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Aspire

Spring | Summer 2011

The Lehigh Carbon Community College Magazine

Go behind the scenes with our NEW degree offerings in computer game and simulation development Joe Volk: 40 years and still making a difference Perspectives from LCCC student workers


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LCCC Mission Responding to the community by providing affordable, accessible, and high-quality education LCCC Vision National prominence and academic excellence as a comprehensive community college

Dear LCCC friend, If you haven’t been on campus in a while, I’d like to personally welcome you back to see the transformation. We opened the doors to the Community Services Center in the fall and have re-opened the doors to our new and improved Berrier Hall, which now houses a wellness and recreation center for LCCC work-study students, faculty and staff use. Enjoy the photos and story about Berrier Hall within this issue of Aspire. This issue also introduces you to our newest program—Computer Game and Simulation Development and personifies the great work of our faculty and staff.

You will also learn firsthand about our students workers and what their experiences meant to them in their time at LCCC. LCCC celebrated its 44th Commencement on May 18, 2011 and more than 550 students graduated with an associate’s degree. LCCC continues to be the starting place for thousands in our community and we want every step along the way to be a step toward the road of success. We always look forward to seeing our students back on campus so we can share in their success, however they have defined it.

Please enjoy this issue of Aspire, read our heartwarming stories and see firsthand how our students continue “Starting here and going everywhere.”

With warm regards,

Donald W. Snyder | President, LCCC


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2 Go behind the scenes 6 LCCC has your personal interest covered 10 40 Years and still making a difference... 12 Keeping the LCCC community healthy 14 Staff giving back 20 Student Section: student workers of lccc 24 Focus on Faculty 27 Alumni Profile 28 Alumni News 29 LCCC Events + Community Leadership

Executive Staff President

Donald W. Snyder, J.D., L.L.M. Vice President for Administrative Services and Workforce/Community Development

Ann D. Bieber Vice President for Finance and Facilities/Controller

Larry W. Ross Aspire: The Lehigh Carbon Community College Magazine is an official publication of LCCC and is published twice yearly. It is distributed free to alumni, friends, faculty, and staff. Copyright Š 2011 by Lehigh Carbon Community College (LCCC). Photographs and artwork copyright by their respective creators or by LCCC. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reused or republished in any form without express written permission. The college will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, ancestry, national origin, age, disabilities, veteran status, or sexual orientation in its educational programs, activities, admissions, or employment practices as required by applicable laws and regulations. For information regarding civil rights or grievance procedures or for information regarding services, activities, and facilities that are accessible to and useable by persons with disabilities, contact the Office of Human Resources. Students may contact the Office of Disability Support Services, LCCC, 4525 Education Park Drive, Schnecksville, PA 18078-2598, 610-799-2121.

Vice President of Academic Services and Student Development

Thomas C. Leamer

Aspire Staff Editor | Associate Dean of Institutional Advancement

Spring | Summer 2011 cover Jennifer Villa is an honors student at LCCC. See her perspective as a student worker on Page 23. above The interest in games and the gaming industry is very high among LCCC students. And the College houses a state-of-the-art Mac lab.

Heather L. Kuhns Associate Editor | Director of Marketing and Publications

Paula Hannam Designer & Production Coordination

Jennifer B. Burns Photographer

Theo Anderson LCCC Photographer

Justin Brosious

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Go behind the scenes Jump over virtual obstacles. Slay the dragons. Race your super-charged car on a challenging track. Test out your beach volleyball skills. Build an app for your phone that does just about anything. There are so many options in the digital game and application world. Have you ever wondered what goes into creating these games? Now you can go behind the scenes of this field with new programs at Lehigh Carbon Community College.

top Steven Weitz is one of the team members who worked tirelessly developing the courses to mimic team interactions in the workforce. bottom left Student collaboration plays a key role in the new degree programs and has received favorable feedback. bottom right Mary Rasley has been instrumental in steering LCCC’s program in a direction where curricula will match both local, as well as overall computer game industry needs.

Starting in the fall of 2011, LCCC will be offering Associate Degrees in Computer Game and Simulation Development. The programs, which have been funded by a National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education (NSF ATE) grant, will be offered in two different tracks—digital arts and programming— preparing students to work in this up and coming field or transfer to a four-year university or college. LCCC is only one of nine colleges or universities in Pennsylvania to offer a program in this discipline, and is the only 2-year school in the area offering these degrees. LCCC has created an advisory board, comprised of business leaders, local college and university representatives, as well as members of the game industry, to ensure its programs are meeting the needs of the workforce. The programs in computer game and simulation development came to fruition after years of planning and through a National Science Foundation Grant (NSF). Mary Rasley, professor of computer information systems, and Steven Weitz, instructor of media arts, worked with Linda Mesics, LCCC’s director of academic grants, to develop a plan that would allow them to merge the disciplines into meaningful course collaborations that would mimic team interactions in the workforce. According to Weitz, the uniqueness of LCCC’s programs helped get the NSF grant. “Our degree will be distinct, in that it blends computer science and digital arts,” says Weitz. Most colleges that offer computer game design or development programs of study focus on only digital arts or programming, but not both. While this may prepare graduates for their dedicated career choice, it does not prepare them for the work experiences they will have in the Computer Game Industry, in which they are continually interacting with team members of a different discipline. “Our programs differ from some of the other colleges,” continues Weitz. “The first year of study is the same whether the student is pursuing digital arts or programming. Even though classes differ between the two tracks in the second year, giving students focused education in their area of choice, the collaboration continues through those second-year courses. Beginning with courses in the second semester of the first year, learning communities exist to incorporate a great deal of collaboration. This is an approach that has received very favorable feedback, and we are looking forward to putting it into practice.”

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Students will be able to choose from four different tracks in the computer game and simulation

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The NSF grant also includes provisions for a mentoring program. Rasley and Weitz plan to involve peer and professional mentors with students enrolled in the programs of study to aid in student retention and recruitment of women (a traditionally underrepresented population in computer game development, as well as computer science as a whole). In addition to developing the new programs of study at LCCC, the NSF grant allows Rasley and Weitz to offer sessions in the summer which include high school teacher workshops along with game camps for middle school children. These are both aimed at demonstrating game-creation concepts for educational purposes. The high school teacher workshops help to prepare teachers, as experts in education, to become educational game designers. The middle school children’s camps seek to educate the children about careers in game design and development and engage them as they create their own computer-based games. Rasley and Weitz were recently awarded a Google: Computer Science for High School (CS4HS) grant they titled “Edugaming” to allow additional high school teachers to participate in the summer workshops.

development degree.

Bringing in the experts “We have reached out beyond the Lehigh Valley to leaders in the computer game industry to seek their advice. Our goal was to form a regional advisory panel for local colleges so that everyone could benefit from the knowledge and advice of the experts. We have succeeded beyond our hopes and now regularly collaborate with companies in California. We plan to continue to add to our board as we make new contacts,” says Rasley. “The advisory board is very excited and the members have been with us every step of the way to be sure our graduates meet the needs they anticipate in their organizations.” The advisory board, adds Rasley, has been instrumental in steering LCCC’s program in a direction where the curricula will match both local, as well as overall computer game industry needs. “The curricula is strategically designed so that what the students learn will not only meet the needs of the computer game industry, but will also be transferable to programming and digital arts careers in general, as well as further degrees, if so desired. One of our goals was to help students prepare to have career options regardless of changes in the economy. We built college transfer, entrepreneurship, and direct employment into the options for our students,” says Rasley.

Growing interest “The interest in games and the gaming industry is very high among our students (and students in general), and having a formal degree in computer game and simulation development will show that there are viable career paths that allow students to continue their interest in games while still receiving a true college education,” says Weitz.

For more information, contact Mary Rasley at mrasley@lccc.edu or Steven Weitz at sweitz@lccc.edu.

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“The buzz about this program has been strong and incorporating this program to the rest of LCCC’s offerings has the potential to enhance LCCC’s existing reputation for having rigorous programs, adding a strong path for education in game creation and potentially drawing students that may have considered going elsewhere. Our vision is to have this program become part of a “geographic gaming center”, with LCCC as the hub,” continues Weitz.

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bottom left Working on body movements is a key aspect of making avatars more realistic. bottom right Small class sizes guarantee a lot of student/teacher interaction.

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Many options to pursue The new computer game and simulation development program offers four tracks—two in digital arts and two in programming, giving students exposure to many different careers including game designer, game programmer, animator, user experience designer and 3-D modeler. LCCC offers a course called “Introduction to Game Design”, which touches on some of the areas explored further in the full degrees. “The course has been offered for a number of semesters, and is always popular,” says Weitz. “At the beginning of every semester, I try to gauge the students’ interest in all of my classes. I have a high number of students interested in gaming in general, and when I mention these new programs, I usually get a favorable response.” Another benefit to this type of degree, according to Rasley, is the ability to work from anywhere—geography doesn’t necessarily play a role. Many people are concerned about jobs being local and think geographically about the workplace. Today, that is simply not important, says Rasley. “Our graduates can seek employment at any location. We are hopeful that our graduates will consider developing their own computer game companies. With the marketplaces for iPhone and Android applications being so accessible to any developer or artist, we believe this goal is within the reach of all our students at a very low cost,” she says. “By collaborating with our Business Enterprise Center, students can learn what they need to and become successful business owners.” So, whether you wish to write the latest greatest phone application or be a part of the next big game fad, it’s time to get your game face on…and get started this fall. |

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LCCC has your personal

Some couples have said that learning to dance was a great ‘date night’ activity. Dance classes are just one of the popular courses offered through the Personal Interest/Noncredit division of LCCC.

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interest covered Do you daydream about swinging your husband or wife around a dance floor or taking memorable photographs on your next trip? Is your new poodle a fussy eater? Are you ready to take your Word and Excel skills to the next level or polish your presentations at work? Over 100 Personal Interest classes in the Noncredit division at Lehigh Carbon Community College are waiting to spark new interests and awaken the senses. Barbara Platt, community services coordinator at LCCC, has her finger on the pulse of the constantly changing interests in the community. “Keeping up with the public can be a daunting task but the challenge of offering new classes, each semester, that both engage and delight, is a satisfying one. Nothing makes me happier than seeing enough folks register to run a new class,” says Platt, who has worked in this division for 11 years, and has seen changes in the department since she began. “People’s interests are more sophisticated and they are demanding more rigorous levels beyond the basic skills level.” Inspiration for new classes comes about from a myriad of sources; anecdotal conversations, media articles about emerging trends and unsolicited course ideas from members of the community eager to share their expertise.

Latest trends Platt says changing demographics can contribute, as well, to new course ideas. As baby boomers age and tip the population, courses are developed to attract a group that, in few aspects, resembles older populations of the past. “The 55+ communities are growing and they are an active, engaged, enthusiastic bunch! Physical strength and mental acuity are prized, equally. They want to feel confident emailing, Skyping, and posting and downloading photographs of their grandchildren.” Choosing a noncredit course over a credit course is a personal choice. “There is the time issue, the money issue, and the expectation from the instructor. Languages are a great example. A credit class will focus on grammar, reading and writing. While a noncredit class will cover these areas to some degree, the focus is more on familiarity, conversation and, in some cases, very specific skills for the individual in the workplace or in a travel situation,” Platt says. Platt adds, “Personal Interest classes bring a lot of the community to the campus who wouldn’t normally come. The exposure is wonderful and people discover a whole new world that may have been right under their nose.”

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Share your expertise Instructors of noncredit courses come from many walks of life. Platt looks at credentials, but most importantly, passion, when choosing a new instructor. “I like to see their work and hear about their experiences,” she says. “We get such great feedback from people who have attended the courses and I have an extensive, huge file of people who have sent me their resumes in every category. The schedule is very flexible and the instructors have a lot of freedom in customizing their classes for their own needs. Across the board, evaluation forms, filled out by people who have taken these classes, show the appreciation students have for their instructors. “Our instructors are enthusiastic, knowledgeable and accommodating to each individual student,” she says. Many of the instructors are also in the industry and can cater the programs to specific needs, adds Terri Keefe, director of community services at LCCC. “Especially for the computer classes—we offer a full range of computer classes including the basics for a grandparent wanting to keep up with his or her grandchildren to the business person strengthening

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workplace skills.” She also adds that classes range from one-day workshops to comprehensive certification programs. Often times, the instructors are enjoying the noncredit courses as much as the students. “We have enjoyed seeing the students or ‘couples’ accomplish more than they thought they could with even just a little bit of effort,” says Ken Schaus, a ballroom dancing instructor. Schaus adds, “Some of the couples who have completed the courses have said that learning to dance was a great activity for their ‘date night.’ Many have commented it was easier than they thought and a lot of fun.” Schaus and his wife, Cheryl, own the New Tripoli dance company, “And Suddenly I Was Dancing,” and have taught noncredit dance lessons at LCCC for the past 12 years.

And for the youngest generation Whether your child wants to be a future news anchor or a veterinarian, LCCC summer camps have you covered. Camp Central Program has offerings for all ages and programs June—August. For this summer, LCCC has two new partnerships—the Lehigh Valley Chapter High School for the Performing Arts School, offering a variety of performing arts classes on site at LVPA and Wickline, a casting company based in Philadelphia. Wickline’s offerings include camps in TV and film, anchoring, acting for TV and modeling. Wickline camps are held at the main campus in Schnecksville. Terri Lubenesky, an instructor for Sports and Shorts, one of the programs offered through Camp Central, enjoys the opportunity to partner with LCCC and the camp. “Camp Central has been my favorite summer job for the past six, going on seven years,” she says. “My experience with Camp Central has been positive in many ways,” she says. “I have met, played and worked with campers from various cultures and nationalities. I’ve also met (and worked with the children of) LCCC staff, faculty and students, which has been an absolute pleasure and an eye opener into our community. I aspire to be the best teacher I can be in whatever capacity or learning situation—Camp Central gives me that opportunity!”

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During the academic year, there has been marked interest in parents asking if their older children can take “adult” courses—either by themselves—or with the parent. “As school programs get slashed from school budgets, we find increasing numbers of pre-teens and teenagers taking many classes in the areas of foreign language, cooking and crafts,” says Platt.

above Barbara Platt, community services coordinator at LCCC, is always looking for new trends in personal interests. The noncredit division of LCCC offers

Flexible scheduling The personal interest course schedule is built with flexibility and convenience in mind. The majority of the classes are offered on LCCC’s main campus in Schnecksville, but some are held in the Southern Lehigh, Whitehall, and Catasauqua school districts.

a myriad of personal enrichment course for everyone’s enjoyment.

Classes are also offered at other LCCC sites. Spanish classes are run at the Donley Center. There are multiple level classes offered so people can practice their language skills while developing their vocabulary. “LCCC’s Spanish Society is a new class developed to meet the needs of an increasingly sophisticated group of Spanish language speakers who meet weekly to discuss various articles from the New York Times, Newsweek and other media outlets,” says Platt.

For the love of cooking Wouldn’t it be nice to sample a menu before deciding on where to go for dinner? LCCC’s Great Chefs program allows you to do just that. “Great Chefs is a much anticipated spring program where several upscale restaurants around the Lehigh Valley open their doors to our students for cooking demonstrations. The program is a win-win for LCCC and the restaurant,” says Platt. “When you go to a new restaurant and enjoy your meal, you share the experience with your neighbors, friends and colleagues at work. Advertising is expensive and word-of-mouth is very effective marketing.” The Great Chefs program offers a two-hour cooking demonstration and the guests have the opportunity to sample the food. The course enrollment is $20 per restaurant. “The restaurants value this opportunity to highlight their signature dishes and our students enjoy the tasty samples,” says Platt. |

To get more information about a personal interest course or to share your expertise and teach a course, please contact Barbara Platt at bplatt@lccc.edu.

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40 Years and still making a difference... Joseph Volk has been attending Lehigh Carbon Community College’s Board of Trustee meetings since July 2, 1970. More than forty years later and through a completely transformed campus, Volk’s involvement with LCCC still keeps him busier than ever. “I have been very proud, over the years, to tell people that I am a Trustee at LCCC. I am also proud of my relationship with many of the fine administrators and faculty,” says Volk. “Being a board member keeps me quite busy, and I enjoy every minute of it. Attendance at board meetings each month, several committee meetings each month, two board retreats each year—fill my schedule. I also try to attend as many special events as possible—I believe it’s important for the students attending an event, to see that a Trustee found it important to be there. And I have rarely missed a commencement ceremony.” Volk was recently recognized for his 40 years of dedication and commitment with a conference room dedicated in his honor and proclamation from the state. “At the November 2010 board meeting, I was taken completely by surprise with the presentation of a board resolution honoring me for 40 years of service as a Trustee. I was even more surprised to look around and see that my wife Peg, my son Mike, my daughters Patti and JoAnn, my granddaughter Chelsea and some very close friends, two couples, had, unbeknownst to me, snuck into the room to be present for the event,” says Volk. “I was so honored and touched.”

A campus transformed over 40 years When Volk started with LCCC, the Administration building was the only building on campus, with the Science Technology building under construction. Today, LCCC has eight buildings in all, on the Schnecksville campus. “I have seen and attended the opening of the Airport Site, the Carbon Center, the Donley Center and the Morgan Center. Also, I have served under all four college presidents, i.e, Founding President Dr. Berrier, Dr. Barthlow, Dr. Davis and Don Snyder,” Volk reflects on his time with the College. Volk has enjoyed the incredible growth over the past 40 years and is very proud to have been part of its growth. The growth will continue, but the College’s progress over the next 40 years will be heavily dependent on state and local school district funding. If sufficient funding is always available, LCCC will continue to grow in acceptance and stature, says Volk. “The greatest advice I can give any student is to be very proud of your affiliation with your college. I have become more proud in recent years because community colleges are becoming more and more recognized in the national dialogue on higher education,” says Volk. “Anyone who crosses the path of a community college has made a good choice.”

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Joe Volk, long-time member of the LCCC Board of Trustees, with his wife of 55 years, Peg. Volk was recently honored for serving on the Board of Trustees for 40 years.

“LCCC is a very good school, among the best community colleges in Pennsylvania and the nation. LCCC is becoming more and more accepted by four-year colleges as an excellent starting point in obtaining a four-year college education. You should be proud to be associated with LCCC—I know I am,” continues Volk.

In the beginning with LCCC Before first coming to LCCC, Volk had considered, for a number of years, running for a position on the Southern Lehigh School Board, but never stepped forward to do it. “When the opportunity presented itself to be appointed to the LCCC Board, I decided I would prefer that, because, above all, I have always considered a good education to be a valuable personal asset,” Volk says. As a Trustee at Large, Volk is elected, not appointed to the Board, as 13 of the 15 trustees are, by their home district school board. He has been continually elected six times by a significant majority of the 117 directors of LCCC’s sponsoring school districts. He has looked forward to the start of every new year, joining in the Board’s deliberations and discussions, and perusal of the necessary local sponsor funding of the College. Volk began his career as a draftsman and designer, teaching him to meet demanding requirements, says Volk. He attended Lafayette College at night, pursuing a Mechanical Engineering Degree while raising a family, then served as a Manager of Quality Assurance for Air Products and Chemicals for 24 years.

Contagious energy and dedication Volk, who is a lifelong, true blue Boston Red Sox baseball and Notre Dame football and basketball fan, resides in Coopersburg. He, and his wife, Peg of nearly 55 years, have four children; son, Michael and three daughters, Patricia, JoAnn, and Kristin; and four grandchildren, Donald, Chelsea, Isabel and Chloe, ranging from one-year old to graduating from college this year.

When Volk is not on LCCC’s campus, he enjoys doing “neat” things with his wife and with their children and families. He also enjoys good music, jazz pianist Keith Jarret to Bach, good food, travel and sailing. During Volk’s time in Coopersburg, he has served as a member of Coopersburg Borough Council for eight years, the last three years as President, 29 years as a member of the Coopersburg Zoning Hearing Board. He has also served on the Board of Directors of Habitat for Humanity of the Lehigh Valley. As demonstrated by his busy schedule, Volk has many loves to fill his time. So whether he and his wife are just ‘enjoying their family and the wonderful things they do together’ or he is serving on the next LCCC committee, he does it with a smile. And his dedication to education and the success of LCCC students makes everyone around smile. |

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Keeping the LCCC community healthy

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The main campus at Lehigh Carbon Community College has seen many changes over the past year—a new building, the moving of a road, to name a few. The latest renovation brings a state-of-the-art wellness center and gymnasium for students, staff and faculty. Berrier Hall re-opened in May with an expanded wellness center, featuring all new fitness equipment. Also housed in the renovated Berrier Hall are the Student Government Association and athletic offices, the game room, a new dance studio and an auxiliary gym. The Wellness Center, formerly known as the Fitness Center, invites all levels of fitness and will be promoting nutrition and overall well-being, in addition to exercise. The center has traditionally seen about 80 students, faculty and staff a day and the center’s staff is hoping to see that number grow with the new, state-of-the-art equipment. “I think the renovation of Berrier Hall is key. There will be state-of-the-art fitness equipment, specialty clinics held throughout the semester covering a variety of fitness topics such as: group training, time efficient workouts, exergaming, specialty classes such as hooping, and zumba,” says Jocelyn Beck, LCCC’s director of athletics. “With athletics, student life and the fitness center all housed in the same place, there is also great potential to create a true campus-wide recreation center.”

Promoting wellness In addition to offering wellness classes, the center will offer progressive and inspiring programs to facilitate and promote lifelong health including a variety of wellness seminars, fitness services and events. “In addition to promoting fitness, we want to facilitate healthy living and lifestyles,” says Beck. “Through

leadership, collaboration and teamwork, we will develop a fun and supportive environment filled with a wealth of options through which students, faculty, and staff can empower their mind and spirit while nurturing their physical self. The Wellness Center will inspire our campus community to make a commitment to health and well being through personalized attention and services designed to foster participation in regular physical activity.” The summer hours of the new fitness center are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday– Friday. Regular hours of 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday–Thursday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday will resume with the start of fall classes. Please contact Marge Beahm, recreation center coordinator at mbeahm@lccc.edu or Jocelyn Beck, director of athletics, at jbeck@lccc.edu for more information. | Photo: Justin Brosious

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Staff giving back The staff and faculty at Lehigh Carbon Community College bring diverse backgrounds, knowledge and experiences to the College. The one area they are definitely not lacking in is a sense of community and giving back. Enjoy the heartfelt stories shared by employees who have done missionary or other trips.

Connection to Haiti Recently returned from her third mission trip in Haiti, LCCC advisor Chris Wargo says it’s hard to come back from a mission trip and the time difference is not the adjustment. “It’s more of an emotional thing. When I’m down there (in Haiti), I am kind of numb and try and separate myself from everything going on. Every once in a while you get bouts of tears. When I return from a trip, it is my time to reflect.” “I see what they don’t have and what they could have. But at the same time they know how to bring it together and be joyful and so hopeful for waking up the next morning,” she says. “That’s what they have that we as Americans don’t. We surround ourselves with all these material things that we think makes us happy but the Haitians don’t have those material things but they seem happier.” The group Wargo goes with is a medical mission group and she serves as a pharmacy technician during her stay, working with a pharmacist. “When you’re there, you see so much need and what you’re doing seems so little. You feel like you are hardly making an impact. We get coached about that by thinking we need to help the person in front of us,” she says. “I feel like I’ve been built/molded for this type of position. With my experience in counseling, I separate myself and it helps me cope with the situation.” Wargo plans to go there every year and says she feels like she could be playing a bigger role. During her most recent visit, Wargo worked in the triage part of the clinic where the nurses were taking blood pressure and assessing people who were coming in. “My main passion is people. I love learning about people and sitting and talking with them,” says Wargo who has a bachelor’s degree in psychology and master’s degree in counseling—has always had an affinity with people. “When I am down in Haiti, I feel comfortable and at home. When I return to the US, I feel like I’ve been ripped away from something and that’s uncomfortable to me.” Wargo worked in mental health for a while and most of her clients were from Philadelphia. She says she had many clients who were inner city kids from lower socio-economic backgrounds and that experience kind of prepared her for Haiti.

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When Wargo travels down to Haiti, she brings a book by Mother Theresa with her and there is a particular quote in there that resonates with her. “Jesus, in the least of His brethren, is not only hungry for a piece of bread, but hungry for love, to be known, to be taken into account.” “We don’t hear a lot of feedback from the local people but when we’re down there, we have lines outside of the clinic and people are literally knocking down the door, which is just a piece of corrugated iron,” she says. “I remember a situation before an earthquake happened where mothers and fathers were handing their babies over the fence because they really wanted to have their children seen by the doctor.” There is so much need in Haiti, she says. “The situation in Haiti is so sad. All the aid that was sent to the country after the earthquake has not even been used. The most the government has done is identify homes that are condemned and need to be demolished but there are still families living in them! Infrastructure is also lacking. For example, there are no ambulances to take you to the hospital.” There is a priest that they work with who has been down there for 10 years. The clinic is currently run out of the church, but it is the group’s goal to build a separate clinic in the village.

opposite Living conditions can be simplistic at best, but the villagers are joyful and appreciative. above Chris Wargo has to have a period of reflection after she returns from her Haiti mission trip.

Wargo participates in her mission trips through Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Doylestown and its sister church in Haiti is the Port au Prince Church. “My experiences in Haiti have made me simplify my life. The level of care that I have for people has also deepened,” says Wargo, who journals her experiences and is hoping to take a drawing class at LCCC to document her experiences through artwork.

Partnering for Haiti Double the commitment to Haiti Deb Rentler, also an advisor at LCCC, has wanted to be a missionary since she was a teen. She finally had the opportunity to go for the first time in 2001. She enjoys going with and actually invited Chris Wargo into going on the missionary trip. Rentler’s husband has been going on missionary trips since the late 90s. As an internist, he was able to help with providing medical assistance. Rentler, who also wanted to provide more medical assistance to the mission, decided to pursue the LPN program at LCCC and graduated from it in 2004. “I’ve always wanted to help people who really need it and are in the situation through no fault of their own,” Rentler says. “I finished the LPN degree primarily because I wanted to help out in Haiti. It’s a useful skill at the medical clinic in Port au Prince.”

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Rentler went back to Haiti in 2005 and used her nursing skills for the first time and it was awesome, she recalls. Three more visits followed— in November 2009, then again after the 2010 earthquake in March and September.

Natural calling “The beauty of Haiti is in the people. The countryside is basically a barren wasteland and the city of Port au Prince, a garbage dump. It’s terrible to see that people live like that. But they are a proud nation and they rise above it and they are very dignified,” says Rentler. “You see smiles everywhere. They are affectionate and warm and I think that’s part of the culture. You feel an instant connection with them.” Rentler’s time in Haiti is filled with so many different experiences and memories. “There are a lot of moments that I don’t like to think about. One sad moment I recall was when a young man came to the clinic. He had been in prison unjustly after being out on the streets. He came to the clinic after being severely beaten. He was in severe heart failure and should have been in a hospital. We did pay for him to go to the hospital but he died within a few weeks,” she says. She also recalls many sad encounters with children. Some of these children may have been Restavecs, defined as a family with a little more money who will take in a child from another family who doesn’t have the means to support that child. It is hoped that the richer family will send the child to school, but many times they end up being a house servant to the host family, she says. “These Restavec children are generally not taken care of. You hear stories of abuse in these situations too—it’s very sad. One child that came into the clinic

Aspire Spring | Summer 2011

was severely malnourished and the family that brought her in were well dressed and well fed. She came in and just sat on my lap and didn’t say anything, I just held her close to me,” Rentler says. Haiti is a nation of eight million people and 300,000 are Restavecs, says Rentler. She carries a poem called “The Face of God” with her and reads it around the third or fourth day of a trip, when she most needs the emotional strength. Rentler recalls some of her best experiences as well. “The one experience that I really enjoy is the deworming section because I get to see everyone. When the mothers come in with their babies, even though we speak different languages, we still communicate with one another as mothers. Knowing that the child is receiving medicine that is really going to help them. You can see it in the mother’s eyes that she is so grateful—it is so heartwarming and satisfying,” she says. Rentler says she would love to go to Haiti more and would like to try different areas, as she has only ever gone to Port au Prince.

Growing in spirit and getting connected “For me, going to Haiti is a spiritual experience and I feel a strong connection with God,” says Rentler. “Sometimes I have blamed God because of all the poverty. Then I see the faith of the Haitian people and realize that God is in them and this greatly strengthens my own faith. I do struggle with the fact that one of the poorest nations on this earth is a two-hour flight from Miami.” Rentler recommends a missionary trip to anyone interested in doing service abroad. A lot of churches do missions to foreign countries and there are some non-secular organizations which also provide aid to third world nations. A well-known faith-based organization is the Matthew 25 house (http://www.parishprogram.org/matthew-25-house) part of the Parrish twinning program. The Haitian arm is run by Sister Mary Finnick from Yardley, Pennsylvania. “Everyone should do this whether you have faith or not. It becomes life changing because generally, people have never experienced poverty to the extent to which

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it is in third world countries like Haiti,” says Rentler. “If you have an opportunity to experience a third world experience, I would highly encourage it because it will make your life better. You will return with so many qualities—gratefulness.” “Things need to change and we are doing our part. One beautiful Haitian face at a time.”

Lending a hand in Honduras Tom Bartasavage is a jack of all trades and he was glad to put his skills to good use by helping a church in Honduras. Bartasavage, a plumber at LCCC, has been doing such mission trips through his church, Lighthouse Church in Orwigsburg, PA.

opposite LCCC advisors Christine Wargo and Den Rentler enjoy missionary trips to Haiti, where they touch the lives of many families and children. above Deb Rentler, an advisor at LCCC, completed the LPN degree at LCCC primarily to help out in Haiti.

Bartasavage has been going to Honduras for two years, while his church has been traveling there for 30 years. The projects vary including pouring concrete floors in the houses and making bunk beds for the children in the village of Santa Rita. “We help where we can. There’s not much plumbing. For example, if there is a flushing toilet in a building, it is generally connected to a pipe that runs about 50 feet from the building and runs out into the street,” says Bartasavage. “The conditions are abysmal. They also store water in concrete vats which isn’t very hygienic. In the cities there is traditional plumbing, but not in the villages we work. “Electrical work is also dangerous—archaic.” Most of the men work in plantations (picking bananas), but when the mission group comes to the village, the men gather together and help out, he adds. “Although the people have a great work ethic and work very hard, they have no money for materials so that’s mainly what the mission group provides.” The next missionary project, which usually occurs yearly in August, is to build a little store front for a local woman who cooks for the missionaries and hosts them. “We want her to have an opportunity to make some money for her family and a store front to sell her goods,” says Bartasavage. Another project on a future trip is to build a church in the village and it will serve as a worship and a recreation center. The pastor is already hired and is working out of another facility. He runs regular worship services and prayer groups, helping out the people in the village, says Bartasavage.

Grateful for the helping hand Overall, the people are very grateful because they know you’re there to help, says Bartasavage. However, there is still a fair amount of crime and theft, so the missionary group stays at a tourist resort community that is gated with 12 foot walls. The group has a private driver and translator who knows the area and a lot of people, so it is easier to get around with them. Even with the poverty and theft being high, Bartasavage believes that the church will bring a lot of values to the people of the village.

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“If the people put their faith in Jesus and God’s work instead of relying on their neighbors, it will bring more value to the people. The goal is to make the people a lot more self-sufficient,” says Bartasavage. “We don’t just go down there and do the work for them. We try and teach them how to do things so they learn how to do it themselves. Our next goal is to try and teach them farming techniques.”

A true passion about a different culture “Being in a place like Honduras really makes you appreciate being an American. You take the simple things like waking up and taking a hot shower for granted. In Honduras, most houses don’t have showers. They generally use a bowl of water to take a sponge bath in,” Bartasavage says. He recalls a story about when he was there for the first time. He put his hands straight into the water source where he was and it was very obvious that it wasn’t the right thing to do, as that water was also the water everyone used for drinking and bathing. He was supposed to take a pan and scoop out whatever water he needed to wash his hands.

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He shares another memory from his last trip—he was walking on the street with Kiki, a carpenter in Honduras who always helps out with Bartasavage’s group, and they stopped to buy a Coke. “Suddenly, this guy yells—Yo-American! Apparently he was from Mississippi and had moved to Honduras about 15 years ago and loves it. He sells fruit on the side of the street and vows never to go back because he loves living there so much. Actually his English was pretty broken from speaking Spanish so long,” says Bartasavage. “That’s why people, myself included, do this work because it’s in their nature to help people out.” Bartasavage adds he especially loves helping the children. “All they want is a hug and to play,” he says. “Even though it’s really hot down there, these kids are running around like crazy playing soccer.”

Keeping a perspective It’s about perspective for Chris Foulsham, an adjunct professor of Spanish at Lehigh Carbon Community College. When he talks about his mission trips, he wants people to understand what others might take for granted. “When we’re sitting in our living rooms or complaining about shoveling snow or the line at the grocery store, just think about what it might be like to live down there (Nicaragua in his case) for a while. People don’t have cars—they walk, and even then they might not have any shoes,” says Foulsham. He adds that while living conditions aren’t shocking, it may be upsetting to the person who has never witnessed this. Foulsham has gone on two mission trips to Nicaragua—spring break in March 2010 and previously during the summer of 2009. His mission trips are through St. John Anglican Church, near Philadelphia. On the summer mission, he was involved in a church (Verbo) renovation project which now has various facilities for the local residents.

Firsthand look In addition to the mission trips, Foulsham had other experiences which helped with his understanding of different cultures. He previously lived in Mexico and Venezuela and spent a little time in Costa Rica to fine-tune his language skills.

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While in Mexico, Foulsham lived with a guest family while attending the Spanish Institute, a language school for advanced studies. “Even if you have experience with a different culture, it’s still a difficult situation. You don’t have the luxury of modern bathrooms and showers. The people eat rice and beans, every day,” says Foulsham. “The facilities we had when we were there were very basic. We had two women who would cook for us. We would go to the store and buy groceries and then they would cook us our meals. The meals they made coming out of a kitchen with a wood burning stove and two burners were amazing!” He also recalls having to wear ear plugs because there was a lot of noise early in the morning from the village such as barking dogs and roosters at 4 a.m. “You realize when you’re at this village, there is no plumbing and very little electricity. There is no garbage service so everything is out in the streets. But it’s positive in a way because it’s all that they know and they don’t complain or grumble—they just get on with their lives with a smile on their faces,” says Foulsham. “You have to be careful with the way you dress when you’re there too so you don’t look like you have money. It helps when you have the language skills too—the people are more accepting of you.”

A whole community On Foulsham’s mission trip, he was in a village that was displaced because of Hurricane Mitch, which hit a volcano nearby and turned the one side of the mountain into a huge mudslide with boulders and trees. There was also a tremendous amount of rain and everything was devastated, he says. The community occupied land that was agricultural and people were self-sufficient, growing their own vegetables and tending their own land. But the government moved them to Santa Maria, a town where they have no land, so although they have housing, they are dependent on others for sustenance. Some of the village community return to where they were uprooted from and farm again, but the government are not supporting them fiscally, he recalls.

“I remember talking to one of the ESL teachers here at LCCC one time and I was listening to a story about a student who refused to look him in the eye. He was pretty suspicious because in our (American) culture, that is a sign of dishonesty and lying,” says Foulsham. “It wasn’t until later, that he realized that it was a sign of respect not to look directly into the eyes of someone higher than your station. This story is a classic example of a cultural difference that might be misunderstood.” |

Supporting education

opposite left Tom

While he was visiting, a local school director who was interested to hear that a Spanish teacher from the United States was there invited Foulsham to speak at the school.

Bartasavage, a plumber

“The system is pretty interesting,” says Foulsham. “The elementary students attend in the morning and the high school students attend in the afternoon.”

opposite right Despite

He remembers this experience he had at the school. As a sign of respect, the students stand whenever a teacher is in the room and they must remain standing until they are told to sit down. Foulsham says he wasn’t aware of this so he was talking to them for a while before he realized that the students were still standing.

at LCCC, uses his handy skills to help others in need. poor living conditions, the locals are a tight-knit community. above Chris Foulsham, an adjunct at LCCC, has had many

“I didn’t know that at first and I was wondering why they were still standing. Then after about 10–15 minutes, the sub-director whispered in my ear that I had to tell them to sit down,” he says. “When I show my current students these photos and try and explain the cultural differences such as standing up as a sign of respect, I think it’s difficult for them to understand or to relate.”

experiences abroad

Bringing cultural awareness to the classroom is important to Foulsham.

the classroom.

which have opened his eyes to different cultures and he brings those insights back to his students in

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student workers of lccc

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LCCC’s student worker program is a win-win situation for the College and the students alike. Combining learning with part-time and flexible work experience gives students an invaluable insight into the operations of the College. A few student workers have shared their experiences here.

Sarah Buonanno

Tyler McClenithan

Honestly, when I applied for a student worker position, I just needed the money. Outside of that, I had no idea what to expect. As with any new experience, my placement in the Institutional Advancement Office at LCCC left me feeling awkward and a bit out of place. I was a student. I had no place in the often overlooked and often misunderstood business side of the school. Yet after a few weeks, the awkwardness wore off and I felt more at home. The experience of working in the under belly of LCCC has given me invaluable insight and appreciation for what it takes to work in the professional world of higher education. Specifically, how people dedicate their lives so that LCCC can continually be improved. Ultimately, this is a dedication to improving students and for that, I am eternally grateful.

—Tyler McClenithan I can honestly say that participating in work study at LCCC has been a highlight of my academic endeavors. Developing relationships with faculty, meeting new students during orientations, and working in my major’s department has provided me with invaluable skills that I will use for the rest of my college and professional career. Work study has truly enriched my college experience. —Sarah Buonanno Aspire Spring | Summer 2011

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I am really grateful for the chance to connect professionally with our associate academic dean, Dr. Michael Torrence. It is an asset to my educational career as

Student Section

well as my resume. I am satisfied in knowing that the college I am attending presents opportunities for those students willing to look.

—Sara Newman

Sara Newman

Gabrielle Raditz

Winnie Ouma

Few people can truly say that they love their job. I am proud to be one of those few. I have worked for several other employers over the years, and none of them even hold a candle to LCCC. The Interlibrary Loan Department has taught me so much about the importance of organization in the workplace, which is crucial for my major—Business Management. In addition to giving me vital skills for my future, LCCC also helps me with the present. It allows me to financially support myself, works around my class schedule, and has introduced me to amazing new people. Working at LCCC is such a positive life experience for me, and I wouldn’t trade it for the world.

—Gabrielle Raditz

Being a student worker is first of all a great opportunity to earn money and gain experience while still studying. Working in school is convenient in the sense that the work schedules are customized according to one’s class schedule. It’s also a great opportunity for involvement and service at our campus. I work as a Cougar Guide with the Admissions Office which gives me a chance to be of service to prospective students in the process of getting them admitted to our school.

—Winnie Ouma

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Being a student worker, I can earn money for my college expenses while getting ahead on my schoolwork. It really helps when I’m working in the Mac lab, where I have access to multimedia software that would otherwise be too expensive to buy for my home computer. I also enjoy helping students that come into the lab to use those programs, and it’s a very rewarding experience!

positive life experiences

—Natalia Faenza

Natalia Faenza

Janina Faunce-Holzinger

Sarah Gehman

Being a student worker has been a great opportunity for me to make some extra money while in college. I save money on gas because I can walk straight from class to work; I know my hours will always work around my classes; and I am able to take off with relative ease to study, do homework, and attend various clubs and activities around campus. The best part about being a student worker is that I never have to feel that I am missing out on the college experience because of work.

—Janina Faunce-Holzinger

Aspire Spring | Summer 2011

I am very blessed to have the opportunity to be a student worker for the Vet Tech program. While taking inventory of the vet tech facility, I became very familiar with the location of the medical instruments and supplies, which was very helpful once we began treating animals. Writing and managing the records of the animals that arrived for lab helped me learn practical skills which I will be able to use once I graduate. Being a student worker is a great way for me learn and helps me form a closer relationship with my instructors.

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As a student attending Lehigh Carbon Community College, both my academic and working experiences are gladly embraced by what the college offers. I am proud to say that I feel honored as a student to be working at LCCC because it gives me the wonderful opportunity to become more involved with the College, meet new people, and provides me a part-time job flexible around my class schedule. I am thankful to have a position as a Lab Aide with such friendly staff!

—Laura Bieber

Laura Bieber

David Lopez Escobales

My name is David Lopez Escobales and I am a lab assistant here in LCCC’s Engineering Department. I like my experience working as a student worker. I receive my instructions from my supervisor and I accomplish what needs to get done with little supervision (which I really like because that instills confidence in my ability to complete the task) and if I have questions Nada is always available to help. The work is good too. It gives me the opportunity to hone my skills in repairing equipment, learning new ways to test equipment, and organize the classrooms so that when students come to learn, materials are in order. —David Lopez Escobales

Jennifer Villa

Working in LCCC’s Rothrock Library Interlibrary Loan is a rewarding opportunity, for it helps conveniently assist the school and myself in securing my future. My responsibilities include both lending books from our collection to students in other schools as well as receiving books our staff or students request. This job made searching for books a lot easier and less overwhelming and allowed me to see the massive amount and variety of books LCCC’s collection contains, pieces to which are desired by not just districts in Pennsylvania, but schools all throughout the United States. Working at the Rothrock Library has given me the opportunity to meet wonderful people and gain the communication skills needed for advancement in careers to come all while helping the people of LCCC and other participating schools.

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For the love of animals The faculty at Lehigh Carbon Community College (LCCC) bring passion and years of experience to the classroom. And Lisa Martini-Johnson is no exception. Martini-Johnson, faculty and the assistant director of the veterinary technician program, has more than 20 years of experience in the field. “I am able to bring real-life examples to my students—everything from performing ophthalmic exams to cleaning hooves to reading blood smears and performing urinalysis,” she says. The Vet Tech program, which was first offered in 1997, is jointly run between LCCC and Northampton Community College (NCC). Martini-Johnson began working with the program in 1999.

Pursuing her passion When Martini-Johnson was in second grade, she visited her teacher’s farm, which had all kinds of animals including horses. She says she knew then that she needed to do something with animals. “As I got older, I became more passionate about it. I had my own horse and became competitive doing English jumping. I was very involved with the 4H organization,” she says. After high school, she decided then that she wanted to be a veterinary nurse. She became licensed as a Veterinary Technician, worked in practice and decided she wanted more. She received her Bachelor’s degree from Marywood University in Scranton and then her doctorate degree at Ross University, which is on the Caribbean Island of St. Kitts. Martini-Johnson’s final year of Vet School was taken at Oklahoma State University. She came back to Pennsylvania and worked at Wright Veterinary Medical Center in Bethlehem when she saw the ad for the faculty position here at the College. Having taught in the program since 1999, she enjoys seeing her students grow and blossom. “That is why I do this. I enjoy working with the students and helping to increase their hands-on and critical thinking skills—both important skills that they need to work in a clinic when they graduate,” she says. She also adds that Clinical Pathology is her favorite course to teach and she believes her love of the subject inspires her students. (Especially when they discover that she actually authored the chapter they study in the textbook.) All of the students work on actual animals where possible. The animals are loaned out from rescue groups (The Sanctuary and Lehigh County Humane Society) so the students are not working on animals that are actually owned by anyone. “It’s a win-win situation,” says Martini-Johnson. “We get four animals a week and we bathe and groom them, clean their ears, perform physical exams, remove mats if needed. We perform serology tests after drawing blood to check for Heartworm, Lyme, Ehrlichia in dogs and Feline Leukemia, Feline Immunodeficiency and Heartworm in cats.

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We vaccine for rabies and distemper if needed, then write a discharge paper that has all of the treatments and procedures we performed on that animal as well as the vaccines that were given. We then give that information back to the rescue group when we return that animal. That paperwork then goes to the person who eventually adopts the animal.”

“The Vet Tech program also has a partnership with the Lehigh Valley Zoo—we use their goats and their sheep—they are a little more wild than the ones from the rescue group,” she says. Pat Kline, a graduate of the Vet Tech program, works at the zoo as its only licensed vet tech ever since he graduated a few years ago and Martini-Johnson enjoys having her current students work with a graduate of the program.

Focus on Faculty

Lisa Martini-Johnson, LCCC faculty member and assistant director of the vet tech program, works with a student and explains a procedure in the vet tech program.

Expanding our reach In addition to teaching and serving as the assistant director for the Vet Tech program, she also serves as the advisor of the Veterinary Technician Club, which runs events and promotes awareness in the community. The Club gets involved with fundraising events such as ‘Paws in the Park,’ and ‘Walk for Life.’ Most of the dollars raised gets donated back to the rescue groups or used to purchase pet first aid evacuation kits for other charity event raffle prizes. An example of a donation by the Club was to cover vet bills for a woman whose house caught on fire and her cats got burned. The Club also makes donations to help animal organizations here and abroad including Heifer International or the American Veterinary Medical Foundation (AVMF) for animals that were abandoned after Hurricane Katrina and after 9-11.

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Outside of the classroom When Martini-Johnson is not teaching, she enjoys deep sea fishing, bottom fishing and vacationing back in St. Kitts, where she also met her husband, Morvin, in addition to attending college. She also loves to ride horses, knit and read—when she has the time! She lives in Whitehall with her husband, Morvin of 21 years and her cat, Cheetah. Yes, she only has one pet. “Cheetah won’t allow any other animals in the house,” she jokes. Martini-Johnson’s daughter, Mervisa, studied in the LCCC Honors program and is now studying business accounting at the University of Scranton. Since the Caribbean has played such an important role in her life—college, the birthplace of Mervisa, the place she met her husband and a favorite vacation spot, there is a mural on the steps painted by Martini-Johnson that depicts a beach scene (with real sand in it from St. Kitts!) with the palm trees and mountains in the background as well as the catamaran, Spirit of St. Kitts. Morvin owned and operated the Spirit of St. Kitts, while living there. Martini-Johnson’s philosophy on life stems from what she learned about living in St. Kitts. One thing she learned about living out in St. Kitts, was not to take things for granted. When she was there, she grew her own garden because the fruit or vegetable boat might not come that week, she says. “Now I live each day to the fullest because you don’t know what the next day might bring. I try to be more

Aspire Spring | Summer 2011

respectful and give back to people because there is always someone who is worse off than you,” she says. And when she can make an animal’s day a little brighter, she does that too.

Lisa Martini-Johnson,

“The biggest win-win in my eyes is the TLC we give to the animals. You never know whether or not they have been abused. Many of the animals are head shy, with their tail between their legs, so I always stress to the students that we need to show the animals a lot of care, love and attention. The animals are with the LCCC/NCC students for a day and a half and when they go back to the shelter, they seem really happy, wagging their tails,” she says. |

St. Kitts where she met

assistant professor of the vet tech program, is pictured in front of the mural she painted using real sand from her husband, Morvin.

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From oil and gas exploration to taking care of others

Alumni Profile

Sometimes a complete 180 is what people need to find their true passion. This was the case for Maureen Miletics who ultimately found her passion in caring for others, but it took leaving a career she knew in geology to do so. “I suddenly found myself as a single mother with three very young children— they were 3, 5 and 6 at the time. I had a bachelor’s degree in geology and my experience was in oil and gas exploration,” Miletics recalls. “I had to make a decision to either go out and get a job and not be able to support my family adequately, or I could train in a new profession that I could get trained for quickly.” “Going to LCCC changed my life. I love what I do right now and if I hadn’t received my RN at LCCC, I wouldn’t be where I am today without going through that experience,” she says. “So while this was totally different than what I was used to, and a very stressful time in my life, it was worth it knowing that I have the career I have today.”

Making the transition Miletics remembers when she first called LCCC and was surprised by the opportunities—starting at LCCC and then transferring to another college to complete a bachelor’s degree. She graduated from LCCC’s program in 1996, and subsequently pursued her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Cedar Crest College and her master’s degree in healthcare administration from King’s College. The program at LCCC prepared her well for the healthcare world, she recalls. “I felt when I had finished my studies at LCCC, I was better prepared to work in a practical situation than many other people who already had a bachelor’s degree.” In addition to numerous opportunities within healthcare, Miletics’ education, which all started with LCCC, helped her transition through many facets including homecare, the operating room and case management. She worked in bariatric surgery and was integrally involved in the development of a program, and served as the director of the bariatric surgery program at Sacred Heart Hospital. Currently, she serves as the director of bariatric services at St Luke’s Hospital.

After completing her RN degree at LCCC, Maureen Miletics felt she was better prepared to work in a practical situation than many other people who already had a bachelor’s degree.

A valued education Miletics speaks very fondly of her education and says it plays a prominent role in her family values. All of her children and stepchildren are either in college or have graduated college, with one common denominator—LCCC. “All our children have experienced LCCC—ranging from one or two summer classes to the first two years of their degree at LCCC,” she says. “My family has always been supportive and education is important to us.” And now that her children are off at college or graduated, Miletics has a little more free time for a few other passions like spending time with Rene, her husband of 14 years. She and her husband enjoy biking, kayaking, reading and going out to eat. |

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Alumni News LCCC Alumni Association Board of Directors Megan Billowitch (‘94) Shannon Ciamacco (‘94) Betty George (‘73) Susan Heller (‘03 and ‘07) Dallas Holtzer (‘73) Linda Krisko (’80) | Treasurer Fabian Moriah (’05) | Secretary Heather Mullen (‘06) | Vice President Christina Schoemaker (‘99) | President 2010 Juan Cheverez of Allentown, PA is a Technical Support Specialist at Synchronoss Technologies. 2009 Tara Anthony of Allentown, PA is a Clerical Tech at the County of Lehigh, Office of the Public Defender. Jonathan Haydt of Macungie, PA is a Registered Nurse with Lehigh Valley Health Network. 2008 Debra (Kelhart) Mynar of Center Valley, PA is an Administrator at ISP Office Solutions. Eric Smith of Schnecksville, PA is a Radio Technician with Transcore. 2007 Christopher Moakley of Coplay, PA is a Personnel Analyst with the County of Northampton. Robert Aaron Woodruff of Coopersburg, PA works as a Product Engineer at Stanley Vidmar. Gretchen (Roesler) Yerger of Slatington, PA is in Customer Service Account Management with Cherry Brothers Cherrydale Farms. 2006 Gene Gross of Allentown, PA is an E.C.M. Supervisor/Clinical Technician at M.I. Products/World Wide Turbine/Keenan House. 2005 Kortney Clause of Lehighton, PA is the Career Services Secretary at LCCC. Roland OCampo of Lehigh Acres, FL works as a Protection Specialist at Target. 2004 Emily Forte of Bloomsburg, PA is an Area Coordinator. 2003 Harry German of Bluffton, SC is a Police Sergeant with the City of Hardeeville Police Department.

Calling all LCCC Alumni: Contribute to Alumni News If you’d like to list an announcement in Alumni News, suggest a story for Aspire, or mentor an LCCC student, simply visit www.lccc.edu/alumni. If you would like to help LCCC be greener, please send an email to marketing@lccc.edu, asking to receive a pdf version of Aspire instead of a printed version. Please include your name, address and email in your message. Thank you!

2002 Erin (Cooney) Fenstermacher of Lyon Station, PA is a Donor Relations Manager at Muhlenberg College. Rachel Doherty of Allentown, PA works at Kraft Foods. 2001 Tyson Frantz of Boston, MA is a Principal/Graphic Designer with Tyson Frantz Design. 1996 Dr. Michael Hartman of Jim Thorpe, PA works as a Nurse Anesthetist at Lehigh Valley Anesthesia Services and Lehigh Valley Health Network.

Aspire Spring | Summer 2011

1987 Michelle (Kunkle) Stermer of Summit Hill, PA is a Registrar at Blue Mountain Health Systems – Gnaden Huetten Campus. 1985 Andrew Brusko of Whitehall, PA is a Systems Analyst with Crayola, LLC. Peggy (Koch) Stroup of Palmerton, PA is a Director of Quality Management at Lehigh Valley Home Health Services. 1974 Elaine (Heilman) Toth of Orefield, PA is a Physical Therapist Assistant at Genesis Rehab.

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LCCC Events + Community Leadership Tribute to long-term friend of LCCC The Lehigh Carbon Community College Foundation continues to be blessed by the community and its generous friends. John “Sonny” Kovatch, who founded Kovatch Corporation and KME Fire Apparatus in Nesquehoning was one of those generous friends. A lifelong resident of Nesquehoning, Kovatch passed away in January of this year. Referred to as a “pillar of the community” by many, Kovatch was instrumental in providing the land for Lehigh Carbon Community College’s Carbon campus. In 1946, Kovatch opened a small auto repair shop, which ultimately grew into the Kovatch Mobile Equipment Corp. The partnership, which included Kovatch’s brother, Joseph, began as a one-care auto repair shop and expanded to include auto and truck dealerships, and eventually a manufacturer of fire engines and other specialty vehicles. The company, which currently employs more than 750 employees, now includes divisions for police cars, fuel trucks and commercial and municipal vehicles, as well. “My father was a true American success story,” says John J. Kovatch III, president and chief executive officer of the Kovatch Organization. “He loved what he did and had a passion to build a legacy that will continue to positively affect our lives for generations to come.” Kovatch’s daughter, Kathy Kovatch Reaman, serves as the vice chair and secretary of LCCC’s Foundation board. |

Clay Shoot is a success On April 29th, LCCC held its 8th annual Foundation and Alumni Scholarship Clay Shoot at Lehigh Valley Sporting Clays. Six of the College’s students volunteered at some of the stands, mixing and mingling with some of our sponsors. Thanks to everyone who made this event a success! |

Photo: Justin Brosious

LCCC 2011–2012 Foundation Board of Directors Ann Bieber | Vice Secretary | Institutional Appointee, Vice President, LCCC Lee Bond, Ashland Technologies Tony Boyle, Boyle Construction John T. Cathers Jr. | Treasurer | Chair of Finance Committee & Compliance Officer, FCFCU Jan Creedon, County of Lehigh Annabelle B. Creveling, LCCC Trustee Bernard Durant, Durant Ent. (retired) Maria Esposito, Saucon Valley Country Club Robin Flores, Allentown Symphony Association Kathy Frazier, PPL Ronald Glass, Administrator Emeritus Andre Green, Verizon Inc. Christopher Jordan, Northstar Youth Services Richard Kern, Wachovia Bank Kathy Kovatch Reaman | Vice Chairperson & Secretary | Kovatch Corporation Buddy Lesavoy, Esq., Lesavoy, Butz and Seitz, LLC David Lobach, Embassy Bank Ellen Millard-Kern | Chairperson | Office of Sen. Patrick M. Browne Ron Neimeyer, Altronics Inc. Kent C. Newhart, Accounting and Tax Associates Inc. Thomas Oleksa | Vice Treasurer | Liberty Savings Bank, FSB Yvette Palmer, CFO & Stuff LLC Roger C. Reis, Lower Macungie Twsp. Commissioner Dale Roth, Architect Christina Schoemaker, Lehigh Valley Health Network Betty Smith, Trexler-Haines, Inc. Willard Snyder, New Tripoli Bancorp Mark Thompson, MKSD LLC LCCC 2011–2012 Board of Trustees Joseph A. Alban, Whitehall-Coplay Robert M. Cohen, Parkland Annabelle B. Creveling, Allentown Mathias J. Green Jr., Northern Lehigh David R. Hunsicker, Northwestern Lehigh Matthew T. Korp, Catasauqua Audrey L. Larvey | Chair | Palmerton Thomas F. Mantz | Secretary | Salisbury Kenneth H. Mohr Jr. | Vice Chair | Southern Lehigh William Santore Jr., Panther Valley Randall L. Smith, Jim Thorpe Larry E. Stern, Lehighton Ann L. Thompson | Treasurer | East Penn Michael J. Torbert, Trustee at Large Joseph C. Volk, Trustee at Large Jerome B. Frank, Esquire, Solicitor

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Nonprofit Organization U.S. POSTAGE PAID Lehigh Valley, PA Permit No. 116

4525 Education Park Drive Schnecksville, PA 18078

Alumni Association Aspire to Care Event On Saturday, April 16, 2011, the Alumni Association was hard at work cleaning the kitchen and painting cabins at Camp Fowler, preparing them for upcoming summer camps. Special thanks to the following individuals for helping— Christina & Chris Schoemaker, Deb Hock, Heather & Bill Mullen, Michelle Mitchell and her son Josh, Donna Williams and Dallas Holtzer. Camp Fowler is a therapeutic adventure camp, nestled in Orefield, PA. At the camp, children from the Lehigh Valley and all of eastern Pennsylvania are able to experience the benefits of the camping experience that might not otherwise be available to them. Camp Fowler is a place to heal, a place to learn, a place to grow. This state-of-the-art therapeutic adventure camp is nestled on the banks of the Jordan Creek. The 43-acre Camp Fowler includes seven cabins that can accommodate more than 150 young people overnight, with complete handicapped accessible bath and shower facilities for boys and girls. If you would like to learn more about Camp Fowler please visit its website at www.valleyyouthhouse.org/CampFowler. | Photos: Justin Brosious

top The LCCC Alumni Association recently helped Camp Fowler, located in Orefield, PA, get ready for its upcoming season through an Aspire to Care event. bottom Michelle Mitchell and her son Josh.

For more information on the Alumni Association and the “Aspire to Care” program, please contact Jane Wilchak at alumni@lccc.edu.

If you would like to help LCCC be greener, please send an email to marketing@lccc.edu, asking to receive a pdf version of Aspire instead of a printed version. Please include your name, address and email in your message. Thank you!

Aspire Spring/Summer 2011  

Aspire magazine for Lehigh Carbon Community College

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