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MOON BARBARA, CONTINUED FROM PG. 13

with gender or fucking with gender is a really important part of drag.” The name of moon baby’s latest EP is rooted in Perry’s early days of drag, a nickname drag sister bestowed upon them. “Drag queens give each other nicknames, which is funny because your drag name is a nickname. When I started doing drag, my drag sister Cherry Bomb used to call me Moon Barbara,” explains Perry. “I’m always working on creating these mythologies to moon baby, and I had this idea that maybe she isn’t an alien, but a nerdy girl who falls in love with Neil Armstrong and went to the moon, so he found her there, and when she came back to Earth, [she] started calling herself Moon Barbara.” Here on Earth, moon baby’s socialmedia posts aren’t stiff and formal like most official band PR. Instead, it feels like she’s addressing her dearest friends. “I do feel like this is how it is, and I want it to feel like [moon baby] is just somebody’s friend. Even at the [release] party, I was going up to everyone and thanking them all for coming. I want moon to be that lowkey party chick that happens to make music. And I think that’s what I want her to come across as, and I think that’s what I need her to be for me personally.” Now that Barbara has been released into the world, Perry plans to try out some new skills. “I really enjoy working with Wise Blood, and [production] is very much my language now. But he came to the release party where I played with some live musicians, and he was very invigorated by that. I love the improvisational style of performing with musicians, so I think I want to learn to work with live things,” says Perry. Perry’s vision for moon baby is not one of fame, but Perry is still ambitious. As Ms. Club Pittsburgh, moon baby co-hosts a monthly party under the project Hated Inc., with her best friend, Josh Bondi, and Perry would like to curate more events featuring queer talent from Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C. and Pittsburgh. “It’s pretty obvious that the performers who live [in Pittsburgh], if we lived anywhere else, we would be more successful, and that’s hard. But it’s nice to have free reign and do whatever you want.” “And the rent’s low,” Perry adds with a laugh. Ultimately, the entire project is about having fun with drag and pushing personal creative boundaries. “There’s this certain kind of drag culture centered around Instagram fame and all these things, and I don’t need to be a Myspace star — I never was a Myspace star. I’m not going to audition for [RuPaul’s] Drag Race. I do drag just because I love to, and it’s cool that my friends love it.” M E G FA I R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 02.07/02.14.2018

Feb. 7, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 6

Feb. 7, 2018 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 28 Issue 6