fun time together will create memories your children will cherish for years to come. Rediscover Reading – Begin a family reading hour or book club. Starting a discussion about literature will open up communication.

Board Game Bonanza – Break out the cards, puzzles and board games for a night of old-fashioned fun. Get Out and Play – Find a local trail and set out on a hike together. You will have a chance to interact with your surroundings and one another and be active too.

Tech Timeout and the Tech Timeout logo are trademarks of The Independent Order of Foresters. Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Savvy Money Tips To Share With Your Teen (Family Features) — Most parents have learned things about money they wish they had known at a younger age. But when it comes to broaching the topic with their own teenagers, about a third would rather talk to them about smoking, drugs and bullying than money.1 Parents can take the angst out of teaching money management by working it into everyday routines. “Your kids are most likely interested in money and having more of it, but they may not know where to start,” says Susan Ehrlich, president of financial services for H&R Block. “Teaching money skills before they graduate will help them make smart choices and learn from their financial missteps now, so they're better prepared when they're on their own.” H&R Block provides free financial education for teens through H&R Block Dollars & Sense, which offers these tips: Encourage learning by earning. You may or may not want your teen to hold down a job while in high school, but you can instill the concept of earning by encouraging occasional paying projects, such as babysitting or mowing lawns. Practice makes perfect. Ask your teen to manage a portion of the family budget, such as writing the weekly menu and grocery list to fit your budget or keeping track of eating-out expenses every month. Save now, spend later. Open a savings account for your teen to plan for future purchases. If you're able, offer to match a portion of their savings to encourage the behavior. This can help convey the difference between needs and wants.

Verbalize your own wants for something the entire family can save for and enjoy together, then share your progress toward the goal. Set some limits. If your teen has a credit card, set a realistic credit limit so the balance can be paid in full each month. Your teen will also see the impact of interest rates and annual fees. Be a good financial role model. Pay your own bills on time and ask your teen to be part of the process. Talk to your teen about the importance of a good credit score and how to maintain it – for example, paying your bills on time accounts for 35 percent of your score. Help them understand lower credit scores mean higher interest that could cost thousands of unnecessary dollars. For more tips visit www.hrblockdollarsandsense.com. Council for Economic Education Photo courtesy of Getty Images

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BOLD Guidance CEO Nichelle McCall BOLD Guidance CEO Nichelle McCall was born and raised in the city of Cleveland. From a very early age, her family instilled in her the value of a quality education; in fact, McCall's mother worked three jobs to send her daughter to Laurel School, in order to ensure she received a solid school experience. Still, as a first-generation college student, McCall had challenges navigating the college application process—everything from organizing the different applications to the FAFSA and other financial aid forms. Enter BOLD Guidance, a web- and mobile-optimized app that breaks down the college application process into manageable, bite-sized pieces with clear deadlines. The app partially came out of McCall's work with her consulting firm, Community Strategies Consulting, through which she develops college-prep programs for schools and nonprofits, but also stemmed from her own experience working in college admissions and applying to college herself. Give us the elevator pitch for BOLD Guidance. BOLD Guidance helps students to navigate the college application process through their mobile devices, while allowing counselors to track their progress online. Essentially we give students deadlines and tasks that are specific to each college application that they are submitting, so they're not missing deadlines, they're not missing standard requirements, and everyone understands exactly what's needed. Counselors love it because it empowers students to take ownership of their college application process, while not increasing their workload. How did you come up with the idea? I've been working in the college prep field for over ten years. I got my start as a college admissions counselor for Baldwin-Wallace University. I've also helped to start up a college access nonprofit here in Cleveland called Minds Matter. We've been up and running now for six years, and 100 percent of our students have been accepted to four-year colleges. I also worked with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation as a liaison on a $20 million college completion project for low-income young adults. With everything that I've been doing, I noticed that there really wasn't a lot of assistance to help students through the college application 10 ¦ JULY-AUGUST 2013

process. I talked to students, counselors and parents, and really started to understand what their pain points were, what their problems were with the process. They were telling me, “It's really challenging to organize all of these deadlines and all of these requirements into one place. We're using Excel spreadsheets trying to create it ourselves, creating folders. We'd love for to have reminders of when things are due—and we just don't know how to manage it.” As I talked to more students, they said, “We'd love to have this on our mobile devices.” And that's where we are today. What about your personality has allowed you to embark on entrepreneurship—and flourish within it? I would say part of it is not being afraid to take risks. Motivated, determined, persistent. I don't fully take no as an answer, in the sense that if someone says something isn't quite right, I work with them to try to figure out a potential barrier—and try to figure out how to get around that. It's just being really flexible and adaptable and being able to quickly take the data and the information I receive—whether it's from mentors or from customers—and being able to make decisions off of that to continue to move forward. As an entrepreneur, what's the best advice you've been given? Not being afraid to go after what you want, to go after what you need, and to be open to hearing what it is that other people have to say—to be coachable. You don't necessarily have to act on every single thing—but take that information, think about it, think about how it applies to your idea, and take action upon it and start to implement. Show that progress to people who are mentoring you. If they see that you're able to take their information and move on it rather quickly, that puts them in a position to continue to want to help you along the way.


OPTIMA Lender Services is one of Cleveland's growing small businesses. The young company provides real-estate transaction services, including full title and s ett l e m e nt s e r v i c e s o n residential and commercial properties, covering both purchase and refinance transactions. With a newly announced strategic partnership, OPTIMA is poised to become even bigger.

Lakewood Bakery Wins “COSE Keeps You Cozy" Award Blackbird Baking Company in Lakewood, Ohio has been awarded a $1,000 prize from the Council of Smaller Enterprises (COSE) in their “COSE Keeps You Cozy” sweepstakes. The contest was aimed at educating small businesses on the benefits of making energy efficiency upgrades in their businesses and participants completed a free, online entry at the COSE website between February and April of this year.

OPTIMA CEO - Monique Winston

In June, Accurate Group Holdings, Inc. announced that it made an undisclosed investment in OPTIMA, which solidified the relationship between the two companies. The investment and partnership signifies the interest of these privately held companies to work together more closely to help grow each business. “We're excited to be associated with an industry leader experiencing explosive growth nationally,” OPTIMA CEO Monique Winston said. “Although Accurate is larger than we are and has been around longer, they share our high standards of excellence and an interest in utilizing cutting-edge, customer-friendly technology solutions.” But even though OPTIMA is a newer player in the real estate transaction space—the certified Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) launched in 2011—it has already earned recognition and secured major clients. For example, in September 2012 Winston received a Presidential Corporate Award from the National Association Of Real Estate Brokers. This award recognized her for being an inspiration to African-American business owners and for having a commitment to AfricanAmerican home and business ownership. OPTIMA's commit to inclusion was also a big plus to ACCURATE. “It was great to find a respected MBE partner demonstrating its desire to impact minority- and womenowned enterprises positively,” says Paul Doman, CEO of Accurate. “OPTIMA's presence in the first mortgage space will further enhance our offerings and broaden our market opportunities. We are proud to partner with OPTIMA to expand our business and our commitment to diversity. ” OPTIMA is on pace to double its revenue in 2013 and expects to expand its market share by leveraging its newest partner's cost-effective valuation appraisal capabilities.

The Blackbird Baking Company is owned and operated by the husband and wife team of Tom and Adria Clark, who will use the winnings to make energy efficiency improvements at their facility. Adria says that small businesses should take a hard look at their energy costs because it’s not always top of mind, “We tend to overlook utility bills as a ‘cost of running a business,’ and it’s easy to be too busy to think much about what we can do to offset the cost. I definitely will now focus more time on comparing rates and considering what we can do internally to be more energy efficient…and this money from COSE will be a great kick-start.” COSE has made energy efficiency a priority for some time now. The Public Utilities of Ohio (PUCO) named COSE the Energy Efficiency Administrator for Small Business in the First Energy territories. COSE is also working with Dominion East Ohio on the Nonresidential Energy Assessment Program. COSE recently partnered with KeyBank to create COSE’s first energy loan program as well as several national organizations to launch the Ohio Energy Resource Fund to enable smaller to mid-size businesses to obtain capital for energy efficiency projects when traditional financing opportunities are unavailable. The national organization, Chambers for Innovation and Clean Energy (CICE) recently recognized COSE as one of the top ten chambers of commerce in the country for driving economic development through energy efficiency initiatives. “We are delighted to be able to award this money to a great local small business like Blackbird Baking Company,” says Nicole Stika, senior director of energy at COSE. “They are very typical of the small and mid-size businesses that can benefit from making energy efficiency upgrades in their office, plant or shop. We look forward to helping Blackbird Baking put their winnings to good use on energy efficiency initiatives.”

About COSE COSE is one of Ohio’s largest small business support organizations, striving to help small businesses grow and maintain their independence. Comprised of more than 14,000 member companies, COSE has a long history of fighting for the rights of all small business owners, whether it’s through group purchasing programs for health care, workers’ compensation, or energy, advocating for specific changes in legislation or regulation to benefit small business, or providing a forum and resource for small businesses to connect with and learn from each other. (www.cose.org). www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ¦ 11


DIVERSITY

Get In, To Fit In By Michelle Phillips Fay Contributing Writer Within the last two years, Hispanics have become the largest minority enrolled in four-year colleges. According to a recent Pew Hispanic Center study, they made up roughly 16.5 percent of all U.S. college students, while comprising roughly 16.5 percent of the country's population according to U.S. Census data. And unless all minority students who seek this same opportunity are given the chance to attend majority colleges and universities, they may fail to acquire the exposure essential to succeeding in mainstream society. At least, the way mainstream society is defined right now.

Diversity of thought is commonplace. Human beings after all are not a monolith. Individually we are as diverse in kind as there are grains of sand. No two people think exactly alike, even if they are derived from the same community, family, home or womb. I learned the latter when mentoring identical twins. On the level of higher education, when the term "diversity" is used it broadly encompasses the categories of: race, ethnicity, gender, gender identification, sexual orientation, gender expression, disability, nationality, language, religion, and socio-economic background, among others. Thus, an overwhelming percentage of colleges today provide students with the intellectual "passports" needed to explore the world. Campus organizations now exist for Asian, Hispanic, Non-English Speaking, Non-Drinking, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer students. To members they offer indispensible moral support, and to non-members through parties and other sponsored events they add a priceless component to their overall education.

Come 2043, the majority may have a very different look and feel because that year is among the projected dates for when racial minorities in the U.S. will become majority. Both the complexion and the complexities within our country are changing. But until that day arrives, we should stay on the path called progress for all.

Bias, bigotry, discrimination and racism have one common root: ignorance. And the only antidote to ignorance is education. So the doors to our colleges (two-year and four-year) and universities (public and private) must swing on open hinges. Campuses need student bodies which are diverse, open (equal access) and affirming (pro-person). The initial way to achieve this goal is to "get them in, to fit them in."

The spectre of a changing American landscape, along with the nation's first African-American president, causes some to raise the sticky question as to whether initiatives like affirmative action, which was intended to repair the damage done by centuries of discrimination, and other civil rights efforts, are still needed. In my opinion, the answer is a resounding yes, which should sound across this land as loudly as the Liberty Bell once tolled.

Social commentators and legal scholars alike argue that the benefits of diversity will not automatically occur from a diverse campus alone. They may well be true. Complex issues require complex solutions. But one cannot dispute that the societal benefits to be gained from diversity on campuses will never occur in the absence of it.

When I attended college, I was a minority on many different fronts. First, I was female. Second, I was African American. And, third, I was a Protestant attending a Catholic university. Fortunately, trailblazers before me had formed an organization for black students. I held an executive office prior to graduating because each of us is required to make a gratitude deposit for the benefit of future generations. My college offered academic scholarships to minority students, then primarily Black students, through a program intended to form a partnership with the surrounding Washington, D.C. community. Indeed, it was called the "Partnership Program." Program funding helped to close the gap between federal loans and grants and the cost of tuition.

This term, the U.S. Supreme Court avoided striking down affirmative action in admissions, choosing instead to impose a stricter level of scrutiny on college and university programs. Now, under Fisher v. University of Texas (notably, my graduate school alma mater), universities must demonstrate "that available, workable, race-neutral alternatives do not suffice" in meeting the goals of attaining diversity in the admissions process. What does this mean? The legal bar to jump was raised while the human hurdle got a little higher. Still, the issue is not soon to go away. Other affirmative action cases are already on the Court's docket for next term. And since the 7-1 Court in Fisher procedurally remanded the case for lower court review, it is possible for that case to return following the lower court's actions.

Of all the minority students I matriculated with, all have worked at least part time, several managed full-time employment. Some of us, including myself, worked multiple jobs at various times. And if it were not for the stories our majority classmates told, we would have thought that spring break in Florida was an urban legend.

As to the final judicially-determined outcome, uncertainty remains. But if decided in the court of public opinion, our growing demographic favors diversity.

In my Protestant home, alcohol was not consumed. Imagine my surprise, when I attended my first department-sponsored "wine and cheese" social and witnessed the priest professors imbibing. My own Baptist ministers would have frowned upon such activity. But college is not only about expanding the mind, but also expanding your horizons -- being able to see beyond the borders established by birth.

Š 2013 Michelle Phillips Fay

12 ÂŚ JULY-AUGUST 2013

Michelle Phillips Fay is a freelance journalist and active mentor. She served as the public relations liaison for the Greater Cleveland CARES Mentoring Movement, which was launched in Cleveland, Ohio in October 2010. Ms. Fay can be reached on Twitter at PrepOrationMentoring.


Diversity is Priority at YMCA of Greater Cleveland The YMCA (Young Men's Christian Association) of Greater Cleveland is an organization of people joined together by a shared commitment to ensure that everyone has the opportunity to learn, grow and thrive. By prioritizing diversity and inclusion, we seek to ensure that all segments of society have access to the YMCA and feel welcome and fully engaged as participants, members, staff and volunteers. 70% of the workforce at the YMCA of Greater Cleveland is female. The up-and-coming Women's Leadership Resource Network at the YMCA of Greater Cleveland strives to be a catalyst for creating an environment that leverages the talents and recognizes the potential of all women in the YMCA. The group is open to all employees, friends, members, and allies of the YMCA.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION: A POEM by Samuel Kincaid Diversity and Inclusion Committee member YMCA of Greater Cleveland Our bones are white, our blood is red, Yet you choose to view me with contempt and dread, Everyone needs love, don't choose hatred, One path, one heart, don't be mislead. Diversity and Inclusion, Accept differences it's the final conclusion, In doing so, we can claim fruition Muslims, Buddhists, the Christians and Jews, Why must we segregate, why must I choose, One group will never win, we all will lose, Admission is the first step to diffuse.

This will be accomplished through professional and personal development that: Addresses current and emerging needs that are unique to women Develops leadership and executive skills Provides opportunities for coaching and mentoring. For more info visit http://clevelandymca.org/

Diversity and Inclusion, Face your fears, receive gratification, Defeat the hate, assume satisfaction. Black, White, Yellow and Brown, We are all brothers and sisters, let us abound, One planet, one love, help spread it around, Peace, Love and Acceptance, I hope will be found.

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“I love diversity and, once I connected the dots in my life, it was clear this is where I'm supposed to be. It's more than a vocation, it's my calling.”

Alfreda Brown, Ed.D. Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Kent State University

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cover - Dr. Alfreda Brown

Collaboration, inclusion and engagement key to Diversity at Kent State By Shelley M. Shockley Dr. Alfreda Brown has the rare opportunity to live and work in her predestined field. Many don't believe that the lives of individuals are predetermined, but as you look at Dr. Brown's Curriculum Vitae and observe her body language as she tells her story it becomes clear that this is more than happenstance. There is a higher power at work. In her current role as Vice President for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI), Alfreda Brown is responsible for executive leadership and management of diversity and inclusion programs for Kent State University. Kent State is Ohio's second-largest university and rated a "Top University in the World" by the Times Higher Education London. Kent State equity programs seek “inclusive excellence” for all students and employees and include: Upward Bound TRiO Programs; the Office of DEI Projects and Initiatives; Office of Diversity Assessment and Research; the Student Multi-Cultural Center; and two offices housed within the Women's Center: the Office of Sexual & Relationship Violence and Support Services; and the Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Center. Alfreda is a strong advocate for strategic planning and outcome-based assessments to facilitate realistic decision-making and the constant improvement of diversity initiatives. But Dr. Brown's journey started when she was a fourth grade student in Rochester, New York, and the siren call for the integration of public schools was being heard throughout the United States. Her mom was determined that her fifteen children would have the best education, and heeded the call that would forever change the life of young Alfreda. She recalls that integration was not a good experience for everyone, but is quick to recount the joyful years she spent in an integrated school system.

Fast forward to her teen years and the end of high school, she learned the stark differences in the world when it comes to “black and white.” Soon after graduation Brown began working for a now defunct Fortune 500 company, where she saw differences in the treatment she and the only other AfricanAmerican employee in their working area received, relating to many things including higher education. The company provided educational assistance to her Caucasian counterparts, but the same opportunity was not afforded to her and the other black employee. She continued to work for this company for a number of years, but at the age of thirty-three she enrolled in her first college course and, she says, “Became a professional student for the next eighteen years, slowly but steadily completing one degree after another.” Dr. Brown also realized that she loved academia and the business of learning. Armed with this new desire to learn as much as possible, Dr. Brown continued her studies, first earning an associate's degree and then a bachelor's degree in Organizational Management, while working full time and raising a family. When she began her collegiate studies there weren't many classes or degree programs in “diversity.” So her love of people led her into organizational development and later completing a master's degree in Career and Human Resources Development, followed by a doctoral degree in Higher Education Administration. Her dissertation research was focused on developing an affirmative action resource manual for higher education.

“I was looking at human differences, distinctions that made people different from one another and why this is a problem in the United States. I reviewed the historical context, federal laws During a recent interview with and statutes that has shaped and Phenomenal Woman, Dr. Brown is reshaped values held within our “As we begin to understand who we are and what we can apologetic – she has just Constitution. I began to analyze contribute as individuals, no matter where we are, we can concluded one meeting and it's concepts and ways of thinking live a purpose driven life, impacting every person that time to sit down for her interview. based upon implicit biases and walks onto our path. We are writing our own script, each Despite a hectic schedule and long prejudices when confronting passing day. In the end we want to leave a legacy that can hours she is relaxed and confident difference, unruly power and pass from one generation to the next. ... ” as she recounts the journey that insensitivity when reviewing court led her to Kent State University. cases. Why is difference and inequality such an anomaly in As Dr. Brown talks about her life and her journey there is a glow that engulfs America and what can we do to level the playing field?” Brown stated. “As I her. It becomes clear that she has a passion for her work, and finds joy in continued my work with affirmative action, my research confirmed the fact making a difference. Smiling, she says, “I love diversity and, once I connected that we live in a diverse world, with a lot of challenges, and a lot of great the dots in my life, it was clear this is where I'm supposed to be. It's more than people who need assistance – when they look like you or different from you, a vocation, it's my calling.” inequity at some level exist amongst us all. As a nation, how can we address the devastating inequities that have its core problem rooted in “difference?” In her early years she understood diversity as the inclusion of other races into the larger society: the desegregation of the education system. It was during this time in school that she learned, “The world is a much larger place than where I lived and attended church.” “This experience was my first encounter with kids that didn't look like me,” Brown said, and she found joy in the “long and loving relationships” she formed. Fondly she recalls the singing group she and some friends formed. “I was the only black girl and there was one Jewish girl and the remaining members were Caucasian, but we didn't notice much regarding differences among us because we all seemed to like the same things.” These early years were fundamental in helping Brown shape her future. “I had a great time and realized that being with different people I could actually see, learn and experience that the world was much bigger than what I was used to, my much smaller community of family and friends. I learned more in the fourth grade that changed my view of the world than at any other time in my life.”

Not limiting herself to being a casual student, Dr. Brown immersed herself in the life of Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) where she was then employed and making a name for herself. Brown worked her way up to the position of Executive Assistant to the Dean, and served as a member of the Commission on Diversity Steering Committee. The work of the committee was producing positive change. It was decided the university needed someone to oversee the continuation of this work. Dr. Brown applied for the position even though she did not meet the minimum requirements. But, as mentioned earlier, this was pre-destined. Her undergraduate thesis was titled “Achieving a Pluralistic Society at RIT.” The president of the university read the thesis and felt Brown was the perfect candidate. She also was less than eighteen months away from receiving her master's degree, which would solidify her credentials. Overtime she was promoted to Interim Chief Diversity Officer, serving RIT a total of twenty-two years.

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cover - Dr. Alfreda Brown

Her experiences as a student, educator and staff member have helped shape Dr. Brown's view of diversity. To her, although important, diversity is not code for adding more minorities based on race, gender and representation. Instead she sees it as incorporating inclusion and pluralism on all levels. She asks the question, “Whose voice is not at the decision-making table?” She believes in a holistic approach for diversity, becoming the voice for those who are not represented. For instance, ensuring that the needs of deaf and hard of hearing faculty and staff are met; ensuring the ADA committee provide recommendations to improving wheelchair accessibility, such as the proper number of ramps, parking spaces and other amenities at Kent State campuses. These examples are all part of the important components of Dr. Brown's job. At Kent State, Dr. Brown's vision found a willing partner in university core values and policies. With diversity and inclusion as the umbrella, there are a number of areas that Dr. Brown must oversee. The key, she says, is “collaboration.” To effect positive inclusive change Brown incorporates collaboration and cultural cross-pollination. “It starts by building relationships with a committed group of engaged people,” she said. The goal is to recruit people from across the university who are different in many ways such as “professorial rank, religious beliefs, national origin and perspectives, who are willing to collaborate” in order to bring about inclusive, progressive, sustainable change. To guide the university community in this collaborative effort, Dr. Brown and her team have produced a five-year Equity Action Plan designed to “promote fairness and inclusive values for all members of the Kent State family and, more specifically, to increase opportunities for underrepresented and underserved groups.” As a spiritual woman Dr. Brown has found a deeper understanding of a meaningful life through Rick Warren's “A Purpose Driven Life.” She explains, “As we begin to understand who we are and what we can contribute as individuals, no matter where we are, we can live a purpose driven life, impacting every person that walks onto our path. We are writing our own script, each passing day. In the end we want to leave a legacy that can pass from one generation to the next. In understanding why we exist, we will conduct our lives with discipline and purpose; ultimately realizing that we are making a difference in the lives of others as we journey through this life.” Personally, she has found that she was drawn to Kent State because of her love for diversity and the Kent State ideal of a higher form of diversity – inclusive excellence in action: Seeking excellence by including the contributions of people with different backgrounds, experiences and abilities. Once she connected those dots, Brown says, “I was completely aligned with purpose. I knew this was where I was meant to be at this time in my life.” In recognition of her leadership, excellence and accomplishments, the National Diversity Council named, Alfreda Brown, Ed.D., recipient of the 2013 Ohio Glass Ceiling Award. The award recognizes women who have overcome barriers to climb to the top in their professions and also have made it possible for others to follow in their footsteps. Dr. Brown received the award at the 2013 Ohio Women’s Conference Award Luncheon held on May 30 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Brown has also authored a book entitled “Word Up: Inspirations, Meditations and Prayers to Help You Face Challenges in Life” that will be released this fall. "...Word Up is powerful, inspiring, and offers hope no matter what your life situation may be. This book encourages you to perform a deep selfanalysis and forces you to search the inner voice; your subconscious soul to unveil truth and direction. The author did an exceptional job connecting biblical scriptures and parables to daily life events, showing how the Holy Bible has unequivocal solutions to all of life's problems."

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One Life Comes Full Circle

Peggy Zone Fisher and The Diversity Center of Northeast Ohio By R. Lee Gamble When I was a young girl growing up on the near west side of Cleveland my father was a Cleveland City Councilman. This was back in the early 60s. One day he gathered us all together and he said your Mom and I have invited a family over for dinner and we want you to meet them. This is the person whom we are going to campaign for. He is the right person and we want him to be the next mayor of the City of Cleveland. That person was Carl Stokes. In one occasion when we came home after a day of passing out literature, someone had painted on the side of our house the words “N____ lovers,” among other hateful things. They killed my sister's little black poodle and left it on the porch with this thing around its neck that said “beware or you will be next.” We were all young kids and we were terrified. My parents gathered us together and I can still hear my father's voice and the words he said, “Look, whoever did this to us, they are the cowards. We are going to hold our head up high and we are going to keep doing what we are doing. We are doing the right thing and I do not want you to be afraid. We are bigger than this and we won't let them win.” During that election period every east side council person endorsed and worked for Carl Stokes and every west side council person endorsed and worked for Seth Taft except one – my father. He supported Stokes and he won. After that we had friends whose parents wouldn't let them play with us anymore. It was hard to understand why they couldn't come over to our house. We felt that discrimination! Peggy Zone Fisher took all of the lessons she learned from her father Mike and her mother Mary and put it to good use at The Diversity Center of Northeast Ohio. Founded in 1927, as the national Conference of Christians and Jews, The Diversity Center of Northeast Ohio empowers individuals to build on the strength of diversity and to create communities where all people are connected, respected and valued. It is the mission of this organization to work towards eliminating bias, bigotry and racism through education advocacy.

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“The most important work that we do is with our youth,” Fisher said. “We work with over 10,000 young people in nine counties in Northeast Ohio. We do middle and high school conferences, overnight camps and a summer camp. We are in schools and the classrooms providing diversity training to young people.” Fisher said that she and her team have found that young people respond better to the programming if they work in small groups. “We break up all the students and we go off into small units with anywhere from 20 to 25 students. This gives the young people a safe space to share their ideas and to talk about subjects that are difficult to discuss.” Diversity, Fisher said, is more than race! “Race is a piece of it and an important part, but diversity includes how we view things through a socio-economic lens,” she said. “Diversity includes physical challenges, sexual orientation, age, gender, religion. All the 'isms' are part of diversity and frankly, one of my personal goals is to help create a community where people feel safe, respected, valued and connected. I want our young people to stay in Northeast Ohio. I don't want to lose them. If they are not feeling heard or respected and valued for who they are, we are going to lose them to other cities.” In addition to the youth programs, The Diversity Center also works with companies and organizations to develop the necessary tools to recognize, understand, appreciate, leverage and celebrate diversity. Some of their annual programs and events include the Count Me in Educator Series; the Humanitarian Award Dinner; Living Voices; Leadership Luncheon; Walk, Rock & Run; Camp STARR; LeadDiversity; and Cultural Competency. “One of the things that I am really proud of is that Cleveland is going to be hosting the Gay Games next summer,” Fisher said. “We are partnering with the Gay Games Committee and we will be conducting diversity training for all the vendors and companies that are participating. We are participating in this exciting event because we want to create a sustainable model that not only will last during the Gay Games, but will help change a culture in Northeast Ohio.” All of the professional development work carried out by The Diversity Center is customized. Each program is created to specifically address whatever issue or topic requested by the school or the corporation. “We don't have cookie cutter programs,” Fisher explained. “We hear, we listen to understand what the culture and environment is about and then we create a program that is tailored for them. We are proud of our custom made programs and workshops.” With a staff of 14, this non-profit organization depends solely on corporate support, fundraising and donations. “Without the corporate support we couldn't do this work. For instance, school districts don't have funds. Every school district is struggling but the need for our programming is greater than it has ever been. Superintendents call me and say we need you, but we are laying off teachers, our classrooms are bigger than they ever were and we can't pay you. Do we walk away from these schools where we have been working with these young people for so many years? That is where corporate and foundation support becomes critical. Through their generosity, we can raise money to help cover the programming costs. We also raise dollars through our annual Walk, Rock & Run held every spring. So we can then say to that Superintendent that it's ok, we can do the programs because we have raised the money through corporate sponsorships.” Fisher said after 30 years of running her own travel business she was looking for something that would resonate with her. “I sold the business and opportunities started presenting themselves but nothing moved me. I didn't know what I was going to do next but I knew whatever it was I had to have a passion for it. It had to be there, otherwise I couldn't do it. I couldn't fake it. The mission of the Diversity Center is something that resonated with me. It spoke to me. I never thought in a million years I would be running a non-profit. I truly believe this is work that I am meant to do. “I was really blessed to have been born to my parents, because they taught us that our world was bigger than the corner of W. 65th and Detroit. They had a big vision for how the world should be and they taught us those ideals. So when the opportunity came for me to work with the Diversity Center, I really felt like my life had come full circle. There is a reason why this organization should be here and there is a reason I should be doing this work.” Mike and Mary's little girl is working hard to make their vision of the world a reality and Northeast Ohio will become a better place because of it.

Get Involved Walk, Rock & Run

Volunteers are critical for the success of the walk and are needed for set-up, food, and registration. Please contact Marci Curtis at 216-752-3000 or mcurtis@diversitycenterneo.org High school students and youth groups are welcome to volunteer at The Diversity Center for Walk, Rock & Run as part of their community service commitment.

College Interns and Senior Projects

The Diversity Center is pleased to work with students and schools for credit and special projects. Please contact Marci Curtis at 216-752-3000 or email mcurtis@diversitycenterneo.org

Camp Counselors

The Diversity Center is looking for dynamic young idealists ages 18 and over to be counselors for our High School Fall Retreat to be held each year in early fall at Camp Wise in Chardon, Ohio. The counselors will be trained as certified facilitators and will receive 50 documented hours of community service. If you or someone you know is looking for an exciting leadership opportunity, please contact AmariYah Israel at 216-752-3000 or aisrael@diversitycenterneo.org

Fall Events Fall High School Retreat

Friday, October 10 - Saturday, October 12, 2013 Camp Wise, Chardon, OH High School students spend 2 nights at Camp Wise participating in in-depth conversations about race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, and other aspects of diversity.

Living Voices

Tuesday, October 15 - Friday, October 25, 2013 At your school or organization Living Voices presents dynamic solo performances uniquely combined with archival film that turns history into a moving, personal journey.

Contact info@diversitycenterneo.org or call 216.752.3000 for more information. www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ¦ 19


going

FURTHER with Diversity at the Core

For more than a year, Donnie Perkins, Vice President for Diversity and Inclusion has led the effort to implement the system wide strategic plan for diversity and inclusion by focusing on increasing leadership and physician diversity, strengthening and growing Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), enhancing physician pipeline programs, promoting diversity and inclusion education initiatives, conducting community engagement programs and providing sponsorship support for community organizations and events. The office continues to build a strong foundation that collaborates with other system units to “diversify the system,” says Mr. Perkins, “so that UH can fully embrace diversity and realize the full benefits of being a diverse and inclusive organization. This means that physicians are better able to provide quality patient care. Research has shown that many people are more likely to seek care from people who look and sound like them. Therefore, our objective is to increase diversity of our board, leadership, physicians and our entire work force, and to sustain a climate of dignity, respect and equity that meets the needs of our patients and the community we serve,” he says.

At University Hospitals, diversity is defined as race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, disability and, from a broader perspective, diversity of ideas, thoughts and perspectives.

going FURTHER with Supplier Diversity University Hospitals' commitment to diversity is evident in the inclusion efforts undertaken during Vision 2010. By expecting UH suppliers to take ownership of inclusion in order to participate in Vision 2010, the hospital was able to achieve the majority of its diversity goals. Cassandra Johnson, architect and director of construction, revealed that UH focused on “creatively bringing people together” through strategic match making while developing areas for inclusion that were not apparent at first. They also had the expectation that subcontractors compete at a higher level and rise to the occasion, which resulted in those suppliers having a “full seat at the table” while gaining first-hand experience in the highly specialized field of hospital construction. Johnson says that the first- and second-tier suppliers “grew up together” and notes that the relationships that were established during construction will be beneficial for the firsttier vendor companies wishing to participate in future projects in the region that also have diversity goals. Completed projects include a new main/visitor entrance, gift shop, Breast Health Center, new front door, west and south additions, a Same-Day Surgery Department and a new Post-Acute Care Unit. Other projects include lab, radiology and surgery upgrades, a Progressive Care Unit and obstetrics. The St. John Medical Center modernization concludes in 2015. Ms. Johnson also ensures the supplier diversity goals are met for the modernization. “We are on pace to meet supplier diversity goals of 15 percent MBE (Minority Business Enterprises) and 5 percent FBE, (Female Business Enterprises)” says Ms. Johnson, adding that the project has added professional services to its goals. There are 26 female- and minority-owned businesses on the project. Expertise areas include contractors, engineers, electrical suppliers, architects, materials suppliers and graphic designers.

Cassandra L. Johnson, Director of Construction, University Hospitals 20 ¦ JULY-AUGUST 2013

As University Hospitals construction projects continue to grow, there is a need for more diverse representation. “We have a new sourcing policy we are putting into place by 2013 which requires that a local or diverse supplier be included in the bid process,” says Alan H. Wilde, Vice President, System Services. “We believe that by initiating this policy, we will increase the number of local and diverse suppliers.”


Going FURTHER with Women in Leadership Five of University Hospitals are led by three women. Two have been appointed within the past year. They are uniquely qualified to strategically move University Hospitals forward in their goal to provide quality patient care to the Northeast Ohio community.

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Laurie S. Delgado, President, University Hospitals Bedford and Richmond Medical Centers, campuses of UH Regional Hospitals Laurie S. Delgado's experience in Health Information Management and Quality helped prepare her for a stellar UH career. After 17 years at University Hospitals Geneva Medical Center serving as a manager, director and chief operating officer, she spent the last five of those years serving as President. In 2008, Ms. Delgado began serving as President at UH Richmond Medical Center and as UH Bedford Medical Center's President in 2011. “As President, my primary goal is to ensure there is strategic direction for both campuses and that we are providing high-quality care for our patients, and ensuring we are meeting the needs of our community,” offers Ms. Delgado. Ms. Delgado's varied experiences have allowed her to focus on improving the awareness of the unique characteristics of the populations UH Richmond Medical Center serves. Those populations include veterans, Baby Boomers, GenXers and Millennials.

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Susan V. Juris leads University Hospitals Ahuja Medical Center, our newest community hospital. Ms. Juris walked the nontraditional path to leading UH Ahuja Medical Center. She holds a degree in psychology and an MBA. Her early career years were spent in mental health and later at large publicly traded service management and health care firms.

Ms. Juris mentions that all health care and business executives share many skill sets such as financial acumen, strategic and operational planning and work force development. “I think women are better system thinkers. We have a tendency to see a broad set of factors influencing a situation. We are better suited to build strong team-oriented organizational cultures.”

Patricia DePompei's career path began humbly as a bedside nurse and progressed to RN. Working in neonatal intensive care gave her the experience needed to understand the skill sets required to care for University Hospitals' littlest patients, their mothers and to lead two hospitals. She recognizes that she typically is the only female and nurse in many high-level meetings she attends. “Many of my colleagues came up through a financial background or are physicians. What's nice is to have a diverse group at the table, with different experiences and different frames of reference. It is important that leaders have a diverse background,” says Mrs. DePompei. She thinks women can be very encouraging of others, “so typically I view us as wanting to see everybody win. It is not so much about competition; there is healthy competition. I personally strive to make it a win-win for everyone involved,” she says. “Hospitals are very fast-paced. Very complicated situations are going on all the time and you have to be able to adapt and adjust quickly to the situation and to a diverse work group,” says Mrs. DePompei. “A leader has to have a keen sense and high regard for the contributions that everybody makes.”

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Inside Scoop and the Steps to help MBEs reach Success

2013 Business Opportunity Fair: Business Connections…Evolving to the Next Level!

Anthony Peebles, President, NOMSDC thanking sponsors and attendees before introducing the Luncheon Keynote Speaker Tilmon “Tim” Brown

Left Bridget Carter, Supplier Diversity Manager, Caesars Entertainment discussing their process with an attendee

By Maria R. Davila The 2013 Business Opportunity Fair presented by Northern Ohio Minority Supplier Development Council with Lead Sponsor Rockwell Automation at Corporate College East on June 4th , was the trade fair to attend. This event attracted not only the “Who's Who” of major corporations, but also Minority-Owned Business Enterprises (MBEs), various Government Sectors and Non-profits. The day's agenda featured Breakfast speaker Jeff Thompson, Vice President of Supply Chain Management from Eaton Corporation. This was followed by Corporate and MBE Workshops that delved into the various hot topics in both areas. While corporations were discussing the Best Practices in Supplier Diversity, MBEs were learning the inside scoop on “Purchasing Opportunities with Higher Education”. After a brief break the workshops resumed with a corporate workshop that focused on two different MBE Development and Mentoring models presented by Scott Hardwick of Rockwell Automation and Amy Anderson of Nationwide Mutual Insurance. MBEs enjoyed learning trade secrets from successful, veteran MBEs.

“Tim was one of the best speakers to I have ever had the opportunity to listen to in my 20 years in business. He was fantastic!” It was the lunch Keynote Speaker Tilmon “Tim” Brown, President and CEO of New Horizons Baking Company that was one absolute crowd favorite. His speech was not only about his company's million dollar evolutional successes, but also about his personal journey as an entrepreneur. Mr. Brown's speech epitomized the theme of 2013 Business Opportunity Fair, “Business Connections…Evolving to the Next Level!” and for many will not be forgotten. After questions and answers by corporations and MBEs, the highly anticipated trade fair and Matchmaker session began. 22 ¦ JULY-AUGUST 2013

World Wide Technology, Inc. actively networking

During this time MBEs had opportunities to learn about the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Business Program presented by Cuyahoga Community College and the many benefits that the program provides. The State of Ohio Development Services Agency also held a workshop for MBEs that was a prerequisite to their participation to immediate purchasing opportunities. The eventful day culminated with a Fireside Chat, sponsored by PNC Financial Group and co-sponsored by Advance Group, featuring a talk with Invacare Chairman A. Malachi Mixon, III. Mr. Mixon discussed his recently published book An American Journey, which chronicles his life as a successful entrepreneur and shares his “18 Life Lessons.” To see highlights from the Business Opportunity Fair, Upcoming Events or to make your reservation for the 15th Annual Awards Gala on November 15th and move visit www.nomsdc.org.


Northern Ohio Minority Supplier Development Council

NOMSDC HELPING BUSINESSES CONNECT The Northern Ohio Minority Supplier Development Council (NOMSDC) is a Nonprofit regional affiliate of the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC). They prepare Minority Business Enterprises (MBEs) to become preferred suppliers in Northern Ohio, certify that businesses are at least 51% owned, operated and controlled by MBE's. Minority businesses are defined as; African American, Hispanic, Asian and Native American. We serve 38 counties in Northern Ohio. Role Includes: · Supporting economic development and growth in Northern Ohio and encouraging the procurement of goods and services from local minority owned businesses · Drawing attention to the benefits of Supplier Diversity · Certifying minority owned enterprises (MBEs) · Supporting the business needs of minority business owners and our corporate members Supplier Development provides individualized coaching in the areas of Leadership development: 1. Operational Strategies - Assess and assistance refining operational strategies 2. Marketing - Define and assist with developing marketing strategies 3. Access to Capital - Assess financials and assist with identifying and securing loan 4. Deal Making - Define negotiating parameters & assist with identifying & securing purchasing opportunities. For more info visit www.nomsdc.org

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Tee Up for Scholarships Golf Outing

The Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Kent State University hosted its first annual golf outing, “Tee Up for Scholarships” on Monday, May 20, 2013 at Windmill Lakes in Ravenna. The weather could not have been more cooperative! It was a beautiful and exciting day…and a wonderful success. Over $30,000 was raised for scholarship funds for underrepresented and underserved college juniors and seniors. The golfers who participated and donations received were from businesses around the Kent, Akron and Ravenna areas. The event was hosted by Kent State University Division of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion's Diversity Advisory Board, which assisted in obtaining sponsors from across the country. For more information about the “Tee Up for Scholarships” golf outing or to consider participating at next year's event, please visit http://www.kent.edu/diversity/golf/index.cfm.

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Women’s Center Summer Programs Continue through August 16th Noon-1pm at Women’s Center

As of June 2013, The Women's Center will be open year round!!

Wednesdays: Walk and Talk Spend the first 30 minutes enjoying lunch with friends and colleagues at the Women's Center. Exercise your brain with lunchtime topics of discussion determined by the group. Every day will be a new conversational adventure! Spend the next 30 minutes enjoying our beautiful summer weather by walking around campus with us. Use this as a springboard to your summer healthy living! No need to register – See you there. Fridays: In the Loop Ever want to learn to knit or crochet but just haven't made the time? Having trouble finding the time to work on those knitting or crocheting projects? If you have your own materials, please bring them. If not, we have some you can borrow. This is a great way to wind down from the work week and get those creative juices flowing. Registration is not required.

Coming in the Fall 2013 Sex Signals September 3, 2013

July 11th – August 15th Thursday Evenings, 5:30-6:45pm: Yoga for Faculty/Staff (Open to both men and women) This 6 week session is a great opportunity to do something for yourself to relax and refocus. $35 for returning yoga students and $40 for new. Payment due to instructor on first day of class. Contact the Women's Center (330-672-9230) to reserve a spot or with any questions. Space is limited.

7-8:30 p.m.; 9-10:30 p.m.; Kiva Blending a unique combination of improvisational comedy, education and audience participation, "Sex Signals" provides a provocative, in-yourface look at issues surrounding dating, sex and date rape on college campuses. Sponsored by the KSU Sexual Assault Response Team (SART), Women's Center, Residence Services, Office of Student Success and University Health Services. This event is FREE.

Other Services Available in the Summer ·

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Women's Center Pantry: The pantry has staples such as pasta, sauces, canned fruits and vegetables, rice, tuna, cereal, etc. available free of charge to students, faculty and staff in need. Crisis Intervention Support staff are available to provide support, resources and referrals to students, faculty and staff around women's health, sexual assault, intimate partner violence, stalking, academic issues as well as other women related issues. Conference Space Available: Our conference room is available for office /departments retreats and meetings. Accommodates up to 20 people. Contact the Women's Center (330-672-9230) for availability.

Email wc@kent.edu to join our listserv for more information and to stay informed. Join us on Facebook to keep up to date with all Women's Center events and activities.

Katie Koestner- "No, Yes" September 12, 2013

Katie Koestner was the first survivor of date rape to speak out nationally. In "No-Yes", Katie shares her survivor story. Her emotionally-charged presentation creates an environment of understanding and helps lay the groundwork for behavioral transformation. Katie shares her story on a level that everyone can fell and relate to. Sponsored by the Women's Center, Sexual Assault Response Team (SART), Center for Student Involvement, Residence Services, Office of Student Success, and University Health Services. This event is FREE. www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ¦ 25


FASHION

Culturally Fashionable- NO BORDERS, NO BOUNDARIES By: Marianna Marron We all know that there are no rules in fashion. Fashion is its own universal language that crosses borders and often boundaries. In the spirit of diversity, I decided to showcase some traditional fashions with a twist. Ilyse is wearing a beautiful coral, fuchsia, tan and mocha colored one piece sheer dress with bell sleeves. The dress is Jordanian inspired. She accessorized with Chocolate feathered earrings with caramel jewels encrusted on the top from Puerto Rico and beautiful fuchsia heelless shoes with tan double ankle straps made in the USA. This ensemble brings the diversity from each look in compilation with Ilyse's exotic beauty to create the ultimate feel of culture and couture. In another look, Ilyse used a traditional all pink African head wrap and tied it around her side creating a one shoulder strap look. Arianna is wearing a traditional two-piece green dress from Ghana. This piece was hand made. The top is cut to fall slightly off the shoulder, keeping the respect of traditional clothing while adding slight sex appeal. The top and bottom have a few wooden beads as the accent. The bottom is a draw string skirt, and the bottom falls slightly into a mermaid cut. This dress is diverse and can be worn anywhere from church to a night on the town.

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Arianna is also wearing a beautiful African head piece known as a Kufi. This particular lavender kufi is also from Ghana. Arianna is adding an American flare to her look with an off the shoulder white half shirt and jeans.

Ilyse is wearing a beautiful purple and pink knee length dress with southern American style patterns. She is wearing a high-waist purple belt to break up the p atte r n s a n d f u c h s i a feathered earrings again from Puerto Rico.

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FASHION

Domonique is wearing a traditional head wrap known as a hijab. This particular hijab comes from Palestine. The hijab is black sheer with beautiful and colorful sequins hand stitched on, giving the hijab a pop of color and extra style. Domonique is wearing an American style silk black and gold bandeau dress, bringing the two cultures together to make yet another beautiful fashion statement. She is also featured in a white sheer hijab. This hijab has beautiful silver sequins in the shape of circles, symbolizing simplicity at its finest. The circle is often used in many cultures to represent peace, unity and continuity- “let the circle be unbroken”. Domonique is also wearing nude hooded top, made in the USA mixed with beautiful jet black feathered earrings from Puerto Rico. No matter the culture, design or pattern, fashion is beauty and beauty comes in all flavors!

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More Fashion from Ethiopia, East Africa ...

Hani

Zewdinesh Chucha

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natural health

By Marjorie Clark Contributing Writer

Sun exposure can cause dry and damaged skin and hair. Shea nut butter is great to rejuvenate skin and hair. Before running out to buy commercial lotions filled with chemicals and over processed shea, consider choosing your shea nut butter carefully. As many companies use solvents that strip shea butter of its healing compounds, unrefined is your best choice, it means it has not been processed. West African Shea is thicker and has more aromas. The East African variety is thinner- can be easily applied and is generally more expensive. Shea contains fatty acids and vitamins A, E, F and K as well. Many creams used to heal scars contain these vitamins so why not try Shea nut butter, nature's perfect ready made unprocessed skin and hair formula right from the nut?

Do you want radiant healthy skin on your face and neck? Try putting a small amount (about a teaspoon) of extra virgin olive oil on a damp warm washcloth and massage your face and neck with it every night after removing makeup. Olive oil is rich in vitamin E and is also loaded with polyphenols (antioxidants). Leave on or wipe off with a damp washcloth.

Do you sleep well at night? You might have tried melatonin or a cup of chamomile tea. If these have not worked for you, consider supplementing with L-Tryptophan. Tryptophan is the precursor for the production of both serotonin (important for sleep and good mood) and melatonin hormones, which are released by the pineal gland in the brain. Artificial lights from computer screens or watching television at the wrong hours could stimulate your brain. Not enough exposure to daylight will also throw ones sleep wake cycle out of whack- as well as just getting older. Tryptophan works wonders for many people who are sleep deprived. A sufficient amount of magnesium and b vitamins are also crucial for relaxation. If you are taking any pharmaceutical drugs, especially serotonin, reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs such as Prozac you should not take tryptophan even though it is a protein building block.

Do you eat enough vegetables? Many people with busy schedule find that they do not get enough varieties and quantities of vegetables into their diets. If you do not have the time to prepare and enjoy eating lots of fresh vegetables in your meals, you might want to consider supplementing with Blue Green Algae which is known as nature's perfect food. It is packed with full of protein, vitamins, enzymes, and healthy fatty acids. Blue Green Algae are also a rich source of minerals, and a great source for 30 ÂŚ JULY-AUGUST 2013

chlorophyll (which transports oxygen through the blood and is a great heavy metal detox). One of the best ways to buy it is in the frozen form. If you do not like the fresh green taste you can add it into a smoothie. One of the best sources on the market is from Klamath Lake. This lake is located in Southern Oregon, and 41,000 feet above sea level. It is fed by volcanic ash, thus a very pristine mineral rich source. Blue Green Algae is also a great source of Phenylethylamine (PEA) which is uplifting to the mood and will help the brain to focus.

Health Benefits of Garlic!! Garlic which is rich in allicin (the chemical that gives garlic the strong o d o r ) i s b o t h a n t i v i ra l a n d antibacterial, so it will ward off colds and protect one from infections. It is also a natural deterrent to bugs that bite us. If you eat it you will be less likely to be exposed to diseases that are spread by these bugs- so it is a double edged sword in this respect. Allicin potentially help keep arteries cleaner- and lower cholesterol. It is truly one of nature's most perfect medicines- both as a preventative and treatment for existing ailments. Allicin also is known to help lower blood pressure. If you look at the ingredients on natural remedies to control high blood pressure, you will notice garlic is used in many of them. If you do not appreciate the taste, you can always get it in capsule form.

Energize your cells! If you are dragging through the day you might be vitamin deficient, so a good start is a whole food based multi-vitamin. Another option to boost your energy is DMG or Dimethyl Glycine which is not only an amino acid derivative- but a major anti-oxidant, cell energizer, as well as an immune system booster. Sometimes when one's muscles hurt, it is from the lack of minerals and sometimes it is from a lack of DMG. This dietary supplement helps in recovery time after working out.

Memory Boosters If you often forget where you put your keys, forget people's names and important things you need to do, writing a list is a given. You also might consider taking Phosphatidylserine otherwise called PS. This memory booster helps cognitive function in general and gives one a sense of well being. PS is beneficial for joints, thus helps people with arthritis.

Omega 3 to the rescue Omega 3 fatty acids are beneficial to our joints, heart, arteries, breast health, skin health, optimal brain function as well as fight depression. Fish oil is not the only source of Omega 3s. Walnuts, pumpkin seeds, hempseeds and flax all contain significant amounts of it. Also consider microalgae and seaweed where fish obtain Omega 3 in such large amounts.

The above is not a medical advice; please consult your physician before starting any regimen.


ATTENTION LADIES!! DO YOU HAVE A FASHION FORWARD SENSE OF STYLE?

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1 in 88

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HEALTH

Puzzle piece by puzzle piece By Michele Garrett More and more of us have had our lives touched by Autism spectrum disorder- I know I have. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Autism affects about 1 in 88 children. Autism is almost 5 times more likely in boys than among girls. It typically occurs in the first 3 years of life. There is also a definite genetic relationship as evidenced by 35 times the risk for a sibling to be affected and 9 in 10 risk for identical twins. The symbol for Autism Awareness is a ribbon with many interlocking colorful puzzle pieces. It is supposed to represent the diversity and complexity of Autism Spectrum Disorder and the people it affects. It is also a bright and colorful symbol of hope that together we can start putting the puzzle pieces together. My 4 year old grandson is autistic. Our journey has been like this ribbon of colorful interlocked puzzle pieces. At times we were frustrated, and cried as we struggled to put the pieces together- to bridge the gap of our different realities. When finally, at least for a moment, a piece fits together, it encourages you to pick up another piece, reach out one more time to connect. For my family, as for many, it all started with a lot of questions. Something was different. He seemed to avoid eye contact, did not cuddle or interact." maybe he can't hear us" "maybe the light is bothering him" "maybe I’m not stimulating him enough"... Then we started noticing peculiar, repetitive behaviors. He swayed, he banged, he rocked, he bristled at our touch and not a single word, or familiar syllable ever crossed his lips. As a close family, we shared our concerns and consulted his pediatrician-a behavioral specialist Dr. Robert Needlman, who confirmed our fears. He gave us books to read, resources to call and support as we all try to find the pieces that will fit.

J A C O T Y

G A R R E T T

Jacoty and his mom Janira. Photo by: Amir Saleem

Each child with Autism is unique and there is not a single pathway for dealing with this. It takes all of us loving him beyond our own understanding to find ways to connect with him. The challenges often are overwhelming. You just don't know until you live with a child with autism. I was blessed to have my grandson, his sister and their parents living with me for about a year as they tried to get on their feet. You see taking care of an autistic child can be a 24 hour a day endeavor. It is impossible to lead a "normal" life. Imagine a child who can't "turn off his brain" and is still up at 4 am running back and forth and back and forth. Let's not mention that Anything and EVERYTHING goes in his mouth, or is smooched, smeared and stuffed in-between couch cushions! Or a simple trip to the grocery store ends with everyone staring as he slaps himself, repeatedly, until his sweet cheeks are bright red as we plead "no, hands down". But there are moments of pure joy when puzzle pieces do fit together for a moment and he looks right in our eyes and smiles, irresistibly, and laughs and kisses and hugs and "ouch" bites! Most of these breakthrough moments come because of the unconditional love of his mother, father and big sister who totally accept and love him just the way he is. They see him THEN the disordersomething I still struggle with. They also are constantly looking for new and creative ways to address his needs and help him develop with the help of his doctors, teachers and therapists. It not only takes a family to raise a special child, it takes a community. Please consider taking the time to become more aware, possibly even make a donation. An excellent site you might like to visit is www.autismspeaks.org. ... And maybe one day, my grandson will speak his first word. www.PHENOMENALWOMAN.me ÂŚ 33


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BOOK REVIEW

Summer Reading By R. Lee Gamble

Summer is here and with it comes relaxing things like the feel of your toes in sand, a tall, cool glass of iced tea and the feel of a warm breeze. Another wonderful aspect of summer is the opportunity to curl up with a good book. Here are a few great reads to help you enjoy a lazy summer day.

The Silent Wife – A.S.A. Harrison A psychological thriller, A.S.A. Harrison's debut novel tells the story of a dysfunctional marriage in the throes of dissolution; a couple headed for catastrophe, concessions that can't be made, and promises that won't be kept. It ensnares the reader from page one and doesn't let go. He is a committed cheater. She lives and breathes denial. He exists in dual worlds. She likes to settle scores. He decides to play for keeps. She has nothing left to lose. The alternating voices pitch the reader back and forth between protagonists in conflict who are fighting for self-preservation, making deeply consequential mistakes, behaving in ever more foolhardy ways, and losing at the games they are playing.

Life after Life – Kate Atkinson What if you had the chance to live your life again and again, until you finally got it right? During a snowstorm in England in 1910, a baby is born and dies before she can take her first breath. During a snowstorm in England in 1910, the same baby is born and lives to tell the tale. What if there were second chances? And third chances? In fact, an infinite number of chances to live your life? Would you eventually be able to save the world from its own inevitable destiny? And would you even want to? Life After Life follows Ursula Todd as she lives through the turbulent events of the last century again and again. With wit and compassion, Kate Atkinson finds warmth even in life's bleakest moments, and shows an extraordinary ability to evoke the past. Here she is at her most profound and inventive, in a novel that celebrates the best and worst of ourselves.

It's Hard to Fight Naked – Niecy Nash You love her on Soul Man and now actress and comedienne Niecy Nash has written a funny guide to romance. A self-professed romantic, Nash wants to bring her wisdom on love and relationships to everyone. By sharing her own personal experiences of marriage, divorce and re-marriage Nash opens herself up and shares the wisdom she has learned over the years about life and love. She is hoping that by sharing the knowledge she has gained on love's battlefield everyone will learn how hard it is to fight naked.

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at the movies

Brings Back the Joy of an Old Fashion Monster Movie By R. Lee Gamble I can't tell you how many countless Saturday afternoons I sat in front of the television waiting for my favorite monster movie to come on. There was nothing like spending an afternoon watching the Japanese military fight to save the world from the threat of Godzilla, or better yet, watching Godzilla fight to save the world from Rodan. Yes more often than not, I could see the zipper going down Godzilla's back or the toy plane hanging from a dangling string as it flies through the air, but I didn't care because it was pure enjoyment. Acclaimed filmmaker Guillermo del Toro brought that moment of pure enjoyment back with his latest film Pacific Rim. Starring Idris Elba, Charlie Hunnam and Rinko Kikuchi, the movie is a classic monster movie on a much grander scale. The film starts with an announcement that aliens have invaded earth, but instead of coming from the sky, they came up from the sea. These aliens called Kaiju look like giant dinosaurs whose sole mission is to destroy every living creature on earth. The only weapon the government has to stop these creatures are giant robots called Jaegers. What is interesting about these robots is that in order for them to work, they have to be operated by two people who have to meld minds in order to be in sync as one person. Yes, this movie throws a little Star Trek in it, but it serves a purpose. In order for the machine to work, one person has to function as the right brain and the other as the left. The action begins very quickly when Jaeger pilot Raleigh Becket (Hunnam) experiences a devastating loss at the hands of a Kaiju. It is only when Stacker Pentecost (Elba) finds Raleigh and tells him that he is needed that he agrees to pilot his Jaeger, named Gypsy, one more time. This film has everything that you would find in a classic monster movie – romance, over acting in all the right places, comedy and of course the classic fight scene in the middle of a swirling sea. The visuals are breathtaking and exciting. This is the type of film that was made for 3-D. The glasses allow you to feel the size and the intensity of the Jaegers. Plus it just makes the film look really, really cool. Casting for the film was on point. Elba was awesome as the commander. He is definitely showing that he can be an action hero and I hope that we will see him in more of these roles. The two other actors that really stood out for me are Charlie Day as Dr. Newton Geiszler and Burn Gorman who portrayed Gottlieb a rival scientist. These two actors are the comic relief for the film. Day is over the top as a scientist whose only wish is to see a Kaiju up close and personal in order to figure out how to destroy them. Gorman's character is determined to prove that only mathematics can save the day. Both end up realizing that they are both right but can they work together to save the world? Well good friends, check this movie out to see how it ends. This is definitely a fun way to spend an afternoon or evening and the kids will love it – my daughter Devin definitely did.

(L-R) CHARLIE HUNNAM as Raleigh Becket and RINKO KIKUCHI as Mako Mori in the sci-fi action adventure “Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures Pacific Rim,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release. Photo Credit: Kerry Hayes

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IDRIS ELBA as Stacker Pentecost in the sci-fi action adventure “Warner Bros. Pictures and Legendary Pictures Pacific Rim,” a Warner Bros. Pictures release. Photo Credit: Kerry Hayes


at the movies

This is The End is a Comical Treat By R. Lee Gamble What would happen if a group of celebrities find themselves trapped in a house when the end of the world comes? Comedy writers Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg show you what happens with their extremely funny film This is the End. The duo also directed the film which stars Jay Baruchel, Jonah Hill, Danny McBride, Craig Robinson and Rogen. All of the actors play themselves which adds to the hilarity of the film. Set in Los Angeles, Baruchel flies in for a visit with his buddy Rogen who takes him to a wild party at James Franco's house. The movie is filled with celebrities including Michael Cera, Kevin Hart, Rihanna, Paul Rudd, Jason Segal and Channing Tatum. Baruchel has a hard time bonding with Rogen's Hollywood friends especially Hill. While on a quick trip to the neighborhood store, Rogen and Baruchel encounter earthquakes and the beginning of the destruction of the world. The laughs in this film starts quickly and just keep coming. It is especially funny when a crater opens up in front of Franco's house and several celebrities fall in. When Franco and the guys board themselves up in his house, they are forced to deal with the reality that their celebrity can't save them. They struggle to survive with very little food or water and they begin to see what they are capable of when they have to fight to stay alive.

Emma Watson stars in Columbia Pictures' "This Is The End," PHOTO BY: Suzanne Hanover

One of the funniest scenes is when Emma Watson shows up at the house. She is tough and she kicks a little butt. It is a side of Watson we have not seen and she seems to enjoy making a little fun of herself. What makes the

L-r, James Franco, Jonah Hill, Craig Robinson, Seth Rogen, Jay Baruchel and Danny McBride star in Columbia Pictures' "The End of the World." PHOTO BY: Suzanne Hanover, SMPSP

film work is the chemistry between the actors. Rogen and Baruchel are great as ordinary guys who happen to be famous. They aren't the typical gorgeous celebrities, which makes them even more lovable. Franco has a serious bromance going on with Rogen and Hill pretends to like Baruchel when he secretly hates him. Throw in the humor of Robinson and McBride as a villain and you have a winning combination. This is not a movie for children. There is adult language and some very scary scenes, but adults who enjoy Seth Rogen films will definitely enjoy This is the End.

The Way, Way Back is Wonderful By R. Lee Gamble Every now and then the stars and the moon align and a wonderful story is born and brought to the big screen. The Way, Way Back is that movie. Directed by Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, The Way, Way Back is a coming of age story of a young man struggling to find himself while dealing with a protective mom and her domineering boyfriend. If there is one movie you see this Fourth of July weekend this would be it. It is funny, moving and most importantly relatable. This is not a shoot'em up. It is not full of explosions and car chases. It won't have you jumping in your seats from fear and it won't annoy you with a ton of gratuitous sex. What The Way, Way Back does, oh so well, is touch your heart and remind you of a time in your life when you just want to have a special boy or girl like you. That time when you wanted to have a group of friends like you for who you are and know that they had your back.

Duncan (Liam James) Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures

Actor Liam James brings all of those thoughts and desires out in the character of Duncan. At 14, Duncan is stuck in a car with his mother, her boyfriend and his daughter as they drive to a summer home. During the drive, the boyfriend Trent (Steve Carell) asks Duncan how he would rate himself on a scale from one to 10. Trent then proceeds to tell him that he would rate him as a three. That was the beginning of the many opportunities Trent would take throughout the movie to say mean things to Duncan or to try to humiliate him. Owen (Sam Rockwell) and Duncan (Liam James) Credit: Fox Searchlight Pictures

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Food

Slow Cooker Hawaiian-Style R I B S Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 3 1/2 to 6 hours Yield: 6 servings (4 ribs per serving)

2 racks pork back ribs (2 1/2 to 3 pounds each), cut into 3- or 4-rib sections 2 cups hoisin sauce* 1 cup pineapple juice 3 tablespoons grated fresh ginger 3 tablespoons sesame oil* 3 scallions, thinly sliced (optional) 1 1/2 teaspoons sesame seeds, toasted* (optional) In medium bowl, combine hoisin sauce, pineapple juice, ginger and sesame oil. Arrange ribs in a slow cooker and pour half of the sauce mixture over ribs. Cover and cook on low for 5 to 6 hours or on high for 3 1/2 to 4 hours, until ribs are very tender. Set remaining sauce aside in refrigerator. About 1/2 hour before ribs are done, remove sauce from refrigerator, and bring it to room temperature. Arrange ribs on plates or a platter and brush both sides with some of the remaining sauce. Sprinkle with scallions and sesame seeds, if using. Serve remaining sauce at the table. * You can find hoisin sauce and sesame oil in the ethnic or Asian section of most major supermarkets. Serving Suggestions: Serve these ribs in the Hawaiian plate lunch style, with a scoop of white rice, macaroni salad, or slaw on the side. They'd also be good alongside a simple carrot salad or a few slices of grilled pineapple. Nutritional Information per Serving: Calories: 770; Fat: 48g; Saturated Fat: 16g; Cholesterol: 135mg; Sodium: 3590mg; Carbohydrates: 65g; Protein: 27g; Fiber: 0g

FAMILY FEATURES

Roasted Vegetables Ingredients 1 2 1 3 1 1 2 Âź 2

small butternut squash, cubed red bell peppers, seeded and diced sweet potato, peeled and cubed Yukon Gold potatoes, cubed red onion, quartered tablespoon chopped fresh thyme tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary cup olive oil tablespoons balsamic vinegar salt and freshly ground black pepper

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Directions Preheat oven to 475 degrees F (245 degrees C). In a large bowl, combine the squash, red bell peppers, sweet potato, and Yukon Gold potatoes. Separate the red onion quarters into pieces, and add them to the mixture. In a small bowl, stir together thyme, rosemary, olive oil, vinegar, salt, and pepper. Toss with vegetables until they are coated. Spread evenly on a large roasting pan. Roast for 35 to 40 minutes in the preheated oven, stirring every 10 minutes, or until vegetables are cooked through and browned. SOURCE: All Recipes via Elegant Foods & Desserts


(Family Features) Abundant plates of fresh vegetables, delicate fish from the nearby sea and splashes of olive oil are all hallmarks of traditional meals found in the Mediterranean. The Mediterranean diet has been embraced for thousands of years by those living along the Mediterranean Sea, and is now followed around the world as consumers discover its delicious flavor components and researchers uncover its countless health benefits, including helping to prevent heart attacks and strokes according to a study conducted by The New England Journal of Medicine. It's easy to embrace this healthy lifestyle during grilling season by giving your grill a Mediterranean diet makeover with the Pompeian family of oils and vinegars. You can enjoy the benefits of the diet without leaving home by making simple changes, such as swapping butter and vegetable oil for Grapeseed Oil or OlivExtra Premium Mediterranean Blend, and making homemade dressings and vinaigrettes by combining oils and vinegars in place of bottled versions.

Master Mediterranean Grilling Give Your Grill a Much-Needed Makeover

Grapeseed Oil, which has one of the highest smoke points of all oils and is a rich source of Vitamin E, has a light taste that will not disrupt the flavors of food while cooking. This versatile, all natural oil is great to line your grill or pan with before cooking to prevent food from sticking. OlivExtra Mediterranean Blend, a healthy combination of canola, extra virgin and grapeseed oils, is the perfect all-purpose oil that represents key components of the Mediterranean diet and provides essential Omega-3 and Omega-6, monounsaturated fat and Vitamin E. Spicy Mustard Chicken Kebabs Servings: 4

1/4 2 Mediterranean Blend 1/4 1 1 1-inch cubes 1/4 1

cup plus 1 tablespoon spicy brown mustard tablespoons Pompeian OlivExtra Premium teaspoon garlic powder tablespoon Pompeian White Wine Vinegar pound raw boneless skinless chicken breast, cut into teaspoon each of salt and black pepper medium red onion, cut into 1-inch chunks

To make sauce, place 3 tablespoons mustard in medium bowl. Add oil and garlic powder, and whisk until uniform. Cover and refrigerate. To make marinade, in small bowl, combine vinegar with remaining 2 tablespoons mustard. Stir until uniform. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Place chicken and marinade in large sealable plastic bag. Remove as much air as possible and seal. Gently knead marinade into chicken through bag. Refrigerate for 1 hour. Meanwhile, if using wooden skewers, soak 4 in water for 20 minutes to prevent burning. Alternately thread marinated chicken and onion chunks onto 4 skewers. Bring grill to medium-high heat. Brush both sides of kebabs with sauce. Grill kebabs for 5 minutes with grill cover down. Flip kebabs and grill for 6 to 8 minutes, or until chicken is cooked through. Enjoy. Nutrition per serving: 215 calories; 8.5g fat; 415mg sodium; 5g carbohydrate; 0.5g fiber; 2g sugars; 26.5g protein Hungry Grilled Romaine Salad Servings: 2 1 tablespoon Pompeian Extra Virgin Olive Oil 1 large heart romaine lettuce, halved lengthwise 2 dashes each salt and black pepper 1/4 cup diced tomato 1/4 cup diced red onion 1/4 cup crumbled reduced-fat feta cheese 2 tablespoons finely chopped basil 2 tablespoons Pompeian Balsamic Vinegar Bring grill to high heat. Drizzle and brush 1/2 teaspoon of olive oil onto cut sides of each romaine half. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Lay romaine halves on grill, cut sides down. Grill until slightly charred, 1 to 2 minutes. Plate romaine halves, cut sides up. Top with tomato, onion, cheese and basil. In small bowl, whisk vinegar with remaining 2 teaspoons of olive oil. Drizzle atop salad and enjoy. Nutrition per serving: 135 calories; 10g fat; 340mg sodium; 9.5g carbohydrate; 3g fiber; 5g sugars; 5g protein

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Food

Lemon Poppy Seed Muffins Brandied Peach Cobbler Ingredients Peach filling: 2 lbs. fresh peaches ⅓ c. sugar 1 tsp. vanilla 2 tsp. cornstarch 1½ T. brandy Pinch of ground cloves Topping: ½ c. all-purpose flour ¼ tsp. baking powder Pinch of salt ½ c. sugar 8 T. unsalted butter, softened ¼ tsp. vanilla 1 large egg yolk

Directions Prepare the Filling: 1. Peel and pit peaches; cut into thick slices. Combine with sugar, cornstarch, vanilla, ground cloves, and brandy. 2. Please in a greased baking dish; cover with foil and bake at 400 degrees until peaches begin to release liquid about 15 minutes. (Note: Let the peaches go the full 15 minutes. I tried to rush this one time, and my topping didn't cook correctly. I think the peaches need to be fully heated through when you put the topping on.) Prepare the Topping: 3. While the peaches bake, mix flour, baking powder, and salt together; set aside. 4. Beat softened butter and sugar until light and fluffy, about 1 minute. Beat in egg yolk and vanilla. Stir in dry ingredients just until combined. 5. After the peaches have cooked for about 15 minutes, remove them from the oven and stir them.

Ingredients

3 cups of all-purpose flour 1 Tbsp baking powder (make sure your baking powder is no older than 6 months) ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 2 Tbsp poppy seeds 10 Tbsp unsalted butter (1¼ stick), softened 1 cup sugar 2 large eggs 1½ cup plain yogurt 1 Tbsp lemon zest 2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice 1 cup confectioner's sugar (powdered sugar)

Directions

Adjust the oven rack to the middle-lower part of the oven. Preheat oven to 375°F. Whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, poppy seeds, and salt and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, cream butter and sugar together, beating until fluffy (about 2 minutes with an electric mixer). Add eggs one at a time, beating until incorporated after each one. Beat in the lemon zest. Beat in one third of the dry ingredients until just incorporated. Beat in one third of the yogurt. Beat in a third more of the dry ingredients. Beat in a second third of the yogurt. Beat in the remaining dry ingredients and then the remaining yogurt. Again be careful to beat until just incorporated. Do not over beat. Use a standard 12-muffin muffin pan. Coat each muffin cup lightly with olive oil, grapeseed oil, or a little melted butter using a pastry brush. Distribute the muffin dough equally among the cups. Bake until muffins are golden brown, about 25 to 30 minutes. Test with a long toothpick (we use a thin bamboo skewer) to make sure the center of the muffins are done. Set muffin pan on wire rack to cool. After 5 minutes, remove muffins from pan. While the muffins are cooling, in a bowl, whisk together the powdered sugar and lemon juice for the glaze. Add more lemon juice if necessary. While the muffins are still a bit warm, use a pastry brush to brush the glaze over each muffin. The muffins will absorb some of the glaze, so you add more glaze to each muffin if you like. Best eaten fresh and warm. SOURCE: Simply Recipes via Elegant Foods & Desserts

SOURCE: The Kitchen Is My Playground 40 ¦ JULY-AUGUST 2013


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July - August 2013