Page 1

LOOK FOR CITY PAPER ’S CITY GUIDE MAGAZINE ON STANDS THIS WEEK!

X PGHCITYPAPER XX XX PITTSBURGHCITYPAPER XX XX PGHCITYPAPER

WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 07.15/07.22.2015


2

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015


He was controversial and subversive. Notoriously clever. Cleverly notorious. In drawing, painting, sculpture, performance, fashion, photography, film, theater, music and publishing, Andy Warhol transformed our image

EVENTS 7.27-7.31 – 9am-1pm SUMMER CAMPS AT THE WARHOL Ultra Violet Pop – Ages 8-10 Presented in connection with Year of the Family.

of art by revolutionizing the way art is imagined. He killed it. He resurrected it...magically, magnificently, beautifully. You like the method, but you LOVE the

8.1 – 10am HALF-PINT PRINTS Presented in connection with Year of the Family. Free with museum admission

8.6 – 1:30-5pm ANDY’S BIRTHDAY Birthday-themed art activities Free with museum admission

madness. The defiance. The courage to… 8.8 – 2pm JOSH & GAB Warhol theater Presented in connection with Year of the Family. Free with museum admission

8.15 – 2pm & 7pm SOUND SERIES: ANIME’BOP! ENSEMBLE The Warhol theater Tickets 2pm FREE; 7pm $15 / $10 student & senior

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

3


Simplify

YOUR RIDE. Visit

simple.portauthority.org and let ’s talk about a way to simplify your ride. If you complete the survey and qualify, you will be eligible to win a pair of Opus One tickets to a concert of your choice at Mr. Smalls Theatre, Club CafÊ or Brillobox. Winners will receive a follow up email from Opus One listing the upcoming concerts.

4

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015


{EDITORIAL}

07.15/07.22.2015

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Assistant Listings Editor ALEX GORDON Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns SHAWN COOKE, JESSICA HARDIN ZACCHIAUS MCKEE, MIKE SCHWARZ, AARON WARNICK

VOLUME 25 + ISSUE 28

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[NEWS] a lack of education; there’s 06 “There’s a narrative of victim-blaming.” — Point Park senior Ren Finkel on attitudes toward sexual violence on college campuses

[VIEWS] a lot of work to be done to 12 “There’s make sure that gas is a responsible citizen in Pennsylvania.” — New Penn Future CEO Larry Schweiger on Marcellus Shale fracking

[TASTE] like the Primanti’s sandwich of 16 “It’s Puerto Rico.” — Jamilka Borges, on the Swing Truck’s tripleta sandwich

[MUSIC]

expect all girl bands to sound the 20 “They same.” — Ladyfest Pittsburgh organizer

us, the minions began as 31 “Like single-cell organisms in the ocean and

STEEL CITY MEDIA GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2015 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

[ARTS] “When I got to know the characters, they didn’t seem to be the model minority.” — Robert Yune discusses his debut novel, Eighty Days of Sunlight

[LAST PAGE]

A CP photo intern spent the weekend snapping pictures of furries in action at Anthrocon 2015. Check out his photo essay and visit www.pghcitypaper.com for our online slideshow.

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS QUIRKS BY ROLAND SWEET 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 47 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 48 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 53 +

Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{PUBLISHER}

evolved into land-dwellers.” — Al Hoff reviews Minions

N E W S

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

Business Manager LAURA ANTONIO Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN]

55

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives DRA ANDERSON, MATT HAHN, JEFF HRAPLA, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MELISSA METZ Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

{ADMINISTRATION}

Athena Kazuhiro on male-dominated music festivals

34

{ADVERTISING}

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

5 $2 Lite Bottles Lite Drafts $2 Show us Your .50

ALL DAY SATURDAY

.50

Summer!

+

Lite Pitchers ALL DAY EVERY DAY

$

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

EVERY MONDAY & WEDNESDAY TTweett @MillerLite @Mill Lit & @M2Thi @M2Thirdd #ItsMillertime #PittsburghEntry for chance to win daily prizes E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

5


“IT’S EVERYONE’S PROBLEM. EVERYONE HAS TO BE PART OF THE SOLUTION.”

THIS WEEK

ONLINE

www.pghcitypaper.com

Violence Against Women Act The Campus SaVE Act, a new provision under the Violence Against Women Act, now requires universities to establish clearer sexual violence politics. See a timeline of the Violence Against Women Act on our website. Read our news feature at right. www.pghcitypaper.com

SAFER SPACE

New law makes reporting, preventing sexual violence a top priority on college campuses {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

Did you miss the furry invasion this weekend? Or, just want to relive this year’s Anthrocon? Check out our photo slideshow from this year’s event at www.pghcitypaper.com.

CITY PAPER

INTERACTIVE

This week’s #CPReaderArt Instagrammer is @linds_c_hill with a shot of people cooling down on the North Side’s water steps. Tag your Instagram photos of the city and surrounding area as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you!

Download our free app for a chance to win tickets to Hozier at Stage AE on July 28. Contest ends July 16. 6

P

OINT PARK University senior Ren Finkel is pretty active in her school. She can tell you how much tuition has increased over the past four decades. She’s participated in the university’s chapter of Habitat for Humanity. And she’s a member of the university’s Student Solidarity activist organization. But if Finkel or a friend were to be sexually assaulted tomorrow, she wouldn’t know how to report it, or where to turn for support on campus. “I wouldn’t know,” says Finkel. “I’d have a few ideas. I know a few guidance counselors. I know the campus police’s number, but I wouldn’t really know where to get help. And if I don’t know, it worries me.” Point Park is one of two Pittsburgh universities being investigated by the U.S. Department of Education for their past handling of sexual-assault cases. For the first time, in 2014, in an effort to increase transparency and awareness, the department released a list of the schools being investigated for Title IX violations. Carnegie Mellon University is also on the list. The more than 100 schools currently being examined across the country have been accused of failing to fairly investigate and arbitrate cases of sexual violence. But a new law should prevent future mishandling of such cases, in time for stu-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

{PHOTO BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

Point Park senior Ren Finkel

dents returning to school in the fall. The federal Campus Sexual Violence Elimination (SaVE) Act, that went into effect July 1, requires colleges and universities to revamp policies dealing with sexual violence. “The Campus SaVE Act makes a huge leap forward in protecting college communities and providing resources for victims of domestic or dating violence, sexual assault and stalking,” says U.S. Sen. Bob Casey (D-

Pa.), who spoke to reporters during a July 1 conference call on the bill. “When students start, or return to, college in the fall, they will benefit from new prevention programs designed to reduce sexual abuse and dating violence, and will have new protections under the law.” Local victim-advocacy organizations have supported and championed the law. And local university administrators say CONTINUES ON PG. 08


Your Vape and Elite Glass Supplier

25% OFHF

WIT THIS AD GLAS GL ASS AS S WO WORL RLD RL D CE CENT NTER NT ER

2010 MURRAY AVE. • SQUIRREL HILL • 412-421-1848

JUICES VAPORIZERS MODS VAPING KONG, VIVA & MORE

WORRIED ABOUT WHAT YOU EAT? HOW ABOUT YOUR BODY IMAGE? EXERCISING TOO MUCH?

New Book! NEW GAMES! L Lauren LLazar Stern S St MA, ATR-BC, LPC

Specialist in Eating Disorders Trauma and EMDR Certified 311 South Craig Street | 412.361.8040 laurenlazarstern@gmail.com LAURENLAZARSTERN.COM

CRAPS PAI GOW POKER

MINI BACCARAT

NOW ACCEPTING MOST MAJOR HEALTH INSURANCE & STUDENT HEALTH PLANS

NOW EVERY DAY 1PM – 2PM

Cavacini Garden Center

PIT 7 (PARTY PIT)

BIG SALE NOW!

Ask about receiving $ 5 MATCH PLAY for learning each game!

• ANNUALS • PATIO POTS • • SHRUBS • PERENNIALS • • HANGING BASKETS • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE 100 51st STREET • L AWRENCE VILLE • 4126872010 Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15212 RIVERSCASINO.COM DOWNLOAD OUR APP RIVERSCASINO.COM/PITTSBURGH/APP

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. Must be 21 years or older to be on Rivers Casino property. Complete set of rules available at the Rush Rewards Players Club.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

7


SAFER SPACE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

much of what’s required under the new regulations is already in place. But some students, primarily at schools on the list of those being investigated, are reserving judgment until they see for themselves the legislation’s impact on campus sexual violence. “I want to give the university a chance to stand by its students, but I really think it’s something we’re going to be keeping an eye on,” says Finkel. “It’s such a direct threat.” The new rules were included in the March 2013 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, as part of the Clery Act, which requires higher-education institutions to disclose information about crime on and near campus, at the time it occurs, and as part of an annual security report. Under the Campus SaVE Act, each institution is required to document annually its awareness-and-prevention program for domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking, as well as the procedures it follows when these crimes occur. Schools must also explain to students, in writing, what their rights are anytime a student reports sexual violence. This should include the victim’s right to notify law enforcement, receive help from the school in reporting, and seek a protective order. “Full implementation of the Campus

SaVE Act is a big step toward the goal of protecting every student,” says Casey, who co-authored the legislation. Institutions must also teach bystander education, which is a prevention strategy that focuses on teaching male and female students that they have a responsibility to prevent sexual assaults and how to do this. Noncompliance can result in fines up to $35,000 per violation and loss of eligibility for federal student-aid programs. “We know that the fight to eliminate campus sexual assault will not end overnight, and it won’t end with these changes,” says Casey. “But this is telling the whole community [that] this is your problem. It’s everyone’s problem. Everyone has to be part of the solution.” The prevention and education aspects of the new regulations are what Finkel says are especially important. “A lot of instances of rape and sexual assault are not someone being pulled off the street by a stranger,” says Finkel. “I’m hoping that’s part of this whole education thing.” Finkel said Point Park currently has a few presentations for students that focus on sexual assault. But she’d like to see more

education on consent. It’s a topic, she says, which was largely absent from the sex education she received growing up. “There’s a lack of education; there’s a narrative of victim-blaming,” says Finkel. “The good thing about dealing with it at college is if it starts here, then for the rest of their life, they know what’s right and what’s wrong. This is really the cornerstone of having bettereducated adults.” But she’s also hoping to see more information provided so students know where they can go during a crisis, and that the people they turn to, who may be faculty and staff members, have more training so that they can provide appropriate responses and aid. “You hear so many horror stories about people reporting. There’s a culture of being afraid to report, because they’ve heard a million stories of people not caring,” says Finkel. Point Park administrators say the university has been doing a lot of the work required in the legislation already. “Point Park is very lucky that the senior leadership took it very seriously and started putting stuff in place a few years back,” says Elizabeth Rosemeyer, assistant director of Title IX compliance for Point Park. “So when the deadline rolled around, we were already prepared.” Rosemeyer says the university has started documenting more of the prevention programming that was already happening and looking for ways they “could beef that up.” “Any good program is done in multiple mediums. It’s not a one-shot, it’s done

“THERE’S A CULTURE OF BEING AFRAID TO REPORT.”

THE FACTORY DIGITAL FILMMAKING PROGRAM

DEC.EDU OUR STUDENT WORK SPEAKS FOR ITSELF: www.decshorts.com For more information about graduation rates, median debt of students who completed the programs, and consumer information, please visit: www.dec.edu/df

throughout the year,” says Rosemeyer. “Our incoming freshmen participate in an online training before they even arrive on campus. And once they’re here, they participate in a variety of programs. And then, we have a number of activities throughout the year where people learn about bystander intervention, consent.” Point Park officials aren’t allowed to comment on the current investigation. They also wouldn’t say whether they had to change current policies and procedures to meet the new requirements. “I think we’re confident that every student here is aware of the resources available to them,” says Point Park spokesperson Louis Casaro. “We don’t have any concerns that our students don’t have access to the resources they need.” Officials at Carnegie Mellon responded similarly. “Carnegie Mellon University is committed to promoting a safe and secure environment for all members of our university community,” CMU spokesperson Abby Simmons said in a statement to City Paper. “For many years, we have had policies, procedures and training in place to prevent and address dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking. We continue to review and adjust our policies, procedures and training to make them more effective and ensure compliance with new guidance and regulations, including those set forth in the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act.” But to some students at Point Park and CMU, the ongoing investigations at their schools are a signal that university administrators aren’t doing an adequate job of handling sexual violence on campus. “So many schools, Point Park included, want to sweep under the rug anything that

REGISTER TODAY! Julia Cooper | Photo by Archie Carpenter

Classes Begin September 8 ‡ Ages 3-18

Students at Pittsburgh CLO Academy can choose from tap, ballet, hip hop, musical theater, voice, acting, piano & more!

NEW CLASSES INCLUDE: Acting for TV & Film · Directing · Dance Composition

With This Ad (Excludes Live Stock) Expires 8/31/15

FULL SERVICE Pet Store 8 CO CONVENIENT O NVENIENT T LO LOCATIONS! O CA ATIO O NS S!

TOTALPETSTORES.COM 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

pittsburghCLO.org · 412-281-2234

PERFORM LIVE ON STAGE! · 2015/2016 CLO Academy Productions: Ages 12-18

Rehearses Mon-Thu eve. & Sat Aug 24 - Sept 20 Performs on September 19 & 20

Ages 7-18 © Disney

Pittsburgh’’s ONLY 20% Off Pittsburgh Purchase Locally Owned

Rehearses on Saturdays Jan 23 - Mar 19 Performs on March 19


can’t go in to a promotional pamphlet,” says Finkel. “If they deal with cases and report them, there’s accountability.” “It makes me pretty embarrassed for my school, and more importantly, worried for the victims involved,” says CMU graduate student Marjorie Carlson. “The school definitely needs to do more.” Carlson is encouraged by the newly enacted legislation and agrees that the education and prevention aspects of the requirements could have the most impact. And like Finkel, she hopes the education will be more than what has been traditionally offered. “It seems like it can only be a good thing to have more education,” says Carlson. “There’s a lot of potential for doing education aimed at men, and I don’t want it to be just a women-be-morefearful campaign.” According to Kristen Houser, chief publicaffairs officer for Pennsylvania Action Against Rape and one of the Campus SaVE Act’s supporters, the new requirements will be about educating administrators, faculty and staff as well. “Sexual assault is a vastly misunderstood issue,” says Houser. “You have people

making decisions who may not be making them with full information. [This law is] much more inclusive of the spectrum and array of crimes and all of the people who can be victimized.” Some facets of the law include an expanded definition of sexual assault, which now includes same-sex assaults. Houser says it also provides “much more stringent guidance, so there’s less room for individual administrators to make judgment calls,” based on personal experiences and opinions. But Houser says sometimes addressing sexual violence isn’t just up to local universities. And for that reason, she says these new regulations won’t completely fix the problems still present. “If you have a campus that is aggressive and appropriate in responding to sexual-assault cases in a community where a prosecutor isn’t willing to bring charges if the case involves parties who knew each other, and/or alcohol and drugs were involved, and/or there are no indicators of gratuitous violence, there is a problem,” says Houser. “Universities are not the only entities who must work to end sexual violence on campus.” RNUTTAL L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

JENSORENSEN

Over 500 Cigar Brands to choose from! Lots of accessories to match any budget!

COLLIER TOWN SQUARE 1597 Washington Pike Bridgeville, PA (next to Bottleshop Café) 412-276-1118

smokecigarshop.com

facebook.com/smokecigarshop @smokecigarshop @smokecigarshop #FineButtsandHotAshes #SmokeYourAshOff

Visit our table at the Pittsburgh Beerfest! N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

9


REST ASSURED?

Council proposal would force city businesses to provide paid sick days {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} MARY JO HEIDKAMP has been a cashier

presents

PET of the

WEEK

Tink Tink is a very sweet cat. She gets along quite well with other cats and has lived with other cats in her previous homes. Her previous owners have said that she can be a bit shy at first, but once she warms to you, she will happily spend an evening in your lap, watching TV or helping you read the daily newspaper. We also heard that she enjoys licking ice cubes as a treat! (A lady has to keep cool in this hot, summer weather!) Stop in to see this lovely lady today and grant her wish of a forever home.

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

www.dayauto.com 10

for nearly two decades. Just after the New Year, she got bronchitis and missed three days of work. “I did have a doctor’s excuse, but I still didn’t get paid for those three days,” says Heidkamp, who’s been working at a Brighton Heights grocery store since 2004. She says she didn’t feel better on the fourth day, “but I went in anyway.” “That really affected me, I was short a couple days in the paycheck,” says Heidkamp, who works between 35-40 hours per week at $11.65 an hour. “I own a home, and I pay bills and taxes. Losing days of work without pay just doesn’t cut it for me on the little bit I make.” A bill introduced by Pittsburgh City Council last week would potentially give people like Heidkamp, who has been advocating for the measure, up to nine days of accrued sick time. Similar legislation passed in Philadelphia earlier this year. However, trade groups and associations representing small businesses say that good companies already offer sick time and that a onesize-fits-all law would be costly to business owners and difficult to navigate on a city-by-city basis. “ E mp l oye r s s h o u l d take care of their employees. If an employer doesn’t, people should go to work for someone who’s going to take care of them,” says Jeff Cohen, chairman of the Pennsylvania Restaurant and Lodging Association. In the city’s bill, at companies with 15 or more employees, workers would accrue one hour of sick time for every 30 hours worked, capped at 72 hours, or nine days. At companies with fewer than 15 employees, sick time would be capped at 40 hours, or five days. Accrual of sick time wouldn’t go into effect until 90 days after a worker’s hire date, and a doctor’s note would be required for three consecutive days missed. “It’s for all workers [in the city], but there’s a lot of people who already have this [paid sick time],” says City Councilor Corey O’Connor, who introduced the bill last week. “So really [we’re] trying to fight for people that don’t. … Most service employees do not.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

Because of a 2009 Pennsylvania Supreme Court case that decided that a city could not regulate the affairs of private businesses, O’Connor is approaching the legislation from a publichealth perspective. “You don’t want an employee coming in and infecting others,” O’Connor says. O’Connor and supporters cite a 2013 UPMC study that concludes that “universal access to paid sick days would reduce flu cases” by 6 percent or more. Tony Helfer, president of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 23, which represents 1,500 workers within city limits, including Heidkamp, says that even if workers left one job for another with better sick-time policies, the public-health problem still wouldn’t be solved. “That problem remains,” he says. “You’re [the customer] standing at deli and asking for pound of lunch meat, and the [employee] is sneezing and wiping their nose on their arm. Is that what you want?” A Better Balance, a legal advocacy organization in New York, advised on Pittsburgh’s legislation and has done so in several places, including San Francisco and Connecticut. “The most important thing in terms of Pittsburgh’s power to do this is public health,” says Sherry Leiwant, co-president of A Better Balance. Leiwant says studies show that businesses in San Francisco and Connecticut have adapted to the laws. According to a 2008 analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy and Research, one year after the law’s implementation, job growth in San Francisco was unaffected. Also, the city reported that both the Chamber of Commerce and the Golden Gate Restaurant Association reported receiving very few employer complaints or concerns regarding the ordinance. But organizations representing area businesses aren’t buying it. “Let’s assume you have 20 people in your company and you give them all nine days per year based on this legislation,” Cohen says. “That’s 72 hours per employee; that’s 1,440 hours. Let’s say each person made $12 an hour; that

“PEOPLE HAVE FAMILIES TO SUPPORT, PEOPLE HAVE MORTGAGES. ALL OF THAT DOESN’T STOP ’CAUSE YOU’RE SICK A WEEK.”

could cost a small company between $25,000-30,000.” “How do you even monitor this thing?” Cohen asks. “They’re assuming people are coming to work sick. I don’t know how they assume that. If this was a state or federal mandate, we’d abide by it because everyone would be on same playing field.” The PA Chamber of Business and Industry cites two 2013 studies from the Washington, D.C.-based Employment Policies Institute, which surveyed nearly 200 employers in both Connecticut and Seattle. The studies found that overwhelmingly, employers said illness was not a serious issue in the workplace. While the Seattle study did not conclude whether the policy increased the cost of running a business, 47 percent of Connecticut employers reported taking actions to pay for the mandate, including raising consumer prices or cutting employee benefits. Several bills on the issue have been introduced on the state level. Senate Bill 333, which passed the senate and needs a house vote, would prevent any municipal paid-sick-time laws passed after January 2015. The two-page bill is in direct response to Philadelphia’s measure. “There’s two issues here. Whether we allow municipalities on their own to do what they want, [which] would be a very complicated environment to do business,” says state Sen. John Eichelberger, a Republican from Blair County. “And then the other debate [is] whether we should have mandatory paid-leave law on the books, and my belief is that the private sector works this out themselves.” Meanwhile, House Bill 624 would mandate accrued sick time across the state. “Don’t we wish that people who have a bad time at a job could just leave and get another one?” says state Rep. Maria Donatucci, a Philadelphia Democrat who introduced the bill. “People have families to support, people have mortgages, people are paying their kids’ tuitions, all of that doesn’t stop ’cause you’re sick a week.” Heidkamp agrees: “Why should I do that? I’m 56 years old. I like my job, but I think my company, or any company for that matter that works with food, could at least provide sick days.” A M U RRAY @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS

featuring John Elefante of Kansas!

Diana Krall

THURSDAY, JULY 23, 7:30 PM

THURSDAY NIGHT ICONS

Randy Newman

THURSDAY, JULY 30, 7:30 PM

Distant Worlds: music from FINAL FANTASY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 8:00 PM

Classical BBQ

Sponsored by BNY Mellon

SUNDAY, AUGUST 2, 6:30 PM MEDIA SPONSOR

INCLUDING A PERFORMANCE BY IN THE GRAND LOBBY AT 7 P.M.!

P I T T S B U R G H S Y M P H O N Y. O R G / S U M M E R N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

11


[GREEN LIGHT]

STATE OF CHANGE {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

2SHQVLQFH&HQWXU\,QQ KRXVHVQLQHRYHUQLJKWURRPV WKH0F&XQH6DORRQDQGILYH KLVWRULFGLQLQJURRPV2XU VHDVRQDOO\FKDQJLQJUXVWLF )UHQFKPHQXVIHDWXUHIUHVK DQGORFDOSURGXFH5HOD[LQWKH WDYHUQHQMR\GLQQHULQWKH RULJLQDONLWFKHQWDNHDVWHS EDFNLQWLPHDQGMRLQXVIRUDQ HYHQLQJRUMRLQXVIRUWKHQLJKW 

“Polish Hill, Sunset.�

#filter412 original iPhone art by City Paper photographer Heather Mull, published every Tuesday

&HQWXU\,QQ Š¤Œ|Œ§|¨¨¢¢ >@I@MT DGGy@IINTGQ<ID< RRR|>@IOPMTDII|>JH

pghcitypaper

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

Friday of JULY!

E H T F O Y DA DEAYD

PART3

$ Jager

Sponsored by

$

Festive face painting for the daring! JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

HE WAS BORN in whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s now McCandless, but even as the head for a decade of the National Wildlife Federation, Larry Schweiger still made his home less than two miles from where he grew up. Now, the nationally known environmentalist, author (Last Chance: Preserving Life on Earth) and former president and CEO of the Western Pennsylania Conservancy is again working in his home state: Last week he was named president and CEO of Citizenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for Pennsylvaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Future (Penn Future), one of the commonwealthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest green groups. Schweiger spoke with City Paper by phone about the role Pennsylvania can play in ďŹ ghting climate change.

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE IDENTIFIED WITH WILDLIFE CONSERVATION. WHAT WILL YOU FOCUS ON AT PENN FUTURE? The energy policies are going to be the trump card for all of the impacts that wildlife experience. The science of wildlife is becoming painfully clear: If we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change our energy practice, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to alter the context for all of nature, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to have an enormous impact on not only wildlife, but what happens to our world, to our children and our grandchildren. WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PENNSYLVANIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROLE? We have a long history of producing and emitting carbon. As such, Pennsylvania now needs to be a leader in the transformation thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s occurring, and needs to occur, toward clean energy. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a great challenge, and it includes everything from sustainable communities and green buildings [to] creating new energy sources; it includes changing public policies to encourage and incentivize clean energy. Right now the debate over putting a tax on natural gas is an important one. It really deďŹ nes whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna be driving our public policy. Is it the gas industry and its advertising blitz that shapes the fact that they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay taxes in Pennsylvania like they do in other major producing states? SOME ENVIRONMENTALISTS FAVOR A MORATORIUM ON FRACKING FOR NATURAL GAS. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been characterized by the industry as being anti-fracking, [but] I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m opposed to fracking done without the most careful standards. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of work to be done to make sure that gas is a responsible citizen in Pennsylvania and does in fact protect its neighbors.

Larry Schweiger, new head of Penn Future

WHAT ABOUT PENNSYLVANIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RESPONSE TO THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLEAN POWER PLAN, TO CUT CARBON EMISSIONS? Pennsylvania has an opportunity to be either a victim of change or a catalyst for change. I think the fact that the EPA rules really move the carbon debate back to the state level is both an opportunity and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a challenge. And I think Pennsylvania, of all the coal-producing states, has the best opportunity to come up with a plan to accomplish the targets that are required by EPA. WHYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THAT? If you look at the leadership thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce, and the leadership in the [state Department of Environmental Protection], we have some really well-informed and smart people who know how to solve problems. HOW SHOULD WE MOVE TOWARD CLEANER ENERGY? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really agnostic about the way we get this done. I just want to get it done. People debate, for example, do we want to have a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade? Do we want to have a portfolio standard, or do we want to do what the Germans have done [to incentivize development of renewable energy]? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m willing to entertain anything that will pass in the Pennsylvania legislature that will actually get the job done. HOW WOULD YOU SWAY A REPUBLICANDOMINATED LEGISLATURE? I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a matter of educating people on the fact that we are walking into a very dangerous future for our children. And helping those who care about the future, care about others, to get involved. And I think that crosses the political divide. In my view, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a matter of building those relationships and helping people understand that this is not a left-wing political agenda. This is about dealing with a serious threat that will grow even more alarming in the days ahead. D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


5166 Butler St. Lawrenceville

Rx Glasses • Sunglasses All frames $95 Contact Lenses • Doctor on site Chromos Cares give back program Hours: Mon-Thurs: 10am-7pm Fri-Sat: 10am-6pm Sun: 11am-4pm To schedule an exam call us at (412)-772-1473

HWY-28 HWY-65

HWY-380

I-279

STEUBEN ST

I-579 I-79

I-376

HWY-60

HWY-22

GREENTREE RD

HWY-837

WE HOST FIELD TRIPS, TIES FUNDRAISERS, BIRTHDAY PA!R & CORPORATE EVENTS

HWY-50

LIBERTY TUNNEL

I-376 HWY-885 HWY-121

FLIGHTTRAMPOLINEPARK.COM 1041 Washington Pike | Suite #200 | Bridgeville | 412-564-0560

LOCATED BEHIND BURTON’S TOTAL PETS AT CHARTIERS VALLEY SHOPPING CENTER. N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

13


NEWS QUIRKS {BY ROLAND SWEET}

+

CO M P IL E D FRO M M A IN S TRE A M N E W S S O U RCE S B Y R O L AN D S WE E T. AUT HE N T I C AT I ON O N D E M AND.

Police arrested gunman Christopher Trail for holding six people hostage at a pharmacy in Red Bay, Ala. He let five of them go but kept pharmacist Donna Weatherford, who said he forced her to supply him with drugs. After an hour, he asked for a recliner. Told there was none, he pulled some chairs together and dozed off. Weatherford picked up the shotgun and fled to safety. (AL.com)

hating the fact that people in wheelchairs are having great sex, better sex than a lot of people are having,” she explained. Fellow organizer Andrew Morrison-Gurza, 31, agreed, declaring, “A wheelchair can become just a big sex toy.” Palikarova noted the “Deliciously Disabled” sex night coincides with the Parapan Am Games and hoped some of the competitors will attend her event to unwind. (Toronto Sun)

+

+

Pizza-delivery driver Richard Dennany, 43, pleaded guilty to drunk driving in Murphysboro, Ill., after he delivered a pizza to the county courthouse while visibly intoxicated. He was found to be three times over the legal limit. (Illinois’s Carbondale Times)

+

When a tornado warning prompted ground crews at Oklahoma City’s Will Rogers World Airport to seek shelter underground, passengers on Delta Air Lines flights from Minneapolis and Salt Lake City were left stranded on the tarmac. Airport official Karen Carney blamed a miscommunication and insisted the passengers “were never in any imminent danger.” Ground crews returned after about 15 minutes to help passengers disembark. (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

+

Toronto has scheduled an accessible orgy for disabled people, with space for 20 wheelchairs, an interpreter for the deaf and free admission for caretakers. The Aug. 14 event is the brainchild of Stella Palikarova, 35, who is in a wheelchair because of spinal muscular atrophy, but declared nothing is wrong with her libido and is tired of people assuming there must be. “The naysayers are just subconsciously

After police arrested Luis A. Cruz, 46, on heroin-distribution charges in Springfield, Ill., his court-appointed attorney, Anna Levine, asked the judge to release her client on personal recognizance, pointing out his history of making court appearances for past offenses. Judge William Boyle responded by holding up a copy of the defendant’s arrest record in Florida, noting that it’s 52 pages long, and asked Levine to review it. She did but pointed out that none of the charges was for failing to appear for court hearings. “It’s a 52-page record for showing up,” she told the judge, who nevertheless set bail at $10,000. (Springfield’s The Republican)

+

Anna Goldshmidt and Elan Stratiyevsky demanded that New York’s Waldorf Astoria hotel return the money they paid for their wedding there or risk a lawsuit. The couple contends the hotel cut short the event because a guest at the reception accidentally fired a gun, grazing a woman in the head. Lawyer Benjamin Brafman said the couple is also considering suing the guest. A hotel official said the reception was canceled immediately after the shooting due to safety concerns. (Associated Press)

+

Gregory Reddick, 54, said he’s suing New York City for arresting him after he charged two tourists $400 for a ride on the landmark Staten Island Ferry. The ferry has been free since 1997. Reddick, who police said has “at least five aliases, six Social Security numbers” and a history of burglary and creditcard fraud convictions, acknowledged his rap sheet is real but insisted that selling tickets is legal and has turned his life around. “It’s better than McDonald’s money,” he said. “It’s better than Burger King money.” (New York Post and The Gothamist)

+

A Colorado judge ordered the parents of Aurora shooting victim Jessica Ghawi to pay $220,000 to the companies that sold ammo and body armor to gunman James Holmes. Sandy and Lonnie Phillips sued the four online businesses but lost. Under state law, plaintiffs who sue gun makers or dealers and lose have to pay the defendants’ legal fees. (The Huffington Post)

+

Russian authorities reported that a 21-year-old woman was in “serious condition” at Moscow’s Sklifosovsky hospital after she shot herself in the temple while posing for a selfie. Police said the victim was holding the 9 mm handgun and pulled the trigger instead of clicking the camera shutter. (Agence France-Presse)

+

Deputies arrested Kristin Howard, 31, for attacking her 50-year-old ar-old mother at her home in Bunnell, Fla., during ng an argument over who was entitled to a plate te of chicken and biscuits. Deputies reported Howard ward punched

THURSDAY, JULY 16

LOT 17 - BLOOMFIELD SMILING MOOSE - SOUTH SIDE MT. LEBANON SALOON - MT. LEBANON

SATURDAY, JULY 18

JR’S BEER WAREHOUSE - ROCHESTER Z PUB & DINER - BEAVER FALLS ZOOKY’S - NEW BRIGHTON

FOLLOW US AT: @MAGICHATLIVE2 #ROADREVELER 14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

her mother in the face and threw tea on her. (The Daytona Beach News-Journal)

+

Police arrested Orlando Thompson, 26, in Panama City, Fla., after they said he killed a co-worker at a seafood restaurant during an argument over the amount of spice to put in gumbo. The victim, Caleb Joshua Halley, had formerly portrayed the Florida State University mascot Osceola. (Tallahassee Democrat)

+

The Internal Revenue Service notified Bill Levin, founder of the First Church of Cannabis in Indianapolis, that it has recognized the church as a tax-exempt religious organization. More than 600 members have paid between $4.20 and $1,000 to join the church, whose mission, Levin said, is to “proselytize the wonderfulness of the gift that this plant is to our human nature.” (Newsweek)

+

The United States fell from 12th to 23rd in the Gallup-Healthways Global WellBeing Index. The survey of 145 countries takes into account what makes citizens of various countries feel accomplished and fulfilled. Panama leads the ranking for the second straight year, followed by Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Switzerland, Belize, Chile, Denmark, Guatemala, Austria and Mexico. Tunisia, Togo, Cameroon, Bhutan and Afghanistan are the least thriving countries. Although the United States dropped 11 positions, it remains ahead of Canada. (Healthways)

FRIDAY, JULY 17

THE CLUBHOUSE - GIBSONIA CRANBERRY SPORTS GRILLE - CRANBERRY FRONT DOOR TAVERN - BEAVER FALLS

SUNDAY, JULY 19

STAGE AE - NORTH SHORE BEFORE AND DURING THE GASLIGHT ANTHEM SHOW

FOLLOW THE VAN ! SPECIALS, PRIZES AND GIVEAWAYS


Would you like to Participate in a fertility study? Volunteering couples are needed to join a research study in Monroeville You may qualify if you and your partner are: • A monogamous, heterosexual couple • Between the ages of 20-45 years old • Sexually active • Trying to conceive or using a non-vaginal form of birth control You will receive compensation for your time and participation. The device is for home use, and has been cleared for OTC use by the FDA. You will be asked to use the device in the privacy of your home. It requires two physician examinations for female participants. Call 412-200-7996 to see if you qualify.

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

15


DE

SI

the

ON

THE MENU MARRIES CLASSIC FRENCH COOKING WITH MOLECULAR GASTRONOMY

SWING TIME

{BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

The team behind Bar Marco and Livermore has launched a new venture: Swing Truck, a food truck specializing in Puerto Rican cuisine. Headed by chef Jamilka Borges, a Puerto Rico native, the truck, located next to Bar Marco in the Strip District, opened at the end of May. Current specialties include beef and pork empanadillas (the pork variety are made with onions, pineapple and cilantro), ceviche (chopped fish) and mallorca (a sweet bread). “Puerto Rico has a lot of African influence and that comes through in the food,” says Borges. “To me, it’s comfort food at its best. It’s fun and the flavors are bold.” The menu also includes tripleta, in which steak, chicken, pork and garlic are layered between two slices of slightly sweet soft bread. “Tripleta is one of those things, where if you go to Puerto Rico, they’re selling them out of carts,” says Borges. “It’s like the Primanti’s sandwich of Puerto Rico.” In keeping with the Bar Marco/ Livermore team’s affinity for using fresh, seasonal ingredients, the changing menu will feature foods inspired by Puerto Rico, and not always the country’s traditional dishes. “Everything on the menu is authentic, but as the season changes, we want to use ingredients that are grown here,” says Borges. And come winter, Borges and co-owner Bobby Fry plan to take Swing Truck on a tour through the South, with the hope of setting up similar trucks in cities across the country. RNUTTALL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2216 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-471-1900

the

FEED

If it’s midsummer, it’s time to get prepped for

Steel City Big Pour, held Sept. 12. Tickets to the ninth-annuall local beer festival go on n sale at noon, Mon., July 27, and sell out quickly. Tickets are $80 (you get a glass, and d beer to go in it); big-spenders can snap up $125 tickets now w (includes T-shirt). Proceeds benefit Construction Junction: Do it for the beer; do it for the old windows that need new homes. www.constructionjunction.org

16

MARVELOUSLY

MODERN {BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

The Twisted Frenchman’s play on beets

H

OW FAST IS East Liberty gentrify-

ing? Just half a dozen years since the first notable restaurants clustered, hopefully, north of the intersection of Centre and Highland, they are already gone. Roaring revitalization is now reshaping the dining scene to serve the occupants of the many swank apartments currently under construction. One of these new, upscale restaurants is The Twisted Frenchman, a sort of hybrid between traditional continental fine dining and hip, modern minimalism. The interior is a picture of restrained elegance, with a cool, aqua-and-taupe color scheme and bouquets of dried flowers wrapped in dinner napkins and suspended above the tables, a quirky touch that matches the Frenchman’s approach to everything from food to service. Service, actually, was excellent — warm, attentive and informative. But we were not very far into the menu when we were somewhat chastened by the note, “Please listen to servers [sic] instruction on dish presentation.” This, we came to find, is because servers at The Twisted Frenchman are involved in far more than carrying plated food between

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

kitchen and table. The menu’s marriage of classic French cooking with molecular gastronomy means that dishes frequently require assembly, finishing or elaborate explanation at the table. Molecular gastronomy is the geekily technical, often showy use of new techniques like sous vide (cooking food wrapped in plastic in a warm water bath, then only finishing it over direct heat) and frequently borrows tricks of chemistry to explore the

THE TWISTED FRENCHMAN 128 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-361-1340 HOURS: Tue.-Thu. 5-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 5-10:30 p.m.; Sun. 5-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers $12-16; entrees $28-36 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED physical and flavor transformations in foods as they cook. Here, chef Andrew Garbarino brings molecular gastronomy to, if not Escoffier-style classical French cooking, at least recognizably traditional combinations of ingredients and flavors. So duck was braised in Bordeaux, sturgeon served with caviar, and celery root

combined with white bean in a soup. But there traditionalism ended. The soup bowl was served with streaks of creme fraiche and lobster foam in the bottom, half a fried soft-shell crab perched upright, and its edges were strewn with baby arugula and edible flowers. Into its well, the server poured the hot bean puree from a cruet at the table. To say there was a lot going on here would be an understatement, but it all harmonized. The purée was velvety and subtly earthy, tempering the intensely briny lobster foam and crispy, musky crab and, in turn, enriched by the soured cream. The tiny but potent leaves and petals brightened both the dish’s flavor and appearance. A risotto “tasting” was a subtler move, but each of the three rice preparations was a success, and the ensemble worked well, too. Grounding the dish was a vibrantly green pea risotto with perfect, creamy texture and pure pea flavor; chef Garbarino nailed it with possibly the best risotto we’ve ever had. Atop this bed was a single arancini (dubbed “mac and cheese”), its core of molten cheese infused with the smokiness of paper-thin slices of bacon, its exterior crisp but not greasy, doubling down on the creaminess of the risotto. Balanced on top


On the RoCKs

of this delectable sphere was a miniature rice-cake-like wafer of puffed garlic. Jason found it slightly bitter, but Angelique wanted to eat a bag of them, like potato chips. Piedmontese steak refers to a breed, not a style; Garbarino served half of a very thick strip with an array that included truffle butter, shoestring blue potatoes and demiglace. Steaks, especially cuts like strip, tend to dominate their plates, rendering other components bit players or sidemen, but here the bold flavor and textures of everything else on the plate played as equals to the meat.

Lamb-wrapped lamb seemed a conundrum, but our server patiently explained: Ground lamb is combined with ground pork to make a sort of paste, which is wrapped around a chop and cooked sous vide until medium rare. The lamb was accompanied by “concentrated” carrots and a brie-stuffed onion, and demiglace was poured on at the table. While the lamb was almost impossibly tender, we were underwhelmed by the firm, whole carrots, and the lightly flavored, fluffy, whipped onion stuffing was disappointingly unlike the rich creaminess and pungent flavor we were expecting from brie. A chocolate brownie for dessert was accompanied by wonderful orange sorbet, saturated with sweet-tart citrus flavor, and a spectacular presentation of chocolate mousse: a pitcher of liquid nitrogen, poured over the bowl at the table, caused the top layer to crater and freeze into, well, something that resembled an astronaut dessert. But the unfrozen mousse underneath was an earthly delight, as were most of the carefully constructed, expertly presented modernist morsels at The Twisted Frenchman. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

N E W S

+

Brunch With

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

EVERY SUNDAY

MEMBERS ONLY

Farm Fresh All Summer Long

“It’s meant to be a great social gathering spot.”

Corey Bardell flames his Mexican War Street cocktail. {PHOTO COURTESY OF ADAM DESIMONE}

Chef Andrew Garbarino prepares dessert with liquid nitrogen.

st Pittsburgh’sA BVeiew!

Inside Ten Penny and behind a sliding oak door, a stairway tiled in ivory white, draws you down into the comfortable quarters of The Penn Society, a new members-only bar and social club chartered in 2010. Adam DeSimone, a club officer, says that having a space had always been a goal. Mid-July marks the soft opening. “This is a pet project for us. It was never meant to be a nightclub or a highvolume bar. It’s meant to be a great social gathering spot.” To sip cocktails at the Italian marble bar, or lounge in leather couches atop the custom parquet floor, you must be referred by a current member or accompany one as a guest. Membership costs $250 a year. All members sign in with the doorman, flashing sleek but weighty black membership cards, highly (and intentionally?) reminiscent of the fabled, black-and-titanium Centurion Amex. Different classes of membership afford different privileges, but both members and non-members can rent the space for special events, with Ten Penny catering. Head bartender Corey Bardell has created a highly approachable but interesting cocktail program. The simple syrup is infused with lavender he grows on his porch. In homage to summer, for one cocktail he stewed organic cherries. Judging from his shelves and the menu, it’s clear he’s committed to providing a warm experience. Wine is served by bottle and from a tap system, and there is a modest but thoughtful selection of beers. Any bartender who can make Cheers jokes and nerd out about gin in the same breath will command the affection of patrons. Bardell and DeSimone both emphasize that membership in the Penn Society is for patrons of all kinds who like good conversation and cocktails, whether you’re a server just off a shift or a lawyer fresh from court. “It’s not based off salary or status,” says DeSimone.

10am to 2pm

1014 Fifth Avenue • 412-281-2583 (BLUE) www.pghuptown.com • www.facebook.com/UptownPgh

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Membership is limited. To apply, visit www.pennsociety.com.

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

17


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

AMEL’S. 435 McNeilly Road, Baldwin. 412-563-3466. This South Hills institution serves up a broad selection of Mediterranean favorites, from kabobs and pilafs to lemony salads, as well as staples of the American and Italian comfort cuisine. Amel’s atmosphere is lively with seating in the restaurant’s amusing and lavishly decorated warrens. KE

TACOS & CARIBBEAN FUSION

COME TO EAST LIBERTY TO TASTE THE NEW SPRING MENU. BRING THIS AD IN FOR 10% OFF AT EITHER LOCATION.

East Liberty

130 S. Highland Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412.362.7969

Beechview

2056 Broadway Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15216 412.344.4700

casarastapgh.com

Monday & Thursday $2 Yuengling 16oz Draft ____________________

Tuesday

1/2 Price Wine by the Bottle ____________________

ATRIA’S. Multiple locations. www.atrias.com. A local chain, Atria’s locations offer distinctly different atmospheres but the same quality steaks, chops and pasta menu. Suburban spots are for quiet casual dining while the North Side location is pure sports pub. Regardless of the ambience, the sherry crab bisque and the pasta fra diablo are superb. kE

Wednesday

Pork & Pounder $10 ____________________

Friday

Sangria $2.95 ____________________

Saturday & Sunday 10:30am-3pm

Brunch Specials & Bloody Mary Bar

----- HAPPY HOUR ----1/2 OFF SNACKS $2 OFF DRAFTS $5 WINE FEATURE

BADO’S CUCINA. 3825 Washington Road, Peters Township. 724-942-3904. The menu at this cozy venue is a focused exploration of authentic Italian cuisine: homemade pasta and sauces, pizza and, instead of full-on entrées, tapas-size portions of heartier fare such as lamb chops and spareribs. Almost everything is cooked in a 625-degree wood-fired oven in the open cucina. JF

Mon- Fri 4:30 – 6:30pm ____________________ 900 Western Ave. I NORTH SIDE

412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com

SOCIAL HOUR

Mon - Fri 5-7pm

40 Craft Beers w

ontap w

BRUNCH 10am-2pm Sat & SUN

Famous BBQ RiBS! Vegan &Veggie Specialties,too! Fresh oysters on a half shell Fresh Peel n Eat seasoned shrimp Crab and Avocado dip with crostini Cilantro and Jalapeño hummus with baguette slices. Fresh rustic bread grilled and seasoned, topped with fresh Burratta cheese. $5 Craft brews(27) • $6 Wines on tap(11) $7 Craft Cocktails 1908 CARSON STREET l SOUTHSIDE l 412-918-1215 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

18

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

24th & E. Carson St. in the South Side 412-390-1111 100 Adams Shoppes Mars/Cranberry 724-553-5212 DoubleWideGrill.com

Sirena Taco Joint and Bar {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} in spring), often combined with pork, but vegetables get a spotlight in dishes such as risotto with local mushrooms. LE DIVE BAR AND GRILLE. 5147 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-408-2015. The kitchen at this unpretentious venue is a sort of freewheeling laboratory for a “what if” approach to re-imagining classic bar fare: sliders, quesadillas, sandwiches, wraps, burgers, specialty burgers, entrees and “I Hate Vegetables” (meals built atop French fries). KE

BURGATORY. Multiple locations. www.burgatorybar.com. Nestled in an off-the-path corner of The Waterworks strip mall, Burgatory is in the running for best burgers in town. It starts with its own blend of ground sirloin, chuck, brisket and short rib, and buttery buns — then piles on the toppings. (There are prefab combinations and checklists for custom orders.) Add shakes, fries — or perhaps an extra-ordinary salad. JE CORNERSTONE. 301 Freeport Road, Aspinwall. 412-408-3258. The contemporary American fare at this warm and welcoming venue offers a creative take on a traditional menu. Every dish is served with a twist, but none — such as fancified mac-n-cheese, slowroasted brisket sliders, grilled lamb burger or pulled-pork nachos — is too twisted. KE CURE. 5336 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-252-2595. Charcuterie specialties are just part of the locally inspired menu at this rustic-chic Lawrenceville restaurant. A short menu offers seasonal specialties (wild onions

Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this finedining but casual establishment. There’s a well-curated selection of mostly grilled fish with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE NEW HOW LEE. 5888 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1888. It’s an oddly signed storefront restaurant, but this is Sichuan cuisine that rises above its peers with food that’s well cooked, expertly seasoned and fearlessly spicy. The less-typical entrees include cumin mutton, dan dan noodles, tea-smoked duck and Chendu fried dry hot chicken. JF PIACQUADIO’S. 300 Mount Lebanon Blvd., Mount Lebanon. 412-745-3663. There’s still pleasure to be had in oldfashioned breaded chicken and veal, served up at this classic Italian-American restaurant. Indulge in old-school comfort foods, such as manicotti (made with crepes) and beans and greens (with sausage), as well as chicken and pastas specials. KE

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

South Side Barbecue Company IMPRESSIONZ. 6008 Broad St., East Liberty. 412-362-7134. This family-run Jamaican restaurant specializes in island cuisine — and welcoming service. The menu offers the island specialty, jerk chicken, and a variety of fish preparations (including jerk), as well a few stews and curries. For a tender meat dish, don’t miss the well-prepared goat curry or the ox-tail stew. KF LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn

POINT BRUGGE CAFÉ. 401 Hastings St., Point Breeze. 412-441-3334. This cozy neighborhood bistro reflects a concerted effort to translate the European neighborhood café — warm, welcoming, unpretentious yet delicious — to Pittsburgh. Despite bits of Asian fusion, the selections are classic Low Country fare such as Belgian beef stewed with beer, and Italian influences in risotto, sausage and polenta. KE RED ORCHID. 5439 Babcock Blvd., West View. 412-837-2527. This cozy, family-run Thai restaurant offers a selection of


Start your weekend off with LIVE MUSIC ON THE ROOF TOP at

Every Friday

Hora Feliz

ALL SUMMER LONG 7-9PM

LATE HAPPY HOUR PARTY!

Dive Bar and Grille {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} mostly tried-and-true cuisine (salads, rice and noodle dishes, and curries), as well as chef’s specials, many involving tilapia filets. “Tulip dumplings” and Thai toast make for excellent starters, and the kitchen shows skill in balancing the flavors of more complex curries and meat entrees. KF THE RED RING. 1015 Forbes Ave., Uptown. 412-396-3550. This Duquesne University venue is a decided cut above student dining. The dining room is spacious, with a handsome fieldstone bar. The fare is contemporary American cuisine, with a thoughtful selection of internationally inflected classics like chipotle barbecue pork tenderloin and blackened chicken alfredo. Artisanal touches like a side dish of “chef’s grains” complete the picture. KE

and noodle dishes, peppered with a few more intriguing options among the chef’s specials and entrée lists. KF TAN LAC VIEN. 2114 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8888. This Vietnamese restaurant offers the popular pho and bun entrees, but also less-common dishes. The menu has a section of com tam (“broken rice”) dishes, including some topped with a fried egg; there is also a jellyfish salad with pickled carrot and daikon. Another worthy entrée was banh xeo, savory crepes filled with shrimp, sautéed pork and vegetables, or try the make-yourown summer roll option. FK

UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675. This lively family-style BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder SIRENA TACO JOINT and chicken) are “dry” www. per AND BAR. 3909 Washpa (with sauces at table), pghcitym ington Road, McMurray. .co and the sides are well724-260-0329. Take some prepared classics: macclassic Mexi-Cali combos, and-cheese, baked beans, add some trans-national twists collard greens and coleslaw. Prices (bulgogi, jerk chicken), are higher than a roadside stand, and the humble, hand-held but the quality is top-notch. KE taco becomes a palette for recombining world cuisines, VIVO KITCHEN. 432 Beaver St., one tortilla at a time. Try Sewickley. 412-259-8945. The fare the Pittsburgh taco, with is contemporary American with a well-seasoned French fries, vaguely European accent, featuring sriracha-ranch slaw and strips elegantly simple preparations of grilled steak. KE of elemental, straightforward ingredients, such as roasted SOUTH SIDE BARBECUE mushrooms with gorgonzola or COMPANY. 75 S. 17th St. South scallops with blood-orange sauce. Side. 412-381-4566. Graduating Flavorings such as lemon, garlic from a food truck, this venue and fennel reflect the kitchen’s offers barbecued meat — Mediterranean heritage. LE enormous wings, St. Louis-style ribs, and pulled pork and chicken, WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 also available as sandwiches. The Bower Hill Road, Upper St. adventurous can try the “bar-bClair. 412-221-1232. At this cozy, cone,” a waffle cone filled with contemporary, candle-lit cottage, mac-and-cheese, pulled pork and the Italian- and Mediterraneanslaw, topped with sauce. KE inspired menu changes every two weeks to showcase the SUKHOTHAI BISTRO. 5813 freshest in-season ingredients. Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. The menu offers fewer than 10 412-521-8989. This restaurant entrées, each matched with a merges the traditional flavors small suite of carefully selected and preparations of Thailand sides. Expect quality ingredients — with modern European-bistro dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, aspirations. The menu features lamb, steak — and exquisitely an assortment of curries and rice prepared meals. LF

FULL LIST ONLINE

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

(Happy Hour) every Monday thru Friday from 5-7 PM.

Enjoy $3 Coors Light 34oz Drafts!

• 1/2 Off Draft Beers • $1 Off Bottled Beers • $2 Off Margaritas • “Beer of the Day” specials and Nacho specials.

$3 Jose Cuervo Silver Margaritas PM FRIDAY, JULY 17, 7-9 s for a

Join The Coors Light Girl Chance to win (2) Kelly Clarkson Premiere Concert tickets

2031 Penn Ave. (at 21st) • 412.904.1242

1401 EAST CARSON STREET SOUTH SIDE | 412-481-3203

now open 7 days a week!

@casareynamex

LUNCH BUFFET EVERY DAY (11:30AM-3:00PM)

The FRESHEST Local Produce from The Strip

Coriander INDIA BAR & G GRILL

TIC THAI CUISINE AUTHEN

OFF ENTRÉE

$ ALL LUNCHES

$

8-$10

MON TUE-THU FRI-SAT SUN

3

11:30-3:00 11:30-9:00 11:00-9:00 12:00-5:00

DINE IN / TAKE OUT / BYOB DI

1906 PENN AVENUE STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4107 +

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

Coriander India dia Bar & Grill Grilll

Coriander India Bar & Grill

Now Featuring!

FULL BAR OPEN TIL 10PM

2201 Murray Ave Ave, Squirrell HI HIll | CORIANDERINDIANGRILL.COM

LITTLEBANGKOKINTHESTRIP.COM M U S I C

Buy 2 adult buffets, get $3 off (VALID 7 DAYS A WEEK) With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

Buy any entrée, get a 2nd entrée of equal or lesser value ½ off. With this coupon. Not valid with other offers. Limited time offer.

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

19


LOCAL

BEAT

“IT’S ABOUT VISIBILITY.”

{BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

Adam Kukic wears a lot of hats in this town: actor, writer and, perhaps most notably, host of The WYEP Coffee House on 91.3 FM. The Coffee House airs every Sunday morning from 8-11 a.m. with the final hour devoted to an on-air conversation with a chosen musician, the segment aptly named Coffee House Conversations. Kukic took over the Coffee House almost three years ago from Cindy Howes, who now co-hosts The Morning Mix with Joey Spehar. The idea for a coffeehouse radio show was to showcase the kind of music one would expect to find in the cozy confines of a coffee shop, namely the folk and singer/songwriter genres. Under Kukic’s watch, the show has grown to include other genres. Shifting slightly from the show’s original coffee-house vision wasn’t easy at first, Kukic says, but he found his chance when programming director Mike Sauter gave him the green light to make the show his own. Kukic began including a guest DJ. Initially reserved for local artists, these guests now include national acts. Kukic chooses artists with upcoming shows or album releases, and he asks them to play songs that have been influential on their songwriting. “So, even when we get folk artists or singer/songwriters,” explains Kukic, “we get the freedom to play something a little heavier. Sometimes it’s easier for artists to talk about what they like instead of their own stuff, so we get some really good conversations.” For Kukic, Coffee House Conversations is a passion piece. He volunteers his time every Sunday morning just as he has done for the past 15 years at WYEP. Recently, he has booked some recognizable names: Damien Jurado, Martin Sexton, Alejandro Rose-Garcie, Elizabeth Ziman, and Catherine Popper to name a few. While Kukic admits that it’s exciting for a national act to join him in conversation, his heart is still firmly planted in Pittsburgh, and locals will continue to be a part of Coffee House Conversations. “My work with WYEP is about building connections for other artists in the future,” he says. “Pittsburgh artists are beginning to support each other more and more without ego. This is how a scene gets national recognition.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Adam Kukic {PHOTO COURTESY OF HUGH TWYMAN}

RADIO BUZZ

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Taking it to the streets: Ladyfest Pittsburgh organizers Steph Flati (left) and Athena Kazuhiro

LADIES FRONT TO THE

T

HE 2014 Three Rivers Arts Festival featured just one female music headliner out of nine. Last year’s Thrival featured two female voices out of 15 acts. Posters for this year’s Coachella and Lollapalooza look nearly naked when stripped of their male performers’ names; St. Vincent, Lykke Li and FKA Twigs float in the empty space left by the temporary absence of the boys’ club. Athena Kazuhiro, co-organizer of this year’s Ladyfest Pittsburgh, recalls a longago Warped Tour where she saw only two female acts the whole weekend. “It felt alienating. Girls see that and think they can’t play music,” says the former rollerderby power-blocker who now plays drums in Bunny Five Coat and is the lead singer of Brazilian Wax. Are summer music festivals a hermetically sealed universe of something uniquely dark and damaging, or are they a reflection of sexism in the world at large? Do these music festivals book a bunch of dudes because it’s what people really want to see

Visit www.wyep.org for more information.

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

and hear, or is it out of what Kazuhiro calls “ignorance”? Maybe it’s because “they expect all girl bands to sound the same,” she says, despite the fact that the three biggestselling albums of 2014 — Beyonce, Taylor Swift’s 1989 and the Frozen soundtrack — all feature women, and sound nothing alike. “Like that’s a genre — ‘girl bands,’” laughs Ladyfest co-organizer Steph Flati, an art teacher in a Shonen Knife T-shirt, who plays keyboard in The Lopez and bass in local supergroup Dream Phone.

LADYFEST PITTSBURGH Fri., July 17, through Sun., July 19. Various times and locations. Visit www.facebook.com/ Vulvapalooza for more information.

It’s this prevailing misconception that recently prompted singer-songwriter Neko Case to publish online a nearly 8,000-word polemic on being a “musician” rather than a “woman in music,” and that continues to fuel Kazuhiro and Flati as they coordinate this year’s Ladyfest.

{BY CARALYN GREEN}

The three-night festival features 30 “female-fronted/dominated” bands and female solo acts performing at The Shop and Howlers Coyote Café, both in Bloomfield; Cattivo, in Lawrenceville: and the New Bohemian on the North Side. It’s an East End punk-heavy lineup, with noise, synth, rock and acoustic acts from across the Rust Belt and beyond — Sleepy Kitty, from St. Louis; the Village Bicycle, from Cleveland; Dysmorphia, from Erie; and Rebecca R, from Bethlehem. Local bands include Action Camp, Murder for Girls, the Fuckies, and both of Kazuhiro’s and Flati’s respective two groups. All performers are donating their time; touring bands are given gas money. Ladyfest proceeds benefit the Women’s Center & Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh, an organization to which Kazuhiro, as a former social worker, is particularly dedicated. Ladyfest 2014 was a two-night, 12-band event that went by a different name, “Vulvapalooza.” The pun on Lollapalooza felt fun and funny to Kazuhiro, but some in the CONTINUES ON PG. 22


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

21


LADIES TO THE FRONT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

the 21st annual

pittsburgh blues festival

• Friday Free with a bag of non-perishable food items • Weekend Pass $53 • Daily tickets available Buddy Guy Duke Robillard Band Marcia Ball Bobby Rush Selwyn Birchwood

presented by peoples natural gas

july 24-26 hartwood acres

Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers Dana Fuchs New Breed Brass Band Billy Price Jarekus Singleton and more For tickets and more information visit pghblues.com.

to benefit greater pittsburgh community food bank

THIS WEEK 7/17:

GET THE LED OUT + RIVER TRAIL ACOUSTIC 7/24 The Edgar Winter Band

LGBTQ community found it divisive. The first Vulvapalooza, organized by Kazuhiro, dates back to July 2002 — four bands at the 31st Street Pub. Kazuhiro brought the event back last year, feeling energized to do more for the Pittsburgh music scene since retiring from her Steel Hurtin’ roller-derby days. Under the new “Ladyfest” name, the event continues to generate enough criticism to keep its organizers up at night, and to understand how the Michigan Womyn’s Festival folded under the weight of its own controversy. One Ladyfest critique that’s been particularly troubling for Kazuhiro? Not enough women of color, besides Kazuhiro herself. “It can be disappointing,” says Flati. “We’re trying to raise awareness, to get money to donate, to create visibility. It’s about visibility. And we run the risk of pissing people off.” Ladyfest’s organizers understand that all people have their stories, their identities and their goals for representation. They concede that it can be hard to make everyone happy. Really, Kazuhiro and Flati just wanted to play music with their friends, and raise money to help victims of domestic abuse. They believe in the power of music. They think that playing music — like playing sports — makes women feel confident and part of a community, and that seeing women creating art inspires other women to create their own art. It’s why they love working with Girls Rock! Pittsburgh, a local camp that helps young women find their voices through musicianship. It’s why they’re excited to work with female performers and female audio engineers, and to play shows at The Shop, which is a femaleowned and -operated space, and at Howlers, where a woman handles booking. These are factors that shape who is seen and heard, they realize. It’s not just the person who is the face and voice of a band; it’s also who’s booking shows, promoting events, making and selling merch, doing sound, loading in and out equipment. It’s who’s behind the drum kit, and who’s in the mosh pit. Toni Morrison once said, “If there’s a book you really want to read but it hasn’t been written yet, then you must write it.” Katie Presley, a writer for Bitch Media and NPR Music, recently echoed this call to action in an interview she did with New York public-radio station WNYC: “If you’re not seeing the bands you want to see represented on stage, start your own festival.” So, is Ladyfest a feminist event? “Yes,” the co-organizers answer in unison. “How could it not be?” asks Flati. “Feminism is the radical notion that women are people,” says Kazuhiro. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

ON THE RECORD

with Riff Raff {BY SETH PFANNENSCHMIDT}

Riff Raff

This week, rapper Riff Raff performs at Altar Bar. It will be his second trip to Pittsburgh in three weeks — he appeared with Warped Tour earlier this month. As Warped Tour snakes its way across the country, Riff is promoting his follow-up to 2014’s Neon Icon, Peach Panther, slotted for a fall release. He took some time to answer a few questions via email about touring, balling and his Pittsburgh-based DJ Ryan Haynes, a.k.a. ORE READ M . DJ Afterthought. at www r ape p ty ci h g p YOU’RE ON THE .com ROAD A LOT. WHAT’S THE BEST AND WORST THING ABOUT CONTINUOUS TOURING? Performing in front of huge crowds is the best. Not being with my dogs is the worst. WORD IS YOU’RE PRETTY GOOD AT BASKETBALL. HAVE YOU BEEN BALLING AT ALL ON TOUR? I am always hooping. Gotta keep my game sharp for these lames tryna come at the throne. LEBRON OR JORDAN? Jordan. COULD YOU SCHOOL ANY NBA PLAYERS IN A GAME OF ONE-ON-ONE? I’m too big to play any NBA players. That would just be free promo for them. HOW DID YOU HOOK UP WITH DJ AFTERTHOUGHT? I met Ryan while I was on tour in Pittsburgh. I needed a DJ and he stepped up, been with me ever since. One of the best show DJs I’ve ever seen. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

RIFF RAFF with GPISGOINGPLACES, KRSZ, more. 8 p.m. Wed., July 22. Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $20-23. All ages. 412-263-2877 or www.thealtarbar.com


N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

23


Dance Like

Stars

the

SATURDAY JULY 18TH

Saturday Night Fever

DOORS OPEN AT 6PM AERIAL/CIRUS PERFORMANCE 6:30PM DISCO/HUSTLE DANCE LESSON 7PM OPEN DANCE PARTY TILL 10:30PM LIGHT REFRESHEMENTS BYOB FREE PARKING EVERYWHERE! FEEL FREE TO WEAR YOUR BEST DISCO OUTFIT.

4765 LIBERTY AVE. | BLOOMFIELD 412.681.0111 PITTSBURGHDANCECENTER.COM PITTSBURGHDANCECENTER COM

COMING UP ROSIE {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} TWO DAYS BEFORE embarking on an 18-city

tour of the East Coast and Sweden, Rosie Flores is at the chiropractor’s office getting an adjustment. “The downside of touring is definitely the travel,” Flores tells City Paper by phone while waiting for the doctor. “I’m getting older and I’m facing some physical challenges with my spine, so I spend a lot of time with chiropractors and physical therapists. I also spend time in the gym pumping iron and doing my stretches, and I try to eat right and take good care of my skin. “I’m not 35 anymore, but when I’m on stage the music makes me feel like I’m 35, and I want my body to match how I feel when I’m up there performing.” Whatever she’s doing is working. Flores, a triple-threat singer/songwriter/lead guitarist from Austin, has been playing and touring for decades. She formed her first band in high school, and in the 1970s formed the alt-country band Rosie and the Screamers. In the 1980s, she was part of the all-female cow-punk band Screaming Sirens. In 1995, she made a big splash with the rockabilly album Rockabilly Filly. Since

MELLON SQUARE CONCERT SERIES IS BACK!

MELLON SQUARE For more info visit:

www.bobfm969.com www.qburgh.com

SUMMER CONCERT

MELLON SQUARE PARK (DOWNTOWN)

S E R I E S

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL BANDS! EVERY THURSDAY - Now thru Aug. 27th • Noon-1pm

This Thursday, JULY 16: THE NIED’S HOTEL BAND Next Thursday, JULY 23: The Shiners

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RODNEY BURSIEL}

Rockabilly filly: Rosie Flores

then, she’s been touring and cranking out records, and has become known as much for her lead-guitar work as for her vocals — if not more so. But Flores doesn’t want to be known as one thing or another. She sees herself as a musician working on all three corners of a triangle. As a little girl growing up in San Diego, she “fell in love with singing,” which led to learning the guitar from her brother, which then took her down the path to songwriting. “I bounce back and forth between the three,” Flores says. “I’m in a jazz group [the Blue Moon Jazz Quartet] where I worked on just vocals. Then I took five years just learning how to be a better guitar-player. Honestly, I’m still working on lead guitar. I think I’m getting more accomplished, but I’m not there yet. I’m always aspiring to do better.” That leads to the third area, songwriting. Flores says she’s spent the last four months working on writing new songs for her next record. “I really got away from writing. I’ve ignored that part of it for some time,” she says. “I want to have more originals on the next album, so it’s time to start working on that again. “I’ve worked really hard on my guitarplaying over the years, and I think that’s hurt my growth as a songwriter.” While that may be true, anyone who’s seen Flores play her baby-blue Fender Strat wouldn’t question the time and dedication she’s put into the instrument. She was once named one of the 75 best female guitarists by the now-defunct Venus Zine. Also, anyone who’s seen Flores play would question why she’s on a list specific to female guitarists when, in fact, she’s arguably one of the instrument’s best artists,

male or female. But Flores doesn’t necessarily mind the distinction. “It doesn’t really bother me,” she says. “If somebody compliments me, I just say, ‘Thank you.’ But if somebody says something like, ‘You play pretty well for a girl,’ that sometimes does come off like they don’t think a woman can be play the guitar. But you know, I read in a book somewhere that the guitar was actually designed for a woman to play. Now, I don’t know if that story is true, but just look at the guitar and how it’s shaped and I sure tend to think it is.”

ROSIE FLORES

WITH THE BAR BRAWL III, SLIM FORSYTH AND JENNIE SNYDER 8 p.m. Thu., July 16. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $15-17. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

Flores’ Pittsburgh show will be her second time in the city this year. In January, she did a short set at the Altar Bar opening up for honky-tonker Dale Watson and rockabilly icon Rev. Horton Heat. But Flores says anyone who saw that show definitely needs to catch her headlining tour. “Wait ’til you see me this time,” Flores says emphatically. “I’ll be here with my band, and they are amazing. I loved being on that tour earlier this year, but I only got to play for 20 minutes. It wasn’t long enough. “I heard some people say they were pissed off because they came to see me and it was too short. Well, this time will be different. The people can come out and find out what I do when I go to work.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015


{PHOTO COURTESY OF BERTA PFIRSICH}

CRITICS’ PICKS

Mourn

There will be blood this weekend at First Niagara Pavilion — some of the biggest names in metal will converge for this year’s Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival. Since 2008, the energy-drink titan hasn’t pulled any punches in booking genre heroes of now and yesteryear for its touring festival. It continues the trend this year with a loaded bill that includes Slayer, King Diamond, The Devil Wears Prada and the Pittsburgh-bred Code Orange. Say what you will Dale about brand synergy — Watson this lineup’s too good to pass up. Shawn Cooke 1 p.m. 665 State Route 18, Burgettstown. $37-73.66. 724-947-7400 or www. firstniagarapavilion.net

[AMERIPOLITAN] + SUN., JULY 19 Even as an opening act for Rev. Horton Heat in January, Dale Watson made a big impact on the crowd in a very short period of time. Now Watson is returning to headline his own show, hot on the heels of his new record, Call Me Insane. Besides the new material, fans can expect an evening filled with tunes from the Austin-based musician’s vast catalog that started with 1995’s Cheatin’ Heart Attack. One might be tempted to call Watson a country artist, but he’s broken away from that label in favor of the term “Ameripolitan” — a sound comprising honky-tonk, rockabilly, Western swing and outlaw country. Pro tip for the show tonight at Thunderbird Café with Wood & Wire: Watson loves taking requests and can always be swayed with a shot of tequila. Charlie Deitch 8 p.m. 4023 Butler St.,

N E W S

+

Lawrenceville. $15-17. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

[PUNK] + TUE., JULY 21 Mourn trade in a sort of bracing simplicity: The Spanish youngsters delivered memorable, in-your-face sentiments like “SHUT UP! MARSHALL!”on their self-titled debut collection of two-minute tracks. Vocalists Carla Perez Vas and Jazz Rodriguez Bueno were likely still in Pampers for the initial reign of Sleater-Kinney and PJ Harvey, but they’ve certainly made up for any lost time to prove their worth as ’90s-punk scholars. It remains to be seen whether Mourn will explore outside this template, but for now, this band has conviction and earnestness to spare. Mourn takes Cattivo tonight with support from Fluorescent Medicine. SC 7 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10. 412-687-2157 or www.cattivopgh.com {PHOTO COURTESY OF SARAH WILSON}

[METAL] + SAT., JULY 18

[FOLK] + WED., JULY 22

Tamara Lindeman’s music as The Weather Station isn’t much like what you’d hear on The Weather Channel. Her great one-two punch of last year’s What Am I Going to Do With Everything I Know EP and this year’s Loyalty gave us a heaping helping of wispy, gentle folk. You’re probably thinking, “We don’t need another one of these singers,” but Lindeman is more concerned with mood and detail than most. The people, places and feelings from her songs seem effortlessly lived-in. She performs tonight at Club Café with Andy Shauf and Adeline Hotel. SC 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10-12. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

25


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} blogh.pghcitypaper.com & Jenny Snyder. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

THU 16

FRI 17

CLUB CAFE. Brick + Mortar w/ JontiTrot, Cape Fear. South Side. 412-431-4950. GOOSKI’S. Ritual Decay, Grisly Amputation, Dreadeth. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARTWOOD ACRES. Bridgette Perdue. Fundraiser for Friends of Hartwood projects in the park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Planes Mistaken For Stars, Edhochuli, Reverse The Curse, Worlds Scariest Police Chases. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Adam Jacobs Duo. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Freekbass. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. LAVA LOUNGE. Mother’s Little Helpers. South Side. 412-431-5282. RIVERS CASINO. John Sarkis Trio. North Side. 412-231-7777. SHADY SIDE ACADEMY JUNIOR SCHOOL. Melinda Colaizzi. Point Breeze. 412-968-3045. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Rosie Flores w/ The Bar Brawl 3, Slim Forsythe

New MENU New COCKTAILS New MUSIC

– Top Tier Craft Beer & Cocktails – 422 Foreland St. | NORTH SIDE | 412.904.3335

JAMESSTREETGASTROPUB.COM 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

Eric Hutchinson. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. These Lions, Brothers Jenkins, Big John & The Stranglers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. PARADISE ISLAND. Gone South. Neville Island. 412-264-6570. STAGE AE. The Gaslight Anthem w/ Desaparecidos, Murder By Death. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Dale Watson w/ Wood & Wire. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

31ST STREET PUB. Karma to Burn, Horehound, Outlander. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. Andre Costello & The Cool Minors. Strip District. 412-251-6058. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. The Carpenter Ants. Harmony. 724-452-0539. CLUB CAFE. The Live Oaks & Brash Teeth. South Side. 412-431-4950. www. per PALACE THEATRE. pa HOWLERS COYOTE pghcitym .co Whitesnake. Greensburg. CAFE. Liss Victory, Park 724-836-8000. Plan, Mud City Manglers, STAGE AE. R5 w/ Sleepy Kitty, Fuckies & Bunny Jacob Whitesides. North Side. Five Coat. LadyFest. Bloomfield. 412-229-5483. 412-682-0320. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Butler St. LINDEN GROVE. Totally 80s. Sessions w/ Ferdinand the Bull. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. NIED’S HOTEL. Nied’s Hotel Band. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. SPIRIT. Wolf Eyes, Ancient Ocean, CATTIVO. Mourn w/ Fluorescent Eel, Demolish Kill, Salome, Cocoon Medicine. Lawrenceville. II. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. 412-687-2157. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Town Pants. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. CLUB CAFE. Rocky Votolato, Dave Hause w/ Chris Farren, Run Forever. South Side. 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Great BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

MON 20

TUE 21

SAT 18

Mitchell Bell. North Fayette. 724-728-7200. CLUB 206. EZ Action. Braddock. 412-646-1203. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. RPG’s. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Slayer, King Diamond, HellYeah The Devil Wears Prada, Whitechapel Thy Art is Murder, Jungle Rot, Sister Sin, Sworn In, Shattered Sun, Feed Her To the Sharks, Code Orange, Kissing Candice. Mayhem Festival. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Lucky Tubb & Danny Kaye. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. Washington. 724-225-5221. MEADOWS CASINO. Natalie Cole. Washington. 724-503-1200. THE R BAR. The Accelerators. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RIVERS CASINO. Artistree. North Side. 412-231-7777. SPIRIT. Lazyeyes, The Teen Age. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. NightStar. Bridgeville. 412-221-5202. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Black Masala. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 19 ALTAR BAR. Jake Miller. Strip District. 412-206-9719. FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Kelly Clarkson w/ Pentatonix,

Caesar w/ Caleb Pogyor & the Talkers. Strip District. 412-566-1000. SPIRIT. Dirty Fences, White Mystery. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

WED 22 31ST STREET PUB. Joy, Outside Inside, Lure. Strip District. 412-391-8334. BRILLOBOX. Beverly w/ Casino Bulldogs, Thousandzz of Beez. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. The Weather Station w/ Adeline Hotel. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Campdogzz. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. REX THEATER. Cracker w/ Jeremy Pinnell. South Side. 412-381-6811.

RIVERS CASINO. DJ Nugget. North Side. 267-932-8760. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 18

DJS

BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Kingfish. North Side. 267-932-8760. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

THU 16

WED 22

CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 17 ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Desus. Lawrenceville. 412-682-6414. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582.

MP 3 MONDAY

MELINDA COLAIZZI

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLI BEAVERS}

Clicking “reload” makes the workday go faster

ROCK/POP

SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

BLUES THU 16 SLOPPY JOE’S. Wil E. Tri & the Bluescasters. Mt. Washington. 412-381-4300.

FRI 17 DAMIANOS. Strange Brew. Midland. 724-508-0948. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Street Swing Allstars. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEVELS. Boulevard of the Blues Band. Formerly Muddy Kreek. North Side. 412-231-7777. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. John Gresh Olga Watkins. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATER. Chris Smither w/ Rusty Belle. South Park.

SAT 18 JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Sweaty Betty. North Side. 412-904-3335. PARADISE PUB.32-20 Blues Band. Monaca. 724-888-2346.

JAZZ THU 16

Each week, we bring you a new song by a local artist. This week’s track comes from Melinda Colaizzi; stream or download “Keeper of the Flame” for free on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com.

ANDORA RESTAURANT - FOX CHAPEL. Harry Cardillo & Charlie Sanders. Fox Chapel. 412-967-1900. ANDYS WINE BAR. Maria Becoates Bey. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. 412-904-3335.

FRI 17 ANDYS WINE BAR. Kathy Conner. 412-773-8884.


Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 17 CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

These tours aren’t slated to come to Pittsburgh, but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

SAT 18 MANCHESTER FAIRGROUNDS. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Manchester. 412-867-0150. OAKMONT YACHT CLUB. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Oakmont. 412-828-9847.

CLEVELAND

SUN 19

{SUN., AUG. 02}

COMMUNITY EMPOWERMENT ASSOCIATION. The Flow Band Reggae Rockers. Harambee Black Arts Festival. Wilkinsburg. 412-273-8928.

La Luz The Euclid Tavern

PHILADELPHIA

COUNTRY

{THU., AUG. 13}

TUE 21

Erykah Badu

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Paisley Fields, Anita Fix, Ferdinand the Bull. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

Dell Music Center

CLASSICAL

CLEVELAND

THU 16

{MON., SEPT. 14}

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA W/ JOHNNY MATHIS. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Airplay (woodwind quintet). In the Unity Chapel. Unity Cemetery, Latrobe. 724-837-1850.

Mikal Cronin Happy Dog

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Travlin’. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335. LA CASA NARCISI. Etta Cox Trio. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LEMONT. NightStar. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Al Lardo. Downtown. 412-471-9100. SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. 724-319-7938.

SAT 18 ANDYS WINE BAR. Mark Pipas. Downtown. 412-773-8884. GROWN & SEXY II. Carl King Band w Floyd King. Strip District. 412-728-4155. LEMONT. Phil & Roxy. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. OAKS THEATER. Etta Cox Band. Oakmont. 412-828-6311. RIVERVIEW PARK. Thomas Wendt. Observatory Hill. North Side. 412-255-2493. ROSALEE’S. RML Jazz. New Brighton. 412-370-9621. WICKED FOX. Eric Johnson & Dan Wasson. Fox Chapel. 412-794-8255.

SUN 19 COLLIER COMMUNITY PARK. RML Jazz. 4123709621. LATITUDE 360. Marcus Anderson. North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

MON 20 ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Open Jazz Night w/ the Howie Alexander Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

N E W S

TUE 21 KATZ PLAZA. Roger Humphries. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange w/ Thoth Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 22 ANDYS WINE BAR. David Bennett. Downtown. 412-773-8884. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Don Aliquo. Downtown. 412-471-9100. RIVERS CLUB. Sal Richetti & Yolanda Barber. Downtown. 412-391-5227.

ACOUSTIC THU 16 DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631.

ORGANIC TOBACCO ORGANIC MENTHOL

FRI 17 PITTSBURGH NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE. Commissions from founder David Stock & Daniel Visconti are paired with the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winning, “Double Sextet”, by American Master, Steve Reich. City Theatre, South Side. 888-718-4253.

SAT 18 PITTSBURGH NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE. Commissions from founder David Stock & Daniel Visconti are paired with the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winning, “Double Sextet”, by American Master, Steve Reich. City Theatre, South Side. 888-718-4253.

VISIT NASCIGS.COM OR CALL 1-800-435-5515 PROMO CODE 96364

*Plus applicable sales tax

CIGARETTES

©2015 SFNTC (3)

Offer for two “1 for $2” Gift Certificates good for any Natural American Spirit cigarette product (excludes RYO pouches and 150g tins). Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. Offer and website restricted to U.S. smokers 21 years of age and older. Limit one offer per person per 12 month period. Offer void in MA and where prohibited. Other restrictions may apply. Offer expires 06/30/16.

SUN 19

FRI 17 BALTIMORE HOUSE. Gina Rendina Acoustic Duo. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-3800. CLADDAGH IRISH PUB. Weekend at Blarneys. South Side. 412-381-4800. PARK HOUSE. The Shameless Hex. North Side. 412-224-2273.

SAT 18

OTHER MUSIC UPPER ST. CLAIR THEATER. Upper St Clair High School Alumni Choir. Upper St. Clair. 239-352-4041.

WED 22 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Brad Yoder. Regent Square. 412-247-1870. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String

TA S T E

ORGANIST ETHAN LAPLACA. St. Paul Cathedral, Oakland. 412-621-6082. WEST HILLS SYMPHONIC BAND. Part of the Bach, Beethoven & Brunch series. Mellon Park, Shadyside. 412-255-2493.

SAT 18

CLUB CAFE. Eilen Jewell. South Side. 412-431-4950.

+

INGREDIENTS:

+

WED 22 CITY THEATRE. “Will, The Poet”. Slam poetry & music from Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble. South Side. 888-718-4253.

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

27


SENTED BY: PRES

28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015


EARLY CHECK-IN DAY OF-DETAILS ONLINE

6:30PM EARLY ADMISSION/CONNOISSEUR 7:30PM REGULAR ADMISSION PITTSBURGH SUMMER BEERFEST ENDS AT 11:00PM N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

SAVE THE DATE:

WINTER BEERFEST

FEB. 26 & 27 +

C L A S S I F I E D S

29


What to do July 15 - 21 WEDNESDAY 15 Waxahatchee

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Opera Theater Summer Fest TWENTIETH CENTURY CLUB Oakland. For more info visit otsummerfest.org. Through Aug 2.

THURSDAY 16 2015 Cars & Guitars HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. Tickets: pvgp.org/hardrock. 7p.m.

Thursday Night Icons: Johnny Mathis with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

IN PITTSBURGH Rosie Flores

Live on the River Beach Boys Tribute

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

RIVERS CASINO OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATER North Side. Free event. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 19

The Drowsy Chaperone ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY & MUSIC HALL Carnegie. Tickets: stage62.org or call 412-429-6262. Through July 26.

Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest

Empires

SPIRIT Lawrenceville. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9:30p.m.

JULY 17-18 STAGE AE

The Gaslight Anthem

FRIDAY 17

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 6p.m.

Station Square Summer Jam: Get The Led Out + River Trail Acoustic

MONDAY 20

MAIN STREET STAGE Station Square. Free event. All ages show. 6p.m.

Harm’s Way “Rust Over America Tour”

Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org/icons. 7:30p.m.

STAGE AE North Side. Over 21 event. Tickets: pittsburghbeerfest.com. Through July 18.

Garden Party with Brooke Annibale

Dark Side of the Moon: A Pink Floyd Experience

RODEF SHALOM GARDEN Shadyside. Free event. 6:30p.m.

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

ALTAR BAR Strip District.

412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

Summer Beer Festival TRAX FARMS Finleyville. 412-835-3246. Over 21 event. Tickets: traxfarms.com. 4p.m.

Where to live

SATURDAY 18

Side. 412-431-4668. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

MEADOWS CASINO Washington. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 8p.m.

Sage Francis

Natalie Cole

White Like Fire SMILING MOOSE South

NOW LEASING

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

NOW LEASING

BEST

CITY

APARTMENTS

& TOWNHOMES

HI-RISE LUXURY APARTMENTS

NOW LEASING

COMING SUMMER 2015

Bakery Living

Micro, 1 and 2 Bedroom Apartments Studio, 1 And 2 Bedroom Urban Apartments

Upscale urban rentals • 855.664.3573

Squirrel Hill, Shadyside, Oakland, East Side & South Side 30

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

CATTIVO Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

TUESDAY 21 State Champs

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

find your happy place

walnut capital.com

THE BEST IN CITY LIVING


TRUE DETECTIVE

EVEN IN THEIR FAMILIARITY, IT’S HARD TO HATE ON THE MINIONS

{BY AL HOFF} The light dramedy Mr. Holmes catches up with the famed Victorian detective Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen) as he spends his golden years at his country home. It’s 1947, the war is over, and Holmes would just like to tend to his bees, and perhaps finish his account of one last case while his failing memory still cooperates. Fortunately, his housekeeper’s young son, Roger (Milo Parker), steps in for the long-gone Watson, helping Holmes sort through his memories.

Elementary: Sherlock Holmes (Ian McKellen)

CP APPROVED

Thus, Bill Condon’s film, adapted from Mitch Cullin’s novel, cuts between contemporary goings-on, Holmes’ recent visit to post-war Japan, and the events of that case, unresolved for many decades. In fairness, everything is a bit jumbled in Holmes’ mind: the mysterious, unhappy woman from his past, the eager Roger, bees, the still-fresh losses of World War II, and his own mortality. The various plots all come to together, and so, I’m afraid, do some obvious “valuable lessons” about life and love. While Holmes’ wits are shaky but able, die-hard Holmsians should note: This is a series of interconnected stories that mostly eschew logic for emotion for their resolutions. It’s a pretty mawkish stew that in lesser hands would relegate this to the cozy-tea-and-sweet-jam set. But, unsurprisingly, McKellen sells the hell out of this rather moony Holmes. Well-acted all ’round and with beautiful period detail, Mr. Holmes is a rather sweet change of pace for the prickly crime-solver. Starts Fri., July 17. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM OFF @PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Paul Newman man kie and Jackie Gleason star in

The Hustler err, Robert Rossin’s n’s ma 1961 drama about poolwman playing. Newman is the brash young r and Gleason portrays hustler, Minnesota Fats. Continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of black-and-white widescreen films. 8 p.m. Sun., July 19. Regent Square

{BY AL HOFF}

T

HE PILL-SHAPED minions from the Despicable Me movies are such popular characters that their creators could have delivered raw footage of the yellow guys just hanging out and jabbering. And while there are aspects of their new animated comedy Minions, directed by Pierre Coffin and Kyle Balda, that offer this sort of narrative looseness, an attempt has been be made to tell a story. In fact, part of it is the whole story — an origin tale in which we learn, with helpful narration from Geoffrey Rush, he how ho the minions came to be. Like us, the minions began as single-cell organisms in mi the ocean and evolved into land-dwellers with better problem-solving skills. (Let wi us pause to pity creationists, who will have ha to make up another Where Minions Come From story.) Co Early on, the minions sort out that their purpose is to serve villains, and we see them working their way through history helping T. Rex, Egyptian pharaohs,

vampires, Napoleon. But when there is a lengthy lull in suitable employers, the minions take to an ice cave to grow forlorn. Until three intrepid minions — Kevin, Bob and Stuart — go in search of a new master to serve.

MINIONS DIRECTED BY: Pierre Coffin and Kyle Balda FEATURING: The voices of Sandra Bullock, Jon Hamm, Pierre Coffin (all the minions) In 3-D, in select theaters

CP APPROVED They wash up in America 1968 — it is here they adopt the denim overalls — and have the luck to wind up at a villain’s conference, where the world’s greatest supervillain, Scarlet Overkill (voice of Sandra Bullock) is looking for help. She flies them back to her groovy pad in London, and tasks them with stealing Queen Elizabeth’s crown.

But plot, schmot: It’s all about the minions being adorable, and walking their patented fine line between clever and bumbling. This iteration will never be as fresh and delightful as when we first met the minions, but even in their familiarity, it’s hard to hate on them. The jokes and sight gags are near-constant, and the film offers top-notch digital animation. Some of the giant bags of money earned from the first two successful films has gone toward the soundtrack, which includes plenty of classic rock tracks (including The Beatles, Donovan, Rolling Stones and, surely lost on many under 50, the title track from Hair). And some has been spent to jet-set the minions around the globe — the Himalayas, Australia, Orlando! None of it quite disguises that the villainous Scarlet is a bit of dud, never quite gelling into a worthy foil for the minions. But Minions is merely a prequel, and we can relax knowing that in time, the little yellow dudes will find their dream villain. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

31


Pittsburgh’s #1 Video Game Shop

Penn Hills Game Exchange

FILM CAPSULES CP

Rear Window (1954) - 7/15 @ 12 noon Free senior matinee of this Hitchcock classic.

___________________________________________________

Jellyfish Eyes

(2015) - 7/15 @ 7:30pm Japanese artist Takashi Murakami blends live action and animation in his feature film debut.

mes. Play Video Ga Be Happy.

___________________________________________________

Soaked In Bleach

(2015) - 7/16 @ 8pm Encore presentation with director Ben Statler and Dr. Cyril Wecht in attendance!

We specialize in Japanese imports and other hard-to-find gaming

HUGE

Microsoft & more! Atari to XBox One, we’ve got it all! Plus, check out our awesome me game room full of arcade & pinball games!

Xbox SALE Going on NOW!

Get a $50 Gift Car d when you buy an Xbox One Kinect bundle!

___________________________________________________

Stung

(2015) - 7/16 @ 10:30pm Killer wasps mutate into seven foot tall predators.

___________________________________________________

Zombo’s Rock & Roll Drive-In 7/17 @ 6pm - Bad movies, great bands, and cold beer. Tickets are $10.

___________________________________________________

48Hour Film Project 7/19 @ 3pm & 7pm, 7/20 @ 7pm, 7/21 @ 7pm

Come see the results of this year’s competition and meet Pittsburgh’s talented new generation of filmmakers.

431 Rodi Road • P Penn H Hills ilillls 412.371.0386

facebook.com/pennhillsgames

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW THIS WEEK ANT-MAN. Peyton Reed directs the latest comics-actioner from Marvel. This one follows the exploits of a man who can become very, very tiny, but also super-strong. Paul Rudd, Corey Stoller and Michael Douglas star. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., July 17 THE GALLOWS. Schools are super-creepy at night, says a character in this new horror film from the production house behind the Paranormal Activity franchise. To drive the point home, he says it again a few minutes later. And despite The Gallows’ weak spots and its many clichés, the dude is right. Schools are creepy at night, particularly this one. The film follows four students — sensitive bro Reese, “theater nerd” Pfiefer, jock asshole Ryan and his cheerleader girlfriend, Cassidy — who get trapped in their school overnight after a prank goes awry. Twenty years prior, a student was hanged accidentally and died while performing in the titular play, and now the school has decided to restage it. Huh? Whatever. That shadowy figure stalking the foursome with a hangman’s mask and a shitload of rope is probably unrelated. Like Paranormal Activity, Gallows is a foundfootage affair, which, along with its jocks-versus-nerds subplot and character named Pfeifer, feels sorta Clinton-era. But beyond the tired tropes and lazy scares are some pretty fun moments, and if you can stomach the Olympic-tier douchebag who mans the camera for most of the film, the spooky stuff should be a breeze. (Alex Gordon) SILK SCREEN ASIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL. The festival of recent films from Asia, the Middle East and the U.S. continues through Sun., July 19, at the Melwood and Regent Square theaters. For the complete schedule, see www.silkscreenfestival.org. TRAINWRECK. It’s a gender inversion of the classic rom-com plot — a commitment-phobic gal finds herself getting serious with a sportswriter — and it stars Amy Schumer and Bill Hader. Judd Apatow directs. Starts Fri., July 17

REPERTORY CINEMA IN THE PARK. X-Men: Days of Future Passed, Wed., July 15 (Schenley), and Sat., July 18 (Riverview). The Lego Movie, Thu., July 16 (Brookline); Fri., July 17 (Arsenal); and Sat., July 18 (Grandview). The Wizard of Oz, Sun., July 19 (Schenley); Mon., July 20 (Highland Park); Tue., July 21 (West End/Elliott Overlook); and Thu., July 23 (Brookline). Godzilla (2014), Wed., July 22 (Schenley). Films begin at dusk. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net. Free ROW HOUSE CINEMA. Road Trippin’ series. The Wizard of Oz (the 1939 classic about a little girl from Kansas and her journey through Oz), July 15-16. Dumb & Dumber (two dimwits take a cross-country journey in this 1994 Farrelly brothers comedy), July 15-16. Easy Rider (1969 hippie classic in which Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper take their choppers on the road), July 15-16. The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (drag queens travel across the Australian outback in this 1994 comedy), July 16. Airplanes series. Airplane! (classic, endlessly quotable disaster-movie spoof from 1980), July 17-21 and July 23. Porco Rosso (yes, pigs do fly in Miyazaki’s animated 1992 film about a fighter pilot), July 17 and July 19-23. Top Gun

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

The Gallows (fighter pilot Tom Cruise takes us to the Danger Zone in this 1986 hit), 7 p.m. Fri., July 17 (RiffTrax edition); also July 18-19 and July 21-23. Snakes on a Plane (no serpent stands a chance against Samuel L. Jackson in this 2006 thriller), July 17-20 and July 22-23. Call or see website for times and complete listings. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-904-3225 or www.rowhousecinema.com. $5-9 JELLYFISH EYES. This new film from Japanese writer-director Takashi Murakami is an odd mix of earnest and loopy, high concept and low-budget ideas, and live action and animation. It’s set in the aftermath of the 2011 tsunami and the subsequent crisis at the Fukushima power plant. Young Masashi and his mother move from the evacuation area to a new town, and Masashi struggles with a new school and missing his dad (lost in the disaster). That part makes sense, and it’s worthy of exploration. But, in another part of town, scientists, garbed in black capes, are working on a machine fueled by the negative energy of children. To facilitate this, they have secretly bequeathed to all the town’s kids F.R.I.E.N.D.S., special, toy-like cute monsters. Masashi gets one — it sort of looks like a jellyfish and loves cheese — but is dismayed to discover the other kids use their F.R.I.E.N.D.S. in fighting matches. Somewhere in all these kooky set-ups, Masashi learns to move past his grief, make friends (real, lower-case ones), teach those friends to stop abusing their F.R.I.E.N.D.S., and thwart the evil plans of the blackcaped scientists, who at one point, unleash “classic” fighting F.R.I.E.N.D.S. — one who looks like a sexy manga girl and the other vaguely Godzilla-shaped. So, it’s a good message, I guess, wrapped up in some offbeat paper. In Japanese, with subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 15. Hollywood (Al Hoff) SUMMER RENTAL. Carl Reiner directs this 1985 comedy about an overworked man (John Candy) whose relaxing vacation goes off the rails. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 15. AMC Loews. $5 SOAKED IN BLEACH. Benjamin Statler’s new biodoc looks at the life and death of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain, drawing from the investigative work of a private detective who was hired to track down the missing musician days before he was found dead. Director Statler and former coroner Dr. Cyril Wecht (who appears in the film) will do a Q&A after the screening. 8 p.m. Thu., July 16. Hollywood FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL: THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF BONING. Video archivists Lux Alptraum and Joe Garden provide live commentary for their selection of vintage sex-ed films and video, which


Kung Fu Killer features such hilarious serious topics as boners, gay sex and puberty. Midnight, Fri., July 17. Acrade Comedy Theater, 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. www.arcadecomedytheater.com 48-HOUR FILM PROJECT. It’s becoming a summer tradition: Form a film-production team; be assigned a genre, a prop, a character and a line of dialogue; and shoot a short film in just 48 hours. Pittsburgh’s teams have finished their films, and you can catch the entries at these three screenings. (The Best Of screening and the awards ceremony is Fri., July 31.) 3 and 7 p.m. Sun., July 19; 7 p.m. Mon., July 20; and 7 p.m. Tue., July 21. Hollywood

KUNG FU KILLER. Somebody is killing the great kung-fu masters of Hong Kong, defeating them with their own specialties (kicking, weapons, grappling). It could only be another kung-fu master (Baoqiang Wang), and it’ll take yet another kung-fu master (Donnie Yen) to find and defeat him. And if that avenging master is in jail, well, the cops will just have to let him out. Teddy Chan’s actioner is a mashup of police procedural, martial arts and an homage to the Hong Kong kung-fu film industry. It has much to recommend it: The story has a few twists; the final showdown, set on a busy freeway, is a good one; and the two female characters are take-charge bad-asses. In Cantonese and Mandarin, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Tue., July 21. Parkway, McKees Rocks. Free (AH) CADDYSHACK. “So I jump ship in Hong Kong and make my way over to Tibet, and I get on as a looper at a course over in the Himalayas. … And who do you think they give me? The Dalai Lama, himself. Twelfth son of the Lama, the flowing robes, the grace, bald. … So we finish the 18th and he’s gonna stiff me. And I say, ‘Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort?’ And he says, ‘Oh, uh, there won’t be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness.’ So I got that goin’ for me, which is nice.” In 1980, Harold Ramis directed the greatest golf movie ever made, featuring the sublime melding of four idiosyncratic comedians: Bill Murray (quoted above as groundsman Carl Spackler), Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield and Ted Knight. 7:30 p.m. Wed., July 22. AMC Waterfront. $5 (AH)

CP

DEATH RIDES A HORSE. Lee Van Cleef stars in Giulio Petroni’s Western, a classic tale of vengeance in which a man tracks down the men who murdered his family. The 1966 film continues the monthly Spaghetti Western Dinner Series — patrons get a spaghetti Western and spaghetti. Dinner at 7 p.m.; screening at 7:30 p.m. Thu., July 23. Parkway, McKees Rocks. $8. Reservations required at 412-766-1668.

The Tales of Hoffman THE TALES OF HOFFMAN. Michael Powell’s 1951 Technicolor opera-ballet-fantasy extravaganza is packed with talent, gorgeous to look at — and decidedly weird, despite its roots in classical entertainment. Powell’s use of light, hyper-color and extraordinary, if wholly artificial sets, give Tales an edgy, off-kilter vibe. And the film’s famous sequence — Moira Shearer’s mechanical-doll dance — ends in a positively grotesque fashion. Mon., July 20, through Thu., July 23. Regent Square (AH)

CP

N E W S

+

NAMASTE NEPAL. Matt McCroskey and Kenny Meehan’s 2009 film documents the journey of 15 American students as they travel to Nepal and spend time with Nepali students in a village high in the Himalayas. Local students who have made a similar trek to Nepal will do a Q&A after the screening. 7 p.m. Thu., July 23. Hollywood. $15 (proceeds benefit Nepali earthquake relief agencies) ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

33


[DANCE]

“I THINK PEOPLE IN PUBLISHING LIKE BOOKS THAT THEY CAN EASILY FIT INTO CATEGORIES.”

PAST FORWARD

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TEXTURE CONTEMPORARY BALLET performs STRENGTH & GRACE Thu., July 16-Sun., July 19. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-25. 888-718-4253 or www.newhazletttheater.org

34

[BOOKS]

BROTHER Kelsey Bartman and Brynn Vogel in Bartman’s “Forget About Home” {PHOTO COURTESY OF KATIE GING}

To open its fifth-anniversary season at the New Hazlett Theater, Texture Contemporary Ballet pays homage to World War II-era women in Kelsey Bartman’s new ballet “Forget About Home.” It’s one of six works on Texture’s July 16-19 Strength & Grace program. The 30-minute ballet for 16 dancers, with libretto by associate artistic director Bartman’s younger sister, Krysta Bartman, is set to 1940s-sounding arrangements of popular music by Maroon 5, Band of Horses and others, created by New Victorians frontman Ben Hardt. Combining contemporary ballet with a musical-theater approach, “Forget About Home” offers snapshots of wartime women waiting for a sweetheart to come home, grieving over the loss of a son, and working in factories, a la “Rosie the Riveter.” Also on the program is a reprise of Bartman’s 2012 solo “Hurts Like Heaven,” set to music by Coldplay and performed this time by company member Christina Sahaida. Recurring guest choreographer Gabriel Gaffney Smith will present a reworked version of his 2013 neo-classical ballet “unaccompanied.” The BalletMet Columbus dancer’s 10-minute trio, set to music by Bach and Son Lux, deals with cause and effect in human relationships. Texture artistic director Alan Obuzor also dips into his choreographic past by restaging his first-ever group ballet, 2006’s “Feel of Fire.” The work was originally created for a Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School production. Obuzor describes the 15-minute ballet for a dozen dancers, with music by Astor Piazzola, as having a “sensual, sexy feel to it.” Obuzor will also premiere his latest ballet for the company, “Inner Division of Existence.” The 35-minute abstract ballet in seven sections is set to music by Flemish Belgian composer Wim Mertens. Says Obuzor: “The music gave direction to the movement and feel of each section.” Rounding out the program is Point Park University alum Darren McArthur’s untitled five-minute work-in-progress about trying to avoid the inevitable, danced to original electronic music by slowdanger’s Taylor Knight. At 3 p.m. Sat., July 18, Texture will present a special matinee designed to expose young children to professional dance. It will feature a 20-30 minute excerpted version of Strength & Grace along with 20-minute interactive session. Tickets are $10 per family.

ACT {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

M

ANY FIRST NOVELS are heavily

autobiographical. But however convincing — and singular — is the story told in Robert Yune’s Eighty Days of Sunlight (Thought Catalog), only fragments are drawn directly from Yune’s own life. The book’s sardonic narrator, Jason Han, is a Korean-American who in a freak Boy Scouting accident gets bullet fragments embedded in his skull. He ends up separated from his immigrant bluecollar father and older brother, living with a wealthy surgeon in Princeton, N.J. Years later, after his father’s suicide, Jason moves into his house near Wilkes-Barre, Pa., delaying college and joining his estranged brother and perpetual foil, Tommy, working at the huge paperback-book plant where their hardworking and distant old man labored (and trying to suss out why he killed himself). By the Y2K era, however, they’ve both become college students in Pittsburgh, an experience with its own set of trials and discoveries. Yune, 33, is Korean-American. He was a college student here in the early 2000s, and he did work at a Wilkes-Barre book plant. But that’s about it for overlap: Despite the plot’s keystone of fraternal conflict, for example, Yune doesn’t even have a brother (though he does have two sisters). Born outside Seoul, Yune was adopted as an infant by a white American

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Robert Yune set his debut novel partly in his adopted city of Pittsburgh.

Navy man and his wife, and by age 18 had moved 11 times to cities around the world and U.S. (There’s a pinch of autobiography in Jason’s foster family, inspired by Yune’s grandfather, a prominent Princeton surgeon.) In 2001, as an undergraduate, Yune transferred from East Stroudsburg University to the University of Pittsburgh. He now lives in Squirrel Hill, teaches at Pitt, and has had short stories published in journals including The Kenyon Review and

The Los Angeles Review. Yune wrote the earliest version of what became Eighty Days to fulfill a short-story assignment in an undergraduate seminar taught by fabled author and English professor Chuck Kinder. It was about three college students “drinking and acting like jackasses,” says Yune. Kinder told Yune that the story had the makings of a novel, but added, “It’s amusing but it can’t go on, it’s not enough.”


Says Yune, “I had to sit and think, ‘There are these people who are doing things, but who are they really?’” Eventually, the backstory emerged, and the two friends turned into brothers. The n ovel was Yune’s grad-s chool thesis, and he continued working on it after graduating. With help from “a really smart edit” by Kinder, Yune completed the novel … only to face rejection from 39 literary agents. A few agents complimented the writing but told Yune they couldn’t sell the novel. “It is difficult to imagine an audience for this,” Yune acknowledges: It’s not a standard coming-of-age novel, for instance. “I think people in publishing like books that they can easily fit into categories, because that makes them easier to sell. And this book really doesn’t invite that.” Yune himself envisions an audience that includes Pittsburgh afficionados, college students and people in the limbo between college graduation and adulthood. But by 2013 he’d given up on getting the novel published. Then a former assistant to an agent, who’d liked the book, called him and requested it for her new employer, Thought Catalog. Eighty Days was published in June. Kirkus Reviews called it “moving and darkly comic” and “an accomplished debut.” The book is especially notable for its particularized and distinctive portrait

of Asian Americans. Yune never wanted to write about racism, racial identity or the immigrant experience, because, well, that’s been done. But at the least, Eighty Days of Sunlight (titled for Pittsburgh’s supposed annual solar exposure) is an unusual take on those matters. Yune notes, for instance, that working-class Asian-American life is usually referenced only as backstory — not depicted in the firsthand way of Jason’s often stupefied workaholic father, or of Jason finding a strange pride in taking his father’s place in a hot, grimy, noisy factory. Nor, in a national literature replete with immigrants “making it,” do we see often such strivers fail. Likewise atypical are Jason and Tommy, contentious young screw-ups who’d fit no one’s typed ideas of Asian Americans. “When I got to know the characters, they didn’t seem to be … the model minority,” says Yune. “A lot of times when we see people who don’t fit the stereotypes, we forget about them.” At the same time, Yune says, he shares as little personality with his narrator as he does biography. Better, he says, to think of Jason and Tommy as “two different aspects of my identity” that he depicted as separate people. “He’s not actually very smart,” says Yune of Jason, “but he’s very manipulative, and that’s how he gets ahead. … As a writer that was more amusing to me.”

In this excerpt from Robert Yune’s novel Eighty Days of Sunlight, narrator Jason Han describes his final shift after deciding to leave his job at the paperback-book factory. The shift I worked after that long walk was one of the worst. It’s amazing what people can get used to. I could suddenly feel my cells and organs dying as the seconds ticked away. It wasn’t really a decision for this to be my final shift down at Tower — I absolutely couldn’t stay any longer. But I would finish out the goddamned shift. I thought about my father, working beside me like a ghost. I wondered when he realized that this is all there was for him. I wondered when he’d given it up. It struck me that I hadn’t thought about him for so long. Force of habit, I guess. But I would feel it like an ache in my forearms and spine: the exhaustion that comes with factory work, the eternal insomnia that accompanies the midnight shift. I wouldn’t want the last thing I breathed to be oil-soaked paper dust, industrial glue, potato chips, and farts. In the end, it must have seemed to my father that the only control he had was to choose his method and time of death. At 7:30 AM, I swept the area clean. I had to leave, but I forced myself to stay for one last ritual.

Finish three books du

{BY JOSEPH PEISER}

Adriana Ramirez {PHOTO COURTESY OF HEATHER KRESGE PHOTOGRAPHY}

LAST DAY ON THE JOB

Read minutes a Letforus6 help

HISTORY RECAST

“A LOT OF TIMES WHEN PEOPLE DON’T FIT THE STEREOTYPES, WE FORGET ABOUT THEM.”

D RI SCO L L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

Make some me time

[BOOKS]

Independence wasn’t the only thing celebrated in Pittsburgh this July 4. The Founding Fathers shared the spotlight with University of Pittsburgh lecturer Adriana Ramirez, whom the City of Pittsburgh honored with “Ms. Adriana Ramirez Day” “for her outstanding writing and poetry that seeks to advance freedom of expression and human rights.” As accolades go, however, a holiday is just another book on the shelf for Ramirez. In June, in New York City, she received the PEN/Fusion Emerging Writer’s Prize for her unpublished essay collection, Dead Boys. The award, including a $10,000 cash prize, “recognizes a promising young writer of an unpublished work of nonfiction that addresses a global and/or multicultural issue,” according to PEN America’s website. Ramirez is the first-ever winner. “I sort of enjoyed toiling in obscurity because there was less pressure to get stuff done,” she says, chuckling. Her essays explore the violence surrounding the ongoing drug wars in her native Mexico and ancestral Colombia. Ramirez tells personal stories of the individual dead to illuminate the political and economic problems that feed such brutality. She connects these stories to violence in Pittsburgh and to the loss of her own brother when she was 5, probing our shared reactions to death. “So much of history is ‘this happened on this day’ and ‘this charge was led by this general,’ but what about the mother whose kid ran away on the day of that battle … or somebody who died of something completely unrelated on the same day? These are the alternate world histories that allow us to get at the emotional truths of what’s happening.” Ramirez, an accomplished slam poet, placed 26th at the 2006 Individual World Poetry Slam in Charlotte, N.C. She is creative director of Steel City Slam, Pittsburgh’s weekly slam-poetry showcase, and sits on the executive board of Poetry Slam Inc., which organizes the National Poetry Slam and Individual World Poetry Slam. With Dead Boys and much of her other work, Ramirez hopes to start conversations on situations south of the border that she feels are being ignored by the mainstream public. “We [in the U.S] are so tied up in other people’s business economically that you cannot deny our implicit cooperation in these screwed-up systems,” she says. “It amazes me how disconnected everyone can be — in every country around the world — from the things they just don’t want to see.”

Read with t

you find your nexta read. Read book from th Tweeta with Tackle classic. Try

Finish that book n #MyNextRead. Impress my boss with th

C k th

h

carnegielibrary.org From theater to dance to the visual arts, City Paper offers

the most honest,

in-depth arts criticism in Pittsburgh

every Wednesday in print and online at www.pghcitypaper.com

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

35


Clicking “reload” makes the workday blogh.pghcitypaper.com go faster ROCK THE BENEDUM ‘80s STYLE! STARRING:

Jenna Ushkowitz

July July Ju ly 24 - Au Augu Augu gust ustt 2

FFrom “GLEE”

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org At the Benedum Center

Groups 412-325-1582

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ARCHIE CARPENTER}

Let them entertain you: Kim Zimmer and Robert Newman in Pittsburgh CLO’s Gypsy

[PLAY REVIEWS]

COMES UP ROSES {BY TED HOOVER}

IT MUST HAVE been an experience sitting in The Broadway Theater on May 21, 1959, for the opening night of Gypsy. Onstage, two little girls are singing a dreadful kiddie song when suddenly in the back of the theater a late-comer barrels in from the lobby yelling at them. It’s not until she’s halfway down the aisle you realize it’s Ethel Merman playing Mama Rose in this musical version of the life of stripper Gypsy Rose Lee — a show considered by many to be the greatest of American musicals.

GYPSY continues through Sun., July 19. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-68. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

For its latest production, Pittsburgh CLO presents Kim Zimmer starring as Mama Rose, and Robert Newman as her long-suffering Herbie. (Guiding Light fans will undoubtedly remember them as Reva and Josh.) Any chance to see Gypsy is welcome, and again I was reminded how incredibly well built Arthur Laurent’s script is, with not a word or scene out of place. He juggles a number of dramatic threads but resolves them to the same point: In a parent/child relationship, love can sometimes be the most painful element. You hardly need me to sing the praises of the brilliant score by Jules Styne and

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

Stephen Sondheim; in this CLO production, what stands out particularly is the extraordinary work of musical director Tom Helm and the orchestra’s masterful handling of the music. It’s the best performance (with a special shout-out to the brass section) of this score I’ve ever heard. The role of Mama Rose has been called the “King Lear” of musicals, and Zimmer uses a strong, clear voice to give her numbers tremendous appeal. Her approach to the character is surprisingly tentative, but that could just have been openingnight nerves. Newman provides rocksolid support (in a role that can often be washed out), and he and Zimmer play with terrific chemistry. Susan Cella gets the chance for big laughs in the dual roles of Miss Cratchitt and Tessie, and knocks both out of the park. Zach Trimmer’s performance of “All I Need Now Is the Girl” is beautifully performed, with Amanda Rose’s painful yearning in the same number deeply moving. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

MYSTERIES {BY COLETTE NEWBY}

KINETIC THEATRE’S production of Sherlock’s Last Case, directed by Andrew Paul and written by the late Charles Marowitz, is a fist made of theater which ripped through my chest right for my heart, like in Temple of Doom. It’s the kind of a play that makes every attempt to describe it through metaphor labored through its sheer peculiarity.


It’s less a detective story than a character study — a subgenre of detective story generally enjoyed only by English professors. Misdirection is employed, but to the end of future surprise. There are clues, but only to motivations — the plot twists are happily ridiculous. It’s difficult to talk about Sherlock’s Last Case because, unlike a detective story where the only real spoiler is whodunit — such as The Mousetrap, which enjoyed decades of critical acclaim without a reviewer publicizing the killer (it was his sled) — Last Case pulls the rug out from under the audience several times before curtain call. And these pulls account for the best part of the show. And this is not to cast aspersions on the rest of the show! The cast is admirable, from Weston Blakesley as a very funny Lestrade, and Susie McGregor-Laine’s adorably Scottish Mrs. Hudson, to Moriarty and an ingénue played by Joanna Strapp. The central duo, of course, will dominate your attention. As Holmes, David Whalen manages to bring charm to a role that, drug-addicted misanthrope that Holmes is, could have ended up quite distasteful. Simon Bradbury’s Watson has my affection for humanizing a character who could have gone far off the rails in a story

like this — or faded into the background, as many a Watson before. I don’t want enthusiasm to scrub me entirely of critical faculty. I am relatively sure Watson exits one scene into what has been established as a closet, and the story frequently drops into comic-book stuff, albeit winkingly so, in its devices and even character motivations. That’s

SHERLOCK’S LAST CASE continues through July 26. Charity Randall Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $35. 888-718-4253 or www.kinetictheatre.org

one advantage stage has over page, of course — to see a physical person is to do most of the work in making an emotion believable, relatable — and presumably a reason the detective’s afterlife on the stage has been so long. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

RABBIT HOLES {BY MICHELLE PILECKI}

IN CELEBRATION — or at least commemo-

ration — of the 150th anniversary of the publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adven-

tures in Wonderland, the Rage of the Stage Players have dusted off their 2006 interpretation for a third production. Company coexecutive producer James Michael Shoberg once again directs his Alice’s Adventures in “Wonderland” with an ensemble of double-, triple-, even quadruple-teamed cast and crew. Shoberg himself has nine credits in the program; his wife and co-exec producer, Carrie L. Shoberg, eight. Note the quotation marks. Carroll’s dream Wonderland becomes a nightmare for this Alice (Rachel Carey), a Catholic schoolgirl — an appropriate stand-in for the original in terms of symbolizing innocence, obedience and troublesome intelligence. The talking animals of the Shobergs’ urban dystopia are more metaphorical beasts: predators, pimps and other unpleasantnesses. Kinda like how American suburbanites view any city. Pittsburgh’s answer to Le Théâtre du Grand-Guignol, Paris’ famous (or infamous) gore show, Rage/Stage is more about tropes and tableaux testing the limits of bad taste. But this pastiche has a certain panache: outrageous costumes with a careful eye for character illustration as well as visual impact. Even if you wince at the adolescent sex banter or miss the playwright’s clever allusions to

and distortions of Carroll’s masterpiece, you can just gawk at the many-hatted Mad Hatter or the various dominatrices of the Hearts pack. The garb for the Queen of Hearts (Lilly Van Sixx) is also a marvel of engineering, so that her cups do not runneth over completely.

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN “WONDERLAND” continues through July 25. Rage of the Stage Players at the McKeesport Little Theatre, 1614 Coursin St., McKeesport. $15. 724-292-8427 or www.rageofthestage.com

The first time I encountered the Rage/ Stage Alice, in 2009, it was in a “theater space” more ramshackle and disreputable than the company itself, which shone in a clipped, well-timed production. From the comfortable seats of the thoroughly respectable McKeesport Little Theatre, Alice seems, ironically, less cohesive. The house does provide for greater intimacy, true, but do you really want to be close to these people? Do we need to add that Alice’s Adventures in “Wonderland” is not for kiddies or the tender of heart? There’s something to offend everyone with multi-layered humor and perverse pomp.

Art History Class: Historical Perspectives on Persian and Iranian Art and Culture

Shirin Neshat, Untitled (detail), 1996, © Shirin Neshat. Courtesy Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

4 Sessions: Wednesdays OR Saturdays, July 22–August 15 10:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m. Explore Iran’s rich cultural and artistic history in this unique four-session art history class. Learn about art forms deeply rooted in Persian history—carpets, ceramics, architecture, and calligraphy and painting. Register today at CMOA.ORG.

cmoa.org

| one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

37


LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER

FOR THE WEEK OF

07.1607.23.15

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

THE CUTTING EDGE: SHARPENING WOODWORKING HAND TOOLS Come learn the basics of sharpening chisels, knives, and planes in this hands-on demonstration workshop. You will learn how to assemble a small sharpening kit that will keep your tools going and keep things simple. About the presenter: Regis Will is a woodworker, craftsman, and owner of Vesta Home Services, a consulting firm on house restoration and Do-it-Yourself projects. He blogs about his work at The New Yinzer Workshop.

JULY 17 The Wonderful World of Boning

This workshop is free to PHLF Members. Non-members: $5 Go to www.phlf.org for more information about PHLF membership.

SATURDAY, JULY 18 • 10:00 – 11:30 AM RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

{ART}

412-471-5808

+ THU., JULY 16 {STAGE} If there’s one thing the Irish love, it’s their authors. Tonight, PICT Classic Theatre premieres its production of popular Irish playwright John B. Keane’s Sharon’s Grave, making its U.S. debut at the Henry Heymann Theatre. Aoife Spillane-Hinks directs after helming last year’s acclaimed PICT production of Waiting for Godot. In Sharon’s Grave (1995), Keane weaves Irish mythology into the story of a young woman trying to keep her land after her father’s death. The cast includes local favorites Martin Giles, James FitzGerald and Karen Baum. Joseph Peiser 8 p.m. 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-54. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

like anything to do with the word “pickle,” the inaugural Picklesburgh is for you. JP 3-10 p.m. Also 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sat., July 18. Downtown. Free. www.picklesburgh.com

{PARTY} Tattoos have been a part of human expression for millennia, whether to denote one’s tribe or get back at Mom. Tonight, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History continues its 21-and-over After Dark parties with Inked. Learn the history of

+ FRI., JULY 17 {FESTIVAL}

Do you know what your Pittsburgh city councilor has been up to? Follow the latest updates on our new blog at www.pghcitypaper.com 38

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

inks and what the earliest tattoo patterns symbolized; check out local tattoo artists’ skills; make your own free screenprint; and dance to live music. Beer, wine and hors d’oeuvres can be purchased. JP 6-10 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10-15. 412-622-3131 or www. afterdark.carnegiemnh.org

There’s a two-day pickle festival on the Rachel Carson Bridge — yes, this was fact-checked. Picklesburgh, a free event of the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership with sponsorship by KraftHeinz and Whole Foods, celebrates everything pickled. International pickled dishes; cocktails with pickled ingredients; contests in pickle-juice-drinking and homemade pickling; pickle ice cream — the list goes on. If you

JULY 18 Jen Kirkman

It’s scary to imagine politics without satire; caring about government would be so boring! Thankfully, funny people have been dedicatedly skewering our leaders since the early days of journalism, and tonight the Toonseum unveils a collection of some of the best current political cartoons. Slinging Satire: Political Cartoons and the First Amendment features more than a dozen Pulitzer-winners and work from prominent magazines, websites and newspapers. The exhibit also engages the post-Charlie Hedbo conversation over satire’s rights and limits with cartoons addressing the attack. JP 7-10 p.m. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org


{PHOTO COURTESY OF KULU MELE AFRICAN DANCE AND DRUM ENSEMBLE}

sp otlight

Part of the nation’s largest festival dedicated to African dance, the fourth Dance Africa: Pittsburgh, July 17-18, will feature two evenings of performances, an Afro-Cuban dance workshop and an African marketplace. Presented by The Legacy Arts Project and Kelly-Strayhorn Theater as part of its East Liberty LIVE! series, the event, entitled “The Healing,” is hosted by founder and artistic director of DanceAfrica, world-renowned teacher/choreographer Baba Chuck Davis. Davis started the festival in Brooklyn in 1977, and it has spread to cities including Chicago, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Miami, Denver and Washington, D.C. The nightly two-hour programs include performances by Philadelphia’s Kulu Mele African Dance and Drum Ensemble, Pittsburgh’s Balafon West African Youth Dance Ensemble, The Legacy Arts Project Community Dance Ensemble and dancer/choreographer Anthony Williams. A mix of traditional Afro-Caribbean and West African dance along with African drumming will be on display, celebrating the African diaspora and “highlighting the majesty of African arts,” says Legacy Arts Project executive director Erin Perry. The event will also honor Davis, who is retiring as DanceAfrica artistic director. Steve Sucato 8 p.m. Fri., July 17, and 8 p.m. Sat., July 18. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. $12-20. 412-519-0182 or www.legacyartsproject.org/dance-africa

{COMEDY} Of all the superheroes, the one who could really lighten up is Batman. Some of his friends — but mostly his enemies — seem aware of this, and tonight they’re staging The Roast of Batman, at Club Café, courtesy of Race to the Coffin Comedy. Hosted by Bane (John Dick Winters), the Dark Knight (Ray Zawodni) will be powerless against verbal onslaughts by the likes of the Joker (Alex Stypula), Superman (Travis Walling) and Mr. Freeze (Shannon Norman). This event is 21-and-over. JP 10:30 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $5. 866-468-3401 or www.clubcafelive.com

{SCREEN} Those VHS connoisseurs at the nationally touring Found Footage Festival have a new treat. The Wonderful World of Boning combines clips of vintage sex-ed videos with comedic commentary by hosts Lux Alptraum (a former sex-ed teacher and Fleshbot. com blogger) and former Onion writer Joe Garden. The program includes: “Seriously Fresh” (blending ’90s fashion and slang with HIV ed); “You, Your Body and Puberty”; the 1981 classic “A Family Talks About Sex”; and the animated “What’s Happening to Me?” The on-screen acting is sure to be as good as the scripts at tonight’s midnight showing at Arcade Comedy Theater. Bill O’Driscoll Midnight. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. www. arcadecomedytheater.com

+ SAT., JULY 18 {WORDS} Critically acclaimed, Clevelandbased novelist Kevin P. Keating visits Mystery Lovers Bookshop

N E W S

+ SUN., JULY 19

with his new novel. The Captive Condition (Pantheon Books) concerns a hapless grad student in a small Midwestern college town who gets mixed up with a mysterious death and strange local characters; hallucinogenic cocktails are involved. Explore the dark side of humanity this morning with Keating, coffee and biscotti. BO 10 a.m. 518 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. 412-828-4877 or www.mysterylovers.com

{SCREEN}

JULY 17 Slinging Satire: Political Cartoons and the First Amendment

{FESTIVAL} The Harambee Black Arts Festival, which debuted in 1967, is among the city’s most venerable cultural events, especially those designed to address social issues and foster community unity. The two-day fest closes down part of Kelly Street in Homewood for live jazz, blues, hip hop, R&B, gospel and spoken-word artists; African dance and drumming; an African Market Place and Food Court; a

11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sun., July 19. 7100 Kelly St., Homewood. Free. 412-254-3078

{ART} Sometimes abstract, sometimes suggesting natural or man-

Dismantled and Reclaimed, and his You Only Live Twice. BO 5-8 p.m. Exhibits continue through Aug. 21. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. 412-687-8858 or www. boxheartgallery.com

Studeny’s paintings, meanwhile, are inspired solely by Japanese woodblock prints from the 16th through 18th centuries, from Kuniyoshi’s samurai images to Hokusai’s landscapes. The New York-

When was the last weekend you crossed off your entire to-do list, let alone wrote, shot and edited an entire movie? That’s the challenge of the 48 Hour Film Project, the worldwide timed film competition. Participants started with a prop, a character and a line of dialogue, drew a genre from a hat and got to work. That was last weekend. Screenings of the short films completed by Pittsburgh’s 46 production teams run today through Tuesday at the Hollywood Theater. Audience members can vote for their favorites. Winners vie for a slot at the Cannes Film Festival. JP 3 and 7 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Mon., July 20, and 7 p.m. Tue., July 21. 1499 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $6-8. 412-563-0368 or www.48hourfilm.com/ pittsburgh-pa

{COMEDY} Thanks to her book I Can Barely Take Care of Myself: Tales From a Happy Life Without Kids, Jen Kirkman — appearing tonight at the Rex Theater — is a hero to many in the child-freeby-choice club. “You do not want me to be a mother,” she quips. “If I had a daughter and she was screaming, ‘Mommy, there’s a monster under my bed!’ I’d be like, ‘Of course there is, that’s where they live!’” But breeders, too, can enjoy Kirkman’s conversationally acerbic comedy, honed in regular appearances on Chelsea Lately and on her recent Netflix special, I’m Gonna Die Alone (And I Feel Fine). Margaret Welsh 8 p.m. 1605 E. Carson St., South Side. $15. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

Art by Jim Studeny

JULY 18 Boxheart Gallery

Children’s Village; art displays and more. It starts with today’s parade, which begins at Westinghouse High School. BO 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Also

+

TA S T E

+

made objects, Erin Treacy’s paintings and paper assemblages explore time and fragmentation, inspired principally by nature. Jim

M U S I C

+

based Treacy and Pittsburgh’s own Studeny share an opening reception today at Boxheart Gallery. It’s a good excuse to check out her exhibit,

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

{PUPPETS} The Lovelace Puppet Festival returns for a second year. As part of the Weather Permitting concert series at Shadyside Nursery, organizers Logan Randolph and Nic Marlton offer an evening of local puppetry in honor of pioneering puppeteer Margo Lovelace. The program include Cheryl Capezzuti (and her Giant Puppet Dance Club) and Margaux Mcgartland’s Cargaux of Puppets performing “Ulster Tales,” which adapt Irish mythology. Also expect sets by Small St. Acro Bats, Puppets in Performance and Miko Miko. Food trucks will park nearby. BO 5-9 p.m. 510 Maryland Ave., Shadyside. $10 (free for kids). www.weather permittingpgh.com

C L A S S I F I E D S

39


{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

310 Allegheny River Blvd. MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

OAKMONT | 412-828-6322

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER ALICE’S ADVENTURES CALL FOR INFORMATION ON PRIVATE PARTIES.

FULL BAR and KITCHEN

theoakstheater.com

FRIDAY JULY 17

Bad Movie Nite SATURDAY JULY 18TH

Etta Cox JAZZ BAND

FRIDAY JULY 24 8PM COME DY MAGIC

&

Jim Krenn & Lee Terbosic

Doors open at 7pm!

SATURDAY JULY 25 Hermie Granati ROCK & ROLL

JULY 31ST

Johnny Angel and the Halos RADICAL TRIVIA EVERY SUNDAY @ 7PM

Great prizes! THE OAKS THEATER IS AVAILABLE FOR SUNDAY MORNING CHURCH SERVICE RENTAL. CALL 412.828.6322 FOR DETAILS. TICKET HOTLINE 1.888.718.4253 40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

IN “WONDERLAND”. A dark, comedic twist on the classic story. Presented by Rage of the Stage Players Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 25. McKeesport Little Theater, McKeesport. 724-292-8427. CHICAGO THE MUSICAL. The classic musical presented by the Theatre Factory. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru July 26. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200. CINDERELLA. A children’s theater production of the classic tale. Thru July 22, 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m., Wed, 10 a.m. and Mon, 6:30 p.m. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. DAMN YANKEES. A romantic comedy about trading your soul for baseball. Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 26. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437.

DAMN YANKEES. A musical about summer baseball & love. Thu., July 16, 7:30 p.m., Fri., July 17, 7:30 p.m., Sat., July 25, 2 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 1, 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-386-9687. THE DROWSY CHAPERONE. When a die-hard theatre fan plays his favorite cast album, the characters come to life in this hilarious musical farce. Presented by Stage 62. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru July 27. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-915-4382. GIRLS ONLY: THE SECRET COMEDY OF WOMEN. A show about what women talk about when men aren’t in the room. Sun, 2 p.m., Sat, 2 & 7:30 p.m. and WedFri, 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 16. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. GYPSY. Based on the reallife memoirs of burlesque mega-star, Gypsy Rose Lee,

African dancing, tattoo history and the Polish Hill arts festival Podcast goes live every Thursday at www.pghcitypaper.com

meets Downton Abbey. Gypsy tells the story of the mother behind the curtain, Upstairs meets downstairs Mama Rose. Blinded by her in this glorious romp set in own ambition, Rose pushes the early 20th century. Sun., her two daughters to pave the July 19, 2 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 1, way to stardom on vaudeville’s 7:30 p.m. Twentieth Century legendary circuit. Sat, 2 & Club, Oakland. 412-386-9687. 8 p.m. and Tue-Fri, 8 p.m. MEDEA. The classic tragedy Thru July 19. Benedum Center, by Euripides. July 17, 18, 23, Downtown. 412-456-6666. 24 & 25, 8 p.m., w/ 2 p.m. HOW TO BE A GOODPERSON™. matinee Saturday. Thu-Sat, A radically inclusive theatre 8 p.m. and Sat., July 25, piece about a world 12 p.m. Thru July 26. where facebook likes The Grey Box & systematic racism Theatre, Lawrenceville. receive equal attention. 888-718-4253. Presented by MUCH ADOE www. per Lamplighter pa ABOUT NOTHING. pghcitym Productions. July 16-18, .co The New Renaissance 8 p.m. The Maker Theatre Company Theater, Shadyside. presents The Unrehearsed 412-404-2695. Shakespeare Project’s “Much LAST GAS. A story of love adoe about Nothing” performed & lost in rural Maine. Thu-Sat, using the unrehearsed cue 8 p.m. Thru July 25. Little script technique. Sun., July 19, Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 2 p.m. Collier Community Park, 724-745-6300. Rennerdale. 773-208-7848. THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO. A NEW KIND OF FALLOUT. Mozart’s classic comic opera An Eco-Opera following a typical Pittsburgh family thrown into conflict by the [ARTS] environmental warnings issued in Silent Spring, its themes of stewardship & renewal & impact on one family & their unborn child. Inspired by the 1962 publication of Rachel Carson’s seminal book, Silent Spring. Sat., July 18, 7:30 p.m., Fri., July 24, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., July 26, 2 p.m. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-326-9687. SHERLOCK’S LAST CASE. Spoof on Doyle’s beloved characters & themes. Presented by Kinetic Theatre. Thru July 26. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-225-9145. SWINGTIME CANTEEN. A Hollywood star & her “gal pals” entertain the troops overseas during a 1944 USO canteen show. Thu, Fri, 7:30 p.m. and Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru July 18. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. THE TRUE STORY OF THE 3 LITTLE PIGS. A production of the children’s classic. Sat, 11 a.m. Thru Aug. 1. Twentieth Century Club, Oakland. 412-386-9687. {PHOTO COURTESY OF LESLIE CLAGUE}

FULL LIST ONLINE

The Polish Hill Arts Festival celebrates its eighth year of quirky and eclectic neighborhood fun. Thirty artists and craft vendors will set up shop on the closed-down streets to the tune of all-day live music. Hands-on art activities for every age encourage your creative side while food trucks and vendors camp out to fill your stomach (vegan and vegetarian options will abound). Bring your family and friends for a day of relaxed fun. Noon-9 p.m. Sun., July 19. Brereton and Dobson streets, Polish Hill. Free. www.phcapgh.org/events

COMEDY THU 16 DERICK MINTO. Open mic. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu, 10 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. CONTINUES ON PG. 42


VISUALART “Medallions” (acrylic, copper on paper, 2015), by Marlana Adele Vassar. From the exhibition Gamine, at The Gallery 4, Shadyside.

NEW THIS WEEK NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Urban Gurlz III URBANRURAL. Photography by Mary Williams & Marylloyd Claytor. Opening reception July 18, 1-3 p.m. Ross. 412-364-3622.

ONGOING 4823 PENN AVE. Studies in Topophilia. Charcoal sketches on vellum by Carolyn Wenning. Garfield. 709 PENN GALLERY. I’ve Been Out Walking. Ashley Jean Hickey’s solo exhibition featuring new work inspired by the woods. Downtown. 412-377-3786. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Pearlstein, Warhol, Cantor: From Pittsburgh to New York. Work from these artists from their time as students at Carnegie Tech to their early days in New York. Treasure/Trash. Works by local artist Elizabeth A. Rudnick. Andy’s Toybox. A playful installation of Warhol’s paintings, prints, & photographs from the late 1970s & 1980s. Glycerine & Rosewater. A site specific artwork by the German/ Dutch artist Stefan Hoffmann, using his unique process of vertical silkscreen printing. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300.

ART INSTITUTE OF PITTSBURGH. Impractical Magic: The Other Side of Practical. Work from Art Institute students & alumni. Downtown. 412-263-6600. ART SPACE 616. Trace Elements. Work by William Earl Kofmehl III & Stephanie Armbruster. Sewickley. 412-259-8214. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ASSEMBLE. Aqui. An exhibition curated by Maritza Mosquera of works that exude place, belonging & strength of vision & a premiere Cafe Con Leche’s short video “What does it mean to be a Pittsburgh Latin@?”. Garfield. 412-432-9127. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Works on Paper. Work by TJ Sheehan. More works in the adjoining “Different Strokes Gallery” by Ellie Brendlinger & Claire Hardy. Verona. 412-828-1031. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Sketch to Structure. Unfolding the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. Jacqueline Humphries. Comprised of entirely new works, the artist’s

first solo museum exhibition in nearly a decade of her silver & black-light paintings. She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World. The work of 12 leading women photographers who have tackled the notion of representation w/ passion & power, questioning tradition & challenging perceptions of Middle Eastern identity. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CITY-COUNTY BUILDING. Shared Border, Shared Dreams. A student exhibit that simulates living as undocumented immigrant in the U.S. Downtown. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Landscapes & Figure Drawings. Ceramic plates & platters by Kyle Houser. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Jack Ann Kate. Work by John McGinley, Ann Averback, Kate Bonello. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). CONTINUES ON PG. 43

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

41


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 40

PITTSBURGH TATTOO CO M PA N Y THURSDAY JULY 16/10PM MOTHER’S LITTLE HELPERS THURSDAY JULY 23/10PM DEL RIOS, SQUATCHKILL THURSDAY AUGUST 20/10PM IMPOSSIBLE COLORS, THE LENTILS $2.75 PBR POUNDERS OR PBR DRAFTS

ALL DAY, EVERY DAY 2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 lavaloungepgh.com

[STAGE]

FRI 17 THE ROAST OF BATMAN. Hosted by John Dick Winters w/ Alex Stypula, James J Hamilton, Ian Insect, Travis Walling, Jeff Konkle, Derek Minto, Shannon Norman, & Ray Zawodni. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-610-2052. THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF BONING. Writer, sex educator, & funny lady Lux Alptraum teams up w/ comedian friends to take a tour of classic sex education videos. 11:55 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

SAT 18

103 SMITHFIELD STREET D O W N T O W N PITTSBURGH, PA 15222

412.201.9075

Walk-ins Welcome!

BETA STAGE: EXPERIMENTAL NEW COMEDY. A weekly platform showcasing new, experimental, & studentgenerated comedy. 6 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JEN KIRKMAN. 8 p.m. Rex Theater, South Side. 412-381-6811.

MON 20 COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. Local & out-oftown comedians. Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. TOTALLY FUN MONDAYS. SCIT resident house teams perform their brand of long form improv comedy. Mon, 8 p.m. The Maker Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 21 TUESDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Tue, 9 p.m. Hot Rod Cafe, Mt. Washington. 412-592-7869.

WED 22 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Ronald Renwick. Wed, 9:30 p.m. Scarpaci’s Place, Mt. Washington. 412-431-9908.

If you dream of setting sail with pirates (the swashbuckling old-school kind), A Pirate’s Tale might be the ticket. This original musical about a mutiny aboard a 16th-century pirate ship is actually offered at sea … OK, as part of a Gateway Clipper Fleet river cruise. The show is written by Shaun Rolly (best known as a fight choreographer) and local composer Paul Shapera. Tickets include show, cruise, “pirate-themed food” and a meet-and-greet with the cast of 12. Five performances remain, from July 29-Oct. 16. Departs from Gateway Clipper dock, South Side. $20-35. 412-355-7980 or www.PiratesTaleMusical.com

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY Southwestern PA. Homestead. HERITAGE MUSEUM. 412-464-4020. Military artifacts & exhibits CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF on the Allegheny Valley’s NATURAL HISTORY. Out of industrial heritage. Tarentum. This World! Jewelry in the 724-224-7666. Space Age. A fine jewelry ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE exhibition that brings together LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. scientific fact & pop culture Capt. Thomas Espy Room in a showcase of wearable & Tour. The Capt. Thomas decorative arts related Espy Post 153 of the to outer space, space Grand Army of the travel, the space age, Republic served local & the powerful Civil War veterans for influence these over 54 years & is the . w w w topics have had best preserved & most per ghcitypa p on human civilization. intact GAR post in the .com Animal Secrets. Learn United States. Carnegie. about the hidden lives of 412-276-3456. ants, bats, chipmunks, raccoons BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. & more. Dinosaurs in Their Large collection of automatic Time. Displaying immersive roll-played musical instruments & environments spanning the music boxes in a mansion setting. Mesozoic Era & original fossil Call for appointment. O’Hara. specimens. Permanent. Hall of 412-782-4231. Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems BOST BUILDING. Collectors. & precious stones from all over Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of the world. Population Impact.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

How humans are affecting the environment. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. H2Oh! Experience kinetic water-driven motion & discover the relations between water, land & habitat. How do everyday decisions impact water supply & the environment? Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad & Village, USS Requin submarine & more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Carrie Blast Furnace. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x 21. COMPASS INN. Demos & tours w/ costumed guides feat. this restored stagecoach stop. North Versailles. 724-238-4983.

CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement & history of the Depreciation Lands. A llison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & EuroAmerican communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape. This exhibit explores landscape painting in Britain form the Industrial Revolution to the eras of Romanticism. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China & Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures & more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. MOUNT PLEASANT GLASS MUSEUM. The Bryce Family & the Mount Pleasant Factory. Telling the story of the Bryce


VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. upStage – An Exploratory of Dance. Work by Peggi Habets, Claire Hardy, Jeannie McGuire & Christine Swann. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. High Voltage. Works by Ron Nigro, Aaron Regal & Bruce Senchesen. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Gamine. Work by Marlana Adele Vassar. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY-VERY FINE ART. Group Show. Work by Linda Price-Sneddon, Peggy Habets, James E. Trusko & others. South Side. 412-901-8805. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. HILL HOUSE KAUFMANN CENTER. Nathan Schritter. An exhibit of work in traditional black & white photography of regional jazz greats. Hill District. 412-281-1026. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. sidewall: a mural project’s first annual group show. A show about the mural artists who participated in sidewall’s first year,celebrating their bodies of work beyond what they have already shared in their murals. Garfield. 412-924-0634. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Lakevue. 724-316-9326. MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY. Veiled Instinct. Work by Lauren Wilcox.

family & their contributions. Mount Pleasant. 724-547-5929. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past.

At the Rum Room. Strip District. 724-884-3261. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MOST-WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. DolliriousThe Art of the Doll. Doll work of all mediums from more than 15 artists, celebrating the dark & unusual, spiritual, whimsical side of doll art. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NEMACOLIN GALLERY. A Midsummers Night. A solo exhibition w/ work by Paul McMillan. Nemacolin. 412-337-4976. PANZA GALLERY. Artist’s Choice Exhibition. Members of the Pittsburgh Society of Artists present works of their choice. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 90 Pittsburgh Neighborhoods. Work by Ron Donoughe. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS. PhAb Now! Photography by Corey Escoto, April Friges, Lori Hepner, Jesse Kauppila, Todd Keyser & Barbara Weissberger. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Out of the Archives & Into the Gallery. An exploration of history & historic artistic technique in glass. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINTBREEZEWAY. Kamili. An exhibition of work by Hannibal Hopson & Amani Davis that reflects their mission to use recycled materials & let the objects determine the form & message. Point Breeze. 412-770-7830. REVISION SPACE. Immediate Realities. Feat. work by international street artists & pop-surrealists. Lawrenceville. 412-735-3201. RUNAWAY STUDIOS. Hi Lo. Work on the anxieties

University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic

of both loss & reclamation of identity, by Dianna Settles. Bloomfield. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. London/Pittsburgh. A solo exhibit w/ work by photographer, Mark Neville. South Side. 412-431-1810. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 13. Work by Elisabeth Higgins, Keith Lo Bue, & Jason Walker. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. The Rights of Passage, Memory of Palestine. Work by Samira Shaheen. Friendship. www.artspace.org. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Sips, Shots & Gulps. A national exhibition of handmade ceramic drinking vessels. W/ work by : Charlie Alessi, Mariana Baquero, Seth Charles, Christy Culp, Myka Hayden, Kyle Hendrix, Leslie Hinton, Molly Johnson, Madeline Klusmire, Lucien M. Koonce, Gretchen Kriner, Cassandra Loos, Carolyn Mimbs, Abbie Nelson, Maryann Parker, Caitlin Ross, Lindsey Scherloum, Ian Shelly, Molly Uravitch, Dallas Wooten & Lisa York. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. Fridays 10 a.m.-4 p.m. & by appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. UNSMOKE SYSTEMS ARTSPACE. Other Books Other Worlds. A mixed media group show feat. David Newbury, Brad & Stephanie Towell, Lena Loshonkohl & Co Bappe. Braddock. www.unsmoke artspace.com. VAGABOND GALLERY. A pop up gallery featuring work from local artists through the end of July. Feat. the art of local artists Carolyn Pierotti, Chris Galiyas, Elizabeth Claire Rose, & Lora Finelli. Shadyside. 412-913-4966.

area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Watch as model trains chug through living landscapes & displays of lush foliage & vibrant blooms. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world.Tropical Forest Congo. An

exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Maz’s Camera. See & touch the giant, heavy camera that snapped the photo of Bill Mazeroski rounding bases, winning the 1960 World Series that was made into his statue at PNC Park. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. We Can Do It!: WWII. Discover how Pittsburgh affected World War II & the war affected our region. Explore the development of the Jeep, produced in Butler, PA & the stories behind real-life “Rosie the Riveters” & local Tuskegee Airmen whose contributions made an unquestionable impact on the war effort. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial

4320 Northern Pike Monroeville, PA

St. Marys, PA

www.straubbeer.com

FEATURES ES

$2.50 $3.50 16 oz. DRAFT

CONTINUES ON PG. 44

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

43


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

{PHOTO BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

*Stuff We Like

village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

DANCE

EVENT: Premiere of

FRI 17 - SAT 18

The Gray Cat & the Flounder

DANCE AFRICA. Performances by Kulu Mele African Dance & Drum Ensemble, the Balafon West African Youth Dance Ensemble, Anthony Williams & The Legacy Arts Project. African marketplace & Afro-Cuban dance workshop. July 17-18, 8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-452-3847.

at Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble, South Side CRITIC: David Mente, 56, a psychotherapist from Greenfield WHEN: Fri.,

FUNDRAISERS Oakland in Summer It’s exactly like it is any other time of year, except warmer and with fewer students clogging up the line at Dave & Andy’s.

Mislaid

{PHOTO BY ASHLEY MURRAY}

Nell Zink’s culturally relevant (see: Rachel Dolezal) sophomore novel about love, race and white privilege.

THU 16 GOLF FORE! DEPAUL. Support the programs & services for students attending DePaul School for Hearing & Speech. 10:30 a.m. Edgewood Country Club, Penn Hills. 412-924-1012.

SAT 18 HOWLING THE BLUES. Live music from the Mystic Knights Blues Band, raffles & foster dogs. Benefits Distinguished Doberman Rescue. 6-10 p.m. Nied’s Hotel, Lawrenceville. 412-559-1877.

WED 22

Market Street Grocery

{PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

This small grocery store just off of Market Square offers produce, dry goods, meats and fish, plus prepared foods, coffee bar and a Gaby et Jules satellite stand for your French pastry needs. www.marketstreetgrocery.com

The 28X Airport Flyer Take the bus to the airport: Avoid traffic jams and save outrageous parking fees or taxi fares. Pro tip: Board in Oakland for best seats. www.portauthority.com

44

It was another incredible multimedia event that stimulates you in all kinds of different ways and leaves you feeling like the whole is more than the sum of its parts. It surprised me sometimes how beautiful some of the visuals are in this thing that’s mostly about music. The visuals were always really stunning, and it’s really cool how it all fits together. The pieces where they put [musicians] in different parts of the theater really just used the space vertically and really opened the whole thing up. I come to these every year, and I think they get more interesting as they go along. They tend to get more adventurous, and this was pretty adventurous with the puppet show, cartoons, story and Stephen Foster songs.

SUN 19 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

WHISKEY FOR WATER. Fundraiser event for Engineers Without Borders Pittsburgh Professional Chapter. 6 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-235-7796.

LITERARY THU 16 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafter happyhour.wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117.

SAT 18 PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729.

July 10

B Y J OS E P H P E I S E R

TUE 21 PITTSBURGH CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY READING GROUP. Tue, 6 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 22 LILLIE LEONARDI. The author of “In the Shadow of the Bridge: A Memoir about Flight 93, A Field of Angels, and My Spiritual Homecoming” will be speaking about her book & experiences. 6:30 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Book discussion hosted by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. This month’s meeting is about poems by Elizabeth Bishop. Fourth Wed of every month, 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-481-7636.

Very Lonely Firefly, The Very Clumsy Click Beetle & The Very Busy Spider. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 18 M3: MATERIALS, MEDIA, AND ME! Explore a new material & make a project every Saturday of the summer! For youth in 4th through 8th grade. Sat. Thru Aug. 29 Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127.

SAT 18 - SUN 19 BUG FAIR: THE YEAR OF THE BEETLE. Enjoy beetlethemed activities, beetle races, & meet beetle experts from the museum. 12 p.m. and Sun., July 19, 12 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

MON 20

KIDSTUFF

MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

THU 16 - WED 22

TUE 21

VERY ERIC CARLE. A play & learn exhibit featuring activities inspired by five of Eric Carle’s classic books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Quiet Cricket, The

HOMEWORK HELP. For grades 1-8. Tue, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-432-9127. KIDSPLAY. Free educational programming w/ music, dancing & hands-on activities

for preschool aged children. New theme every week. Tue, 10-11:30 a.m. Thru Aug. 25 Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511.

OUTSIDE SAT 18 CELEBRATE THE BLOOM. Music, outdoor activities, artisan vendors, food, & more. 9 a.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. Annual Chanterelle Hunt w/ Valerie & Jack Baker. Meet at the North Park swimming pool parking lot. 10 a.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

SUN 19 GEAR & CHEER 5K RUN & WALK. 9 a.m. Brady’s Run Park Lodge, Beaver Falls.

WED 22 EDIBLE TEACHING GARDEN WORKSHOP. Workshop will focus on organic controls in the garden. 7 p.m. Office of Penn State Extension, Point Breeze. 412-860-4179. FARMERS AT PHIPPS. Shop for local, organic & Certified Naturally Grown on Phipps front lawn. Wed, 2:306:30 p.m. Thru Oct. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 16 ART NIGHTS AT THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Bring your own medium for a communal creation night w/ music by King Friday. Third Thu of every month, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. BEATS N’ EATS. A neighborhood dance party, mixer & lunch w/ music & food trucks. 12 p.m. KellyStrayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000. CITY OF STEEL. Ken Kobus, author of City of Steel: How Pittsburgh Became the World’s Steelmaking Capital During the Carnegie Era”, will talk about early steelmaking in Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. DEER & PEST CONTROL WORKSHOP. Hosted by the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture. 6-8 p.m. Morris Organic Farm. pasafarming.org GANGS & OUTLAWS OF WESTERN PA. Author & historian Thomas White explores tales of the region’s


dark side. 12:15 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: MODERN ORGANIZED CRIME. 6:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. INTRODUCTION TO REIKI. Reiki is a Japanese Healing Tradition based on the premise that our bodies are part of a larger field of universal energy that can impact our overall well being. Rebecca will discuss how Reiki & other similar healing modalities work. Registration required. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Homewood. 412-242-3598. JUDAISM: A SUMMER SAMPLER. Topic is “Shabbat” led by Rabbi Stephanie Wolfe. 7 p.m. Panera Bread, Downtown. 412-372-1200. LAN IN THE HIGHLANDS. 300 person XBOX & PC gaming LAN party. 4 p.m. Seven Springs, Seven Springs. 252-955-6092. MIMI, AL-LIN & KAI TOGETHER AGAIN. A celebration & performance of Chinese music. 7 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. REFUGEE & IMMIGRANT CAREER FAIR. For refugees & immigrants w/ legal status to work in the U.S. who have a minimum of conversational English through those w/ advanced English, professional skills & higher education. Attendees are encouraged to dress professionally, bring multiple copies of their resume & research employers & available positions beforehand. 9 a.m. Human Services Building, Downtown. 412-904-5947. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. SUMMER GALA. Food from bellfarm Kitchen Bar & First Class Caterers, music by The Mavens, wine tasting, barbecue-style games, prizes & more. 5:30 p.m. Roselea Farms, Coraopolis. 412-264-6270. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768.

N E W S

THE HISTORY OF FIRE DEPARTMENTS IN MCKEESPORT. Lecture presented by Michelle Wardle. 2 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832. SILK SCREEN FILM LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS’ FESTIVAL. A showcase of MARKET. Near Allegheny Asian films & filmmakers Valley Bank. Sat, 1-4 p.m. w/ 30 feature films & Thru Oct. 31 412-802-7220. 8 short films at the Regent LIVING HISTORY: Square Theater, Melwood COOKING. Re-enactors Screening Room & Melwood will use seasonal ingredients Classroom. For more info, to prepare foods common visit silkscreenfestival.org. to the diets of 18th century Thru July 19. Pittsburghers. Third Sat of every month, 10 a.m.4 p.m. Thru Aug. 22 AFRICAN DANCE Point State Park, CLASS. Second Downtown. and Third Fri of 412-281-9284. every month and THE PITTSBURGH www. per a p ty Fourth and Last Fri THUNDERBIRDS. pghci m o .c of every month Competing in Irma Freeman Center the American Ultimate for Imagination, Disc League. 7 p.m. Garfield. 412-924-0634. Cupples Stadium, BEECHVIEW BRAWL. South Side. 330-979-9347. Pro wrestling, food carts, SCOTTISH COUNTRY family friendly. Presented DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., by the Keystone State social dancing follows. No Wrestling Alliance. 6 p.m. partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. 1544 Broadway Ave., and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Beechview. 412-726-1762. Church, Mt. Washington. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA 412-683-5670. DANCE. A social, traditional SOUTH HILLS American dance. No partner SCRABBLE CLUB. Free needed, beginners welcome, Scrabble games, all levels. lesson at 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon Swisshelm Park Community Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Center, Swissvale. 412-945-0554. 412-531-1912. INKED..AFTER DARK. SWING CITY. Learn & Cocktails, museum exploration practice swing dancing skills & tattoo history. 6 p.m. w/ the Jim Adler Band. Sat, Carnegie Library, Oakland. 8 p.m. Wightman School, 412-622-3131. Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. ROCK AND ROLL DRIVE-IN. THE PITTSBURGH Bands include Nox Boys, BREWERY TOUR. Visit Vertigo-Go, Ninth Ward, three breweries in Pittsburgh, Stone Cold Killer, The Goodfoots w/ craft beer samples & more. The movies include & guided tours at each Chained for Life, The Terror brewery. 11:30 a.m. of Tiny Town, Mad Youth, The BeerHive, Strip District. Omoo-Omoo, The Shark God, 412-323-4709. & Reefer Madness. 6 p.m. URBAN CHICKEN FARMING. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. Hannah Reiff discusses 412-563-0368. chick brooding, best backyard SUMMER FRIDAYS AT chicken breeds, housing THE FRICK. Picnicking, tours, & runs, feed, waterers, & wine bar, yard games, music basic natural chicken care. & different food trucks every 2:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, week. Fri, 5-9 p.m. Thru Aug. 7 Downtown. 412-281-7141. Frick Art & Historical Center, WIGLE WHISKEY Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, BEGINNER TAI CHI North Side. 412-224-2827. CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. WOMEN’S SELF CARE Friends Meeting House, SUPPORT GROUP. Reduce Oakland. 412-683-2669. stress, tackle anxiety & BONE & JOINT HEALTH strengthen boundaries while SERIES. Doctors Anton building practical coping Plakseychuk & Ken Urish techniques & tools in a as they discuss the causes confidential, healing & of arthritis & available supportive environment. Sat, treatment options. 10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. Anchorpoint Concordia of South Hills, Scott. Counseling Ministry, North Hills. 412-641-5486. 412-366-1300 ex. 129. FAMILY DYNAMICS ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted WORKSHOP. 12 p.m. by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. Trinity Evangelical and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church Lutheran Church, Mt. Oliver. of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-853-3189. 412-965-9903. ZEN MEDITATION. Hosted by City Dharma. Thu, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sat, 7-8:30 a.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903.

THU 16 - SUN 19

FRI 17

FULL LIST ONLINE

HARAMBEE BLACK ARTS FESTIVAL. Located on the 7100 block of Kelly Street between N. Homewood & N. Lang Avenues. Featuring stage performances of African dance & drumming, live jazz, blues, hip hop, R&B, gospel & spoken word artists, an African Market Place & Food Court, the Legacy Art Gallery, & a Children’s Village. 11 a.m. and Sun., July 19, 11 a.m. Community Empowerment Association, Wilkinsburg. 412-254-3078.

for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Third Sun of every month, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. POLISH HILL ARTS FESTIVAL. Art & craft vendors, live music, hands-on kids’ activities & food vendors. 12-9 p.m. Brereton & Dobson St., Polish Hill. 412-681-1950. SUNDAY MARKET. A gathering of local crafters & dealers selling unique items, from home made foodstuffs to art. Sun, 6-10 p.m. The Night Gallery, Lawrenceville. 724-417-0223.

SUN 19

MON 20

SAT 18 - SUN 19

BOARD GAME NIGHT. Third and First Sun of every month, 6 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-437-8676. CARRIE FURNACES PHOTO SAFARI. The 3-hour photo safaris will be led by Ivette Spradlin, a CubanAmerican photographer, video artist & educator. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 12, 1-4 p.m. Carrie Furnace, Rankin. MARGARET LOVELACE PUPPET FESTIVAL. 5 p.m. Shadyside Nursery, Shadyside. 412-251-6058. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, education & advocacy

A NIGHT FOR NEPAL. Katie Brown, relief worker, Bibhuti Aryal, founder of Rukmini Foundation & Diwas Timsina, founder of Children of Shangri-Lost, will speak about the work they are doing in Pittsburgh to help those in need in Nepal. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. ROBOTO MONTHLY MEETING. Meet w/ the Roboto board of directors to find out what’s happening at the space & help guide its future. Third Mon of every month, 7 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. 412-853-0518.

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

MON 20 - TUE 21 ESSENTIAL GRANT SKILLS TRAINING. 8:30 a.m. and Tue., July 21, 8:30 a.m. Bayer Center for Nonprofit Management, Downtown. 800-421-9512.

TUE 21 CAPOEIRA ANGOLA. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, Garfield. 412-924-0634. FALLOW GROUNDS & NEU CITY PANEL DISCUSSIONS. A panel discussion w/ Michael Koliner, Anika Hirt & Georgina Brett, the June & July resident artists. They will discuss their projects taking place in the community & how their previous projects have informed the processes they’ve used. 7-9 p.m. Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, North Side. 412-322-2224. URBAN HOMESTEADING SERIES: MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S JAM. Learn how to preserve berries to make jam. 6 p.m. Penn State Center Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-482-3464. CONTINUES ON PG. 46

SAT 18

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

45


BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 45

for both galleries for 2017. to adult. Prepare a short Exhibits run from 1 monologue & song for the to 2 months. Ongoing. musical, The Secret Garden. 412-721-0943. August 9, 7 p.m. at the THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking Seton Center & August 10, performers & artists to 7 p.m. at the Schoolhouse Arts participate in First Fridays Center. 412-254-4633. Art in a Box. For more THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN information, email CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. thedapcoopzumba@ Seeking young singers from hotmail.com. Ongoing. 8th through 12th grades. 412-403-7357. Prepared solo of your choice, BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY preferably a classical selection GROUP. For Widows/Widowers HOUR REVIEW. Seeking (art song, aria, etc.) Carefully over 50. Second and Fourth submissions in all genres selected works from musical Wed of every month, for fledgling literary magazine theater may be performed, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, curated by members of but these should demonstrate Ross. 412-366-1300. the Hour After Happy a classical singing technique CARIBBEAN DANCE Hour Writing Workshop. rather than belting. WORKSHOP. afterhappyhourreview.com To schedule an Learn dances Ongoing. audition, call from Puerto Rico, INDEPENDENT FILM Emily Stewart at Haiti, the Dominican NIGHT. Submit your film, 412-926-2488. www. per pa Republic & Cuba. 10 minutes or less. Screenings Auditions will pghcitym o .c Wed, 7-8:30 p.m. held on the second Thursday be conducted on Thru July 29 Assemble, of every month. Ongoing. August 27, after Garfield. 412-432-9127. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, 3:30 p.m. Third DETROIT STYLE URBAN Greensburg. 724-219-0804. Presbyterian Church, Oakland. BALLROOM DANCE. JOHNSTOWN FILM MON RIVER ARTS. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. FESTIVAL. Accepting Auditions for Urinetown Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. original short films of 30 the Musical. Prepare 32 bars 412-242-4345. minutes of less. Any genre. of a Broadway Musical & DRINK TEA & DRAW. All entries must be submitted come dressed to dance. Creatives come out & literally on DVD, non blu-ray, & will Accompanist provided. draw out your ideas, share, not be returned. For more Audition dates are July 19, collaborate, enjoy. 6 p.m. info, www.johnstownfilmfest.org. 2-5 p.m., July 20, 6-9 p.m., Arnold’s Tea House, North Side. Thru July 18. & July 21, 7-9 p.m. Mon 412-339-0608. THE NEW YINZER. River Arts Studio, Elizabeth. MOBILE ART W/ ROMIBO. Seeking original essays 412-405-8425. An outdoor art program w/ ipads. 10 a.m. Highland Park. ORGANIC CONTROLS IN [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] THE GARDEN. A workshop presented by the Penn State Extension Master Gardeners. 7-8 p.m. Edible Teaching Garden, Point Breeze. PFLAG WASHINGTON. The Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank is seeking Support, education & volunteers to help run the Pittsburgh Blues Festival on advocacy for the LGBTQ the weekend of July 24-26. Help is needed taking tickets, community, family & friends. working concessions, facilitating children’s activities Fourth Wed of every month and directing parking. Volunteers must be 18 years and First Presbyterian Church, older, as well as able to stand and walk for long periods Downtown. 412-471-3436. of time. For more information, visit www.pghblues.com/ THE PITTSBURGH volunteers. SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, NEW CASTLE PLAYERS. about literature, music, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. Seeking 5 men & 3 women TV or film, & also essays SPEAK FREELY W/ LUIS for a farce. July 20 & 21, generally about Pittsburgh. VON AHN. Lecture from 7 p.m. Annex theatre. To see some examples, visit the co-founder of Duolingo. New Castle Playhouse, www.newyinzer.com & view 6-8 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, New Castle. 724-654-3437. the current issue. Email East Liberty. 412-363-3000. all pitches, submissions & TAROT CARD LESSONS. Wed, inquiries to newyinzer@gmail.com. 7 p.m. Dobra Tea, Squirrel Hill. THE AUTHORS’ ZONE. Ongoing. 412-449-9833. Accepting submissions for THE POET BAND the 2nd Annual TAZ Awards, COMPANY. Seeking showcasing independent GREENSBURG CIVIC various types of poetry. authors from Southwestern THEATRE. Applications are Contact wewuvpoetry@ PA & beyond. Entrants must being accepted for directors & hotmail.com Ongoing. complete the online entry form choreographers for its 2015-16 TOONSEUM. Seeking (www.theauthorszone.com) & season of adult & Greasepaint submit payment by August 1, 2015 sequential artists to submit Players’ family productions. works for consideration for their work to be considered. Candidates should send a theatre for the upcoming exhibit, 412-563-6712. resume including directorial “Drawn In Pittsburgh: BOULEVARD GALLERY references by July 24 to info@ Local Cartoonist Showcase”. & DIFFERENT STROKES gctheatre.org. Greensburg For more information, visit GALLERY. Searching for glass Garden and Civic Center, http://www.toonseum.org/. artists, fiber artists, potters, Greensburg. 724-836-1757. Deadline July 31. The ToonSeum, etc. to compliment the exhibits THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Seeking actors ages 10 for 2015 & 2016. Booking Downtown. 412-232-0199. THE WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA MUSHROOM CLUB. An introduction to Microscopy for Mushroom Identification. WPMC Mycologist La Monte Yarroll will present an introduction to studying mushrooms w/ a microscope. 7 p.m. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

WED 22

FULL LIST E N O LIN

PITTSBURGH BLUES FESTIVAL

SUBMISSIONS

AUDITIONS

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015


MASSAGE

Savage Love

M2M 412-494-8170 AMY! 412-657-5278

{BY DAN SAVAGE}

My boyfriend and I have been together for two years. I moved in a year ago, and we have been happy living together since. During the past year, I’ve come across a lot of his ex’s old belongings — letters and pictures. It’s not like I snoop. He’s kind of a hoarder, and I frequently find this stuff tucked in books or drawers. It’s starting to frustrate me. I long ago threw away most of my ex’s things, and the stuff I did keep is stored in a box that’s out of sight and mind. I don’t necessarily want him to throw all this stuff away, but I want to feel comfortable in our shared environment. I also want to be able to think about our life together and not his past. How do I communicate this? EX’S VARIOUS ITEMS DISTURB ENTIRELY NEW COUPLE’S ENVIRONS

I’m like your boyfriend — not a hoarder, but definitely a tucker. I tuck letters and photos and other keepsakes into books, stuff them in the backs of drawers, set them on shelves or beside the rest of the tchotchkes. I do this because (1) I’m not organized/depressed enough to scrapbook, and (2) I like running across old photos or letters when I’m looking for something else. Perhaps your boyfriend feels the same way — or maybe your boyfriend is a hoarder and a slob. Either way, EVIDENCE, my advice is the same: Own up to your insecurities — tell him that there’s nothing about his past that should prevent you from enjoying your present — and then ask him to make a reasonable accommodation. Tell him you would like to place his ex’s pictures and letters, as you run across them, into a box that’s clearly labeled and easily accessed, but out of sight and mind. If he says yes, EVIDENCE, take that yes for an answer. That means putting whatever you find away, refraining from griping at your boyfriend about the stuff he chooses to hold on to, and reassuring yourself that a day will soon come when your shared environment is completely ex-proofed.

With my past four serious girlfriends/sexual partners, I noticed that my sweat began to smell more like theirs after we had been sleeping together for a while. Is that a real thing or is it all in my head? SWEAT TURNING INTO NEW KINK

I haven’t heard of this, STINK, and it might be all in your head — but my hunch is that it’s all in your diet. The things you ingest impact the scent of all of your bodily fluids, some more noticeably than others, and the longer you’re with a particular woman, the likelier you are to be sharing the same meals, the same wines, the same beers, juices, recreational drugs, etc., and this is probably what’s causing your sweat to smell more like theirs the longer you’re together. Mom came for a week and snooped. She found our bondage stuff, just a set of cuffs and a blindfold, and completely lost her mind. What do we say to her? MY OUTRAGED MOM’S MADLY YELLING

MAN TO MAN 412-734-5399

BLONDIE 412-805-2557 HOT STUFF $95 724-513-8876

“It’s a hotel for you next time.” I am a wife and a cuckold. I’m turned on when my husband sleeps with other women. I have wanted to pursue these fantasies pretty much for as long as I have been in serious relationships. My husband and I have been married for four years, and we worked hard to get to where we are today, learning how to communicate and setting rules. Lately, though, I feel like my feelings are changing. While we do all our communicating with other women in group-chat settings, my husband has more free time than I do. Some days I wake up to literally hundreds of message exchanges, and I can’t keep up or get a word in. Making it worse: I oftentimes have to talk to him about mundane things, like bills and what we are having for dinner, while his conversations with other women revolve around hot sexts. We have better sex than ever, and I come harder, faster and more often after he has been with another woman. But I am not sure how to reconcile these feelings of jealousy and inadequacy. I worry that he’s thinking, “What am I doing with her when I could be by myself and get all the pussy I want?” I do not want to quit seeing other women (see the bit about hot, hot sex), but I do not know how to balance my fears and jealousy.

“THERE’S NOTHING ABOUT HIS PAST THAT SHOULD PREVENT YOU FROM ENJOYING YOUR PRESENT.”

MASSAGE

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

TS

TS CARAMEL

ADULT ENTERTAINER

Man 2 Man Massage by Lee

DOMINATE CURVY BRAZILIAN SHEMALE

Professional and Discreet 24/7

412-628-1269 COOL DOWN

with a Rub Down Domination/ Role Playing. DAILY SPECIALS Interviewing Ladies.

412-277-1589

VISITING JULY 15th thru JULY 21st

781-504-2790 MENS HEALTH VIAGRA 100MG, CIALIS 20mg. 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement! Discreet Shipping. SAVE $500. Buy the Blue Pill Now! 1-800-404-1271 (AAN CAN)

TROUBLE IN MY INTENSE DESIRES

Always nice to hear from the exception that proves the rule — typically, husbands get straight couples into cuckolding — but you’re not a cuckold, TIMID. Cuckolds are men. Women who are turned on when their husbands cheat on them are cuckqueans. (Credit to Annie W., a former co-worker who introduced me to that term.) OK, TIMID, let’s make a list of everything your husband would lose if he dumped you: love, stability, history, family, intimacy, hot sex and someone to co-tackle the day-to-day crap (cleaning, bills, dinner) that he would otherwise have to tackle all by himself. He would also lose a wife who’s happy to let her husband fuck other women — lots of other women — and those wives are few and far between. I’m not saying you’re wrong to feel insecure, just that you have more leverage — and more value — than you seem to realize. Inform your husband that these feelings of jealousy and inadequacy — which are fueled by his thoughtlessness and inconsideration — are putting your arrangement and maybe even your marriage at risk. Your cuckquean marriage, which he ought to regard as a paradise, is only gonna work so long as you feel included (in the fun) and secure (in his commitment). Tell him he has to cut way, way back on the sexting, which has gotten way the fuck out of hand, and that he has to make an effort to include you more, or he risks getting cast out of paradise. On the Lovecast, Dan talks with special guest Tristan Taormino: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

47


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

07.15-07.22

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “A poet must not cross an interval with a step when he can cross it with a leap.” That’s an English translation of an aphorism written by French author Joseph Joubert. Another way to say it might be, “A smart person isn’t drab and plodding as she bridges a gap, but does it with high style and brisk delight.” A further alternative: “An imaginative soul isn’t predictable as she travels over and around obstacles, but calls on creative magic to fuel her ingenious liberations.” Please use these ideas during your adventures in the coming weeks, Cancerian.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): July is barely half over, but your recent scrapes with cosmic law have already earned you the title of “The Most Lyrically Tormented Struggler of the Month.” Another few days of this productive mayhem and you may be eligible for inclusion in the Guinness Book of World Records. I could see you being selected as “The Soul Wrangler with the Craziest Wisdom” or “The Mythic Hero with the Most Gorgeous Psychospiritual Wounds.” But it’s my duty to let you know that you could also just walk away from it all. Even if you’re tempted to stick around and see how much more of the entertaining chaos you can overcome, it might be better not to. In my opinion, you have done enough impossible work for now.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “People who have their feet planted too firmly on the ground have difficulty getting their pants off,” said author Richard Kehl. That’s good advice for you in the coming weeks. To attract the help and resources you need, you can’t afford

to be overly prim or proper. You should, in fact, be willing to put yourself in situations where it would be easy and natural to remove your pants, throw off your inhibitions and dare to be surprising. If you’re addicted to business-as-usual, you may miss opportunities to engage in therapeutic play and healing pleasure.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “A failure is a person who has blundered but is not able to cash in on the experience,” wrote American author Elbert Hubbard. In light of this formulation, I’m pleased to announce that you are likely to achieve at least one resounding success in the coming weeks. At this juncture in your destiny, you know exactly how to convert a past mistake into a future triumph. A gaffe that once upon a time brought you anguish or woe will soon deliver its fully ripened teaching, enabling you to claim a powerful joy or joyful power.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The poet Mary Ruefle describes reading books as

get your yoga on! schoolhouseyoga.com classes range from beginner to advanced, gentle to challenging

“a great extension of time, a way for one person to live a thousand and one lives in a single lifespan.” Are there other ways to do that? Watching films and plays and TV shows, of course. You can also listen to and empathize with people as they tell you their adventures. Or you can simply use your imagination to visualize what life is like for others. However you pursue this expansive pleasure, Scorpio, I highly recommend it. You are set up to absorb the equivalent of many years’ experience in a few short weeks.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian rapper Nicki Minaj is not timid about going after what she wants. She told Cosmopolitan magazine that she’s “high-maintenance in bed.” Every time she’s involved in a sexual encounter, she demands to have an orgasm. In accordance with the current astrological omens, Sagittarius, I invite you to follow her lead — not just during your erotic adventures, but everywhere else, too. Ask for what you want, preferably with enough adroitness to actually obtain what you want. Here’s another critical element to keep in mind: To get exactly what you want, you must know exactly what you want.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A college basketball player named Mark Snow told reporters that “Strength is my biggest weakness.” Was he trying to be funny? No. Was he a bit dim-witted? Perhaps. But I’m not really interested in what he meant by his statement. Rather, I want to hijack it for my own purpose, which is to recommend it as a meditation for you in the coming weeks. Can you think of any ways that your strength might at least temporarily be a weakness? I can. I suspect that if you rely too much on the power you already possess and the skills you have previously mastered, you may miss important clues about what you need to learn next. The most valuable lessons of the coming weeks could come to you as you’re practicing the virtues of humility and innocence and receptivity.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In Margaret Mitchell’s novel Gone With the Wind, Rhett Butler delivers the following speech to Scarlett O’Hara: “I was never one to patiently pick up broken fragments and glue them together again and tell myself that the mended whole was as good as new. What is broken is broken — and I’d rather remember it as it was at its best than mend it and see the broken places as long as I lived.” Your oracle for the near future, Aquarius, is to adopt an approach that is the exact opposite of Rhett Butler’s. Patiently gather the broken fragments and glue them together again. I predict that the result will not only be as good as new; it will be better. That’s right: The mended version will be superior to the original.

east liberty- new location! squirrel hill north hills

48

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Australian actress Rebel Wilson has appeared in several successful movies, including Bridesmaids, Bachelorette and Pitch Perfect. But she didn’t start out to be a film star. Mathematics was her main interest. Then, while serving as a youth ambassador in South Africa at age 18, she contracted malaria. At the height of her sickness, she had hallucinatory visions that she would one day be “a really good actress who also won an Oscar.” The visions were so vivid that she decided to shift her career path. I foresee the possibility that you will soon experience a version of her epiphany. During a phase when you’re feeling less than spectacular, you may get a glimpse of an intriguing future possibility.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Stop Making Sense” was originally the name of the film and music soundtrack produced by the Talking Heads in the 1980s, and now it is the central theme of your horoscope. I think your brain would benefit from a thorough washing. That’s why I invite you to scour it clean of all the dust and cobwebs and muck that have accumulated there since its last scrub a few months back. One of the best ways to launch this healing purge is, of course, to flood all the neural pathways with a firehose-surge of absurdity, jokes and silliness. As the wise physician of the soul, Dr. Seuss, said, “I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When you read a book that has footnotes, you tend to regard the footnotes as being of secondary importance. Although they may add color to the text’s main messages, you can probably skip them without losing much of the meaning. But I don’t recommend this approach in the coming days. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, footnotes will carry crucial information that’s important for you to know. I mean this in a metaphorical sense as you live your life as well as in the literal act of reading books. Pay close attention to the afterthoughts, the digressions and the asides.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The English word “quiddity” has two contrary definitions. It can refer to a trivial quibble. Or it can mean the essential nature of a thing — the quality that makes it unique. I suspect that in the coming weeks you will get numerous invitations to engage with quiddities of both types. Your first task will be to cultivate an acute ability to know which is which. Your second task: Be relentless in avoiding the trivial quibbles as you home in on the essential nature of things. What’s the name of the book you may write some day — perhaps your memoir? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342 EXT. 189

EAST FOR RENT

SHADYSIDE

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

412-363-2967

Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on July 21, 2015, until 2:00 p.m., local prevailing time for:

2BR apt, w/d on premises, close to public trans and shopping. $950+utils.

HELP WANTED

MUSIC INSTRUCTION

REHEARSAL

ROOMMATES

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

GUITAR LESSONS

Rehearsal Space

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

All Styles All Levels Berklee Grad

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

www.AaronLewinter.com CALL 201-417-6262

starting @ $150/mo. Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access.

412-403-6069

HELP WANTED

ADOPTION

CLASSES

CLASSES

START YOUR

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-4136293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

EARN $500 A DAY as Airbrush Media Makeup ArtistFor Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One Week Course Train & Build Portfolio. 15% OFF TUITION AwardMakeupSchool.com 818-980-2119 (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-7251563 (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED

AUTO SERVICES

AUTO SERVICES

GENERAL FOR SALE

MAKE $1000 A WEEK Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No experience required. Start immediately www.themailinghub.com (AANCAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN)

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/MONTH! Call 855-9779537 (AAN CAN)

HUMANITARIAN CAREER at One World Center and gain experience through international service work in Africa. Program has costs. Info@OneWorldCenter.org

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) SAVE! Regular Price $34.99 Call Today and Ask About FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 888-992-1957 (AAN CAN)

M U S I C

+

Pittsburgh Greenway Baseball Field Upgrades General Prime Pittsburgh Public Schools Service Center Rehabilitation of the Service Center Loading Dock General, Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Primes Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on June 29, 2015 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700) 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is nonrefundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

S C R E E N

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent Hotline: 412-622-7920 ~ www.pps.k12.pa.us

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

49


FULL and PART TIME throughout the Pittsburgh and surrounding areas.

H Must have clear criminal background.

CALL CENTER JOB FAIR

H Excellent verbal and written communication skills. H Physically fit and able to walk/stand for long periods H Reliable transportation Apply at www.am-gard.com or in person at:

JULY 15 • 4PM–7PM 11 Parkway Center • Pittsburgh, PA 15220

Bring a Resumé – On-site Interviews • • • • •

$12.50/hr + Regular Increases 2nd Shift Medical Benefits Tuition Reimbursement Promotional Opportunities

Apply at PHEAA.org/jobs today. PHEA A IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

AM-GARD 600 Main St., Pittsburgh, PA 15215

Sodexo

located at the University y of Pittsburgh g

Now Accepting Applications for the 2015-2016 school year! Looking for candidates with great customer service to join our team! Openings include cooks, bakers, food service workers, baristas, catering drivers, banquet servers and set up, and utility. We are also recruiting for bake shop, retail bakery, and frontline supervisors.

FULL AND PART TIME POSITIONS AVAILABLE: • FT positions offer medical and dental, vacation time and paid holidays. • Flexible hours- many schedules to choose from • Uniforms, safety shoes and employee meal provided • Great opportunity for advancement

Visit http://sodexousa.jobs for all current job openings and to apply. Please contact 412.624.2347 for questions/additional information or sodexoupitt@gmail.com

Sodexo is an EEO/AA/Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran employer


l l ’ e l w l ’ e w

d n a d E n a V IIV E

DDRRke yo u ta ou

! s e c a l p ! s e c a l p ttaa ke yo u

$5 ,000 S ig n -O n Bo n u so r w e’ll p a y fo r a d estin a tio n va ca tio n a fter o n e yea r o fd ed ica ted service!* QUALIFIED CERTIFIED CLASS A DRIVERS ENJOY

• Nights at Home • Competitive Wages • Weekends Off • Competitive Benefits VISIT RFSHIRES.COM FOR A COMPLETE LISTING OF CAREERS RFSHIRES.COM RFSHIRES.COM

877.573-7447 877.573-7447

Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions. Equal Opportunity Employer/Disabled/Veterans

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

51


Clinical Research Opportunity for Women Do you suffer from uterine fibroids?

SMOKERS WANTED for Paid Psychology Research

to participate in a research project at Carnegie Mellon University! To be eligible for this study, you must be: • 18-50 yrs. old • In good health

DO YOU EXPERIENCE?

• Willing to not smoke or use nicotine products before one session

• Heavy or abnormal periods • Abdominal pain and pressure • Increased need to urinate with your periods

You may earn up to $70 for your participation in a 3 hour study. For more information, call: The Behavioral Health Research Lab (412-268-3029) NOTE: Unfortunately, our lab is not wheelchair accessible.

UTERINE FIBROIDS • Negatively impact your quality of life • Doctors in your area are looking for women to participate in a clinical research study. • All investigational medication and study-related care is provided at no cost. Compensation for time and travel may be available. To see if you qualify, visit

www.VenusResearchStudy.com or call

(800) 216-2057

Do you wear compression stockings regularly? Are you on blood thinners for your persistent leg discomfort? Are your legs constantly swollen? You may have blocked or restricted blood flow in the veins of your leg. If you are 18 years or older, you may eligible to participate in the VIRTUS clinical research study of an investigational device to improve the blood flow in your leg.

CALL TODAY TO SEE IF YOU QUAILIFY

1-800-280-8109 www. MyLegDiscomfort.com CAUTION – Investigational device. Limited by Federal Law to investigational use only. PrintAd 5x5_REG-009 Rev A

52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

NON-DAILY SMOKERS NEEDED Do you smoke cigarettes but only on some days? You may be eligible to participate in a research study for non-daily smokers. Must be at least 21 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated for their time. For more information and to see if you’re eligible, call the Smoking Research Group at the University of Pittsburgh at

(412) 383-2059 or Text NONDAILY to (412) 999-2758 *Studies for non-daily smokers who DO want to quit and DO NOT want to quit


TED TOO

{BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM}

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Hot Stone Massage

Xin Sui Bodyworks

NOW OPEN

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work

Professional Massages Friendly Staff Walk-Ins Welcome Deep Tissue Located on lower level of Monroeville Mall next to Dicks Sporting Goods Mon-Sat. 10am-9pm Sun 11am-6pm

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, PA 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza

412-373-0649

412-335-6111

MASSAGE

MASSAGE

HEALTHY Massage 9:30am-11pm Table Shower 724-742-3333 20550 Rt. 19 Unit 7 Cranberry Twsp, Pa 16066

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

ACROSS

1. Slate employees: Abbr. 4. Restaurant bigwigs 9. Punk’s facial expression, often 14. Pro-concealed carry org. 15. Scale notes 17. Sets right, as a bike wheel 18. Number due east on some clocks 19. Cited a Facebook post? 21. “It was ___ blur” 23. Emphatic ending for “yes” or “no” 24. Tie the knot 25. Buddy who everybody knows is gay but himself? 29. Singer Lopez 30. Believer’s suffix 31. Led on a Biblical sufferer? 36. “I can help you” 40. Step below the majors 41. Stunk big-time 43. Brazilian carnival spot 44. Some hotels 47. Caught actor Nathan in the act? 50. Forever 21 rival 52. Sarge’s boss 53. Allocated enough money for a very small tattoo, say? 59. Veggie that’s “split” in soups 60. Auto route from Me. to Fla. 61. Houston player, briefly

62. Marijuana used as the subject of a mural? 66. Detective Velcoro of “True Detective” 67. See 9-Down 68. Clay-andwater mixture 69. “___ frog had wings” 70. V flyers 71. Prolonged attack 72. First stat in a triple double, often: Abbr.

DOWN

1. Early digital computer 2. Marching orders followers 3. Popeye, famously 4. Antiquated recording formats that hipsters will embrace, I’m guessing, around 2027 5. En fuego 6. Clear, as a thumb drive 7. Bad smelling 8. Happy or Brainy, e.g. 9. With 67-Across, World Series of Poker legend nicknamed “The Kid” 10. Checkers command 11. Exposed publicly 12. Unwanted growth 13. It makes psych records sound better 16. Czech river 20. Prince George’s nana, for short

N E W S

+

22. Take ___ (drink slowly) 26. Tree creature of “LOTR” 27. Tournament level 28. Class that advertises with foreign words: Abbr. 31. Lao-Tze’s “Way” 32. Party girl 33. ___ de mots (pun) 34. Approves 35. Money at stake 37. Track event? 38. Game played with blocks 39. Nondiscrimination hiring letters 42. ___ Soul 45. Chameleon cousins 46. :( 48. Eagles guitarist

TA S T E

Felder 49. “Number the Stars” author Lowry 51. PC key used in navigation 53. Off-white 54. Those in Madrid 55. Works and works and works 56. Bored-withlife feeling 57. Raison ___ 58. Georgetown players 59. Southern cornbread 62. Milk purchase 63. Pisa prime 64. Work unit in physics 65. Use Manic Panic, e.g. {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

53


MASSAGE

MASSAGE

Grand Opening New Location!

Grand Opening

Bodywork by Cindy

Bodywork by Cindy

Chinese Massage & Free Table Shower. $50 per hour

Chinese Massage, Sauna & Table Shower Available. $40 per hour

Open 7 Days a Week

9:30am-10:30pm

9:30am-10:30pm

180 Imperial Plaza Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15126

7777 McKnight Road Pgh, PA 15237

724-695-8088

412-366-7130

Asian 888 Massage Chinese Massage • $39.99/Hr. 412-349-8628

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment LOCATIONS IN

1744 Greensburg Pike, North Versailles, 15137

412-401-4110 322 Fourth Ave.

MONROEVILLE AND WEXFORD, PA Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL

Judy’s Oriental Massage GRAND OPENING!

$40/hour Open 24 hours

Wellness Center

Grandng Openi

MASSAGE

Downtown

JADE

FULL BODY MASSAGE

$10

$40/hr

Coupon with this ad

- a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency • Group and Individualized Therapy

4126 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE

Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

412-380-0100

www.myjadewellness.com

SUBOXONE TREATMENT WE SPECIALIZE IN

Painkiller and Heroin Addiction Treatment IMMEDIATE APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

Pregnant? We can treat you!

Problem with Opiates? Prescription Medication or Heroin?

Help is Available! blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Pittsburgh

Methadone - 412-255-8717 Suboxone - 412-281-1521 info@summitmedical.biz

Pittsburgh South Hills

Methadone - 412-488-6360 info2@alliancemedical.biz

Beaver County

Methadone - 724-857-9640 Suboxone - 724-448-9116 info@ptsa.biz 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 07.15/07.22.2015

• INSURANCES ACCEPTED • DAY & EVENING APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE CLOSE TO SOUTH HILLS, WASHINGTON, CANONSBURG, CARNEGIE, AND BRIDGEVILLE

Let Us Help You Today!

412-221-1091 info@freedomtreatment.com


FURRY INVASION Pittsburgh welcomed the furriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; annual Anthrocon convention back to town this weekend

E MORO S T PHO NE! I L ON

{PHOTOS BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

www.aper yp h g p citom .c

N E W S

+

TA S T E

+

M U S I C

+

S C R E E N

+

A R T S

+

E V E N T S

+

C L A S S I F I E D S

55


START YOUR WEEKEND EARLY THURSDAY NIGHTS AT RIVERS CASINO

5 CRAPS & BLACKJACK

$

HOT SEATS | 6PM – 2AM

2 FOR $75 INCLUDES STARTER, TWO ENTRÉES & DESSERT

PLUS: Live Entertainment | Pittsburgh’s Hottest Happy Hour SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15212 RIVERSCASINO.COM DOWNLOAD OUR APP RIVERSCASINO.COM/PITTSBURGH/APP

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. Must be 21 years or older to be on Rivers Casino property.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

July 15, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 28

July 15, 2015  

Pittsburgh City Paper Volume 25 Issue 28