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A guide for disabled learners interested in higher education

Information, advice & guidance for higher education

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Contents Section

Page

Page

A guide for disabled people interested in higher education. Why higher education?

4

Types of support you can expect.

24

5

Specialist support.

26

Is HE right for me?

6

What other resources are available?

30

Applying to higher education where to begin. Some important dates to consider.

7

Financing your higher education.

35

8

36

The application process.

9

What is the Disabled Student Allowance (DSA)? Making an application for the DSA.

Choosing what to study.

14

Eligibility & assessment for the DSA.

41

Choosing where to study.

16

Other sources of financial support.

43

Social and recreation facilities.

46

Choosing your preferred learning route. 19

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Section

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Contents Section

Page

Student living accommodation.

48

Preparation for work after HE.

49

Disability Discrimination Act (DDA).

51

Complaints procedure.

52

What does all this mean?

53

Who can help?

55

Keep up-to-date.

58

Glossary of terms.

61

Acknowledgments.

61

Aimhigher contact details.

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A guide for disabled learners interested in higher education If you are a disabled learner and thinking about going into higher education (HE) you will no doubt have many questions. These may be about the features of the course, assessment and examination methods, living accommodation and the types of support available to you.

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As a matter of good practice and as a requirement of the law, colleges and universities are continually making themselves more accessible to disabled learners. They want to provide you with the best possible learning experience, whatever your interests and abilities, and help you gain the skills and experience you need to get the most out of life.

This guide will help by giving you information on the types of support and learning resources that are generally available.


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Why higher education? Higher education (HE) is about furthering your education, learning new things, being in charge of your choices and getting to where you want to be in the future. It’s not just about going to university; you can study one of 50,000 HE courses either at a university, a HE college or at a Further Education (FE) college.

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Is HE right for me? Colleges and universities generally encourage participation from disabled learners and those with specific learning difficulties. They are committed to breaking down the barriers that some learners face. There are many reasons why learners need support. Some learners may experience difficulty with reading or writing.

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Some learners may be unsure of how to structure a piece of coursework, or how to approach an exam. Others may need support due to a physical or sensory impairment. But whatever your needs, there is help and support available. Colleges and universities can offer additional help to learners with a range of impairments including:

Sensory - hearing impairments and visual impairments. Physical impairments. Mental health difficulties. Specific learning difficulties. Aspergers syndrome. Staff will work with you to devise a programme of study that is tailored to your requirements.


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Applying to higher education - where to begin When applying to a college or university, it is important to get your application in early as popular courses fill up quickly. Also, the process of applying for the Disabled Student Allowance (DSA) can take some time.

There are just 4 simple steps to think about. 1 Do your research into the colleges and universities that you are interested in. 2 Choose a course.

3 Apply to the HE Institutions (HEIs) of your choice via UCAS, or if you are applying to a college, apply to them direct. 4 Once accepted, apply for the DSA through your Local Education Authority (LEA) and consider other sources of financial aid.

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Some important dates to consider By the beginning of September you should have carried out research into your chosen HEIs and attended open days. You should have read the various prospectuses and discussed your plans with teachers, careers advisers or UCAS advisers.

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By the end of September post application interviews may start to take place. The majority of HEIs no longer interview for courses, but they may invite you to come to the institution to meet the staff, check out the facilities and give you the opportunity to ask about the resources for disabled learners.

January is the deadline for applications under the main scheme. By March most offers for a place at the HEIs should have been made. May is normally the latest date to reply to UCAS to accept or reject any offers which were made to you.


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The application process Application

Pre-application There is a vast range of information available about colleges and universities. This is normally available in a variety of accessible formats including Braille, audio cassette, large print, foreign language versions and electronically. Ask the Student Services department for more details.

Open days provide an opportunity for you to visit the college or university informally. It gives you the chance to find out the range of resources and support available to you.

It will help with your application if you contact the Disability Adviser at the college or university beforehand. They will be able to give you more information about the extra support that can be provided. Colleges and universities aim to ensure that support is available to all learners who require it. The type and level of support required can be assessed before you start a course.

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Full-time study If you intend to study fulltime, you will need to apply for a place through UCAS. This means completing a standard form and writing a personal statement. UCAS provide plenty of advice on how to fill in the application form, including a list of do’s and don’ts. Your careers adviser or access course tutor can also help you with this.

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You can apply on a paper form, but most applications are now made online at the UCAS website. Disabled learners are asked about their disability on the UCAS form. Normally, applications need to be sent to UCAS between 1st September and 15th January of the academic year before you want to start your course.


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Part-time study or flexible learning Some universities and courses (eg medicine) may have different deadlines, so it’s worth checking this out.

If you want to study part-time or follow a flexible learning course, you’ll need to make a direct application to the HEI. The college or university will use a form similar to the UCAS one, but the deadlines are likely to vary, so check this out with each HEI.

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Disclosure of your disability It may be at this point that you start to think about disclosing your disability to the institutions you would like to attend. If and when you disclose your disability is a personal choice. Many disabled learners who have gone into HE have given positive feedback about informing the institution of their disability at the time of applying.

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At the time of applying, universities and colleges really need this information on the UCAS form to start planning the support arrangements early. Many colleges and universities can invite prospective disabled learners to discuss their individual needs in regard to the course before it begins.

This can make the difference between having your support set up in time for when you begin your first lecture, to receiving the support two months after the start of your course. Disclosing a disability will not affect the academic decision on offering you a place. All disclosures of disability are treated sensitively and used only for the potential benefit of the learner.


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Interview and assessment arrangements If you have a disability or a specific learning difficulty, the college or university may arrange for you to come for an assessment of your needs. The assessment process is supportive and is based on the exchange of information and the identification of an appropriate individual learning programme.

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Choosing what to study When deciding upon which course to study, in addition to considering your anticipated grades, you will need to consider: What do you enjoy doing? What subjects are you good at? Is the course vocational or academic? What job do you want to do? Do your course and career plans match?

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What knowledge and skills will be useful after the course?

How many hours of essay writing, reading or practical work is involved?

What prior education and experience is needed?

What is the balance of continuous assessment and exams?

What are the sizes of the lecture or seminar groups? How are the lectures or seminars delivered?

How many hours will you be taught per week?


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Things to do‌ Check out which HEIs run your preferred course, then look at each of their websites and request a prospectus to get further details about what the course involves. Research the course thoroughly, find out the entry requirements and phone or write to the institution with any queries you may have concerning the course content. Go to www.ucas.com to find further details about the courses you are considering.

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Choosing where to study Colleges and universities offer a great opportunity to experience a new environment and meet a wide mix of people. Deciding upon where to study can be almost as important as what you study, as you need to feel happy and settled.

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Whatever college or university you decide to study at, it is important that you obtain the support to meet your disability-related needs. The university prospectus and information packs will give you the basics about a college or university and what it offers in terms of courses and services. Individual websites can also help you compare and evaluate the merits of each place.


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Things to think about How much experience does the college or university have in supporting disabled learners? What additional support and resources are available? Is there access to counselling and any other services? Will you feel comfortable at the campus?

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Are the lecture rooms and social areas accessible? Is the accommodation suitable for your needs (if you are staying away from home)? Will you be in accommodation with people of the same age and gender? Are field trips and any practical work accessible? Is there a ‘disabled student’s representative’ at the Students Union?

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What facilities can you access outside college or university hours? What recreational, sporting and leisure activities are available in the evening and at weekends? Is the college or university well equipped with enabling equipment such as speech and magnification software? What arrangements are made to support new learners and make the first weeks easier?

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Things to do Read up about the college or university via their prospectus and/or website. Attend open days and visit the colleges or universities of your choice. Try to visit during term time to ask current learners about their experiences.

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Find out what the policy of the college or university is towards disabled learners. Are they proactive towards disability-related issues, do they encourage disabled learners to attend, are staff trained in disability awareness?

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Choosing your preferred learning route There’s a number of ways that you can complete your studies, including full-time, part-time and through flexible routes such as e-learning and distance learning. HE doesn’t just mean getting an Honours degree, there are many learning routes that you can take. You can study and work at the same time, whether that’s casual work fitted around a full-time course, or studying part-time while working.

You can study for a Foundation Degree, a Higher National Certificate (HNC), a Higher National Diploma (HND), or a Diploma of HE, or you could work towards credits that lead into HE. The chart on page 20 gives you an idea of the various qualifications and the different routes that you can take.

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Choosing your preferred learning route continued The chart below gives you an idea of the various qualifications on offer, as well as the different learning routes to HE. Whatever your interest and learning styles, there's something to suit everyone. If your exams results are... AS/A Levels, BTEC National Dipoma Advanced Apprenticeship NVQ Level 3 5 or more GCSEs at Grade C or above BTEC First Diploma Apprenticeship, NVQ Level 2 Fewer than 5 GCSEs at Grades E or D BTEC First Certificate Entry to Employment Mainly Grades E at GCSE No formal qualifications

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You could choose to study... Degree / Honours Degree Foundation Degree, NVQ Level 4 Higher National Certificate & Diploma AS/A Levels BTEC National Diploma Advanced Apprenticeship, NVQ Level 3 Apprenticeship BTEC First Certificate & Diploma NVQ Level 2 BTEC Introductory Certificate & Diploma Foundation Programme NVQ Level 1, Entry to Employment


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Apprenticeships and Advanced Apprenticeships

AS & A Levels

These are designed for young people and they combine employment with day or block release study at college.

These are some of the most recognised qualifications around. They are accepted as proof of your academic ability for entry into university. AS is the first year of an A level qualification and is a stand-alone qualification.

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BTEC First Certificate/Diploma These are work-related qualifications. They provide essential sector-specific skills and knowledge and open up further study options at Level 3.

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BTEC Higher National Certificate/Diploma BTEC Introductory Certificate/Diploma BTEC National Certificate/Diploma

Degree/Honours Degree

A BTEC course is often taken as an alternative to A levels and covers a wide range of vocational subjects.

An Honours degree (BA, BSc and other Bachelor degrees) is the most common HE qualification.

HNCs are often studied part-time over two years by learners who are also working.

Like A levels, a BTEC HNDs take two years National Diploma is not a full-time to complete, HE qualification in itself, but it or longer part-time. will facilitate your entry into HE. HNCs can allow entry A Higher National Certificate into the second year of an (HNC) or Diploma (HND) Honours degree, while HNDs is available in a multitude of allow entry into the second subjects from accounting to or third year. video production.

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It takes from three to five years of full-time study and can also be taken part-time or by flexible learning. Many degrees are subjectbased, rather than focused on a specific profession, and can offer a wide range of employment options.


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Foundation Degree Foundation degrees are employment-related HE qualifications that provide professional development in a broad range of vocational areas. They are available in subjects ranging from chemical technology and commercial music to police studies, textiles or tourism. A foundation degree will also allow you to keep your options open for further professional development or academic study.

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NVQs They can be studied both full-time and part-time and give you the opportunity to progress to a Honours degree should you wish.

These are designed by employers and they help you develop your knowledge, competencies and understanding in specific areas. Successful completion demonstrates that you are competent to do the job. These are assessed mainly through the workplace and are available for around 88% of occupations in the UK. A level 3 NVQ is recognised as equivalent to A-levels, and can be used to apply for an HE course.

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Types of support you can expect There is a wide range of support available to you at college or university. It’s really important to try and access this support before you start your course. It can take several weeks to set up the support package you require, so if you wait until you start your course, you may experience a delay in getting the support in time for your first lecture.

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It also helps if you let staff know about your disability prior to starting university or college, by indicating your needs on any application forms. By doing this, staff in the disability service can contact you to start preparing a support package.


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Support can include: A meeting at pre-entry stage to agree the support and any adjustments required for your study programme. Specific testing for dyslexia. Provision of specialist equipment such as IT hardware and software, audio facilities and laptop computers.

Production of resources in different formats such as Braille and audio tape. Extra help with literacy, numeracy and study skills. A reader and note-taker in lectures and exams, if appropriate. In some cases, personal assistance for either part of, or the entire course.

An individual learning support plan. Information leaflets and contact numbers for various disability organisations. Advice with finance. Extra time in exams. Transport support provided by the LEA.

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Specialist support Colleges and universities offer a wide range of specialist support including the latest learning technology to help ensure that disabled learners have full access to all learning opportunities. It is important to check out what your chosen college or university actually provides in terms of specialist support.

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For learners with visual impairment Specialist support may include: Screen reading software. Computers with screen magnification and speech output software.

CCTVs – screen enabling magnification of printed materials. Tactile diagram-making facilities. Braille translation and production facilities.

Audio recording/playing equipment. Talking, scientific or standard calculators. Talking dictionary. Guide-dog toilet area.

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For D/deaf and hearing impaired learners

For learners with physical impairments

For learners with specific learning difficulties

Radio hearing-aid systems.

Adjustable work benches.

Educational note-takers.

Adapted study rooms.

Specialist networked software such as Inspiration.

Help with reading, writing and maths.

Educational note-takers.

Communication support workers. Weekly one-to-one and small group sessions. An induction with other D/deaf learners.

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Specialist study skills tutorials. Buddy scheme an opportunity to meet dyslexic students in their 2nd or 3rd year of study who can pass on their advice and support to you.


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For learners with Asperger’s syndrome Vocational tasters to help you gain the skills for working life. A programme to help you be more independent in day-to-day tasks. Extra help on your mainstream programme including individual tutorial time or support with the organisation of your materials and study time.

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Examination arrangements Special arrangements can be made during examinations, these may include:

Adapted/enlarged examination papers if you have a visual impairment.

Extra time allowance based on your input/writing speed.

Where appropriate, you may have the facility of sitting an exam separately from other candidates in a dedicated room.

Use of a word-processor if you have difficulty writing. Provision of a scribe if writing or word-processing is too slow and/or causes fatigue.

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What other resources are available? Through the Student Services department, there’s lots of help and information available to you, these can include: Counselling

Careers guidance

If you require the services of a personal counsellor, this can usually be arranged through Student Services.

Staff at some colleges and universities work closely with personal advisers from Connexions to offer you advice and guidance on career options.

It gives you the opportunity to talk through any issues you may have with someone trained to listen.

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Personal advisers are available to support you with job applications, interview techniques, CV preparation and your UCAS application forms.

They give you access to the latest careers information including computer and internet-based careers programmes.


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Disability advisers Whilst the role of the disability adviser may vary from place to place, generally, they will:

Help put in place the support that is recommended in the DSA assessment report.

Help you with your DSA applications (refer to page 36 for full details of DSAs).

Offer you advice on other sources of funding and support.

Arrange DSA assessments on your behalf.

Advise on any particular barriers that may arise from specific courses.

Explain and give advice on the DSA assessment reports.

Work with accommodation services, social services, LEAs and academic departments on your behalf.

Co-ordinate the network of support workers. Supervise and arrange training for support workers.

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Learning resources centre

Mentors

You will have access to the learning resource centre at your college or university, which usually comprises a library, drop-in computer suite, and group and individual study facilities.

Mentors may be available to work with you in structured one-to-one sessions and to help your social and emotional skills develop.

Staff are on hand to guide you through any difficulty that you may have with your project or assignment work.

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They will also support you to take an active part in HEI activities and practice the skills you are learning in a real life situation.


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National Union of Students (NUS) The NUS is your voice at college or university. Everyone has an opportunity to join the Students Union, stand for election and to vote in a democratic process to select the union chairperson, treasurer, representatives for each of the residential hostels and for various working groups.

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Personal tutor The core values of the Students Union are democracy and equality to ensure that every student’s voice is heard and effectively represented. The Students Union is responsible for organising the student social calendar throughout the year.

Many colleges and universities assign you a personal tutor who will provide you with the academic support and guidance you may need throughout your study.

Membership entitles you to discounts from many high street outlets and cinemas.

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Study skills centre

Student services

If you need additional support with your studies, the study skills centre at your chosen college or university can offer help with grammar, spelling and reading, as well as study skills, writing techniques and dyslexia support. Not all colleges or universities have study skills centres, so check this out in advance.

This department will be vital to your support and guidance whilst at college or university. They will advise on:

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Money advice and funding for study. Accommodation. Employment advice and job search.

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Financing your higher education Once you have been accepted at a college or university, you need to start thinking about financing your way through your HE.

Course costs are everything related directly to your course, such as books, field trips, equipment, photocopying etc.

Remember, there are three main costs that every student needs to consider:

As a disabled student, there’s extra financial help available to you.

Tuition fees charged by the college or university.

One of the first things to do is to contact your LEA who will be able to help you with your DSA application.

Living costs. Course costs.

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What is the Disabled Student Allowance (DSA)? They include: The DSA is an allowance for full-time and part-time disabled learners including those studying through the Open University and other distance-learning methods. Part-time learners must be studying at least 50% of a full-time course to qualify.

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DSAs are awarded by the LEA to learners who can show that they have a disability, a medical condition or a specific learning difficulty that affects their ability to study. They help pay for extra costs that you may have in attending a HE course as a direct result of your disability.

Specialist equipment allowance. A non-medical helper's allowance. A general allowance. Extra travel costs you have to pay as a result of your disability. The amount you get does not depend on your income or that of your household. Unlike a student loan, it does not have to be repaid.


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Specialist equipment allowance This allowance is to help you buy any items of equipment you may need when in HE, such as enabling software or a laptop computer.

Your LEA can also reimburse costs that you have to pay to rent, rather than buy a major item of equipment if this is more economical.

You can also use it to pay for any repair, technical support, insurance or extended warranty costs arising from owning that equipment.

You can apply for the specialist equipment allowance at any time during your course.

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Non-medical helper’s allowance This allowance can be used to provide you with nonmedical helpers such as readers, sign language interpreters, note-takers and other non-medical assistants, so that you can benefit fully from your course. If you have a disability and you would benefit from extra tutorial support, you could receive funds from your LEA under this allowance.

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General allowance

Travel costs

This allowance may be used towards other disabilityrelated items such as tapes and Braille paper, or to top-up the other allowances if necessary.

If you have to pay extra travel costs to attend your college or university because of your disability, your LEA may be able to help with them. Student Services may also be able to help with travel costs through the Learner Support Fund. You will not normally be eligible for help with everyday travel costs, which any student would expect to have.

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Making an application for the DSA

Eligibility & assessment for the DSA

It is important to apply as soon as you can for DSAs before your course starts, in order to receive payments promptly. However, you can apply for DSAs at any stage of your course. Application forms can be obtained from your LEA.

Your LEA must consider all cases where learners face extra costs to attend a course because of their disability.

If you need help completing your DSA application, please speak to your Disability Adviser at your local college or university.

You will need to provide medical proof of your disability such as a letter from your doctor or specialist. If you have a specific learning difficulty such as dyslexia or dyspraxia, your LEA will need evidence of this from a suitably qualified person.

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In order to determine the extra help needed for your course, your LEA will ask you to undergo an assessment of your course related needs at an agreed assessment centre. The assessment centre will provide a comprehensive report identifying the type of equipment required, and a recommended supplier.

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Eligibility & assessment for the DSA continued The report will also identify any training and non-medical help that will be required, together with an estimated cost of this support. If you are studying part-time and want to apply for the DSA, you will need to ask your college or university to certify that your course of study is at least 50% of an equivalent full-time course to be eligible.

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There are certain conditions where you are not eligible for a DSA. Contact the Disability Adviser within the college or university to confirm eligibility.

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Other sources of financial support Adult Learning Grant (ALG)

Learner Support Fund In addition to DSAs, financial help may also be available from the Learner Support Fund. This fund can: Meet particular costs which are not already being met from other grants. Help if learners are in financial difficulty.

Provide emergency payments for an unexpected financial crisis. Help learners who may be considering giving up their course because of financial problems.

This awards a weekly grant of up to ÂŁ30 per week, payable to eligible learners over the age of 19yrs who are studying for their first Level 2 or 3 qualification. This is a pilot scheme that only operates in certain areas. Further information is available from Student Services.

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Educational Maintenance Allowance (EMA) This is an allowance of up to ÂŁ30 per week for 16-18 year olds. It is payable to eligible learners who are in year 11 and planning to continue to study full-time in further education. Payments will depend on household income and will not affect any other benefits. Further information is available from Student Services.

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Student loan

Studying on benefits

This is money available from the Government to support tuition fees and living expenses for HE courses only.

You may be able to undertake a course of study at college or university and still retain your benefits. This will depend on your personal circumstances so it’s important that you seek advice from Student Services before commencing your course.

Part of your entitlement is based on your family income. All learners on full-time HE courses may apply to their LEA.


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They may also be able to advise you on benefits that you may be able to claim while you are studying. All universities and colleges are offering bursaries and scholarships and it is worth checking out the website of the HEI concerned.

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Social and recreation facilities Whilst course and location are crucial considerations when you’re choosing which college or university to attend, it’s also worth giving thought to how you’ll fit in.

Some Student Unions appoint a disability officer to ensure that the sporting and social activities on offer have considered the needs of disabled learners.

Many colleges and universities have a wide range of sports and outdoor activities available, as well as various clubs and societies to join, to suit many different interests.

If you are moving to a new area, the Tourist Information Office will have information on accessible venues such as theatres, cinemas and restaurants.

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Things to consider Is there a Disability Adviser at the HEI? Is there the right social mix for you to feel comfortable? What pubs, clubs, gig venues, cinemas, theatres, and sports facilities are on offer?

Are the social facilities physically accessible if you have mobility difficulties? Are religious facilities accessible? Speak to current disabled learners at the college or university about their involvement in social activities.

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Student living accommodation If you decide to live away from home, most colleges and universities have a range of living environments including those adapted for disabled learners. Most colleges and university have adapted a number of study bedrooms and may include:

Accessibility for wheelchair users. Loop systems, vibrating pillows and adapted fire alarms suitable for deaf learners. Specialist signage, large shelves to accommodate Braille copies of publications and extra room space for guide dogs. Halls of residence usually offer a variety of study bedrooms and communal kitchen, lounge and bathroom facilities.

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If you are more confident in terms of your mobility and independence skills, you may decide to apply to live in shared houses on, or near the campus. For more information about student accommodation, contact Student Services at your chosen college or university. Make sure you apply in good time as there is usually a limit on the number of accessible rooms available within a campus.


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Preparation for work after HE Your time at college or university will help you prepare for employment and your career. Voluntary work Whilst studying, there will be opportunities for you to get involved in voluntary work, which will give you vital experience when applying for employment following your course. Student Services will be able to put you in touch with local organisations that can offer you this experience.

Work experience As part of your learning programme, you can request to undertake some work experience.

Many courses include a placement period. This is a great way of applying what you are learning into practice, as well as boosting your confidence and helping you build a network of contacts. Student Services will help you find a suitable placement.

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Mentoring schemes Some universities and colleges offer an employer mentoring scheme. This creates constructive partnerships whereby the talents of individual learners are fostered and channeled to help them attain their full potential.

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Careers service Mentors from industry and commerce act as positive role models who offer experience, knowledge, advice and commitment. They help build the bridge for learners at the transition stage from graduate to employee. There are specialist mentoring schemes specifically tailored for the needs of disabled learners. Ask if such schemes exist at your chosen college or university.

The university or college careers service will advise you on how to apply for a job, go for an interview and where to find the support you need to start work.


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Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) From September 2002, the DDA made it unlawful for HEIs to discriminate against disabled learners by treating them less favourably in their admissions policies, or in the services they offer.

Under the Act, institutions must make reasonable adjustments so that disabled learners are not at a major disadvantage compared to learners who are not disabled. Your LEA will treat any information about your disability as confidential.

However if you choose not to tell your university or college about your disability, the necessary reasonable adjustments may not be made. You can tell the Disability Adviser at your chosen HEI in complete confidence about your disability to make sure that you get the support you need.

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Complaints procedure Every college and university has a complaints procedure. You can obtain a copy from Student Services or the Student Union at your college or university.

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What does all this mean? Access to HE as a disabled person is getting easier. Today, there are more disabled learners pursuing their academic career at a college or university than in previous years.

Policies and procedures are being introduced to ensure that colleges and universities actively encourage disabled learners into HE and cater for their needs.

So when you go into HE, try to implement the following:

However, in order for this to be a success, there must be a two-way process between disabled learners and staff.

Give feedback to your college or university via committees, equal opportunities officer and the Student Union.

Be proactive – talk to the staff about your requirements. Don’t expect them to be able to foresee your needs.

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Networking Build up a network of people to help you deal with your studies and cope with any issues such as home-sickness. This could include: counsellors, friends, support groups, other learners and academic staff.

Good luck‌ your future is just beginning!

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Who can help?

Department for Education and Skills (DfES)

There are dozens of organisations that offer help - far too many to list in this guide.

For information and advice on all stages of education and learning.

The following is a list of just some of the national organisations that you could contact as a starting point.

Sanctuary Buildings, Great Smith Street, London. SW1P 3BT Tel: 0870 000 2288 Textphone/Minicom: 01928 794274 Website: www.dfes.gov.uk/studentsupport Disability Rights Commission (DRC) The DRC is an independent body that works to promote equal opportunities for disabled people. It provides information and legal advice on the Disability Discrimination Act 1995. FREEPOST MID 02164, Stratford upon Avon, Warwickshire. CV37 9BR Tel: 08457 622 633 Textphone: 08457 622 644 Website: www.drc-gb.org

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National Union of Students (NUS) NUS represent the interests of students in further and higher education throughout the United Kingdom. They provide research, representation, training and expert advice for individual students and students' unions. 2nd Floor, Centro 3, 19 Mandela Street, London. NW1 0DU Tel: 0871 221 8221 Textphone: 0207 380 6649 Website: www.nusonline.co.uk

Skill: The National Bureau for Students with Disabilities A national charity that promotes opportunities for young people and adults with any kind of disability in post-16 education, training and employment across the UK. Chapter House, 18-20 Crucifix Lane, London. SE1 3JW Telephone/Minicom: 0207 450 0620 Website: www.skill.org.uk

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Aimhigher Aimhigher is a national programme that aims to increase the number of people entering higher education, and attract individuals from groups in the society who are currently under-represented. www.aimhigher.ac.uk For a full list of Aimhigher regional offices, please see the back cover of this booklet.

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Keep up-to-date Please take a few moments to register your copy of ‘A guide for disabled learners interested in higher education’ and be kept up-to-date with free publications and relevant information from Aimhigher.

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Keep up-to-date! A guide for disabled learners interested in higher education. Name: Address:

How did you find out about this guide? Please tick where appropriate: Teacher

Email address: Gender: Age (yrs): Do you intend to go into higher education? Please tick where appropriate: yes no If no-please state you reasons:

Parent/carer College/university representative Display stand in an information centre Other (please specify below)

If yes-what course do you plan to study? Where do you plan to study?

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Keep up-to-date! How useful have you found this guide: Please tick where appropriate:

Please use this space to add any additional comments or suggestions about this guide:

Very useful Useful Not useful at all (please give your reason(s) below)

Please state what you have found to be the most useful parts of the guide.

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Thank you for taking the time to complete your registration. Please tear off and return to: Karen Mandefield Marketing and Communications Officer Aimhigher West Midlands Wolverhampton Science Park Wolverhampton. WV10 9RU Email: karen.mandefield@wlv.ac.uk


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Glossary of terms

Acknowledgments

Below is a glossary of terms used in this booklet:

This guide has been produced by Aimhigher West Midlands: Tel: 01902 824423 Email: karen.mandefield@wlv.ac.uk

ALG

Adult Learning Grant.

DDA

Disability Discrimination Act.

DfES

Department for Education and Skills.

DRC

Disability Rights Commission.

DSA

Disabled Student Allowance.

Karen Mandefield, Marketing & Communications Officer, Aimhigher West Midlands.

EMA

Educational Maintenance Allowance.

Carol Wilson, Impact Associates.

FE

Further Education.

HE

Higher Education.

RNIB, SKILL, Keighley College and Wolverhampton University for photography.

HEI

Higher Education Institution.

PHd Design.

LEA

Local Education Authority.

Alternate formats

NUS

National Union of Students.

UCAS University College & Admissions Service.

Aimhigher West Midlands would like to thank the following for their co-operation in the production of this guide:

This guide is also available in audio and Braille. To obtain a copy, speak to your Aimhigher Area Office.

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Information, advice & guidance for Higher Education.

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Contact your local office now...

North West Tel: 01695 584 805 Email: preadyb@edgehill.ac.uk www.aimhighernw.ac.uk

East of England Tel: 0845 196 4868 Email: s.kuyser@anglia.ac.uk www.aimhigher.ac.uk/eastofengland

South East Tel: 01483 470118 Email: enquiries.aimhigher@hese.ac.uk www.hese.ac.uk/aimhigher

East Midlands Tel: 01509 223763 Email: d.a.coppock@lboro.ac.uk www.aimhigher-eastmidlands.ac.uk

South West Tel: 0117 328 2361 Email: susan.hatt@uwe.ac.uk www.aimhighersw.ac.uk

London Tel: 0207 612 6507 Email: j.davies@ioe.ac.uk www.londonaimhigher.co.uk

West Midlands Tel: 01902 824437 Email: aimhigherwm@wlv.ac.uk www.aimhigherwm.org

North East Tel: 0191 516 4405 Email: enquiries@aimhigher.northeast.ac.uk www.aimhigher.northeast.ac.uk

Yorkshire & Humber Tel: 0113 343 6994 Email: enquiries@yorkshireuniversities.ac.uk www.aimhigheryandh.co.uk

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