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MULTIPLE CHOICE: ELECTION MEANS BIG CHANGES FOR CITY SCHOOL BOARD 06


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{EDITORIAL}

04.24/05.01.2013 VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 17

[NEWS]

06

“There is a real opportunity for change here.” — Irene Habermann of the Pittsburgh Interfaith Impact Network on the impending turnover on the city school board

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

go to school. I go to work. I’m not 63 “Iintellectually disabled. I just can’t hear.” — Educator Angel Mahnick on being a role model for deaf students

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“THERE IS A REAL OPPORTUNITY FOR CHANGE HERE.”

INCOMING RE: Building Momentum: Vastly more efficient homes and offices are crucial for a greener future (April 17) “[I]f we’re going to get out of the mess that industrialization caused, we can’t solve it by using industrial methods. I’m not saying we need to adopt an Amish model, but we need to recognize that proper design — passive solar, water-harvesting, [and] living, natural systems are the path forward. We can’t engineer our way out of this — we’ve engineered our way into it and only by looking at ecological solutions will we find our way forward.” — Web comment from “Don Orkoskey”

RE: Urban Renewal: How Pittsburgh could save the world ... or at least itself (April 17) “The right way to ‘go green’ is by taxing resource consumption and pollution, not by subsidizing technologies whose only merit is that they will ‘pollute less.’ Subsidies cause people do consume more energy, while taxes on energy cause them to consume less.” — Web comment from “Dan Sullivan”

RE: Braddock Library to be Declared National Historic Landmark (April 19, online only) “This is an honor that is richly deserved for a building that was almost destined to not be. It has been the hard work of many … citizens of Braddock and North Braddock that not only saved a historical structure, but additionally saved the community in the process[.] Our beautiful, now historic, library has been and will remain the foundation to enrich the communities of both Braddock and North Braddock.” — Web comment from “Fran Brashier” “I grew up in this Library! It brought me many hours of fun and excellent reading ... I’d spend hours in the reading room every weekend. It was there I discovered the joys of ‘The Bobbsey Twins’ and reveled in the investigations of ‘Nancy Drew’!” — Web comment from “Joanne”

CORRECTION In the April 17 City Paper story “Building Momentum,” Matt Mehalik’s employer was misidentified. Mehalik is program manager for Sustainable Pittsburgh.

{ILLUSTRATION BY VINCE DORSE}

CLEAN SLATE I

N THE WARM night air, standing near the steps of the Homewood branch of the Carnegie Library, two candidates seeking seats on the Pittsburgh Board of Public Education continued their debate over whether schools should lock down doors during the day. Both were intense, carrying the discussion over from one that had started earlier in front of a roomful of parents, educators and community leaders. “We got to work on the community and then you won’t have to worry about drug dealers coming into the schools,” said Lucille Prater-Holliday, a candidate

for the District 1 seat. Dave Schuilenburg, a candidate for the District 9 seat, countered: “All I can do is control what happens inside the school, and if that means

New faces will tackle PPS issues as board readies for largest turnover in decades {BY AMYJO BROWN} that I’m going to keep the drug dealers out by allowing the doors to open only one way, I’m going to do it.” “OK, OK. But there is also an alterna-

tive,” Prater-Holliday continued. Schuilenburg and Prater-Holliday weren’t alone that night: Six other candidates seeking a spot on the school board also mingled outside the library, voices occasionally rising over issues such as the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment tests and the district’s pressing financial distress. All had been shooed out of the library, which had closed as they continued their discussions following a panel debate hosted by the NAACP. “This blew my mind,” says Tina Weeden, a Homewood woman who has two nephews in Pittsburgh Public CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013


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CLEAN SLATE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

est challenges yet. Pittsburgh Public Schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2013 General Fund, at $521 million â&#x20AC;&#x201D; larger than the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general-fund budget of about $469 million â&#x20AC;&#x201D; includes a $9.8 million operating deďŹ cit. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s despite the recent closure of nearly two dozen neighborhood schools, and last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $50 million trim in expenses, which included the layoff of about 300 teachers. If spending patterns continue, the district is expected to deplete its reserve balance by 2015, according to Superintendent Linda Lane. At the same time, the district is working under an aggressive reform agenda, trying to raise the performance of low-income and African-American students, who make up 55 percent of the more than 26,000 students attending the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 54 schools. In the middle of it all looms the May 21 primary election. Five seats for the school board are on the ballot. Only one incumbent, Thomas Sumpter of District 3, is running for reelection. With four open seats, the election â&#x20AC;&#x201D; no matter who is voted in â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will result in the biggest turnover seen on the board since the board switched from appointed to elected positions in 1976. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ďŹ rst time where four board members have said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m done, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had enough,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? says retiring director Theresa Colaizzi, who represents District 5. She announced her decision along with Board President Sharene Shealey, of District 1; Floyd â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skipâ&#x20AC;? McCrea, of District 9; and Jean Fink, of District 7. Their retirements are notable not just because they are all coming at once, but also because of the membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; length of service. McCrea and Colaizzi are serving in their 12th year. Fink has been there for 33 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just tired,â&#x20AC;? Fink says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I started my oldest child was starting high school. Now I have great-grandchildren.â&#x20AC;? But while the board is losing experienced members, parents and community organizations who monitor district decisions say they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ever been this excited about an election â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or the slate of candidates they have to choose from. Three of the races â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all but Finkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dis-

trict 7, which encompasses a large part of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s southern neighborhoods â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are contested. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a real opportunity for change here,â&#x20AC;? says Irene Habermann, chair of the education task force of the Pittsburgh Interfaith Impact Network (PIIN). The candidates, she says â&#x20AC;&#x153;are bringing something different to the table.â&#x20AC;? Of the eight new candidates, two â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Terry Kennedy and Stephen DeFlitch, both competing for the District 5 seat â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are parents who have been active volunteers in the district for years. Two others, Schuilenburg and Prater-Holliday, are known community activists. The other four are former teachers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all with a decade or more of experience working in the district. Sylvia Wilson, facing off in District 1 against Prater-Holliday, taught in elementary schools for 40 years before retiring at the beginning of this year. Cindy Falls, who is running unopposed for Finkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s District 7 seat, spent 18 years as a health and technology instructor; Lorraine BurtonEberhardt logged 31 years in the district teaching at all levels as well as working as a principal and administrator. Carolyn Klug has taught at the elementaryand middle-school level for more than 20 years. Both Klug and Burton-Eberhardt are running alongside Schuilenburg for the District 9 spot. Nina Esposito-Visgitis, executive director of the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers, is thrilled with the choices, she says. The teachers â&#x20AC;&#x153;have a real knowledge of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important in the school and whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ&#x201A;uff,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting goose bumps talking about this, but they get it. They got the big picture. They are the total package.â&#x20AC;? At the debate April 18 at the Homewood library, and during interviews and earlier forums held in their districts, the candidates have all hit substantive notes on the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most pressing issues. On the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pending insolvency, the candidates talked about being frugal and targeted with the limited resources the district has â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even if that meant diverting resources from one school to another that needed them more. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each and every school has its own climate, its own characteristics, its own culture,â&#x20AC;? says Falls, who has been attending community meetings outside of her district in order to gain a better understanding of the needs of each school.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;EVERYONE SHOULD BE PAYING AS MUCH ATTENTION TO THE SCHOOLBOARD RACE AS THEY ARE TO THE MAYORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RACE.â&#x20AC;?

CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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CLEAN SLATE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

To raise achievement levels at the lower-performing schools, “maybe we rob Peter to pay Paul,” she says. DeFlitch, too, argues for more accountability and data to address disparities: “There’s not one single report that operations puts out that shows school-level expenditures,” he says of the need for site-based budgets. “How much money is your school getting and how does that compare to other schools?” And while all the candidates express a willingness to be open to solutions to the budget challenge, Kennedy noted specifically at a recent forum that she is willing to look at increasing the district’s tax rate. “I don’t think any of us are willing to raise taxes, but if that is the only way to plug the funding gap, I think we have to seriously consider that,” she says. Wilson, Klug and Falls, who have a history with the teachers’ union, say that perspective could be helpful, too, when the teachers’ contract comes up again for negotiation. “I think at least I have an understanding of both sides,” Wilson says. “I know what the process is like, I know what each side looks at.” When it comes to testing, particularly the PSSA test, the candidates, as a whole, seem to agree that there is too much testing going on in the schools. Kennedy has

gone the farthest in expressing her dissatisfaction, saying she would fight to opt the district out of the PSSA. BurtonEberhardt, on the other end, emphasizes her support in measuring teachers’ effectiveness through rating systems. “The buck stops with the teachers,” she says. Schuilenburg, a 911 dispatcher, is the only candidate who has spoken in favor of the idea of arming school resource officers, although he notes that he would advocate for putting such a decision on a referendum before approving it. “I take to heart increasing security in our schools,” he says. Frances May-Burke, co-chair of the education committee for the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP, says she is impressed, overall, with the options voters have. “They all have a different way they want to do it. But it comes together. It’s like you’ve got flour, a little bit of salt and a little bit of sugar, and it all comes together.” The candidates have more forums scheduled, including another where all eight will meet: 6 p.m. Wed., May 8, at the Kaufmann Center in the Hill District. “[Everyone] should be paying as much attention to the school-board race as they are to the mayor’s race,” says parent Deborah Ferrington. “Even more so.”

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CHOICE ELECTION On social issues, mayoral candidates have similar positions, but different histories {BY LAUREN DALEY} IN LOCAL elections, voters are often more

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concerned with salting roads than with social issues. But civil-rights advocates say that even local officials can do much to advance — or hinder — causes like reproductive freedom and LGBT equality. “From same-sex partner benefits for city employees … to economic development initiatives, mayor[s] can have a huge impact on the rights and opportunities of women and girls,” says Heather Arnet, CEO of The Women and Girls Foundation. Mayors can also decide police presence at women’s health clinics, and use appointments to determine the demographic makeup of city boards, and authorities and commissions. Those agencies, Arnet says, “create the majority of policies and budget decisions that impact the lives of residents.” The three major contenders in this year’s Democratic primary — Pittsburgh City Councilor Bill Peduto, state Representative Jake Wheatley, and former state Auditor General Jack Wagner — all have broadly similar positions on LGBT equality and reproductive rights. But they arrived at those positions in different ways.

accessibility for all,” he said. Peduto, whose mayoral run has been endorsed by Planned Parenthood, backed a 2005 “Medical Safety Zone Ordinance,” which set up a 15-foot buffer zone around women’s health clinics — and an 8-foot “bubJack ble zone” Wagner ar o u n d p atients entering or leaving. That measure, supported by prochoice groups, was later overturned when a judge ruled it infringed on the free speech of abortion opponents. (Currently only the buffer zone remains.) But at the April 18 forum, Peduto said his support for access hadn’t changed: “If it does require an officer to be there to remind [observers of] the rights of all individuals, I’ll certainly have an officer there.”

“FROM SAMESEX PARTNER BENEFITS FOR CITY EMPLOYEES TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES, MAYORS CAN HAVE A HUGE IMPACT.”

Bill Peduto

Bill Peduto

While all three candidates have earned strong marks for their stance on LGBT issues in recent years, Peduto has received the most love in return. His mayoral bid has been endorsed by three LGBT-advocacy groups: statewide advocacy group Equality Pennsylvania, as well as the Steel City Stonewall Democrats and the Gertrude Stein Political Club. He supported efforts to create a citywide domestic-partner registry, which allows same-sex couples to formally declare a committed relationship. (The registry has no legal authority, but can be used by employers as a basis for providing domestic-partner benefits to employees.) And at an April 18 forum hosted by Planned Parenthood, he suggested constructing new buildings with bathrooms designated for transgender occupants. “[T]here has to be

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

Jack Wagner Wagner’s position on LGBT equality has evolved over the course of his political career. As a city councilor, he opposed a 1990 ordinance to include gays and lesbians in the city’s anti-discrimination law. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported that while Wagner acknowledged “incidents” of discrimination, “I don’t believe that [Pittsburghers] discriminate in any systematic manner against homosexuals.” But during a 10-year stint in the state Senate, Wagner championed nuJake merous pro-LGBT bills, in- Wheatley cluding measures to bar discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and to punish attacks on gays and lesbians as hate crimes. In this year’s mayoral race, he told the Steel City Stonewall Democrats that he backed “full equality under the law for members of the LGBT community,” including “the right to marry.” During his failed 2010 gubernato-

rial campaign, some anti-choice groups touted Wagner as an ally, but while Wagner described himself as a “prolife Democrat,” he also said he “support[ed] the current state law” — which permits abortion. In any case, Wagner’s campaign told City Paper that he pledged to “enforce [clinic-access] laws appropriately.” He also pledged to initiate a genderequity pay audit, to weed out any disparities in pay, and to ensure his appointments “reflect the demographics … of our city” — particularly in terms of gender.

Jake Wheatley While Peduto edged out Wheatley for Planned Parenthood’s endorsement this year, Wheatley earns high marks from the group as well. In Harrisburg, he’s supported pro-choice causes, including state funding for family-planning programs. Wheatley has also co-sponsored a 2009 measure requiring comprehensive sex-education courses in public schools. And when the legislature took up a bill to impose stringent — and arguably arbitrary — standards on abortion providers in 2011, Wheatley voted in line with Planned Parenthood’s position. At the Planned Parenthood forum, he joined Peduto in pledging to uphold clinic-access laws. “We need to enforce our laws and protect our citizens regardless of [if] it is coming out of a reproductive center or if you are walking down the street in Homewood,” he said. Wheatley is a member of the legislature’s LGBT Caucus, a group of lawmakers who support the cause of LGBT equality. Wheatley, too, has co-sponsored legislation that would prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity and expression. In 2006, he voted against a proposed constitutional amendment banning gay marriage. And as he told the Steel City Stonewall Democrats in 2010, he has long been involved in “fighting back laws that would discriminate against individuals within the LGBT community.” L D A L E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Additional reporting by Chris Potter


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HELPING OUT Trevor Project provides hope to teens struggling for LGBT acceptance {BY CHRIS POTTER} EVERYWHERE YOU look, people are changing their minds about gay marriage, and publically supporting LGBT loved ones and neighbors. Well, maybe not everywhere you look. “I go to a small rural school outside Pittsburgh where the population is 99 percent white and 99 percent straight. … I also get bullied a lot. Not physically, but verbally. … But they hurt all the same.” So begins a letter posted online by the Trevor Project, a suicide-prevention group focused on LGBT youth. And it’s a story familiar to many Pennsylvania LGBT advocates, who say progress has come slower in some places than others. In rural areas especially, says John DeBartola, LGBT youth “have to be tremendously cautious [about] exposing themselves to a lot of hatred and discrimination, because it is much more difficult to seek or get assistance.” That’s not for lack of trying. An acclaimed 2010 documentary, Out in the Silence, explored the hardship of being gay in Oil City, and small towns like it. But when DeBartola’s Johnstown-based group, the Keystone Alliance/Gay Life newsletter, sought to screen the film for then-Congressman Mark Critz and his Republican opponent that year, they got no response — even when the filmmakers and other elected officials took up the cause. It’s “unfortunate that an elected individual cannot take a stand,” says DeBartola. So in rural areas especially, LGBT youth end up standing on their own. That’s why, when DeBartola organized this year’s Miss Pittsburgh Public Access Pageant on cable channel PCTV, he dedicated the event — and any proceeds from it — to the Trevor Project itself. Spawned by the 1994 film Trevor, about a gay high-schooler in the Bible Belt, the project began as a suicide-prevention hotline for LGBT youth. It now also hosts trevorspace.org, an online network with 60,000 members age 13-24, says Trevor Project communications director Laura McGinnis. “You can come from a town of 200 people, and be the only person you know of that is not straight, and find other people who face the same challenges,” she says. “They might live down the street, or in Iran.” Conversely, she says, finding a support group across town often “requires access to a car. And that’s not always easy, especially if you

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

John DeBartola (on right, kneeling before banner) at Pittsburgh Pride 2011

don’t have accepting parents.” DeBartola’s partner in the pageant, Brian Tee, has been informing viewers about Trevor on his own PCTV show, Brian T World. Tee says he was once contacted by a teen-age viewer “in crisis”: Tee recommended he contact Trevor Project, and the teen “has kept in touch with me since,” Tee says. “Kids like him have been an inspiration.”

Brian Tee at a 2012 Pride rally in Erie

But not every town has a gay-news program on local TV. And only 30 Pennsylvania municipalities have anti-discrimination laws. Nearly two-thirds of Pennsylvanians, especially those outside larger cities, live without such protection, says Liz Bradbury, of the Allentown-based Pennsylvania Diversity Network. “When you don’t have a law like that,” she says, “young people don’t see anybody saying they shouldn’t be discriminated against.” Nor do they always get that message from school officials, who can be hostile to efforts like establishing gay-straight student alliances. Barring such groups is against the law, she notes,

but in rural areas especially, teens “don’t have someone to tell [school officials], ‘You can’t do that.’” “Pennsylvania is slightly behind the rest of the nation” on LGBT protections, sighs Ted Martin, who heads Equality PA. “West Virginia has more advanced LGBTbullying laws than Pennsylvania.” Trevor isn’t the only LGBT resource in rural areas, of course. PFLAG, an advocacy group for LGBT people and their supporters, has 15 chapters statewide, including locales like Lancaster and Indiana County. DeBartola’s Keystone Alliance/Gaylife Newsletter, meanwhile, has been offering online content since 1999. It’s also been active within and beyond its Johnstown base, with activities ranging from sponsoring Halloween Parade floats to Trevor Project LGBT-awareness workshops. “Rural areas are awakening,” says DeBartola. Even drag shows, he says, show “the changing of the tide. More and more people are realizing that … they are a form of artistic expression.” And while drag shows may not be political debates, PCTV’s pageant will be judged by Pittsburgh mayoral candidate AJ Richardson. (Richardson says DeBartola “asked me if I’d be a judge, and I said, ‘I’d be honored.’”) In any case, says Tee, even someone “who has never given a second thought to the struggles of our LGBT youth just might watch and end up sending a donation.” C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Applications for the Miss Pittsburgh Public Access Pageant are available by contacting keystoneallicancegaylifenewsletter@ hotmail.com, and will be accepted until 5 p.m. Fri., April 26. The pageant will be held at PCTV’s studios from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., April 27. A small number of audience tickets are also available; a donation of at least $17 for the Trevor Project is suggested.


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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To counter the now-well-publicized culture of rape in India, three engineers in Chennai said in March that they are about to send to the market women’s anti-rape lingerie, which will provide both a stun-gun-sized blast of electricity against an aggressor and a messaging system sending GPS location to family members and the police about an attack in progress. After the wearer engages a switch, anyone touching the fitted garment will, said one developer, get “the shock of his life” (even though the garment’s skin side would be insulated). The only marketing holdup, according to a March report in The Indian Express, is finding a washable fabric.

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In March, Washington state Rep. Ed Orcutt, apparently upset that bicyclists use the state’s roads without paying the state gasoline tax for highway maintenance, proposed a 5 percent tax on bicycles that cost more than $500, pointing out that bicyclists impose environmental costs as well. Since carbon dioxide is a major greenhouse gas, he wrote to one constituent (and as reported on The Huffington Post in March), bike riders’ “increased heart rate and respiration” over car drivers creates additional pollution. (Days later, he apologized for the suggestion that bicyclists actually were worse for the environment than cars.)

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The maker of the “all-natural herbal extract” Super Power (which promises “powerful erections”) issued a voluntary recall in January after “independent” lab tests revealed that the supplement mis-

takenly contained a small amount of sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra. Such unregulated dietary supplements cannot legally contain drugs without Food and Drug Administration approval. (Also, in March, the Federal Trade Commission ordered three retailers, including Neiman Marcus, to re-label some fake-fur garments because they, mistakenly or intentionally, contained real fur.)

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A Boston Herald reporter said in March that he had been kicked out of a State Ethics Commission training session (as the meeting was for Massachusetts House members only). However, at least two people in attendance refused to give their real names to the reporter as they left. Rep. Tim Toomey insisted he was not a member (though he is) but was “just passing through,” and Commission chairman Charles Swartwood III (a former federal judge magistrate) refused to give his name at all, telling the reporter, “I’m not saying because that’s a private matter.”

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Police in Knoxville, Tenn., confiscated five venomous snakes during a February traffic stop, and Pastor Jamie Coots of the Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name (of Middlesboro, Ky.) is demanding them back. Coots said he possesses them openly during his services in Kentucky, but Knoxville police said they are illegal to own in Tennessee. Said Coots, “If I don’t have them, then I’m not obeying the word of God.”

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In Bristol, England, Anthony Gerrard, 59, had been arrested for possessing child pornography, but after an inventory, police found only 11 images of his massive 890GB porn

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U.S. companies legally deduct the expenses of doing business from their gross profits before paying income tax, but purveyors of marijuana (in states where possession is legal and where prescription marijuana is dispensed) cannot deduct those expenses and thus wind up paying a much higher federal income tax than other businesses. As NPR reported in April, “Section 280E” of the tax code (enacted in 1982 to trap illegal drug traffickers into tax violations) has not been changed to reflect state legalizations. The effect, experts told NPR, is that legal dispensaries in essence wind up paying tax on their gross receipts while all other legal businesses are taxed only on their net receipts. (The federal government continues to regard marijuana as illegal.)

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Transportation Security Administration rules protect passengers against previously employed terrorist strategies, such as shoe bombs, but as Congressional testimony has noted over the past several years, the perimeter security at airports is shockingly weak. “For all the money and attention that in-airport screening gets,” wrote Slate.com in February, “the back doors to airports are, comparatively, wide open — and people go through them all the time.” Perimeter breaches in recent years astonished officials at major airports in Charlotte, N.C.; Philadelphia; Atlanta; and New York City.

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In March, Stephen Thresh, 47, voluntarily handed in his computer at a police station and confessed to possessing hundreds of (illegal) images of women having sex with animals, including a snake, a tiger and an elephant. Thresh said he had earlier downloaded a message of unknown origin notifying him that “law enforcement authorities have been informed,” and he thought they would go easier on him if he turned himself in. (Police denied knowledge of the message.) Thresh insisted that possessing such images was not a problem that needed addressing.

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In March, the makers of Lululemon black Luon yoga pants issued a recall, expressing concern that they had been made with an unacceptable level of sheerness. However, a company official initially told customers that “the only way you can actually test” for the too-sheer pants would be for a customer to bend over before a store associate. (The company changed the policy a few days later, and the product manager resigned.)


Inflate the tires! Oil the chains! Gear up for the 2013 National Bike Challenge! The 2013 challenge officially kicks off on May 1 and goes through September 30th. The free and friendly competition encourages all people to get out and ride – no matter your age or reason – whether as daily commuters, weekend warriors, or somewhere in between. Pittsburghers can participate as individuals or teams, and see how they stack up against others in the Pittsburgh region, and nationally too. Check it out at NationalBikeChallenge.org or BikePgh.org When you're out on your ride it's good to know Port Authority has your back, all Port Authority buses are now equipped with bike racks. So we’re ready to help get your bike on.

Bikes can now be used on Port Authority’s Light Rail System seven days a week. Bikes can also be taken on the Mon incline at any time with no restrictions. There are no bike racks on the T or Incline. Bikes must be stowed in the designated wheelchair spaces. Persons in wheelchairs have priority over bikes.

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{BY LAUREN DALEY} I may have married a New York stater, but my first interaction with the state’s popular “beef on weck” sandwich came thanks to Sal’s City Deli, right here in Downtown Pittsburgh. The deli features the Western New York staple — a pile of slow-roasted, rare roast beef on a Kümmelweck roll, with a side of au jus for dipping. Sal’s, which has a walk-up counter and table service, offers standard diner fare, such as Reubens, fish sandwiches and burgers, as well as more unusual lunch options. Tuck into gumbo with chicken and Andouille sausage, a grilledcheese with Havarti, or a char-grilled salmon with a jalapeño remoulade. Side dishes are more than just chips and fries: Alternatives include potato pancakes, red-skin potato salad and a Southwestern quinoa salad. Specials might mean the sinfully overloaded potato-pancake Reuben, in which hot corned beef (or pastrami), sauerkraut, Thousand Island dressing and Swiss cheese are suspended between two pancakes. The Reuben’s sister sandwich, the Rachel, marries roast turkey with Thousand Island dressing and creamy coleslaw. Then there’s the beef on weck sandwich, stacked so high with tender beef that the meat tumbles out of the sides. The roll is salty and soft, soaking up the au jus. It’s the perfect getaway for lunch, and I don’t even have to drive to New York. LDALEY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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THE OPEN KITCHEN PERFUMED THE AIR WITH CURRY AND SPICE

{PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

W

E CAN’T DENY rooting for the lit-

tle guy. Patronizing small, local businesses is good for the local economy, of course, and it also feels like helping somebody’s dream succeed. Red Orchid, a family-run Thai restaurant in a little strip mall in West View, is smaller than most: just a row of tables along one wall and a kitchen behind a partial wall on the opposite side. It seats so few, in fact, that we felt lucky to get a table when we arrived without reservations on a Saturday evening. Yet it didn’t feel cramped, and someone with a confident sense of style had done a nice job of blending standard Thai restaurant decor — wood carvings, colorful photos of villages and markets — with modern touches like pendant lamps that look like folded paper snowballs. On the tables, colorful, gilt-edged fabrics created sophisticated place settings. The open kitchen perfumed the air with curry and spice. The menu offers a comprehensive selection of mostly tried-and-true Thai restaurant cuisine: salads, rice and noodle

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

Mango with sticky rice

dishes, and curries. In addition, there is a page of chef’s specials, many involving tilapia filets and a couple of items with “Thai teriyaki” sauce. There’s nothing wrong with that, but we tried to stick with dishes that reflected the “authentic Thai” of Red Orchid’s subtitle.

RED ORCHID 5439 Babcock Blvd., West View. 412-837-2527 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 1-9 p.m. PRICES: Appetizers, soups and salads $3.50-9.50; dinner entrees $11-16 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Tulip dumplings brought an unfamiliar (to us), charmingly poetic name to a familiar appetizer of seasoned, ground meat in wonton wrapper pouches, available fried or steamed. We ordered them fried, which was harsh treatment for such delicate little dumplings. But the rich shrimp-and-chicken filling held up just fine, and the ginger-and-black-soy

dipping sauce complemented them well. We followed these with “Red Orchid Style Bread,” the kitchen’s take on Thai shrimp toast, in which marinated ground shrimp is mixed with onion, garlic and herbs, spread on little slices of bread and deepfried in egg batter. The combination of sweet, savory and crispy was irresistible, and we especially liked the choice to serve it with a bright, sweet-sour dressing laced with diced cucumbers, whose freshness seemed to lighten the toasts. The dressing on our avocado salad confounded us, however. Consisting of half of a perfectly ripe, creamy avocado sliced and served atop a bed of lettuce with some chopped hard-boiled egg for additional ballast, this fresh yet filling salad seemed to cry out for a light, bright, citrusy dressing. Instead, it came with a thick, peanutbased sauce similar to what accompanies satay. Though tasty on its own, it was too thick to toss with the greens, resulting in several bites of plain lettuce. Our final starter, nam took, was essentially a steak salad that could have easily


doubled as an entrée, with marinated slices of beef grilled medium-rare and served over greens with a scoop of sticky rice. This dish presents two challenges: developing sufficient sear on steak thin enough to cook instantly, and balancing the elements of a dressing that is spicy, cool and just a bit earthy from the ground rice. Red Orchid nailed both counts: The meat was perfectly tender, with flavor boosted by a well-rounded dressing loaded with finely crushed chilies. Green curry was another well-balanced concoction, this time of piquant green chilies, sweet coconut milk, aromatic herbs and spices, vegetables and moist chicken whose mild flavor was a perfect foil for the bolder ones it accompanied. Shrimp pad Thai, however, was too sweet for our taste, and could have used more fresh lime and crushed peanuts. Shrimp were few but full of succulent flavor, so that they served as more than just a garnish.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

TAPPED IN On-tap cocktails offer distinctive flavor — and they’re fast, too “We get a lot of people that say, ‘I came here to watch a cocktail made,’” says Lynn Thomas, one of the partners who owns South Side’s Acacia. But Acacia also offers a different spectacle: cocktails poured from a tap. And while it may not be quite so visually impressive, Thomas says, “This is a completely different cocktail than you’d get if it were made by hand.” Acacia is one of a thimbleful of locations to offer pre-made cocktails straight from a tap. For a bar like Acacia, which has quickly become a go-to spot for beautifully crafted cocktails, pre-batching cocktails can help speed up hectic service. But Thomas says the real draw is the subtle differences in flavor between on-tap drinks and cocktails made on the spot. The pre-made cocktails are delivered through a nitrogen-powered tap system, and Thomas says “The pressure of the nitrogen melds the flavors in a way that’s different than a shake or stir would. It’s a completely different taste, softer and a little smoother.” Acacia currently has two cocktails on tap: Lucien Gaudin (Beefeater gin, Campari, dry vermouth) and Backwards Manhattan (Jim Beam, sweet vermouth, Nonino Amaro, wormwood bitters). The drinks are also served at a slightly warmer temperature than a “fresh” cocktail; flavor components that would otherwise be masked by cold become more prominent. As a rule, on-tap cocktails are alcohol-forward. “You want the mix to be all booze,” Thomas says, since elements like citrus juice can cause the drink to separate, or even go sour. Adding a little water, though, is OK, and mimics the dilution of alcohol that would normally be caused by ice melting when a drink is shaken or stirred. Thomas says that he’s just beginning to experiment with cocktails on-tap, and that a variety of drinks are in the works. It’s just another way to engage a bartender’s creativity, he says, adding that of the cocktails he’s created, “For the most part they’ve been working really well.”

“THIS IS A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT COCKTAIL THAN YOU’D GET IF IT WERE MADE BY HAND.”

Thai iced coffee

Finally, pad ka prao was a deceptively simple dish of ground pork and sweet red and green peppers in a spicy basil sauce, served atop rice and garnished with a fried egg. Yet each element added distinct flavor and texture, so that the dish added up to more than the sum of its parts. The peppers, in particular, pervaded the dish, providing crunch in each bite and alternating sweet and slightly bitter notes. Additionally, the yolk of the egg contributed a creamy element to the sauce while extending the dimension of umami flavor. Red Orchid may be small, but it represents a significant addition to the community of Thai restaurants in and around Pittsburgh. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2108 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-488-1800 or acaciacocktails.com

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

So thern South rn Hospititalit Hosp lity. Who said you can’t find

Real Soul Food in Pittsburgh?

HEY BROWN BAGGER, EAT YOUR LUNCH AT STEELHEAD! Pittsburgh Marriott City Center 112 Washington Place, Downtown 412-471-4000 for Reservations www.thesteelhead.com

Come See Uncle Troy! Soul Food at Monroeville Mall Scan to View Steelhead Menus

Located in the Food Court

412.858.5155

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BADO’S CUCINA. 3825 Washington Road, Peters Township. 724-942-3904. The menu at this cozy venue is a focused exploration of authentic Italian cuisine: homemade pasta and sauces, pizza and, instead of full-on entrées, tapas-size portions of heartier fare such as lamb chops and spareribs. Almost everything is cooked in a 625-degree wood-fired oven in the open cucina. JF BIG JIM’S. 201 Saline St., Greenfield. 412-421-0532. Pittsburgh has seen a massive expansion of high-end dining. This cozy eatery — with bar and separate dining area — isn’t part of that trend. It’s old-school Pittsburgh: good food in huge portions, with waitresses who call you “hon.” The place you go to remember where you’re from. JE BLUE. Duncan Manor Plaza, McCandless. 412-369-9050. Blue may be located in a strip mall, but it makes up points with an urbane, lively, clublike interior and a sophisticated, contemporary menu that runs the gamut from the de rigueur (chicken satay) to the refreshing (gorgonzola hummus). And that’s just the appetizers. LE

Luke Wholey’s {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} CORNERSTONE. 301 Freeport Road, Aspinwall. 412-408-3258. The contemporary American fare at this warm and welcoming venue offers a creative take on a traditional menu. Every dish is served with a twist, but none — such as fancified mac-n-cheese, slow-roasted brisket sliders, grilled lamb burger or pulled-pork nachos — is too twisted. KE GULLIFTY’S. 1922 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8222. Gullifty’s desserts are so well known that people go to this

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James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} neighborhood mainstay for nothing else. But Gullifty’s has spiced up its dining experience by adding barbecue to its line-up of sandwiches, pasta and pizza. Now, the lip-smacking BBQ sauce — offered on a variety of dishes — gives the sweets competition. JE JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St., North Side. 412-904-3335. This venue offers a nicely up-todate selection of refined pub grub, including inventively dressed burgers (corn chips, salsa and ranch dressing), meatloaf and fried chicken. A relaxed gastropub, with fun appetizers, such as steak “pipe bombs,” live music on one floor and menus housed in old LP covers. KE

LEGUME BISTRO. 214 N. Craig St., Oakland. 412-621-2700. The former Regent Square bistro now has a more urbane Oakland location. To its inspired cuisine based on fresh, seasonal and local, Legume has also added a full bar and in-house butchering. The expanded menu might include: steaks, lamb kielbasa with celeriac puree, grilled escarole and lemonverbena panna cotta. LE LUKE WHOLEY’S WILD ALASKAN GRILLE. 2106 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-904-4509. Expect fresh fish from this finedining outpost of Pittsburgh’s long-running Strip District fish market. There’s a well-curated selection of mostly grilled fish, with various sauces. Appetizers include favorites such as calamari, mussels and crab cakes, but also grilled corn with feta cheese. KE

LA CUCINA FLEGREA. 100 Fifth Ave., No. 204, Downtown. MEDITERRANO. 2193 Babcock 412-521-2082. The specialties Blvd., North Hills. 412-822-8888. of Italy’s Campi Flegrei are This Greek estiatorio offers featured at this Downtown hearty, homestyle fresh fare in a restaurant. The cuisine of this casual, yet refined, setting. Salads, coastal region naturally offers appetizers (many of them lessseafood, but also vegetables familiar) and casseroles are and cured meats. Thus, on offer as well as heartier a pasta dish might be fare like kalamarakia laden with shellfish, (octopus), roasted leg or enlivened with of lamb and stuffed radicchio and tomatoes. LF prosciutto. LE www. per pa pghcitym o .c MIRCHI. 20445 Route LAS VELAS. 21

FULL LIST ONLINE

Market Square, 2nd floor, Downtown. 412-251-0031. Authentic “family favorite” dishes are the standout at this Mexican restaurant, offering a vibrant antidote to Mexican “cuisine” mired in tired clichés. Trade a taco for cochinita pibil (vinegar-marinated pork), chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) or alambres (meat smothered with peppers, onions and cheese). Also notable: above-average sides, including rice, beans and potatoes. KE

19 (Excel Center Plaza), Cranberry. 724-772-1867. Some of the best Indian food in the area is hidden away at this strip mall. There are the standard Northern Indian entrees, as well as Southern staples such as dosas and fritters made with rice flour and lentils. Mirchi also offers rotating chaat — street-food appetizers — and a superb Chicken 65. KF PARK BRUGES. 5801 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-661-3334. This


WINGHART’S BURGER AND WHISKEY BAR. 5 Market Square, Downtown. 412-434-5600. Big, beefy burgers, wood-fired pizza and a selection of whiskeys make this sliver of a bar and restaurant a welcome addition to Market Square. Burger toppings range from standard cheeses and fried onions to arugula and truffle oil. And don’t miss the pizza, with its excellent crust, that balances nimbly between pizzeria-grade and gourmet. JE

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LESS THAN WEEKS AWAY!

MEAT AND GREET Local butcher touts one-on-one interaction with customers

D.J. Smulick, of D.J.’s Butcher Shop in Bloomfield {PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

SPAK BROS. 5107 Penn Ave., Garfield. 412-362-7725. A pizza, sub and snack joint with fare for all: vegetarians, vegans and carnivores. You’ll find vegan pizza with soy cheese, seitan wings, steak sandwiches, pierogies — much of it made from locally sourced ingredients. J

TAMARIND FLAVOR OF INDIA. 257 N. Craig St., Oakland (412-605-0500); 2101 Green Tree Road, Green Tree (412278-4848); and 10 St. Francis Way, Cranberry (724-772-9191). This menu combines southern Indian cuisine with northern Indian favorites, including meat, poultry, seafood and vegetable curries with rice. Chief among its specialties are dosas, the enormous, papery-thin pancakes that are perhaps the definitive southern Indian dish. JE

ANTHONY BOURDAIN

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

THE RED RING. 1015 Forbes Ave., Uptown. 412-396-3550. This Duquesne University venue is a decided cut above student dining. The dining room is spacious, with a handsome fieldstone bar. The fare is contemporary American cuisine, with a thoughtful selection of internationally inflected classics like chipotle barbecue pork tenderloin and blackened chicken alfredo. Artisanal touches like a side dish of “chef’s grains” complete the picture. KE

TAMARI. 3519 Butler St., Lawrenceville (412-325-3435) and 701 Warrendale Village Drive, Warrendale (724-933-3155). The concept is original and simple: blending the salty, citrusy flavors of Asia with the bright, spicy flavors of Latin America. Although the execution is highend, individual dishes are quite reasonably priced, with lots of small plates — everything from Peking duck quesadilla to chipotle tuna tartare with avocado and wasabi. KE

AN EVENING WITH

offMenu

Belgian-style bistro offers more than moules (mussels), though those come highly recommended, in either a traditional creamwine preparation or spicy Creole. Rather than frites, try variations on French-Canadian poutine, such as adding chipotle pulled pork. Steaks, tarte flambée flatbreads and even a burger round out this innovative menu. KE

“AM I GOING to be OK if I usually add a little olive oil to my burgers when I mix them up?” Jay Alman, of Highland Park, asks D.J. Smulick, the owner of D.J.’s Butcher Shop in Bloomfield. It’s just one of the questions that Alman, a firsttime customer, has about the bacon-cheeseburgers he wants to make — and about the grind of shank and chuck meat that Smulick is offering. “If I get two pounds [of meat for the burgers], how many slices of bacon am I going to need?” “How big are you making the burgers?” Smulick asks. “The size of the palm of my hand, easily,” Alman says. “Probably six pieces of bacon,” Smulick says. It’s a scene that harkens back to a different time, before commercial grocery stores offered piles of hanger steaks and lamb shanks. Smulick, who is also the shop’s sole employee, cuts his meats by hand with a handsaw. He grinds the meat on the spot, with whatever proportion of beef, lamb or chicken sounds best. Inventory changes daily, with shipments coming from slaughterhouses in Butler, Washington and Lancaster counties. There is no freezer in the shop. In a way, says the 34-year-old Smulick, he’s re-training people on how to buy meat. “People are starting to catch on,” he says. “They’re buying in smaller quantities and coming in more often.” Smulick, who held his first job as a dishwasher when he was 14, graduated from the Culinary Institute of America in New York before returning home to Pittsburgh. He opened his own business after his homemade sausage gained a following at farmers’ markets. Running a shop that counters the conveniences of mass production requires finesse, Smulick says. “You have to massage [the customers] a bit: ‘Let me show you this, teach you how to do this.’” And Alman, after getting answers to all his questions, says he is happy he walked in. “We were going to go down to ShurSave down the street here,” he says. “If I can get something better at a local place like this, I’ll give them my money.”

www.GoodvsEvilTour.com

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4623 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-3100 +

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ANGKO STR TRIIP HE S TH P N T IIN

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Don’t be late.

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412.431.4000 24

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theShilohGrill.com


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LOCAL

“A DOPE MC IS A DOPE MC, AND A DOPE FIDDLER IS A DOPE FIDDLER.”

BEAT

{BY NICOLE CHYNOWETH}

TRIBUTE WIZARDS At age 11, Nathan Zoob listened to The Who’s Tommy for the first time. “I laid down on the couch, closed my eyes and had probably one of the first transformative experiences of my life,” he says. “It sort of created me as a musician.” Thirteen years later, Zoob will pay homage to the album that has shaped his musical journey by performing the rock opera with fellow Tommy fans Guy Russo, Josh Verbanets, James Rushin and Max Somerville at Club Café, on April 26. Zoob and Russo devised the idea after meeting at a freshman-orientation talent show at Carnegie Mellon University six years ago. They expressed their deep-rooted love for Tommy to each other and made a pact that one day they would perform every track live. “It’s kind of like when you’re a kid who loves baseball, you dream of growing up and playing in the majors. When we listened to Tommy, we’d pretend we were Pete Townshend,” says 25-year-old Russo. When Zoob started considering a move to New York last year, the pair felt it was time to finally “pull the trigger” on their pipe dream. They knew Verbanets, Rushin and Somerville from the local music scene and recruited them for the production. “We’re all very focused on our individual projects, but we’re more than welcoming this chance to collaborate with each other,” says Russo, who also plays in folk duo Broken Fences. The band has rehearsed for several months. “We want to really honor the original record,” says Zoob. “It’s the best version of the story and the best version of the songs.” They also selected a few special guests to add to the performance, including Morgan Erina, of Broken Fences, and Jesse Prentiss, who will supply additional vocals. Russo thinks the opening “Overture” will engage the crowd as well as the performers in celebrating the enduring album. “There’s magic in those chords, and we all sort of feel it. It’s in our DNA,” he says. “When those first chords start, there are so many memories and nostalgia that come flooding back. There’s so much rich, great music throughout the whole album. I don’t think there’s going to be a dull moment.”

“WHEN WE LISTENED TO TOMMY, WE’D PRETEND WE WERE PETE TOWNSHEND.”

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE WHO’S TOMMY performed by Pittsburgh musicians. 7 p.m. Fri., April 26. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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HIGH, LONESOME RAP {PHOTO COURTESY OF SEAN MARSHALL}

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

R

EMEMBER WHEN gangsta rap was being decried as the most violent and degenerate form of music ever created? When even the President of the United States was pressuring Warner Brothers to pull Ice T’s “Cop Killer”? In 1994, Spin magazine’s Eric Weisbard made an excellent point about that hoopla. MTV was playing a heavily censored version of Warren G’s “Regulate,” with awkward silences in place of its gun references. “At the same time, in light rotation, Johnny Cash is allowed to offer up the far more explicitly murderous ‘Delia’s Gone’ in its entirety,” Weisbard noted. Nearly 40 years earlier, Cash had delivered a classic, in which brags he “shot a man in Reno just to watch him die,” but the world wasn’t ready to hear about Warren G cruising the streets of Long Beach with “sixteen in the clip and one in the hole.” Weisbard concluded: “White music is allowed significant artistic leeway.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

Straight outta country music: Gangstagrass (Rench, far left)

This comparison came to mind upon hearing “Pistol Packin,” from Gangstagrass, a Brooklyn-based collective that tries to bridge the seemingly sizable gap between hip hop and country, with MCs rhyming over live bluegrass musicians. The song’s most bad-ass lyrics come from the chorus: “The hold-up men all know me, and they sure leave me be / I’m a

GANGSTAGRASS

WITH SHELF LIFE STRING BAND, MEGA DEF 9 p.m. Thu., April 25. Howlers Coyote Café, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $7. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

pistol-packin’ papa, and I ramble where I please.” Those words come not from either of the rappers but from a sample of a 1930 recording from the yodeling “father of country,” Jimmie Rodgers.

In both pre-Nashville country and modern-day hip hop, “there are a lot of songs about outlaws, being on the run, hard times and heartbreak,” says Rench, the producer behind Gangstagrass. “There is a different language, but there are stories from country [songs] that would fit perfectly in hip hop.” “And both have a strong improvisational basis,” adds Rench. “We show that onstage with one MC freestyling and my banjo player going off.” Rench has always had a foot in both worlds. Growing up in Southern California, he and his friends would set down cardboard to breakdance to Run DMC on the playground — but when he went home, his Oklahoma-born father had Cash, George Jones and Willie Nelson on the stereo. When he made it to Brooklyn and began producing rap and trip-hop acts, Rench would insert loops of steel guitars and banjos into tracks. “Those


instruments are very rhythmic, because bluegrass traditionally doesn’t have drums,” he says. The reaction to his mash-ups was strong enough that he recruited a few musicians from New York City’s roots scene to record with his hiphop collaborators. Ganstagrass’s first proper album, 2010’s Lightning on the Strings, Thunder on the Mic, featured one rapper, T.O.N.E.z, while last year’s groan-inducingly titled Rappalachia expanded the concept to several MCs, including the legendary Kool Keith. The band hit pay dirt when its “Long Hard Times to Come” was selected as the theme to FX’s Elmore Leonard-inspired neo-western Justified. The project has only Rench as a permanent presence. For the current tour, he recruited rappers R-SON and Dolio the Sleuth, along with the less colorfully named Dan Whitener on banjo, Jon Westover on fiddle and Landry McMeans on dobro.

“THERE IS A DIFFERENT LANGUAGE, BUT THERE ARE STORIES FROM COUNTRY SONGS THAT WOULD FIT PERFECTLY IN HIP HOP.” Zig-zagging from the country enclaves of Kentucky and Tennessee to the mean streets of New York and Philadelphia, the sextet plays to all kinds of audiences. “The hip-hop crowds have been harder to reach because all the hip-hop cats have an opinion of what hip hop is supposed to be, and it probably isn’t us,” says R-SON. “But when my man breaks out that fiddle, they recognize what he does is dope. Any true hip-hopper will realize what’s dope is dope. A dope ballerina is a dope ballerina. A dope pianist is a dope pianist. A dope MC is a dope MC, and a dope fiddler is a dope fiddler.” He adds that both genres “are communal music, of average people getting together to talk about what their lives are like. They’re both people’s music.” Still, Rench says the audiences of the two art forms are polarized. “It’s like North versus South and urban versus rural and red states versus blue states. Hip hop versus country is the same thing, and it doesn’t help that there are different radio stations and different charts for both.” “People have this impression of the two Americas, and you can’t be in the middle,” he adds. “My goal for Gangstagrass is to make good music and have fun, but if we can bring people together, that’s all the better.” INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

A FRESH START {BY ANDY MULKERIN} STRICTLY SPEAKING, Bill Deasy didn’t really go anywhere: The onetime Gathering Field frontman has been releasing solo albums for over a decade, the most recent in 2009. He is a published novelist as well, and he’s been based in Pittsburgh all along. But his new album, Start Again, represents, if not a return, then something of a reimagining of his musical output. And it has a lot to do with working with bandmate and producer Chris Parker — and their shared affinity for Van Morrison. “That was exactly the jumping-off point,” Deasy says. “Chris had played with me for a few years, and we’d gotten to understand that we had some of the same influences.” It shows on the album’s eponymous opening track; much like Morrison’s Astral Weeks and Veedon Fleece-era output, the mix is dominated by simple percussion and bass work. There are flourishes of flutes and strings, but it’s mostly Deasy’s voice and the rhythm section guiding the way — a far cry from what the guitarist is accustomed to. “It was liberating,” he says. “I’m not an amazing acoustic guitar player, but I have a distinct style that really directs everything, without me even knowing it. Most records, you start with an acoustic track and vocal. On this one, we really shied away from that; sometimes it would just be me singing with a drum beat, and no guitar. And I was just thrilled with the changes that brought.”

Getting back to basics: Bill Deasy

“My [other] records might be slightly more accessible,” he says, “but even going back to The Gathering Field, there were always these weighty lyrics and all. That’s how I think of myself. And the idea of Start Again was me getting back to that.” At first glance, with a note inside the album sleeve that says, “No vocals were auto-tuned in the making of this record,” and an opening line that goes, “Analog got converted to digital / Say goodbye to the future of rock and roll,” one might see earnest concern about the state of contemporary music at the forefront of Start Again. Not so, says Deasy. “Usually I love Autotune,” he says. “You give a good performance and there might be one or two notes that are off. It was just a joke, really. The first line of the record, some purists feel that way — and that’s me saying that that’s a cop-out.” It’s true, though, that Start Again sounds like it’s of a different time; it’s an organic record that calls on acoustic instruments to fill out its depths, and it’s a step out of the ordinary for Deasy. In the end, it’s a tribute to what a few risks and faith in one’s collaborators can lead to. “At first, Chris might have some ideas about arrangement or production that might be a little foreign to me,” Deasy says. “But I really consistently fought the urge to question anything [he suggested]. And I just wound up thrilled by what he was doing.”

START AGAIN HAS MORE STREAM-OFCONSCIOUSNESS THEN WE’VE COME TO EXPECT FROM DEASY.

05/09 CRYSTAL CASTLES 05/16 ESCAPE THE FATE 05/18 GHOST B.C. 04/25 THE PINES 04/26 THE WHO’S TOMMY:

BILL DEASY CD RELEASE 8 p.m. Fri., April 26. Oaks Theater, 310 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Sold out at press time. 412-828-6311

LIVE IN CONCERT (EARLY)

04/26 ACTION CAMP, LOVE & RADIATION

MAD RAPTURE (LATE) A BENEFIT FOR DENNY STRAUSER SONS OF FATHERS POOR OLD SHINE THE DAVID MAYFIELD PARADE HE'S MY BROTHER SHE'S MY SISTER TRIXIE WHITLEY (SOLO) (EARLY) JAMES McCARTNEY AND

04/27 04/30 05/01 05/08 05/09 05/10 05/12

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

The changes include a slightly less commercial sound. While it’s no avantgarde record, Start Again might have more stream-of-consciousness than we’ve come to expect from Deasy, and the sing-along choruses are few and far between. For those who think of Deasy as the guy whose “Good Things Are Happening” was the theme to Good Morning America for years, it might seem an aberration, but he doesn’t see it that way.

A M UL K E RI N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013


NEW RELEASES

PROSEED DEPTH IN SHALLOWS (SELF-RELEASED)

On his third album, Proseed may have his most cohesively fulfilling project. His attimes unorthodox rhyme scheme channels MCs like Pharoahe Monch, while the subject matter fits the mold of Rhymesayers Records. He mines personal experience, as expressed in the love story told on “Real Security.” Germany’s Ulliversal handles the production, shining on “Communication Problems,” on which a hypnotic sample blends with standard boom-bap percussion, and also on “My Sweet Valentine,” that offers swords clashing underneath an infectious violin and vocal samples. BY RORY D. WEBB

PROSEED CD RELEASE. 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $7. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.net JASON DAVIS SONGS FOR THE PHONOPHOBIC (SELF-RELEASED)

Nine new tracks from the Pittsburghborn and Duquesne-educated musician, now living in New York state. Davis is an in-demand studio songwriter and musician, cutting tracks for TV and such. On this album, he displays his chops and his versatility, though he doesn’t necessarily reveal a lot of focus. Each track has a personality of its own, drawing from punk rock, grunge, classic rock, even a little bit of electronic music; it’s impressive playing and writing, but most of us want a little more cohesion if we’re going to listen to a record all the way though. BY ANDY MULKERIN

ACCORDIONANARCHY SONGS FROM THE MON VALLEY (SELF-RELEASED)

Despite the silly name and general aesthetic, and principal Steve Pellegrino’s penchant for pranksterism, this one includes some serious, and some seriously interesting, music. It begins with a fullensemble title track with shades of Satie, and works through an a cappella deepvoiced (throat-singing?) track, and some accordion-and-voice material. Cool sax stuff in between; a worthwhile pickup for those into jazz and the avant-garde. BY ANDY MULKERIN

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CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN NIESZ}

Wussy

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., APRIL 26 In a world where the term “indie” has largely lost its meaning, Cincinnati’s Wussy remains a shining example of what indie rock once was. The four-piece is critically acclaimed but not exactly a household name; its fuzzy guitar-rock and slightly awkward, untrained vocals hearken back to the lo-fi early years of indie as exemplified by Homestead Records in the ’80s. Tonight, the band plays Brillobox with Sun Ray, Shining Tech N9ne Light and Robin Vote. Andy Mulkerin 9:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[HIP HOP] + SAT., APRIL 27 Since 1999, rapid-fire rapper Tech N9ne has been putting out solo albums showcasing his distinct, complex rhyme schemes coupled with the sort of infectious, digital production work that characterized the popular hip hop of the early ’00s. The Kansas City native’s delivery is often referred to as “chopper”-style rap, but it’s not the speedy delivery or the complex rhymes that have listeners reeling; it’s the ease with which he pulls it off. It’s easy to picture him lounging in a recliner, reciting bar after bar of verse lackadaisically. Tonight, he plays Stage AE with Brotha Lynch Hung. John Lavanga 6:30 p.m. 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side. $22. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

[BENEFIT] + SUN., APRIL 28 For three decades, Dave Iglar has been a local-

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

music fixture; the blues and rock guitarist has played with the band Force Field, in a duo with Shari Richards, and more recently with his own eponymous band. He’s also recently undergone surgery and radiation treatment for cancer; tonight, his band and some other local staples play a benefit to help defray the costs of treatment. It’s called Dave-Aid, and includes a buffet dinner, raffle and more. Pete Hewlett and Scott Anderson, Miss Freddye, Bill Ali, Eugene Morgan and members of theCAUSE all play as well. AM 4 p.m. Joey D’s Bar and Grille, 2801 Freeport Road, Harmar. $15-20. All ages. www.daveiglar.com

[INDIE ROCK] + TUE., APRIL 30 Athens, Ga., has long been the epicenter of a highly successful indie-rock scene, and fuzz-rockinfluenced fourpiece Twin Tigers exemplifies this perfectly. The band, which began when guitarist Matthew Rain and bassist Aimee Morris began writing and recording music sessions in a basement, utilizes reverb-heavy, layered guitar work and disarmingly soothing vocals to move somewhere between the deeply emotional and the vaguely psychedelic. It’s also a style that translates well onstage, where they’ve become well known for great live performances. At Brillobox with Imperial Railway and Young Brokaw. JL 9:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

ROCK/POP THU 25 ALTAR BAR. Dillinger Escape Plan. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CH-CHANGES. Lizzy Borden, Zion Cross, Metal Lords. New Castle. 724-971-0620. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. The Pines, The Brushfire. South Side. 412-431-4950. HARD ROCK CAFE. The Stationary Set. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Gangstagrass, Shelf Life String Band, Mega-def. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. Gloriana. Warrendale. 724-799-8333. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. The Frantic Heart of It, Robin Vote, Chaibaba, Pairdown. Support MJai! Benefit Show for Hit-and-Run Victim. Music, food,

fancy coffee drinks & a silent art auction. Bloomfield. REX THEATER. Greensky Bluegrass, Fruition. South Side. 412-381-6811. STAGE AE. Steel Panther, Hillbilly Herald. North Side.

GOOSKI’S. The Ceiling Stares, Brass Chariot. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. HARD ROCK CAFE. Lou Lombardi’s Strangelove. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Rock N’ Roll Freakout, 45 Spider, Jakels of 222 ORMSBY. Speedy Botswana, The Boss Ortiz. Mt. Oliver. Mustangs. Bloomfield. ALTAR BAR. One More 412-682-0320. www. per a p Time(A Tribute to Daft pghcitym INN-TERMISSION o .c Punk). Strip District. LOUNGE. The Lady 412-263-2877. & The Monsters, BRILLOBOX. Wussy, Sun Ray, Children of October, Under Shining Light, Robin Vote. a Nightmare, The Renfields. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. South Side. 412-381-3497. CLUB CAFE. The Who’s THE LOOSE MOOSE. Gone South. Tommy: Live In Concert (Early) Baldwin. 412-655-3553. Action Camp, Love & Radiation, MCGROGAN’S TAPROOM. One Mad Rapture (Late). South Side. Gig at a Time, Cookie Willacy. 412-431-4950. Canonsburg. 724-745-9119. CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Fleetwood Mac. Uptown. Crowder, Stetson & Cia. Millvale. 412-642-1800. 866-468-3401. GATOR’S LOUNGE. Polkadot NEW HAZLETT THEATER. Cadaver, PIPEWRENCH, Solarburn, Aimee Man, Ted Leo. North Side. Invader, Fubar. Jeannette. 412-320-4610. 724-527-5262. NORTH PARK CLUBHOUSE. Lucky Me. Gibsonia. 724-449-9090. OAKS THEATER. Bill Deasy. Oakmont. 412-828-6311. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bardo Pond, Mike Tamburo, Drugula. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 26

MP 3 MONDAY THE WAVE

SAT 27 31ST STREET PUB. Antiseen, Submachine, Iron City Hooligans Legendary Hucklebucks, Misery Jackals, Imperial Rooster. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 6119 PENN AVE. Valleys. East Liberty. BACKDRAFT. King’s Ransom. Baldwin. 412-885-1239. BROTHERS GRIMM. The Kardasz Brothers. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. CLUB CAFE. Brad Yoder, Mark Pipas, Gab Bonesso, Blue Baxter, Mark Dignam, Gena/Carlos/ Preach, Mike Medved, Judith Avers, Wreckids, Pete Bush, Paul Tabachneck, Mike Why, Gary Musisko. A Benefit For Denny Strauser. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Pulp Friction. Robinson. 412-489-5631. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Tatsuya Nakatani & Michel Doneda, Comoros, Blinded. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Don Strange & The Doosh Bears. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Tenique & These Guys.West Mifflin. 412-466-1331.

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from hip-hop duo The Wave; stream or download “Feelin’ Famous” on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

SHOWS K THIS WEE

Visit jergels.com/calendar for a complete list of shows & to buy tickets!

Thu 4.25 GLORIANA w/Canaan Smith And Lizzie Sider Ticketed Event // 8 pm show // $15/$19 Fri 4.26 AIRBORNE W/JEFF JIMERSON // rock covers // 9 pm // $7 Sat 4.27 MERCEDEZ // dance // 9 pm // $7 Sun 4.28 JAZZ CONSPIRACY // jazz // 7 pm // $5

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 31

THURS, APR 25 • 9PM LATIN FLAMENCO DANCEABLE WORLD-FUNK MIDDLE EASTERN

MESZECSINKA WITH KHAFIF (TRIBAL BELLY DANCE) Band Night Every Thursday!

FRI, APR 26 • 9PM PSYCHEDELIC ROCK

APRIL 25 The Catastrophe, Doomsday Initiative, Before You

BARDO POND PLUS DRUGULA AND MIKE TAMBURO

MAY 2 Mystic Cowboyz, Ariel MAY 9 Noah Sugarman of 500 Miles to Memphis, The Semi-Super Villains

KID DURANGO WITH BARBARA PERFECT

$2 PBR Drafts

FEATURING

Everyday 9-11

$5 PBR Draft & Fireball Shot Thursdays 10-Midnight

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

SAT, APR 27 • 9PM GRUNGE/ROCK

MON, APR 29 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG KING TUES, APR 30 • 9PM ROOTS/AMERICANA

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES

THE HEARTACHE YEAR OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Hard Money, Let Them Eat Cake, Lampshades. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. JOEY D’S. The Dave Iglar Band. Harmarville. 412-828-0999. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. The Gum Band. Bridgeville. 412-221-1543. SILKS LOUNGE AT THE MEADOWS. DaPhunk Band. Washington. ST. JAMES PLACE TAVERN. Lucky Me. South Side. 412-431-3222. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Kid Durango, Barbara Perfect, Love Tara. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 28 CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Yngwie Malmsteen. Munhall. 412-368-5225. CARSON CITY SALOON. Tony Janflone Jr. Band. South Side. 412-481-3203. JOEY D’S. The Dave Iglar Band, The Bill Ali Band. Harmarville. 412-828-0999.

MON 29 GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Winter Line, Requiem, Sunturret, Satyr/ Elfheim. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

TUE 30 BRILLOBOX. Twin Tigers, Imperial Railway, Young Brokaw. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Sons of Fathers, Sephus Lee. South Side. 412-431-4950. CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. The Flaming Lips, The Black Keys. Uptown. 412-642-1800. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. The High Highs, Nevada Color, The Dressed Frets. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Gran Grilla, Icon Gallery, Seax. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Steven Wilson. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

WED 01

Join Balafon West African Dance Ensemble, Inc. for the Second Annual Black River African Dance Conference May 17-18, 2013! Dance, drum and cultural workshops, plus an African Marketplace, will be held at Barack Obama Academy (formerly Peabody High School), 515 N. Highland Ave, in East Liberty. Don’t miss the concert performance of Kidiri, a Cinderella-style story with an African twist, Friday, May 18 at Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave. Visit http://www.balafon.org for more information. Information is also available via phone at 412.204.7068 or via email at blackriverconference@balafon.org. Black River Conference is sponsored by The Pittsburgh Foundation and The Heinz Endowment and City Paper. The presentation of Black River Conference Concert Performance is made possible by support from the Kelly Strayhorn Theater.

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

CLUB CAFE. Poor Old Shine, The Unknown String Band. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Datagram Lanyard, Gorgeous Suntan, Joey Molinaro, 8 Cylinder, Sub Mistress. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Neighbours, Honey Wild, Andre Costello & the Cool Minors. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Dirty Charms, Strangelove. Dollar Shots, The War Is On, Hudson Falcons. South Side. 412-381-3497. ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739.

DJS THU 25 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 26 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Harry Lurker. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 27

Placement, Stillborn Identity. South Side. 412-431-4668.

BLUES THU 25 CHAMP’S SPORTS GRILL AND LOUNGE. The Fabulous Mr. “B” & the Bad Boyz. North Versailles. 412-829-5100.

FRI 26

EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The Southside Groove Squad. South Side. 412-431-4090. MOONDOG’S. Jimmy Thackery & the Drivers. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NATILI’S. Jimmy Adler Trio. Butler. 724-287-5033. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Billy www. per Price & the Lost Minds. pa pghcitym o Shaler. 412-487-6259. .c

FULL LIST E N O LIN

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Motown Night. w/ PghSoulDj. Classic Motown, Rare Soul, Funk. South Side. 412-431-5282. MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan Diego VII. Salsa & Latin music. Downtown. 412-980-7653. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

CHRISTINA’S. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. White Oak. 412-672-5750. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. MUGSHOTS CAFE. Jill West & Blues Attack. Crafton. 412-921-7474. PIZZA DADDIES. Sweaty Betty. Gibsonia. 724-443-0066. THREE RIVERS HARLEYDAVIDSON. Shot O’ Soul. Glenshaw. 412-487-3377.

SUN 28

JAZZ

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Give A Man a Break Sunday Night Soul Sessions w/ DJ Soulful Fella. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 30 BELVEDERE’S. DJ T$. Lawrenceville. 724-312-4098. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. DJ Zan Naz, DJ Outtareach. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

WED 01 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. DJ Outtareach. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Brotha Mike & DJ Skooze. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B SAT 27 CJ’S. The Old School. Strip District. 412-642-2377. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. The Optimists. Shaler. 412-487-6259. SMILING MOOSE. Proseed, Fortified PhonetX, Ivies, Advanced

SAT 27

THU 25 ANDYS. Dave Vannatter. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. KISKI AREA HIGH SCHOOL. Gordon Goodwin & The Big Phat Band. Leechburg. 724-842-0419. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 26 ANDYS. Trevor McQueen. Downtown. 412-773-8884. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. James Johnson III, Vince Agwada Blues Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & the Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

SAT 27 ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Afro Blue. Downtown. 412-292-1753. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

HILL HOUSE KAUFMANN CENTER. Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra. Hill District. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Sean Parsons Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Theh Kim Hassara Band. Downtown. 412-392-2217. ROMAN BISTRO. The James Hovan Trio. Forest Hills. 412-871-3704.

SUN 28 ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Dr. Jamie Moore Quartet. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. Warrendale. 412-256-8234. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. UP MODERN KITCHEN. Dave Roth. Jazzed-up brunch. Shadyside. 412-688-8220.

MON 29 ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

TUE 30 ANDYS. Mark Shuttleworth. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Sean Jones & Dwayne Dolphin. Jazz Meets Funk Vol. II. Downtown. 412-325-6769. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Claudio Roditi. North Side. 412-904-3335.

WED 01 720 RECORDS. James Johnson, Paul Thompson, Cliff Barnes. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Daval/ Stater Guitar Duo. Sewickley. 412-427-9979.

ACOUSTIC THU 25 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Juan Vasquez. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 26 565 LIVE. Yellow Tie Guy. Bellevue. 412-522-7556. BONNIE & CLYDE’S. Lenny & Jeff. Wexford. 724-934-2110. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. John Lilly, Rick Bruening. Harmony. 724-452-0539. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin the Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

SAT 27 BEE’Z BISTRO & PUB. Gina Rendina Acoustic Duo. Bridgeville. 412-257-9877. ELWOOD’S PUB. Acoustical Bruce. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAVA HOUSE. Paz & Ukulele


C O H E N

Jefferson College, Washington. 724-223-6546.

FRI 26 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, “Ode to Joy.” Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

Steely Dan Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica

DARIA BURLAK, ORGANIST. Epiphany Catholic Church, Uptown. 412-471-0257. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, “Ode to Joy.” Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WYSO PHILHARMONIC. Seton Hill University, Greensburg. 724-834-2200.

{TUE., JULY 23}

Bob Dylan with Wilco, My Morning Jacket Merriweather Post Pavilion

PHILADELPHIA {Wed., July 31}

MON 29

Paul Weller

RENAISSANCE CITY WINDS. Americana. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-276-3456 x 7.

Union Transfer

Eddie. Brighton Heights. 412-415-0734. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. Alex Talbot Trio. North Side. 412-237-9400. SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Exports. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322.

SLIPPERY ROCK UNIVERSITY. The Hunts. Slippery Rock. 724-738-2018.

MON 29

COUNTRY

WORLD THU 25 PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Teetotallers. Shadyside. 412-361-1915. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Meszecsinka, Khafif Tribal Bellydance. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 26 PENN BREWERY. Autobahn Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

SUN 28 CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. World Kaleidoscope: Bastard Bearded Irishmen. Oakland. 412-622-3151.

N E W S

I LOVE

BEING

ME ,

DON’T

YOU?

APRIL 27 BYHAM THEATER 8 PM

Presented in collaboration with The Andy Warhol Museum’s Off the Wall performance series

Box Office at Theater Square t TrustArts.org 412-456-6666 • Groups 10+ Tickets 412-471-6930 PITTSBURGH PITTSB

ACCESSIBLE ACCES SIBLE

LTURAL LTUR RAL

SERVICES

TRUST T TRU ST

WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Greensburg-Salem High School, Greensburg.

AVAILABLE AVA V ILABLE

, N LP LE OURAY B A L L AVAI AND B CD

OTHER MUSIC

SAT 27

SAT 27

MOONDOG’S. The Flow Band. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe Quartet. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. RIVERS CASINO. Michael Christopher. North Side. 412-231-7777.

BULGARIAN-MACEDONIAN NATIONAL EDUCATION AND CULTURAL CENTER. Daphne Alderson. “A Night on the Black Sea” cabaret. West Homestead. 412-461-6188. LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. STRAND THEATER. Three Phantoms in Concert. Revue of the “guy” songs of Broadway. Zelienople. 724-742-0400. WEST VIEW VFW. Pittsburgh Banjo Club Roaring Twenties Night. West View. 412-931-9954.

SAT 27

SUN 28

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Jamey Johnson. Munhall. 412-368-5225.

ASPINWALL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. The Pittsburgh Gospel Choir. Aspinwall. 412-781-2884. LEMONT. Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. STRAND THEATER. Three Phantoms in Concert. Revue of the “guy” songs of Broadway. Zelienople. 724-742-0400.

THU 25 ELWOOD’S PUB. Midnight Rooster. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

FRI 26

CLASSICAL THU 25 HEART STRINGS. North American premiere of Sir Paul McCartney’s, NOVA performed by the members of the Pittsburgh Symphony. Benefits the Rock for The Heart Foundation. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. JEFFREY SIEGEL: KEYBOARD CONVERSATIONS. Concert & commentary. Washington &

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SATURDAY

SUN 28

COLUMBIA, MD.

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-596-2743.

T R U S T

Bernhard

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, “Ode to Joy.” Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. WCCC COMMUNITY CHOIR & SYMPHONIC BAND. Westmoreland County Community College, Youngwood. 724-925-4000.

{TUE., JULY 23}

WED 01

G R I G S B Y

SAT 27

CLEVELAND

HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SANDRA &

+

MON 29 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

DARKTHRONE “THE UNDERGROUND RESISTANCE”

STEVEN WILSON “THE RAVEN THAT REFUSED TO SING”

Meet STEVEN WILSON in person! WHEN - TUESDAY TUESDAY, APRIL 30 2013 12:30 P.M. to 1:30 P.M., WHERE - THE EXCHANGE 6533 ROBINSON CENTER DR., ROBINSON TWP 15207

QUEENSRYCHE “FREQUENCY UNKNOWN”

WED 01

LIKE E US S ON

CLUB COLONY. Mark Vennere. Scott.

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July 2

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Byham Theatre with special guest

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Guitar Center Pittsburgh 1020 Park Manor Blvd. 412.788.1071 For more locations, visit guitarcenter.com. 15% OFF A SINGLE ITEM PURCHASE (UP TO $500 DISCOUNT) WITH QUALIFYING TRADE-IN ON THE SAME TRANSACTION. SEE STORE ASSOCIATE FOR DETAILS.

#PY0รณDFBU5IFBUSF4RVBSFt XXX5SVTU"SUTPSHtXXX(SFHH"MMNBODPN 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013


What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

April 24 - 30 WEDNESDAY 24 Mushroomhead

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guest Final Trigger, Lydia Can't Breathe & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6p.m.

The Joy Formidable STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Fort Lean and You Won’t. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 7p.m.

Rebelution MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest J Boog & Hot Rain. All ages show. Tickets: 866468-3401 or ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 25

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

newbalancepittsburgh.com

and Black Clouds. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Jamey Johnson CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 26 Gallery Crawl

SUNDAY 28

CULTURAL DISTRICT. 412-4566666. Free event. For more info visit trustarts.org. 5:30p.m.

Pittsburgh Power vs. San Antonio Talons CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: consolenergycenter.com or 800-745-3000. 2p.m.

Crowder MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guest Stetson & Cia. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THE BLACK KEYS TUESDAY, APRIL 30 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

Beethoven’s Ninth “Ode to Joy”

Shannon and the Merger HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guest Lou Lombardis & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

Dillinger Escape Plan

The Who’s Tommy: Live in Concert

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guest The Faceless, Royal Thunder

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 7p.m.

SATURDAY 27

Sandra Bernhard

KAUFMANN CENTER Hill District. 412-281-1026. Tickets: kaufmanncenter.com. 8p.m.

Millionaires

13th Annual Brewski Festival SEVEN SPRINGS MOUNTAIN RESORT. 800-452-2223. Over 21 event. Tickets: 7springs.com. 8p.m.

The Black Keys

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Sean Jones & The Pittsburgh Jazz Orchestra

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through April 28.

TUESDAY 30

The Dirty Ball ATTACK THEATRE Strip District. 412-281-3305. Tickets: 1-888-71-TICKETS or attacktheatre.showclix.com. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guest Ashland High, Beneath The Sun & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. With special guest The Flaming Lips. Tickets: livenation.com or 800-745-3000. 8p.m.

An Evening With Steven Wilson MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Spring Event

NEW BALANCE

Friday April 26 - Sunday May 5

20

on any regular priced New Balance, Aravon, Dunham or Cobb Hill purchase.

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS N E W S

+

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10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

Minimum purchase $100.00. Limit to one certificate per customer. Certificate must be presented at time of purchase. Can not be combined with other offers and discounts. Some exlusions may apply. MAILRNB

TWENTY DOLLARS

GIFT CERTIFICATE

$

WEXFORD

Valid thru May 31, 2013

TWENTY DOLLARS GIFT CERTIFICATE

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

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YOU’LL BE LOOKING FOR THE NEAREST KILLER ROBOT

GOOD SPIRITS {BY HARRY KLOMAN} Robbie Emmerson (Paul Brannigan) is angry. He’s 24 years old, the product of hoodlum parents, and he’s doing 300 hours of “community payback” in Glasgow for beating up some guys. He has a patient and sensible girlfriend, a good influence, who just gave birth to their son. And he vows he’ll never hit another man so his son’s life can end the generational cycle of wasted lives.

EARTH DAZE

Robbie (third from left), distilling life lessons

CP APPROVED

Ken Loach, the leonine British director, has spent half a century making socially conscious working-class character dramas like The Angels’ Share, and this one is among the finest in his canon, a beautifully acted film of quiet intensity and gentle humor. It’s crisply shot and tightly edited, and yet, it feels like a raffish slice of life, heightened by Paul Laverty’s intelligent script. We learn the meaning of the film’s title when Robbie tours a distillery. Every year, about 2 percent of the whiskey in every cask evaporates: This is the angels’ share, and what’s left after 20 or 30 years of care is the best of what the cask has to offer. It’s the most elegant metaphor I’ve heard in as long as I can remember in a mature and inspiring drama that follows Robbie as he tries to distill his anger and join society. Starts Fri., April 26. Regent Square INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE BIG WEDDING. Justin Zackham directs this comedy about a divorced couple who, while attending a family wedding, pretend to still be married. ried. Complicated! Amanda Seyfried, Ben n Barnes, Robert DeNiro Niro and Susan Sarandon are re among the ensemble nsemble cast. Starts arts Fri., April ril 26

{BY AL HOFF}

E

ARTH IS A post-apocalyptic wasteland. Starting in 2017, aliens attacked, nukes were set off, and somebody blew up the moon. By 2077, there are only two people left, coordinating the last bit of resource extraction before joining the rest of humanity near Saturn in just two weeks’ time. But as Joseph Kosinski’s Oblivion recounts, this fortnight will be as tumultuous as any cop’s proverbial last day on the force. Jack (Tom Cruise, in silver leather) manages drones for mankind’s temporary HQ, a floating giant pyramid called the Tet. The drones are equipped with super-duper visual-analysis screens, and hunt down the remaining troublesome aliens known as “Scavs.” The Tet, despite the high-tech ability to freefloat in space, can barely communicate via the scrambled-video visage of Sally (head of Melissa Leo). Jack’s partner, Julia (Andrea Riseborough), runs communication from the couple’s faaabulous mid-century-mod-

Me and my drone: Jack (Tom Cruise) is the last man on Earth.

ern-ish dream home (with floating infinity pool!). But bad news, ladies: Even if you’re literally the last woman on Earth, you gotta report to your desk job in a skin-tight dress and spike heels. Jack and Julia have had their memories wiped, which they seem cool with — 2066 sucked, after all — but Jack keeps getting weird flashbacks to pre-apocalyptic times: He’s a Yankees fan at the Empire State Building canoodling with a pretty girl (Olga Kurylenko).

OBLIVION DIRECTED BY: Joseph Kosinski STARRING: Tom Cruise, Olga Kurylenko, Andrea Riseborough

Imagine his surprise when the Scavs shoot down a rocket module, and there in delta sleep is the very same girl! Oh, and the Scavs take him hostage, and Julia gets prickly, and Jack starts to ask ques-

tions about his job that you know are gonna lead to problematic, if wholly predictable, answers. Oblivion is mildly entertaining, and looks good with sharp digital effects and weirdo landscapes. (Thanks, Iceland!) It’s good enough for popcorn, but not enough to overcome the flat acting and weak plot. Or more correctly, plots — since Oblivion is a blatant pastiche of ideas, tropes and set pieces from other films including Star Wars, Terminator, Moon, The Matrix, 2001, WALL*E, Planet of the Apes, even the 1957 soaper An Affair to Remember! For all the nifty visuals, too much of the tale, and what it means, is simply told to us (at times, by special guest star and noted explainer Morgan Freeman). Sci-fi is often about the tension between human and not-human, and hoping us soulful types triumph. But when any of Oblivion’s characters start spouting nonsense about love or dreams, you’ll be looking for the nearest killer robot. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013


ROBERT SHIA JULIE SAM JACKIE REDFORD LaBEOUF CHRISTIE ELLIOTT EVANCHO ANNA STANLEY NICK RICHARD BRIT NOLTE MARLING JENKINS KENDRICK TUCCI

FILM CAPSULES CP

With

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

++++

NEW THE COMPANY YOU KEEP. A stellar cast of indie-film workhorses such as Stanley Tucci, Chris Cooper, Brendan Gleeson, Richard Jenkins and Julie Christie can’t give Robert Redford’s lackluster thriller the oomph it needs. Redford (craggy and ageless) portrays a lawyer who goes on the run when a young reporter (an unconvincing Shia LaBeouf) uncovers his connection to a long-ago Weather Underground crime. (The fact that the radical group and the times it operated in must to be explained within this film doesn’t bode well for audience engagement.) As the lawyer and the pursuing journalist hop around the country, the back story gets filled in, and with each new revelation it gets more ridiculous: What’s pitched as a political thriller with shades of moral relativism turns increasingly into a hokey melodrama. Of local note: The Weather Underground once claimed a bombing at the Gulf Tower, and Redford’s daughter is played by Pittsburgh’s tiny opera singer, Jackie Evancho. Starts Fri., April 26. (Al Hoff)

BRENDAN TERRENCE GLEESON HOWARD CHRIS SUSAN COOPER SARANDON

With

And

“A DAZZLING DISPLAY OF PERFECT PERFORMANCES.”

HIGHESTRATING RATING HIGHEST

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Like traveling on the Mississippi, Mud is a bit of a slow float, with too many port calls and noisy distractions, but there are also some interesting quieter moments along the way. Plus, a roster of good actors on board: Ray McKinnon, Sam Shepard and Michael Shannon, and a cameo from Walking Tall’s Joe Don Baker. Starts Fri., April 26. AMC Loews (AH) PAIN & GAIN. Miami bodybuilders get caught up in a kidnapping and extortion scheme in this comedy “based on real events.” Dwayne Johnson and Mark Wahlberg star; Michael Bay directs. Starts Fri., April 26. THE SAPPHIRES. In the late 1960s, four young Aboriginal women, under the haphazard tutelage of their soul-loving Irish manager (Chris O’Dowd), set sail for Vietnam to sing for the troops. Wayne Blair’s film is complete piffle, an utterly predictable rom-com juiced up with some Aboriginal civil-rights history and ’60s pop music, and starring wobbly actors you’ve never heard of. It’s also, in spite of itself, one of the more enjoyable films I’ve seen this year. The film burbles along pleasantly, its soapy fare leavened by O’Dowd’s lovable-Irishrogue shtick, toe-tapping musical numbers and some feel-good bromides about everybody just getting along. Who knew we wanted a mash-up of Rabbit-Proof Fence, The Commitments and Good Morning, Vietnam? Starts Fri., April 26. Galleria (AH)

CP

The Sapphires MUD. On a small island in a remote part of the Mississippi River in Arkansas, two 14-year-old boys — Ellis and Neckbone — are astonished to find a boat high in the trees (left by a flood) and a man named Mud living in it. The amiable Mud (Matthew McConaughey) spins the lads a number of tales about how and why he’s hiding out on the island, and sufficiently charmed, the two agree to help him escape. What follows is a slow-paced comingof-age tale with elements of thriller, family melodrama and Dixie gothic, with a nod to the granddaddy of Mississippi adventures, Huckleberry Finn. The film is written and directed by Jeff Nichols, who scored an arthouse hit last year with his moody, paranoiac Take Shelter. But Mud is closer in vibe to his first film, Shotgun Stories. Mud is meant to be meandering, but it does suffer from being overly long, and some of its subplots feel underdeveloped or clichéd. What’s more effective are the scenes of Mud and his new acolytes: McConaughey works his new-and-improved career niche, playing another off-track scrambler whose laconic charm is undercut by something feral and creepy, and the two young actors have an easy chemistry with McConaughey and each other. (Jacob Lofland, as Neckbone, is especially good at conveying a disaffected but canny veneer.)

SOUND CITY. It was a grubby place in the no-glam San Fernando Valley, but Sound City recording studio was where some of the most popular and influential rock albums of all time were recorded. In its heyday, it was beloved by musicians and producers for friendly staff, a commitment to the essentials of rock ’n’ roll, and its massive custombuilt Neve analog sound board. Foo Fighter and film director Dave Grohl has assembled an entertaining history of the now-shuttered studio, interviewing staff and musicians. The often-debt-plagued studio survived each decade by luckily recording an eradefining blockbuster: Fleetwood Mac in 1975; Rick Springfield’s Working Class Dog (1981); and Nirvana’s Nevermind, in 1991. The film’s first hour is a blast for music historians and tech-heads. But, the second half, in which Grohl jams with an assortment of musicians (including Steve Nicks, Springfield and a Historical Legend) at his studio (now home to Sound City’s Neve board) is pretty dull. Fri., April 26, through Sun., April 28. Melwood (AH)

TOMMOROW’S INDIE FILM HITS IN YOUR LOCAL THEATER TODAY

REPERTORY DOWN BY LAW. In Jim Jarmusch’s cult-favorite 1986 film, three men (John Lurie, Tom Waits, Roberto Benigni) share a Louisiana jail cell and plot to escape. 8 p.m. Wed., April 24. Melwood. $2 PIAZZA FONTANA: AN ITALIAN CONSPIRACY. Marco Tullio Giordana’s docu-drama recounts the investigation of the 1969 bombing of a bank in Milan, in which 14 people died. It’s partly a police procedural, and partly a snapshot of the politically chaotic times

GATHR.US

4 NEW FILMS PREVIEWED EACH MONTH

CP

Series launches THURSDAY, MAY 2 at 7:30PM with FREE screening of THE ICEMAN at the HOLLYWOOD THEATER at 1449 Potomac Avenue, Dormont. RSVP or become a member at

Gathr.us/series/Dormont-previews

CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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GET TRAINING. GET NOTICED.

GET CREATIVE. GET STARTED. ET S TARTED.

FILM CAPSULES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

MAKE TELEVISION. MAKE MOVIES. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. DIFFERENCE

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Mud

COMCAST 21, VERIZON 47 that spurred the bombing. The interested parties are numerous, spanning political groups (from neofascists to anarchists), government officials, cops, infiltrators and perhaps a shadowy foreign figure or two. If you’re not well-versed in Italian politics, it’s a bit tricky to keep all the players sorted out, but a clear and gripping narrative emerges: This bombing is not what it seems, and justice is among its victims. Good stuff for folks who like thrillers based on reallife political machinations. Screens as part of a festival of recent Italian films, presented by the University of Pittsburgh. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., April 25. Alumni Hall, University of Pittsburgh, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org/pittsburgh (AH)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

TORMENTI. Filiberto Scarpelli’s animated film depicts a romance, set amid the backdrop of political tumult in 1930s Italy. Screens as part of a festival of recent Italian films, presented by the University of Pittsburgh. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Fri., April 26. Alumni Hall, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests. org/pittsburgh

OUT OF THE PAST. “Build my gallows high, baby,” Robert Mitchum tells man-eater Jane Greer in one of film’s rare moments of lightness. Still, she complies, in collusion with her lover, gangster Kirk Douglas, as the two of them twist Mitchum’s private eye into knots and double-crosses from the mountains of Lake Tahoe to the beaches at Acapulco. This flashback-filled tale of wrong turns is one of the quintessential films noir, directed with plenty of dark brilliance by one of the genre’s masters, Jacques Tourneur. The 1947 film concludes a Sunday-night series of classic noir on 35 mm. 8 p.m. Sun., April 28. Regent Square (AH)

CP

N DWIC H WITH ANY SA

THE GREAT OUTDOORS. Dan Aykroyd and John Candy star in Howard Deutch’s 1988 comedy about a vacation ruined by rowdy relatives. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 1. AMC Loews. $5

FOR THE NEXT 7 GENERATIONS. This 2007 documentary depicts the formation of The International Council of 13 Indigenous Grandmothers, an alliance founded in response to numerous global crises. Filmmaker Carole Hart will be present, and following the screening there will be a talkback with some of Pittsburgh indigenous elders. 6:30 p.m. Fri., April 26. Eddy Theater, Chatham University, Shadyside. $10 suggested donation. www. wholepersonwholeplanet.com

DAZED AND CONFUSED. Ahh, to be young in the mid-’70s: Besides the usual thrills and trials — girls, beer and clueless parents — there was Skynyrd, conversion vans, giant headphones and the cultivation of certain herbs. Drift back in time with Richard Linklater’s nostalgic 1993 coming-of-age comedy, set in Austin in 1976. Midnight, Sat., April 27. Manor

FFRRESHECEUT FR I ES

4. This year’s theme is “Re-Imagining Class,” with recent Russian films chosen for their depiction of the country’s middle class. Five films screen during the day April 29-May 3 (Room 106, David Lawrence Hall, Pitt campus Oakland; free). Four films screen at night May 1-4 at Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Melwood Screening Room (7:30 p.m.; $8). All films in Russian, with English subtitles. See www.rusfilm.pitt.edu for complete schedule.

th

RUSSIAN FILM SYMPOSIUM. The 15 annual symposium runs Mon., April 29, through Sat., May

Out of the Past KOKOKO. A museum ethnographer “adopts” a working-class woman, and their rocky friendship is the subject of this recent dramedy from Avdotia Smirnova. Screens as part of the Russian Film Symposium. In Russian, with English subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 1. Melwood VIVAN LAS ANTIPODAS. Travel to Earth’s antipodes — places located diametrically opposite each other on the globe — in Victor Kossakovsky’s new documentary. 7 p.m. Thu., May 2, and 11 a.m. Sat., May 4. SouthSide Works RITA’S LAST FAIRY TALE. In this metaphorical and fantastical melodrama examining social and institutional decay, Death works as a nurse at a shabby hospital. Renata Litvinova directs and stars. Screens as part of the Russian Film Symposium. In Russian, with English subtitles. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 2. Melwood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[OPERA]

THE EXHIBITION PUTS NOTEWORTHY EMPHASIS ON THE PERSPECTIVE OF LOOKING OUTWARD

POSSESSION {BY STEVE SUCATO}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Pittsburgh Jewish Music Festival presents THE DYBBUK: BETWEEN TWO WORLDS 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 25, and 7:30 p.m. Sun., April 28. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $1530. www.pittsburghsymphony.org/dybbuk N E W S

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[ARCHITECTURE]

LOOK INSIDE Clarinetist Gilad Harel performs in The Dybbuk. {PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVE NICKERSEN}

How far would you go to be with the one you love? That is the central question in Ofer Ben-Amots’ multimedia chamber opera The Dybbuk: Between Two Worlds. This retelling of S. Ansky’s seminal 1914 Yiddish play of the same name is presented by the Pittsburgh Jewish Music Festival April 25 and 28, at the New Hazlett Theater. Part of the Pittsburgh Symphony’s Music for the Spirit Festival, the opera also marks the 10th anniversary of the Pittsburgh Jewish Music Festival. A tale of faith, mysticism and the power of love, The Dybbuk tells the story of Hannan, who was spurned by his lover’s family and died of a broken heart, but returns from the grave as a Dybbuk (deceased soul) to take possession of his lover Leah’s body. Leah, now near death herself from the experience, must choose between following her lover into the afterlife or remaining among the living without him. Steeped in European Jewish culture and set to Ben-Amots’ folk-inspired score, The Dybbuk is the first opera PJMF director/ cellist Aron Zelkowicz has mounted and directed for the organization. He says he took some artistic liberties with its libretto. “I wanted to update the opera so it wasn’t so much about the afterlife and ghosts, but about memory and loss of loved ones,” says Zelkowicz. Most notable is that this 90-minute, three-act opera now incorporates about 50 minutes of dance. The dance is choreographed by Joan Wagman, with contributions from Texture Contemporary Ballet’s Alan Obuzor and Kelsey Bartman, and performed by members of Texture. “The music lends itself very well to dance,” says Wagman. Zelkowicz also altered the opera’s ending. Sung in Hebrew, with English supertitles projected on a screen, The Dybbuk stars Israeli soprano Yahli Toren as Leah. Clarinetist Gilad Harel portrays the spirit of Hannan. Both performers originated their roles at the show’s 2008 premiere. “The role of Leah was really cast with Toren’s voice in mind,” says Zelkowicz. “It is a soprano part but has very low register.” The opera also features Duquesne University’s voice-department chair, baritone Guenko Guechev; the Pappert Women’s Chorale; the Children’s Festival Chorus of Pittsburgh; and video art by Sheri Wills.

{IMAGE COURTESY OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART}

{BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM}

Longfellow, Alden & Harlow Architects’ elevation of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh (1887-92)

T

HEINZ Architectural Center opened 20 years ago. I worked there two summers as a graduate-student intern helping to prepare for its opening, and I remember wishing it were a freestanding building, instead of the complex of interior spaces that it occupies within the Carnegie Museum of Art. From the Parthenon and Chartres cathedral to Fallingwater and the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, we frequently understand brilliant works based largely on their iconic sculptural image. Even if we talk about space as the essential quality of architecture, a dramatic sculptural form is usually necessary to, say, get on a magazine cover. But now that HAC is marking its 20th anniversary with a celebratory exhibition, 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades of the Heinz Architectural Center, I am not so concerned about such outside appearances. HE

Founded as a gift from Drue Heinz to honor the interest that her late husband, Henry J. Heinz II, had in architecture, the HAC has a mission: showing artifacts and interpretations of great works in order to encourage broader appreciation of the builder’s art.

20/20: CELEBRATING TWO DECADES OF THE HEINZ ARCHITECTURAL CENTER continues through May 19. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

The HAC complex itself was designed by New York-based architects Cicognani Kalla in a restrained postmodern style that makes

more sense as an old space than a new one. With ochre-colored plaster walls (as well as red and blue in a few places), fabric display surfaces, and coved ceilings, it is organized around a dramatic, skylit, multi-story central corridor which visitors enter from the Hall of Sculpture. The space recalls, at least generally, the London home and museum of John Soane, an 18th- and 19th-century British architect and collector. Soane’s Museum, belying its restrained façade, is packed with the architectural fragments, casts and other artifacts that the architect collected during his career. Rooms articulated in his presciently and elegantly streamlined version of classical architecture provide a foil for the many objects. The pieces give the sense that visitors are peering not so much into Soane’s house as into his mind. HAC is a similarly cerebral volume, as the 20/20 exhibition reminds us. Just as CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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LOOK INSIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 39

— A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

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the architects’ desire to evoke some great historical spaces of collecting is apparent, so too have the curators revealed their minds through the objects displayed in this show. A favorite section in the galleries is where individual sketches, perspectives and models from the collection are on display, along with comments from current and past curators about the significance of each. Curator Tracy Myers selects a drawing by Felix Duban that shows the modified triumphal arch at the entrance to the Ecole des Beaux Arts on the Rue Bonaparte, in Paris. A better-known view of this arch looks toward the school, with Duban’s Palais des Etudes building in the background. This view, instead, looks away from the school and back toward the street — peering out, rather than in. The distinction, nction, which is subtle in the choice of the drawing, reflects an important ortant quality of the 20th-anniversary celebration as a whole. Both put a noteworthy emphasis on n the perspective of looking ooking outward. I for one ne would be perfectly happy with an endless succession n of internalized, cerebral ruminations tions on architecture. ture. But HAC cultivates vates a broader view, w, and it has worked th tthrough rough the years to turn urn that Model of a church, possibly New York view around, d seek(c. 1800s); ing not simply to look artist unknown back out, but also to bring people in as part of the process. Early exhibitions on Pittsburgh neighborhoods of Manchester and Oakland reflected this emphasis, as have exhibitions on barns and Pittsburgh architecture — subjects that have leaned on and drawn from the audience’s expertise. Accordingly, 20/20 features a short film in which a variety of Pittsburghers talk about their favorite experiences in local buildings, from Larry Glasco in Schenley Farms to Chris Gmiter in the East Liberty Library to Edna Council at her home in the Hill District. Correspondingly, visitors to the museum are invited to write down and submit their own experiences of buildings that are important in their lives. The face of architecture is not the one that buildings present to the world, but rather the many faces a place attracts, so they can participate in the dialogues of the discipline.

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40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

[ART REVIEW]

DARK RUMINATION {BY LEO HSU}

The Safe Light installation {PHOTO COURTESY OF NICK CHILDERS}

LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER

Darkrooms are isolated and self-contained spaces, places where time and light operate under special rules. Entering Dennis Childers and Nick Childers’ installation Safe Light, there is a noticeable change in temperature, a low hum. Red and amber safelights, which allow photographers to work with light-sensitive paper, illuminate curling vintage prints hanging from clotheslines. Darkroom timers are plugged into one another recursively. Six photographic enlargers are the focus of the room: Tiny projectors fixed inside their bellows project video onto sheets of paper floating in developing trays — short films made over the years by both artists, who are father and son. But the Safe Light installation, and the photographs that complement it in the adjacent room at the Irma Freeman Center, are not just a nostalgic homage to increasingly rare technologies. The stuff of black-and-white wet printing has been rearranged according to an unexpected logic, and to powerful effect. The work challenges the popular notion that analog and digital photography are incompatible or oppositional media. iPhone photos hang alongside inkjet prints made from film negatives; color is selectively dropped into black-and-white images. Photographs excite the memory, even as they are the artifacts of artists making sense of their environment. Safe Light is particularly well attuned to the ways in which photographs function as both records and as constructions. The images are mostly modest, small observations. Many were made in Pittsburgh, where Dennis Childers has been a part of the arts community for decades, and in New York, where Nick Childers now lives. Unassuming as they are, the pictures are all interventions, notes on these surroundings. They embrace the plasticity of photography, whether in the way the ink looks on paper, or in the use of panoramas and color. And while Safe Light deals with all of these ideas both intuitively and deliberately, it also does so intimately. Safe Light feels like going inside someone’s head — or two people’s heads — and it is as much about the process of making memories as it is about the specific subjects that the works represent. Remembrance and possibility intersect in the Childers’ dream of a darkroom where their movements through the world are reconstructed in a place of safety. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SAFE LIGHT continues through the May 3 closing reception. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, 5006 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-924-634 or www.irmafreeman.org


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19. Urban Pathways 6-12 Gallery 29. Katz Plaza

Gregory Barsamian: Momento Mori > At once

212 Ninth Street

low-tech and approachable, Barsamian simultaneously floats between the conscious and unconscious worlds.

Darkroom Mania > Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild.

914 Penn Avenue Wild Life > Student artwork. Music by the Sounds of Steel steel pan band, 6:15 & 7:45pm.

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900 Penn Avenue

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Pilates as Art in Motion > Play an interactive game.

Joyce Werwie Perry: Places & Faces

Win a private Pilates session! 6 & 7pm.

Live Music by Elevations, 5:30 to 7:30pm.

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812 Liberty Avenue Mean Girls > Partnered with Strong Women, Strong Girls and guest-curated by Jill Larson. Music by DJ Pingting.

929 Liberty Avenue An independent bookstore. Open until 7pm.

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4. Urban League

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610 Wood Street

Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Lobby (third floor)

Celebrating the Urban League in Pittsburgh

August Wilson X: 10 Years of August Wilson on Stage

5. Memento Mori

> csapgh.com

14. Toonseum

Tito & Exchange Way A set of billboards reminding us that life can be short and its end unpredictable.

947 Liberty Avenue

Cartoon Quickies! > Drop-in cartooning lessons.

6. Cell Phone Disco

Tito & Exchange Way Visualizing the electromagnetic field of your mobile phone.

7. Shaw Galleries 805 Liberty Avenue

Brave New World: Maps of the 19th-century

15. August Wilson Center for African American Culture 980 Liberty Avenue

Pittsburgh Public Schools All-City Music Showcase. > Begins at 6pm. SOLO Exhibits > Work by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates and Tina Brewer.

8. Trust Arts Education Center

Glamazonia by Mario Epanya Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix

Pittsburgh Public Schools All-City Music Showcase > Performances at 5:30pm, 6:30pm, 7:30pm.

16. Tonic

805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio (lower level)

111 Ninth Street

142 Sixth Street, Third Floor

Pittsburgh CAPA Visual Art Students in 6–12.

Creating Your Own Perspective > Performances

819 Penn Avenue

Displacement > Work by Phil Hessler and Natalia

136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro)

23. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

Free Dance Lessons and Demos > Merengue at

Eighth Street & Penn Avenue Parking Lot Food and art vendors—combined with music and dance. 7 to 11pm.

Clark.

809 Liberty Avenue

Magic by Peter Corbett > Be prepared to be wowed!

Harris Theater Short Films

27. 707 Penn Gallery

Heather Springer: eye of the beholder

18. Urban Pathways K-5 Dance Studio

10. Arcade Comedy Theater

Free Dance Lessons > By Pittsburgh Dance Center’s

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The Art of Pierogie Making > Join Chef Brian Volmrich, as he demonstrates how to create a pierogie.

34. Boutique 208

208 Sixth Street Meet the local artists creating art and artisan products.

35. Robot Repairs

210 Sixth Street Is your robot experiencing technical difficulties? Consider visiting this place for a potential fix.

36. PNC Legacy Project

709 Penn Avenue

Cast of Characters > Curated by Cindy Lisica and Vicky

600 Liberty Avenue Showcasing Pittsburgh’s transformation and reflecting PNC’s dedication to revitalizing the city.

* AFTER THE CRAWL

707 Penn Avenue

Holly. Merengue at 6:30pm, Salsa at 7:30pm. Freestyle dance between and after the lessons.

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107 Sixth Street

808 Penn Avenue, 2nd Floor Guided Meditation > 6:30 to 7pm. Register at mcallan@bendyoga.com. Poetry reading > With Tarun Reddy. 7:30 to 8pm.

946 Penn Avenue

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33. Braddock’s American Brasserie

24. Bend Yoga

9. Harris Theater

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7:30pm. Bachata at 8pm. Salsa at 8:30pm.

Ivette Spradlin: carbon first, then light

Work by D.Hopper & Justice Coughenour

811 Liberty Avenue Pittsburgh’s best sketch and improve comedy.

[not universally accessible]

810 Penn Avenue, Suite 200

Music by Shay and Bryan William Kinney.

925 Penn Avenue

32. Arthur Murray Dance Studio

Gonzalez Requena. Guest curated by Kristen Kovak.

third & fourth floors

Tiny Harris Gallery

at 7:30, 8:30, 9:30pm.

22. Future Tenant

Pittsburgh Public Schools All-City Visual Arts Showcase > All-City K-12 Arts and Cultures Exhibitions.

17. August Henry’s City Saloon

Seventh Street & Penn Avenue Live Music by JD Eicher & the Goodnights. Button-making with Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

Push-pinned Prints & Drawings > Work by

25. Night Market IV

971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd Floor Gallery [not universally accessible]

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Visit TrustArts.org or call 412-456-6666 for complete program info.

PENN

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Presented by THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST Department of Education and Community Engagement. All information and locations are subject to change.

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A Production of:

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in the Cultural District Friday, April 26, 2013 5:30–9pm

Marc Burgess: Adult Arcade

Cabaret at Theater Square, 655 Penn Avenue

28. Magnolias for Pittsburgh

Salsa Friday

Seventh Street & Penn Avenue Craft (origami) magnolias with the Office of Public Art.

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Free Admission to Salsa Friday with DJ Jeff Shirey of Salsa Pittsburgh. Get your Salsa! Bachata! and Cha Cha Cha on! 10pm to 1:30am.

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[STAGE] TAGE]

BEING BERNHARD {BY Y BILL O’DRISCOLL} FOR OR 30 YEARS, Sandra Bern-

hard’s ard’s seldom been farr from the public eye, from her breakout eakout role in Martin artin Scorsese’s The King ng of Comedy y (1983) and a stint int on Roseanne to dozens of chats with Howard Stern and nd David Letterman. On April pril 27, the singer and comic makes akes her first Pittsburgh appearance arance in years, as the Pittsburgh urgh Cultural Trust brings her and nd pianist Jeremy Siskind to the Byham yham with the live showcase I Love Being Me, Don’t You? Like her er acclaimed 1988 stage show, film m and album Without You I’m Nothing, othing, the show blends standup p and music with Bernhard’s brand and of feistiness. Without you, she’s … still Sandra Bernhard

Bernhard, 57, rec recently spoke home, in New with CP from her h longer version York City. A lon of this interview is at www. pghcitypaper.com. WHAT’S THE WHA NEW SHOW LIKE? LIKE I kinda take people own personal on my ow journey, because even when politics or world I talk about polit events, I try to personalize not like what them, so it’s no on Jon Stewthey would see o weave it all in art. And then I w songs. It becomes and out of songs postmodern musical in kind of a postmoder a weird way. SONGS? WHAT ARE SOME S I never tell people what songs I’m doing, because then it gives away. i a it w y. It covers everything wa ffrom fr om m rock ’n’ roll to Broadway to blues. b bl ue es. CRITICS YOU’VE SOME M C RITICS SAY YOU MELLOWED. there’s more I definitely think th

vulnerability and more elements of emotion than there was 20 years ago. I have a 14-and-a-half-year-old daughter, I’m in a long-term relationship. I think you do change spiritually and emotionally as your work evolves. MEANWHILE, POP CULTURE HAS CHANGED A LOT. I’m totally disgusted by it all. … I think social media, maybe there’s a tenth of it that’s productive and helpful, and the rest of it is white noise, and people talking about things over and over again [about which] they’re not even equipped to be social commentators.

SANDRA BERNHARD’S I LOVE BEING ME, DON’T YOU? 8 p.m. Sat., April 27. Byham Theater 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $35-40. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

All these people are just jumping on bandwagons and just forwarding out their feelings. And that’s all fine, but go to a therapist or talk to your friends. Don’t respond to the world and clog up

the airwaves. There are actual people, reviewers and writers, they’ve spent many years honing their craft and their point of view. You want to go to somebody who has that expertise. I’m not interested in somebody who’s in high school and pissed off, or some … person at home who’s frustrated and emibittered. That doesn’t hold any water for me. YOU’VE STRONGLY CRITICIZED REALITY TV. It just gets more idiotic by the minute. There’s nothing there that can uplift or educate. It’s just one stupider [thing] like — yahoos out hunting crocodiles. People buying barns and seeing if there’s anything good in them. The shit is just crazy. YOU HELPED POPULARIZE AN IRONIC PERFORMING STYLE. HAS THE CULTURE CAUGHT UP WITH YOU? People have taken it and gone for the cheap aspect of it. I don’t think that most people have the talent to make it nuanced and layered the way Lenny Bruce did, or Richard Pryor. Or [George] Carlin. You’ve got to have a deeper take on humanity than just saying superficial, stupid, snarky things. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Memento Mori Gregory Barsamian Wood Street Galleries Opening Reception + Gallery Crawl: Friday, April 26th, 5:30–9pm WoodStreetGalleries.org 412 471 5605 Wood Street Galleries is FREE and open to the public. Miguel Chevalier, The Origin of the World, 2012

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

A project of:


[PLAY REVIEW]

THE NEIGHBORS {BY TED HOOVER} IN 1941, in the Polish village of Jedwabne, a large group of Jewish residents were locked in a barn and burned alive … and 70 years later, those are the only facts everyone agrees on. In post-war occupied Poland, the “official” version was that Nazis carried out the murder with some local help. Meanwhile, a 2000 book by Jan T. Gross, Neighbors, created an international stir claiming the town itself (its Gentiles, at any rate) killed 1,600 Jewish villagers, an act the occupying Germans permitted. And recently, Poland’s National Institute of Remembrance conducted an investigation which placed the death toll at around 300, and concluded that while the Nazis were the pogrom’s instigators, many of Jedwabne’s Catholic residents were active participants. And, lucky you, here’s your chance to see a play about it … because, God knows, current events aren’t depressing enough. Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre presents Our Class, by Polish writer Tadeusz Slobodzianek, adapted by Ryan

{PHOTO COURTESY OF SUELLEN FITZSIMMONS}

Quinn Patrick Shannon and Vera Varlamov (front), and (rear, left to right) Justin Fortunato, Caroline Shannon, Aaron White, Jonathan Visser, Jimmy Mason, Katya Stepanova and Bernard Balbot in Our Class, at Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre

Craig. Whatever the full truth of the massaWe meet 10 schoolchildren in the early cre might be, a mob tortured and murdered 1930s — some Jews, and some not. In a few short years, they will be on one side or the other of that burning barn door. The secOUR CLASS ond act charts the rest of their lives and the continues through May 4. Stephen Foster emotional fallout from the event. Memorial Theatre, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow Boulevard, Oakland. $25-48. Director Aoife Spillane-Hinks oversees 412-394-3353 or www.picttheatre.org a rock-solid production. (It’s worth noting that she was an eleventh-hour replacement life-long friends and neighbors. And that’s when Andrew Paul, the PICT co-founder the story Slobodzianek sets out to tell. and artistic director who was the show’s

announced director, was fired by the company.) Slobodzianek has written a very theatrical, almost impressionistic, play, and Spillane-Hinks’ direction feels hand-inglove with his writing. Especially compelling is her use of Susanne Ortner-Roberts, a clarinetist whose plaintive, expressive playing snakes through the entire production. It’s a very large cast featuring local and regional actors; I don’t have room to mention them individually, but in any case, their power (and it’s considerable) is in the collective force of their work. There are harrowing moments in the script, and this cast brings them all to heartbreaking life. Did I say “moments”? I wish. The downside to Our Class is that — especially in light of current events — it’s just too much. For nearly three hours, wave after wave of misery crashes against the audience. There’s the pogrom, of course, but also the terror of living in the Soviet occupation of Poland before the war. Then here come the Nazis, then here come the Communists, then here come the Secret Police, then it’s off to Israel for terrorist bombings. And by this time the kids are seniors, so here come diabetes, cancer and death. It’s a strong production of a blistering play … but right about now I could really go for a tap-dancing chorus line. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Pittsburgh Dance Council Presents

Mark Morris Dance Group

“Astonishingly beautiful and

intricate demonstration of genius.” — The New York Times

Saturday, May 4, 2013 8pm » Byham Theater Box Office at Theater Square » 412.456.6666 TrustArts.org /dance » Groups 10+ 412.471.6930 Media Partner

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FOR THE WEEK OF

04.2505.02.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

APRIL 26 Music for the Spirit Festival

+ THU., APRIL 25 {WORDS} You weren’t one of those people who, during the 2008 presidential campaign, thought Obama’s pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, was an enemy of all that was right and proper because of his incendiary sermons? Good. Because tonight you can hear him for yourself at the August Wilson Center, courtesy of the Bayard Rustin Lecture Series. The Chicago-based pastor is still speaking out on faith, civil rights and more. His talk tonight is supported by the Heinz Endowments and Highmark. Bill O’Driscoll 7 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-45 (free for students). 412-983-8895 or www.brownpapertickets.com

the post-Crawl Salsa Friday, at Cabaret at Theater Square. It’s all free. BO 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{CABARET} It’s a cabaret-a-day kind of weekend. Tonight, watch a dozen Carnegie Mellon stu-

After Dark, an evening of Shakespeare-themed “moments” by local poets and actors. And on Sunday, it’s the premiere of Pittsburgh New Works Cabaret, the venerable Pittsburgh New Works Festival’s showcase of 30 new monologues, songs, dances and more by local artists at

+ FRI., APRIL 26 {ART} With three dozen Downtown venues showcasing visual art, live performance, film and more — even guided meditation — there’s plenty of stuff at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s spring Gallery Crawl. Some highlights: Memento Mori, Wood Street Galleries’ new show of strobe-lit kinetic sculpture based on artist Gregory Barsamian’s dreams; the New Hazlett Theater’s preview of its Community Supported Art series (937 Liberty Ave.); the outdoor food-’n’-art Night Market; August Wilson monologues at Pittsburgh Playwrights; and

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

APRIL 27 Art All Night: Lawrenceville

dents billed as POP Cabaret conclude their performanceart class with Sprung: A Variety Show in Two Acts, at The Andy Warhol Museum. On Saturday, Beat Cabaret returns to ModernFormations Gallery with Shakespeare

Carnegie’s Carnegie Music Hall. BO Sprung: 7 p.m. (117 Sandusky St., North Side; free; 412-237-8300). Beat Cabaret: (4919 Penn Ave., Garfield; $10; 412-362-0274). New Works Cabaret: 3 p.m. Sun., April 28 (300 Beechwood


sp otlight

“I don’t have penis envy,” quips trans-man comedian Ian Harvie. “I have three of them in my top drawer at home.” Harvie was born a girl, in small-town Maine. He was past 30 — and two years into his standup-comedy career — when he had chest surgery and went on testosterone while touring with Margaret Cho. “I literally transformed on stage,” he says, from “a very butch dyke” to “very adolescent-boy-looking.” Harvie’s résumé includes comedy clubs, colleges and theaters nationwide; he was again opening for Cho when she played Pittsburgh a few years back. Now, with his documentary film Ian Harvie Superhero making the festival rounds, Harvie returns to play Cruze Bar on April 27. (On May 3, he and comic Felon O’Reilly bring their We Are Not Saints Comedy Show to Downtown’s Arcade Comedy Theater.) Harvie, 44, considers himself America’s first trans-guy comic, but he says most audiences still don’t know his story. “I make them like me and if they hate me after that, then they’re an asshole,” he jokes, adding: “It doesn’t matter who they are. … It’s just sharing my story in a way people can wrap their heads around.” He does prep newbies: “If you don’t know who the fuck I am, you’re gonna want to lean in on this shit.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Sat., April 27. Cruze Bar, 1600 Smallman St., Strip District. $15. 412-471-1400 or www.facebook.com/cruzebar

Ave., Carnegie: $12; www. pittsburghnewworks.org).

circulated, channeled, sprayed and frozen. The new version of the exhibit remains on the third floor of the museum’s Lantern building. The exhibit also includes an original artwork, Rain Meander, by artist Stacy Levy, whose work focuses on environmental phenomena. JI 10 a.m.5 p.m. Children’s Museum, 1 Children’s Way, North Side. $12-13. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

{STAGE} Arranged marriages don’t have a terribly good reputation in the West, but Varun Mahajan thinks they’re worth singing and dancing about. The Indian-born, Pittsbughbased playwright’s new musical Arranged Marriage premieres this week in a production by his Guiding Star Dance Foundation. The show, with English dialogue and Indian music and dance, emphasizes the influence women wield even in traditional Indian culture. Arranged Marriage, featuring both Indian and American performers and costumes sourced in India, gets three performances at the Charity Randall Theatre. BO 7:30 p.m. Also 7 p.m. Sat., April 27, and 3 p.m. Sun., April 28. Stephen Foster Memorial, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow. $5-20. 800-838-3006 or www.gsdfonline.org

{DANCE} Point Park University, which has an acclaimed dance program, wraps up its season today with Point Park Connections. This annual Downtown showcase offers dance students performing work by the school’s adjunct dance faculty, choreographed in a wide range of styles. There are four shows through Sunday, starting tonight. BO 8 p.m. Also 2 and 8 p.m. Sat., April 27, and 2 p.m. Sun., April 28. GRW Performance Studio, Point Park campus, Downtown. $7-20. 412-392-8000 or www. pittsburghplayhouse.com

{MUSIC} The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s inaugural Music for the Spirit Festival concludes

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APRIL 27

Working artists, frustrated artists, beginners and everyone in between — all are welcome at the 16th annual Art All Night: Lawrenceville. The city’s most democratic art show runs 22 hours at the same venue as last year: Willow Street Development, a former light-industrial space. Submit your artwork — one per artist, any medium — and let some 12,000 visitors parade past work by you and 1,200 other contributors. (Submission guidelines are online.) The free, uncensored show, orga-

Waterplay with this weekend’s program. Premiering is “The Gift,” commissioned by the PSO in honor of long-time board chair Richard P. Simmons. In addition, the wildly recognizable Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 is featured. The symphony’s final movement takes its text from Friedrich Schiller’s poem “Ode to Joy,” capping off the tribute to humankind’s better angels by celebrating harmony and brotherhood. Manfred Honeck (pictured) conducts, and guests include the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. Jeff Ihaza 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., April 27, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., April 28. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-98. 412-392-4900 or www. pittsburghsymphony.org

Museum of Art. Also, today only, look for Imagination Playground, a mobile system of blocks. Inside the museums, admission’s free for kids, with activities encouraging engagement with artworks; story time; puppet shows; and artmaking. The day’s organized by the Carnegie Museums, the Carnegie Library and the Pittsburgh Association for the Education of Young Children.

BO 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free for kids 12 and under. 412-622-3131 or www.carnegiemuseums.org

{PLAY} Today, a redesigned Waterplay exhibit opens at The Children’s Museum. Waterplay features nearly 20 new hands-on elements that present water in all the ways it might be pumped,

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The second Saturday Night Stories Reading at Biddle’s Escape features novelist, screenwriter, editor and awardwinning short-story writer Elise D’Haene. Tonight’s reading also features J.H. Benigni, a local writer and photographer whose work has appeared online and in print publications such as Smith Magazine and The Bremerton Sun. Also at the coffee house is Amanda Young, a graduate creativewriting student at Carlow University who’ll read excerpts from her fiction. JI 7 p.m. 401 Biddle Ave., Regent Square. Free. 412-999-9009 or www.biddlesescape.com

Starting tonight, Pittsburgh Opera closes its season with Gioachino Rossini’s 1817 work La cenerentola (his follow-up to The Barber of Seville). The opera, based on the classic Cinderella story, features local favorites Vivica Genaux and Paolo Pecchioli. Mezzosoprano Genaux sings the role of Angelina, who attracts the love of a wealthy prince, but her stepsisters and stepfather plot against the lovers. Former resident artist Arthur Espiritu portrays the Prince, and Antony Walker conducts. JI 8 p.m. Also Tue., April 30, and May 3 and 5. Benedum Center, 719 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10.75-155.75. 412-456-6666 or www. pittsburghopera.org

APRIL 26 Gallery Crawl

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+ SAT., APRIL 27 A new kids’ play space debuts today at a place kids won’t necessarily associate with gymnastic romps. Play Day at the Museums includes the debut of the Lozziwurm, a permanent, colorful, large-scale serpentine tubular play structure in front of the Carnegie

nized by the Lawrenceville Corp., includes live entertainment (like Cartooning All Night) and kids’ activities like an “interactive paint splash project.” BO 4 p.m. through 2 p.m. Sun., April 28. 40th and Willow streets, Lawrenceville. Free. 412-235-1950 or www.artallnight.org

Art by Gregory Barsamian

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER 9 TO 5: THE MUSICAL. 3 female coworkers concoct a plan to get even w/ their sexist boss. Fri-Sun. Thru May 12. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-657-3969. ANNE OF GREEN GABLES. Fri, Sat. Thru April 27. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ARRANGED MARRIAGE. Musical highlighting the power & influence exerted by Indian women in their relationships formed through marriage & families. Presented by Guiding Star Dance Foundation. April 26-28. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-877-7502. CINDERELLA. Presented by Pittsburgh Opera. Tue, Fri and Sun., May 5. Thru May 3. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. CLYBOURNE PARK. A look at the house & neighborhood from A

Raisin in the Sun in 1959 & 2009. Presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Tue-Sun. Thru May 19. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. DEATH OF THE BARD. Presented by Musical Mysteries & More. Sat., April 27, 6 p.m. Grandview Fire Hall, Jeannette. 724-523-8251. DREAM OF AUTUMN. Two former lovers face the forces of the past & future. Presented by Quantum Theatre. 3955 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. Wed-Sun. Thru April 28. 1-888-718-4253. THE DYBBUK: BETWEEN TWO WORLDS. Multimedia chamber opera. Part of the Pittsburgh Jewish Music Festival. April 25-28. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-392-4900. IT’S MY PARTY & I’LL DIE IF I WANT TO. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Every other Sat. Thru April 27. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640.

JACQUES BREL IS ALIVE & WELL & LIVING IN PARIS. Thu-Sat and Sun. Thru May 12. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 412-374-9200. LITTLE GEM. Three generations of middleclass Irish women tell the story of one extraordinary year. Tue-Sun. Thru May 5. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. Presented by the Musical Theatre Guild. April 26-28. Succop Theater, Butler Community College, Butler. 724-287-8243. MA NOAH. Rebecca Pratt, a single mother of four, struggles to keep her family intact in the face of drugs, pregnancy & unemployment. She must draw upon all her reserves of hope & courage in her fight to save her children’s souls. Thu-Sun. Thru May 12. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. CONTINUES ON PG. 47

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I CN OT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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THE ODD COUPLE. Sat, Sun. Thru May 5. The Legacy BILL BENDEN, DAVID Theatre, Allison Park. MICHAEL, TOM MUSIAL. 877-987-8080. 7 p.m. The Rose Bar and Grille, OUR CLASS. The Pittsburgh White Oak. 412-751-6960. premiere of a play about MAGICIAN DOC DIXON, Polish neighbors during HOWARD MINCONE. the Holocaust. Presented 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy by Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theater, Downtown. Theatre. Thru May 4. 412-339-0608. Stephen Foster SANDRA BERNHARD: Memorial, Oakland. I LOVE BEING 412-624-7529. ME, DON’T YOU? A STREETCAR 8 p.m. Byham . w ww per NAMED DESIRE. Theater, Downtown. a p ty ci h pg Staged reading of 412-456-6666. .com the play by Tennessee Williams. Part of the In The Raw Festival. Mon., TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. April 29, 7 p.m. Bricolage, Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Downtown. 412-471-0999. Improv Theater, Shadyside. SUITE SURRENDER. A 412-404-2695. Farce by Michael Mckeever. Thu-Sun. Thru May 11. South OPEN MIC STAND UP Park Theatre, Bethel Park. COMEDY NITE. Hosted by 412-831-8552. Derek Minto & John Pridmore. YOU SAY TOMATO, I SAY Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, SHUT UP! A 21st century love South Side. 412-612-4030. story where “Happily Ever After” meets “It’s Complicated” Wed-Sun. Thru May 5. Cabaret COMEDY NIGHT AT BUCKHEAD at Theater Square, Downtown. SALOON. First Wed of every 412-325-6769. month Buckhead Saloon, Station Square. 412-232-3101. JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu. 412-452-3267. Thru April 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

SAT 27

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 29

VISUAL

ART

TUE 30

“The Underside of Happy” by Louise Evans-Scott, from RetroFRESH at Galerie Werner

NEW THIS WEEK AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. GLAMAZONIA. Photographs by Mario Epanya. SOLO Exhibits. Work by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates & Tina Brewer. Gallery Crawl: April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Places & Faces. Paintings by Joyce Werwie Perry. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-325-6766. CATHOLIC CHARITIES BUILDING. Darkroom Mania. Photographs by students at the Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6999. CULTURAL DISTRICT. Gallery Crawl in the Cultural District. Free, festive showcase of arts & entertainment at galleries & arts spaces. April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-6666. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Opening reception: April 25, 6-8 p.m. & by appointment. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIA MALL. New Oil Paintings. Work by Joe Winkler. Opening reception April 26, 8 p.m. Mt. Lebanon. GREATER PITTSBURGH ARTS COUNCIL. carbon first, then light. Photographs by Ivette Spradlin. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-391-2060. HARRIS THEATER. eye of the

beholder. Work by Heather Springer. Also feat. regionallymade short films. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. PITTSBURGH CAPA. Push-pinned Prints & Drawings. Work by Visual Art Students in grades 6-12. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-338-6100. SHAW GALLERIES. Brave New World. Maps & engravings of the 19th century. Opening reception: April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-281-4884. TONIC BAR & GRILL. Not Universally Accessible. Work by D. Hopper & Justice Coughenour. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-0460. TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Pittsburgh Public Schools All-City Visual Arts & Music Showcase. Also showcasing at the August Wilson Center for African American Culture. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-456-6666. THE URBAN LEAGUE OF GREATER PITTSBURGH. Leslie Ansley. Paintings & murals celebrating the Urban League’s 100th anniversary. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-681-1110. WILLOW STREET DEVELOPMENT. Art All Night. All-night community art show. April 27. Starts at 4 p.m., ends at 2 a.m. Lawrenceville. 412-235-1950. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Memento Mori. Sculpture by

Gregory Barsamian. Opening reception: April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Part of the Gallery Crawl. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

COMEDY

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Whatever Works: A Hang Your Own Art Exhibition. Work by Robert Drakulic, Brent George, Robyn Graham, Michael Hegedus & James Miller. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 707 PENN GALLERY. Adult Arcade. New works by Marc Burgess. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. In Cast of Characters. Curators Vicky Clark & Cindy Lisica bring together 6 diverse artists to question the nature of our everyday existence & our relationship to larger-than-life heroes & gods. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BARCO LAW BUILDING. The Art of Japanese Noh Drama Tsukioka Kogyo, 18691927. Japanese woodblock prints from the collection on Richard & Mae Smethurst. Oakland. 412-648-1490. BFG CAFE. Support Local Artist Exhibit. Group show, through April. Garfield. 412-661-2345. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Painters of le Poire. Feat. work from artists at le Poire Studio & Gallery. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military artifacts and exhibits on the Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Juxtaposing prime examples of Warhol’s paintings, sculpture, & films with those by other artists who reinterpret, respond, or react to his work. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades of the Heinz Architectural Center. Feat. timeline highlighting important CONTINUES ON PG. 48

FRI 26 BILL BENDEN, MIKE WYSOCKI, LISA DAPPERICH. Rostraver Youth Baseball Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Willow Room, Belle Vernon. 412-736-5733. IMPROV W/ PLAYER ONE & RUCKUS. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOHN EVANS, DAVID MICHAEL, TOM MUSIAL. North Hills Instrumental Band Boosters Funny Fundraiser. 7 p.m. West View Fireman’s Banquet Hall, West View. 412-953-8496. KAREN RONTOWSKI, SONYA KING, DAVID KAYE. Lifespan Services Funny Fundraiser. 6 p.m. Bethel Park Community Center, Bethel Park. 412-464-1300 x 156. MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT: AN IMPROVISED SITCOM. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays $15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Happy Hour 6-8pm

Tickets on Sale NOW www.brownpapertickets.com

05.19 Latrice Royale Anti-Bullying Benefit 06.14 Jujubee Loud & Proud Show Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net

FRI 26 - SAT 27

146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events

BASILE. April 26-27 Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

FRI 26 - SUN 28 HARLAND WILLIAMS. April 26-28 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

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COME EARLY STAY LATE!

SUNDAY, APRIL 28 vs SAN ANTONIO TALONS

Where:

When:

EVERY TUESDAY 9-11pm

What:

TRIVIA NIGHT with “Big Tom”

Why: To prove how smart you are and win awesome prizes – DUH! $5 Evil Drinks “Bloody Brain” + Complimentary shot for all trivia participants!

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

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exhibitions & events, a display of 20 objects from the collection selected by current or past curatorial staff, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities. Folk art objects illustrating the power of women working together to provide for their families, educate their children, promote equality, & give back to their communities. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay. Feat. nearly 70 fine art jewelry pieces. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. What We Collect: Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007–2012. Botanical illustrations from the early 19th century through the present. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. CONTINUES ON PG. 50

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 47

BOULEVARD GALLERY. Follow Your Dreams. Work by Pamela Price & Karen McKee. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Shed. Mixed media collage by Tate Hudson. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. 42.8864° N, 78.8786° W. Feat. work by 10 artists from the Buffalo (NY) Arts Studio. Part of the Distillery 7 Exchange Program. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. The 102nd show from the oldest continuously exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. Japan is the Key: Collecting Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Laura Jean McLaughlin, Jane Ogren. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRUCIBLE BUILDING. Live Archive. Collaboration of 1st & 2nd year MFA students from Carnegie Mellon University & the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Strip District. EAST END BOOK EXCHANGE. The Surreal Banana Peel: Whimsical Collage Wizardry. Work by Joel Brown. Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. EASTSIDE GALLERY. New Door. Work by Joan Downing, Bernie Pintar, Phiris Kathryn, Sickles, more. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FE GALLERY. Alabaster Blast. Fiber art exhibit feat. over a dozen internationally renowned artists. Lawrenceville. 412-389-5800. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. E Block. Photography by Mark Perrott. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10th-century splashware, buffware, slip-painted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Displacement. Installations by Phil Hessler & Natalia González Requena. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. The Classic Collection: European & American Classical & Academic Styles. Early 19th & 20th century paintings. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Flying Bird to River Town & More. Paintings by

Tim Menees & ceramics by Holly Van Dine. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Salon Show 2013. Group show feat. work selected from 100s of entries. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. April in Paris. Photography by Scott Davidson. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. THE INN. (Re)released. Work by Ryan Woodring. Lawrenceville. 412-298-5703. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. 1st Annual Student Show. Work by Bethany Summers, Carter Warren, Chloe Newman, Nicole Catalfamo, Rigel Richards, more. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. SAFE LIGHT. Multi-media collaboration between Nick & Dennis Childers. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. unwrapped. Shibori-dyed quilts by Jan Myers-Newbury. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/ Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Four Suites. The artwork of Susan Constanse, Jean McClung, John Morris, & Laurie Trok. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Nancy Adams, Marilyn Andrews, Ronit Dagan, Eric Boos, Barbara Poole, Frank FLynn, Lavon Williams, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PANZA GALLERY. ARTaBet. Work by members of the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of

contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. Point Park Project 1: Kaleidoscope. Work by Di-Ay Battad, Katie Mackowick, Chris McGinnis, & Daniel Luchman. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin Turner: New Work. Sculpture. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 15. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White & Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints, Drawings & Photographs. 35-some works on paper from the museum’s collection, from photographs to lithographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Mean Girls. Work by Jenn Gooch, Sonja Sweterlitsch, Randie Snow, Vanessa German, more. Gallery Crawl: April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Small Shrines. Juried exhibit feat. 2D & 3D works made in honor, dedication or celebration of an individual, a group of people, a place, a thing or an idea. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. The Art of Akira. Production art from Katsuhiro Otomo’s film. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRINITY GALLERY. Evolution. New work by Matt Gatto. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2458. UNDERCROFT GALLERY, FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Watercolors by Phiris. A solo exhibit of watercolor paintings by Phiris Kathryn Sickels. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. THE UNION HALL. Light/ Dark: Shades of Self & Surface. Paintings by Rachael Ryan. Strip District. 412-471-1900. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Faster Than Walking. Work by Lindsey Peck Scherloum & Sarah Leavens. Braddock. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. An Art(ist) in Motion. Work by Aaronel deRoy Gruber. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.


2013 Bayard Rustin Lecture Series

The cherished tale - not quite how you remember it. Rossiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

WELCOMES

(Cinderella)

Dr. Jeremiah Wright

D STAN R E D UN ORD:ed W Y EVER xts project

PA S T O R E M E R I T U S TRINITY UCC CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

! h te Englis e the stage abov

Thursday, April 25 7:00pm August Wilson Center for African American Culture 1 0 0 0 L I B E R T Y AV E N U E P I T T S B U R G H , PA 1 5 2 2 2

Get audio & video at pittsburghopera.org

$20 General Admission Two for $30 FREE for Students 12-20 RSVP $45 VIP Seating & Post Reception with Guest Lecturer. RSVP Required

Campaign by Creme Fraiche Design. Photo: David Bachman.

OPENS SATURDAY! APRIL 27, 30; MAY 3, 5 Benedum Center Tickets start at $10 412-456-6666 pittsburghopera.org

T I C K E T S AVA I L A B L E AT : B R O W N PA P E R T I C K E T S . C O M , DORSEYS, STEDEFORDS & THE AFRO AMERICAN MUSIC INSTITUTE. FOR MORE I N F O R M AT I O N C A L L 412-983-8895

Generously Suppored by the Heinz Endowments, Highmark & Wyndham Grand N E W S

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BOBblehead

n. A person who moves their head up and down to the music of BOB FM

OLIVER MILLER War industrial village. Scottdale. HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/ 724-887-7910. Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY PGH VINYL CON #4. 12-8 p.m. MUSEUM. Trolley rides Pittsburgh Filmmakers, Oakland. and exhibits. Includes displays, 412-681-5449. walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. KALEIDOSCOPE ARTS Butterfly Forest. Watch FESTIVAL. Dance, music, butterflies emerge from their theater, & visual arts showcase. chrysalises to flutter among Thru April 28 Slippery Rock tropical blooms. Summer University, Slippery Rock. Flower Show. Glass art 724-738-4586. surrounded by colorful blooms. Feat. work by Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens LIFE IS SWEET CHEF feature exotic plants and SHOWCASE. Feat. 5 local floral displays from around chefs partnered w/ a Buddy the world. Oakland. Sous Chef w/ IDD to 412-622-6914. prepare gourmet small PITTSBURGH plates for guests. PLAYWRIGHTS Benefits Best THEATRE. August Buddies PA. 6-9 p.m. Wilson X: 10 Years August Wilson www. per a p of August Wilson on Center for African pghcitym o .c Stage. Photos, artifacts American Culture, & props from the past Downtown. 10 years of performing 412-432-5913. August Wilson’s Century SUPPORT MJAI: BENEFIT Play Cycle. Monologues from SHOW FOR HIT-&-RUN VICTIM. the 10 plays will be performed. Live music, art auction, more. Opens April 26, 5:30-9 p.m. http://healswiftmjai.blogspot. Part of the Gallery Crawl. com/ 6 p.m. The Mr. Roboto Downtown. 412-456-6666. Project, Bloomfield. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many BOOK SALE. Adult, teen & endangered species. Highland children’s titles. Benefits the Park. 412-665-3639. Friends of the Carrick Library. RACHEL CARSON Thru April 27 Carnegie Library, HOMESTEAD. A Reverence Carrick. 412-882-3897. for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. A TRIBUTE TO JOE NEGRI. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL Cocktail reception, dinner, HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits live jazz by Joe Negri & his on the Homestead Mill. Steel students, more. Benefits the industry and community artifacts Joe Negri Jazz Guitar Endowed from 1881-1986. Homestead. Scholarship. 6 p.m. Power 412-464-4020. Center Ballroom, Duquesne SENATOR JOHN HEINZ University, Downtown. HISTORY CENTER. 1968: The Year that Rocked America. Nearly a dozen interactive 7TH ANNUAL FUR BALL. video presentations & more Benefits the Butler County than 100 evocative artifacts Humane Society. 6 p.m. Butler that explore how the year Country Club, Butler. 1968 helped shape our modern THE DIRTY BALL. Dance world. From Slavery to performances, music by Title Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s Town Soul & Funk Party & role in the anti-slavery Pandemic, more. Benefits movement. Ongoing: Western Attack Theatre. 2101 Mary St., PA Sports Museum, Clash South Side. 8 p.m. of Empires, and exhibits on 1-888-718-4253. local history, more. Strip THE RETURN OF THE District. 412-454-6000. FORBIDDEN FIVE SENATOR LOWRIE HOUSE. The FUNDRAISER. Band Civil War in Pennsylvania. Butler. performance & film screening 724-283-8116. to benefit the Hollywood ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Theater. 7 p.m. Hollywood Features 5,000 relics of Theater, Dormont. Catholic saints. North Side. 412-563-0368. 412-323-9504. SPAGHETTI DINNER. Benefits WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. the Woodland Hills Band-Parent Learn about distilling and Organization. 3:30-7:30 p.m. coke-making in this pre-Civil Woodland Hills High School,

SPECIAL SAT 27

FESTIVALS

THU 25 - SUN 28

FUNDRAISERS THU 25

FULL LIST E N O LIN

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FRI 26

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

Churchill. 412-371-0311. SPRING FEVER DANCE. Live music & light buffet. Benefits Westmoreland Cultural Trust. 8 p.m. Ferrante’s Lakeview, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SAT 27 - SUN 28 SUSAN G. KOMEN RACE FOR THE CURE WALK-IN REGISTRATION & PACKET PICK-UP. April 27-28 Ross Park Mall, Ross. 412-369-4400.

SUN 28 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. REDLINE FASHION SHOW. Benefits The Pittsburgh Aids Task Force. 6:15 p.m. The Priory, North Side. 412-231-3338.

POLITICS SUN 28 JUST WAR & DRONES. Panel discussion w/ speakers from University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Duquesne University School of Law & Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. 3:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-365-0519.

LITERARY THU 25 THE BOOK REPORT. Give a book report in 5 minutes or less. Kids & teens welcome. Benefits Book ‘Em books-toprisoners project. 7 p.m. The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-945-0664. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FRI 26 OAKLAND OPEN MIC. Poetry, music & political speeches welcome. Second and Fourth Fri of every month, 7 p.m. 610-731-1804. PALS BOOK CLUB. Seniors only. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

SAT 27 THE BEAT CABARET: SHAKESPEARE AFTER DARK. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. SATURDAY NIGHT STORIES. 7 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. SUSTAINING WONDER: REBOOTING YOUR WRITE


MIND. Writing workshop. Sat, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru May 25 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

OUTSIDE EVENT: Carnegie Mellon AB Concerts Presents Lupe Fiasco, on the CMU campus

MON 29 BRING YOUR OWN BARD: SHAKESPEARE’S WOMEN. Informal scene night, actors & non-actors read works of Shakespeare. 7:30 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406.

CRITIC: Liza Boulet, 21, a student from Oakland

WED 01 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116.

KIDSTUFF THU 25 THE DOLL SHOW. Storytime, sign language activities, & more for infants & toddlers. Thu, 1 p.m. Thru April 25 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SPRING COMICS CLUB. Learn about the visual & narrative elements of comic strips & graphic novels. Thu, 4-6 p.m. Thru May 23 Assemble, Garfield. 773-425-1531.

WHEN: Fri.,

April 19

I haven’t really heard much about Lupe Fiasco since high school, so when I first heard he was coming I didn’t really know what to expect. I have to say, I wasn’t disappointed. Even though the event had to be moved inside because of weather, Lupe Fiasco genuinely seemed like he wanted to be performing, which, at a lot of college shows, is kind of rare. You get the feeling they just come and do a few songs and don’t invest in the audience. Lupe was much different, he was full of energy, and even though people kept wanting to hear his really old songs, he took it in stride and delivered a really great night to cap off the CMU carnival. B Y JE F F IH AZ A

THU 25 - SUN 28 NARNIA. Presented by Act One Theatre School. Thu-Sun. Thru April 28 Sisters of St. Francis, Millvale. 724-272-2291.

THU 25 - WED 01 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CHARLIE & KIWI’S EVOLUTIONARY ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as he travels back to the Age of Dinosaurs to discover how evolution works. Feat. story theater & discovery area. Presented by Commonwealth Connections Academy. Tue-Sun. Thru May 12 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MOVE WITH ART. Pull levers to move a 10-foot wooden man, create images on a giant Kaleidoscope, feed rubber balls to a life-size wooden cow & much more. Thru May 12 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 26 DANIEL TIGER PLAYTESTING. Test out a new game feat. Daniel Tiger. Ages 4-6. Fri, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Thru April 26 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 26 - SUN 28 THE SECRET GARDEN. Based on the children’s book by

Call to register. 6-8 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 773-425-1531.

Frances Hodgson Burnett. Fri-Sun. Thru May 5 Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-643-9004. SEUSSICAL. Presented by Stage Right. April 26-28 Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-832-7464.

SAT 27 - SUN 28

SAT 27 DISCOVERY BASECAMP OPENING. Feat. hands-on, interactive learning w/ real & replica specimens, educational kits, more. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. PLAY DAY! Participatory activities for kids & families. Activities also happening at Carnegie Museum of Natural History & Carnegie Library, Oakland. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. SATURDAY CRAFTERNOON: CRAFTY ORCHESTRA W/ ANNIE GORDON. Create musical instruments using recycled materials. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. SHAKESPEARE FOR KIDS BY KIDS: TWELFTH NIGHT. Presented by Falstaff’s Fellows. 2:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WATERPLAY REOPENING. Water wheel, dam building, more. Feat. ice sculptor Rich Bubin from 11 a.m.-noon. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

ICICLE PAINTING. Paint w/ frozen watercolor icicles. April 27-28 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SWORD IN THE STONE. Sat, Sun. Thru April 28 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

SUN 28 GUITAR MAKING WORKSHOP. Ages 8+. 10:30 a.m., 12 & 3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. INVENTION CONVENTION. Design session that challenges students to use mostly reused materials to create prototypes for products they want to create. Ages 8-13. Call to register. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 773-425-1531. SUPER WHY LIVE: YOU’VE GOT THE POWER! 2:30 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666. A WORLD OF SIGNS. Film screening introducing parents/ caregivers & toddlers to a holistic experience, which incorporates elements of play, American Sign Language, music, visual art, & multicultural traditions. Sun, 1 p.m. Thru April 28 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 29 BESPOKE: LITERARY READING FOR KIDS. Ages 6+.

SAT 27 BIRDWATCHING HIKE. Sat, 8-10 a.m. Thru April 27 Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100. LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL QUEST. Sat. Thru May 25 412-255-0564. SLIPPERY ROCK CREEK CLEAN-UP. Shuttle from Jennings to Slippery Rock Creek & pick up trash from a canoe or kayak. 9 a.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 30 SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 01 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 25 ADHD MASTERY WORKSHOP FOR PARENTS. 6:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church Pittsburgh, Shadyside. 215-307-9855. BOARD GAMES NIGHT. Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. CITY DHARMA. Soto Zen Meditation. jisen@ deepspringzen.org Thu, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. FREE BUSINESS FINANCING WORKSHOP. 6 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-727-7855. FREELANCING & THE LAW. w/ Eric Davis of Elliot & Davis, PC. Presented by cityLAB. 6:30-8 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-434-7080. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: CLIMATE CHANGE. Panel discussion & Q&A. Presented by Global Solutions Pittsburgh. 6-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/

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[COMEDY] international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE TRANSFORMATION. Supreme Meditation & the Science of Transformation w/ Acharya Kedar. Free public program. Doors open at 7:15, seating ends at 8 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 724-420-5826. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TARIK GÜNERSEL. Discussion w/ Turkish PEN, hors d’oeuvres, more. Presented by City of Asylum. 5:30 p.m. James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, North Side. 412-323-0278. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

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THU 25 - FRI 26 HONORING THOMAS F. TORRANCE: REFLECTIONS ON CHURCH & MINISTRY. The Henderson Lecture Series. April 25-26 Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, East Liberty. 412-924-1345.

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Harland Williams’ standup is Dadaist absurdity by way of corny, dad-style non sequiturs. As if to prove his comfort with discomfort, for his most recent comedy special — A Force of Nature — Williams eschewed a theater and audience in favor of a desolate hilltop in the Mojave Desert, where he was heckled by crows. This weekend, however, he’ll demonstrate his unpredictable comedy in a more traditional setting, with five shows at the Improv. Fri., April 26, through Sun., April 28. 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, Homestead. $22. 412-462-5233 or pittsburgh.improv.com

FRI 26

ANNE LEIGHTON MASSONI. Part of the Speaking Light lecture series on the photographic arts. Presented by the Point Park School of Communication. Thayer Hall. 6 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100. COMMUNITY CREATIVE SCHOOL: PLANNING YOUR FIRST BICYCLE TOUR. w/ Seth Gernot, Events Unlimited. 12-1 p.m. Bruno Works, Downtown. NETWORK CONVENTION. COMMUNITY SUPPORTED Presented by Talk Magazine. ART. Sneak peak of the April 26-27 Wyndham Pittsburgh new performance series University Center, Oakland. at the New Hazlett Theater. 412-823-4007. Part of the Gallery Crawl. 6 p.m. 937 Liberty Ave, Downtown. 412-320-4610. CREATE YOUR OWN FOR THE NEXT 7 COMIC KICKS PARTY. GENERATIONS. A Bring a pair of shoes for Documentary Honoring a comic decoupage the International Council workshop. 5-8 p.m. of 13 Indigenous The ToonSeum, Grandmothers. Eddy Downtown. Theatre. 6:30 p.m. 412-232-0199. . w w w Chatham University, EARTH DAY IN aper p ty ci h g p Shadyside. MT. LEBANON. .com 412-365-1100. Green crafters, food POP CABARET: SPRUNG. vendors, children’s Short performances activities, more. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. presented in collaboration Mt. Lebanon Park, Mt. Lebanon. w/ Carnegie Mellon 412-600-7797. University’s School of Art. 7 p.m. HIGHLAND RIDGE FILM Andy Warhol Museum, North FESTIVAL. Feat. independent Side. 412-268-2409. films & screenplays including films less than 30 min. in length. Presented by the Highland Ridge Community AFRICAN-AMERICAN

SAT 27

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Development Corporation. 1-5 p.m. Life Church, Washington. 724-678-4225. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LEARN TO MEDITATE. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Shambhala Meditation Center, Highland Park. 412-345-1759. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 53

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7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SPRING GARDEN WORKSHOP. Lectures, presentations & garden tour. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 120. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. VERONA EARTH DAY CELEBRATION. Food & product vendors, children’s activities, more. 11 a.m.3 p.m. Verona Borough Building, Verona. 412-828-8080.

DEVELOPMENT COURSE. Presented by Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Mon, 6:45 p.m. Thru April 29 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

TUE 30 CLADDAGH’S GOT TALENT. Singing competition. Call for more information. The Claddagh Irish Pub, South Side. 412-381-4800.

WED 01 37TH ANNUAL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY FAIR. Presented by the Western Pennsylvania Minority Supplier Development Council. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville. 412-391-4423.

will be served. First Wed of every month, 7 p.m. Margaret’s Fine Imports, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-1606. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS AURORA PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Viagra Falls, a new play by Jackie Nicoll. April 27-28. Men & women of all ages. Cold readings. Bring a resume. Call for more information. The D.A.P. Co-Op, Carnegie. 412-595-8230.

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AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. BELLYDANCE CLASS W/ JEMEENA. Sun, 10 a.m. Thru June 30 Wilkins School Each year, Hosanna House provides a summer-camp Community Center, Swissvale. experience to underserved Wilkinsburg youth with 412-337-1846. Sherwood Acres, a 14-acre green site about a mile GLASS FLOWER from the main campus. To get the site in shape for this WORKSHOP. 9 a.m. & 6 p.m. summer’s campers, volunteers are needed to help with Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-889-0662. painting, cleaning, landscaping and more. Call 412-243ITALIANO-ESPRESSO. 7711 or visit www.hosannahouse.org for information. Italian conversation club. Presented by Mondo Italiano. Sun, 11 a.m. Thru June 30 COMMUNITY GARDEN: INDEPENDANT FILM Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. PLANNING MEETING. 6 p.m. PRODUCTION. Auditions 412-478-3682. Carnegie Library, South Side. for “Drummer for the Mob.” PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS 412-431-0505. May 7. Seeking male actors CABARET. Poetry, music, COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. age 26-65, female actors spoken word, dance, more. Seeking new players, age 30-45, 1 female age Benefits the Pittsburgh no experience 25-30 who can pass for 17. New Works Festival. necessary. Wednesdays, Readings from the script. 3 p.m. Andrew Squirrel Hill. Bring headshot & resume. Carnegie Free 412-422-7878. Call for appointment. Library Music Hall, . ENGLISH Residence Inn Pittsburgh, www per Carnegie. a p ty ci pgh m CONVERSATION North Side. 732-922-0483. 1-888-718-4253. .co (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN THE SECOND Mount Lebanon Public CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. COMING. w/ Ed Foote. Library, Mt. Lebanon. Spring audition dates for Pittsburgh Theosophical 412-531-1912. their Nov. concert. May 20 - 21. Society. 1:30-3 p.m. JUICING & BLENDING: A Call MaryColleen Seip or visit Chatham University, Shadyside. ROAD TO BETTER HEALTH. www.themendelssohn.org 412-462-4200. Workshop by Deborah for more information. SLEEP & AWAKENING. Uttenreither of LifeFuel Westminster Presbyterian Discussion presented by Health Coaching. Call for Church, Upper St. Clair. the Gurdjieff Society of reservation. 6:30 p.m. East 412-835-6630. Pittsburgh. 3 p.m. First End Food Co-op, Point Breeze. MARYLLOYD CLAYTOR Unitarian Church, Shadyside. 412-242-3598. DANCE COMPANY. Rolling 412-826-9657. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! auditions for Modern Dance & Practice conversational Modeling Spring Intensive. English. Wed, 5 p.m. April 22, 24, 29, May 6, 8, 13, & MORNING SPANISH Carnegie Library, Oakland. 15. mclaytorcapricornii@verizon. LITERATURE & 412-622-3151. net YWCA Downtown, CONVERSATION. Mon, THE PITTSBURGH SHOW Downtown. 412-882-5509. 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon OFFS. A meeting of jugglers THE MENDELSSOHN Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. & spinners. All levels CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. 412-531-1912. welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Additional audition dates SCOTTISH COUNTRY Union Project, Highland Park. for the 2013/2014 season. DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., 412-363-4550. Singers will be heard social dancing follows. TEA CLASS & TASTING. April 27th at Heinz Hall, No partner needed. Mon, History of tea, steeping & May 15th after 5pm at 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. techniques, Storing Tea, Third Presbyterian Church, Grace Episcopal Church, Health Benefits, more. Tea Shadyside. Contact Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. samples & European cookies MaryColleen Seip or visit SCREENPLAY PLOT

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 29

www.themendelssohn.org 724-263-5259. MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for The Music Man. April 27-28. Teens ages 14-18, prepare a broadway song & bring sheet music. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-384-0504. RED PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for contemporary dance review w/ paid performances. April 28. 1-min. solo contemporary dance piece. For appointment & more info, email shoemakers0@gmail.com. Amerifit Fitness Club, Green Tree.

SUBMISSIONS 2013 RALPH MUNN CREATIVE WRITING CONTEST. Submit poetry, screenwriting & short prose to teens@ carnegielibrary.org w/ Ralph Munn Entry in the subject line. Open to all students in grades 9-12 in Allegheny County. http://www.carnegielibrary.org/ ralphmunn FUTURE TENANT: IMPROBABLE MOVIES. Submit a 1-sheet poster & 400-600 word plot for a movie w/ an unlimited budget that will never be made. Entries due by May 5, 11:59 p.m. More info at http://futuretenant. org/events/improbablemovies-call-for-entries JOHNSTOWN FILM FESTIVAL. Seeking original short films of 30 min. or less. For complete rules & entry form, visit www. johnstownfilmfest.org. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Seeking vendors for the Garden Mart to sell plants, products, more. Call for details. Thru May 11. 724-266-4500 x 114. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking entries for 8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY showcase. One digital submission per person. Digital, film, or cell phone cameras allowed. http:// silvereye.org/8x8registrationform. pdf 412-431-1810. VERONA’S CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking artists, food & product vendors for marketplace running May-September. Call for more information. Verona Borough Building, Verona. 412-721-0943. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@ wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WRONG WAY PRESS. Seeking illustrated stories & fables. http://www.wrongwaypress.com


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ACROSS 1. Company that owns Zipcar 5. Blow, as a line 9. Comparatively surreptitious 14. Pack down, as a bowl 15. Deconstruct? 16. Prefix with lending 17. Collaborative website for Lady Gaga and RuPaul? 19. Skirt 20. Sizing up a potential partner, perhaps 21. Leftist writer Ali 23. Carver of giant stone heads 24. Emulate an angry chimp? 27. Rihanna’s hairstylist, frequently 28. Blind cousins? 30. English Channel contents, to the French 31. “American Idol” judge Nicki 33. Volt maker, casually 35. Kid’s lunch food tainted by kickbacks and cronyism? 39. Property claims 40. Nickname for infielder Ernie Banks, who stayed with one team for eighteen years 41. Curry on TV 42. Gold pan, e.g. 44. This and that 48. Growth on the entrance to

an abandoned castle? 51. Astronomer Brahe who wore a fake nose 52. Estée Lauder brand 53. Tush 55. Theme park conceived as a utopia 57. Hustler content? 59. Feed, as a fire 60. Philosopher Zeno’s town 61. Name on “Sons of Anarchy” and “The Andy Griffith Show” 62. Certain LSD medium 63. Green building certification letters 64. One of the more benign of the seven dirty words

DOWN 1. Author of “The Handmaid’s Tale” 2. How peacocks are said to strut 3. “Let’s do it!” 4. Parker, part of the time 5. Neck division 6. Stow cargo 7. Submachine gun legal to own in the U.S. 8. Certain British Invasion invader 9. Oiliness 10. Raging mad 11. Haughty, aloof lady 12. Goof up 13. Smell up the fridge, say

18. Colbert’s is called Americans for a Better Tomorrow, Tomorrow 22. Walkman batteries 24. $180 Monopoly purchase 25. “Avatar” race 26. “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” host Fieri 28. Paragon of collectivity 29. “Hamburger Hill” setting 32. Hypotheticals 33. Grand ____ (wine designation) 34. Boutique for role players 35. Gershon of “Cocktail” 36. Brave protector of Claire’s Boutique and Sbarro

37. Modern Honda SUV 38. Card with a flexible value in blackjack 39. Online gamer’s bane 42. Roll some grass 43. High-end fashion designer Marant 45. They’re venomous and highly armed 46. Greek sea goddess 47. Stable presences? 49. Bring to mind 50. Thing fed or read 51. “___ the season ...” 53. Cruciate ligament locale 54. “OMG!” ancestor 55. Clairaudience, e.g. 56. “The Master” director, familiarly 58. Summer ___ {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

04.24-05.01

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1921, Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev — born under the sign of the Bull — premiered his opera The Love for Three Oranges in the United States. Here’s how The New York Times felt about it: “There are a few, but only a very few, passages that bear recognizable kinship with what has hitherto been considered music.” It’s possible, Taurus, that you will get a similar reaction when you debut your new approach or endeavor. And that may disturb you. But I think it would be a good omen — a sign that you’re taking a brave risk as you try something innovative and unfamiliar.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’m passionate about doing whatever I can to make the world a better place. How boring and sad it would be if I only thought of satisfying my personal needs. But I also remember what Aldous Huxley said: “There is only one corner of the universe you can be certain of improving, and that’s your own self.” Even if you have mad skills at healing and fixing everyone whose life you touch, Gemini, Huxley’s reminder is good for you to honor right now. The place that’s in most pressing need of transmutation — and where you’re most likely to be successful — is within you. Now here’s the trick ending: To the degree that you regenerate yourself, you will improve everyone around you. Your inner work will be contagious.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Thomas Jefferson almost pulled off a miracle in 1784. America was a young country. There were only 13 states and a few unorganized territories. As a representative to the Continental Congress, Jefferson proposed an ordinance that would have prohibited slavery in those territories, including what would later become Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama. By just one vote, alas, the provision failed to pass. Can you imagine what the United States would have been like if slavery had been partly extinguished decades before the Civil War? The moral of the story, Cancerian, is that at certain pregnant moments, small shifts can have big consequences. The astrological omens suggest your life will be proof of that in the coming weeks.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I believe you will crawl or scramble or glide to the top of some mountain in the next four weeks. What mountain do you want it to be? A crumbly molehill? A pile of cheap but useful gravel? A lofty peak where you can see for miles and miles? I urge you to decide soon on which of the possibilities you will choose. Then affirm your intention to call on all your resources, allies, and powers to help you make the ascent. This is a chance for serious expansion, Leo. Unleash your soulful ambitions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Have you ever seen a moonbow? It’s like a rainbow but is created by the reflected light of the moon instead of the sun. For this phenomenon to occur, the sky must be dark. The moon has to be full and setting in the west, near the horizon, and rain must be falling. So it’s a rare event. All the conditions have to be just right. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it’s more likely than usual that you’ll spot one of these exceptional beauties in the coming days. Your affinity for curious wonders and mysterious marvels of all kinds will be at a peak. I suspect

you will have a knack for being exactly where you need to be in order to experience them.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Lonesome George was about a hundred years old when he died last year. He was the last remaining member of a giant tortoise species that had lived on Ecuador’s Pinta Island for thousands of years. But scientists say his kind is not necessarily extinct forever. They believe that by cross-breeding tortoises of other related species, they could recreate a 100-percent-pure version of Lonesome George’s species. I suspect, Libra, that you may be able to pull off a metaphorically comparable resurrection — especially if you initiate the effort in the coming weeks.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Let’s imagine ourselves near the snowy summit of Washington’s Mount Rainier. We’re in an unusual kind of cave. Volcanic steam rises from cracks in the rocky floor. Above us is a roof made of ice. As we stand between the heat and the chill, we find the temperature quite cozy. The extremes collaborate to produce a happy medium. Can you accomplish something in your life that’s similar to what’s going on in this cave? Metaphorically, I mean? I think you can.

of her early diaries. “Some people remind me of sharp dazzling diamonds. Valuable but lifeless and loveless. Others, of the simplest field flowers, with hearts full of dew and with all the tints of celestial beauty reflected in their modest petals.” I suspect that even if you normally love cold brilliancy, Aquarius, you will need an abundance of warmth and softness in the coming days. To attract the best possible embodiments of this influence, get clear about your favorite forms of it. Be picky! Don’t accept sloppy sentimentality.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Ludwig Wittgenstein was a genius. His last book, which influenced many different fields of thought, is regarded as one of the most important philosophy tomes of the 20th century. And yet he was a big fan of foolishness. “If people did not sometimes do silly things,” he observed, “nothing intelligent would ever get done.” Another time he said, “Never stay up on the barren heights of cleverness, but come down into the green valleys of silliness.” Here’s one more of his opinions: “Don’t be afraid of talking nonsense!

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

+

ARIES (March 21-April 19): How we react to the sound of the wind gives clues to our temperament, said philosopher Theodor W. Adorno. The unhappy person thinks of “the fragility of his house and suffers from shallow sleep and violent dreams.” But for the happy person, the wind sings “the song of protectedness: Its furious howling concedes that it has power over him no longer.” I bring this up to illustrate a point about your life. There will be a strong and vivid influence coming your way that is like the wind as described by Adorno. It’s neither bad nor good in itself, but may seem like one or the other depending on the state of mind you choose to cultivate. Buy or make yourself a present that encourages you to be more generous. Report results at Freewillastrology.com.

& J S

“We cannot accept the world as it is,” remarked Belgian author Hugo Claus. “Each day we should wake up foaming at the mouth from the injustice of things.” I don’t subscribe to the idea that each day should begin like this. On some mornings we should rise and greet the world singing songs of praise for the great fortune of being alive. But I do think Claus’s approach is precisely right on certain occasions — like now, for you Sagittarians. The time is ripe to tap into your reservoir of righteous anger. Fight to right the wrongs that disturb you the most.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Your story begins the moment Eros enters you,” says Anne Carson in her book Eros the Bittersweet. “That incursion is the biggest risk of your life. How you handle it is an index of the quality, wisdom and decorum of the things inside of you. As you handle it, you come into contact with what is inside of you, in a sudden and startling way. You perceive what you are, what you lack, what you could be.” I want to extend Carson’s dramatic hypothesis. I’d like to propose that eros enters you again and again in the course of your life, and your story resets each time. How will you handle it when it makes its next incursion? Get ready, because here it comes.

WATER PIPES AND GLASS FOR ALL YOUR SMOKING NEEDS SPECIALIZING IN HAND BLOWN WATER & GLASS PIPES AND INCENSE

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

1918 MURRAY AVE • SQUIRREL HILL

“I prefer by far warmth and softness to mere brilliancy and coldness,” wrote Anais Nin in one

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412-422-6361 or 561-665-0592 Student Discount with valid ID PUBLIC PARKING LOT LOCATED BEHIND BUILDING

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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But you must pay attention to your nonsense.” I hope that’s enough evidence to support my advice, Pisces, which is: Now is a good time for you to get both smarter and wiser. And a good way to do that is to play and play and play some more.

FOR TOBACCO USE ONLY

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 58 + LIVE 58 + STUDIES 59 + SERVICES 60 + WELLNESS 61

WORK

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Paid In Advance! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.thehomemailer. com (AAN CAN)

Link Art Inc. seeks people, regular citizens and professional drivers - to go about their normal routine as they usually do. Send us an email for more details dbelushi882@gmail. com or call 209-753-4893

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay. com (AAN CAN)

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

Help Wanted! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN) Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Spokesmodel National Promotional agency is seeking Spokesmodels to conduct promotions for a leading tobacco product within nightlife and retail establishments in Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. This part time position is ideal for attractive, outgoing young men and women who are looking for an interesting, challenging position within the nightlife and retail scene that will allow them to make good money and have fun. Position Requirements: • 20 – 25 hours of daytime and/ or evening availability over 3 – 7 days per week. • Clean neat appearance and outgoing personality excellent verbal and people skills • Prior Face-to-Face Promotional Experience preferred • MUST be at least 21 years old Responses can be sent to HR@MSPromotions.com and must include resume, references and comp card/recent photo.

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

Part Time Membership Sales Reps NO cold calling. Flexible 25 hrs/wk.

Benefits package.

Submit resume: careers@aaaec.com

Applications available online or in store www.eastendfood.coop 7516 Meade St. Pgh 15208 Corner of Braddock & Penn Ave (412) 242-3598 71C/67 bus lines

LIVE

HOUSE FOR SALE

ROOMMATES

MOVING SERVICES

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069 Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

HOUSE FOR SALE

$1,400/Month Health Care and Child Care $5,550 Education Award and Federal Student Loan Deferment Hands on Leadership Development, Coaching, and Nonprofit Career Based Training Information Sessions will be held from March – May For more information, visit www.publicallies.org or Contact Branden Ballard at 412-258-3022 or brandenb@publicallies.org

Application Deadline May 24th

Pittsburgh’s only cooperative, natural Cafe & Grocery store. We’re always interviewing for quality-minded “co-operators.” Must provide great Customer Service and scheduling flexibility. Possible Full TIme; great benefits!

AAA HIRING

Base pay plus comm.

Do you like to work on the issues you care about? Would you like to prepare for your future? Want to get paid to make a difference?

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

REAL ESTATE SERVICES AMERICA’S BEST BUY! 20 acres-only $99/ month! $0 down, no credit checks, MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Owner financing. West Texas beautiful Mountain Views! Free color brochure. 1-800-755-8953 www. sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

New Price $ 360,000 - Mexican War Street Totally Renovated3-story, brick, 3 BR, 2 BA home. Original details, mantels, with 5 fireplaces. Beautiful woodwork & copper downspouts. Extra lot included. Call George E Lucas to see. 412-771-8400

Cheaper than Rent $ 47,900 - Stowe Twp. Well Maintained - 2 BR, Frame Cape Cod set on a large level, fenced-in lot. Features a gas furnace with central air. Ready to move in. Call George E Lucas Today. 412-771-8400

EAST FOR RENT Highland Park- 3rd Flr, 3RM w/eq kit, prvt entr, bathroom, equip kit, $600+e Call 412-661-6343 Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

BREATHTAKING HISTORICAL HOME Located in Shadyside. This 3 story, 5 BR, 3.5 Ba. 9 room home features large formal dining room, open foyer, new kitchen, mother-in-law suite and 2 car integral garage. Priced at $600K MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!!!

Call George E Lucas 412-771-8400 #1 Choice Real Estate

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013


STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

ENDOMETRIOSIS?

Schizophrenia Research Study Participants Needed

CLINICAL STUDIES Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

MENSTRUAL CRAMPS?

CALL TODAY!

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412.363.1900 CTRS

Do you or someone in your family have schizophrenia? This UPMC research study examines the effects of schizophrenia on cognition. We are seeking families affected by schizophrenia to take part. Participation involves 1-2 visits; during these visits, you will complete diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, provide a blood sample, and complete a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI). Participants will be reimbursed $175 for completing all study procedures.

Healthy Controls Needed for Research Study (UPMC Oakland) This study of cognition and schizophrenia is looking for healthy controls of European descent over the age of 30. Participation involves 1-2 appointments lasting a total of between 5-9 hours and the completion of diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, donation of a blood sample, and taking part in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI). Participants will be reimbursed $175 upon completion of study procedures. Men and women ages 40 and above with no history of psychotic illnesses and no current problems with substance abuse may be eligible.

For more information, please call 412-246-6356 or 1-800-994-8182

For more information, please call 412 246 6356 or 1 800 994 8182

See what our clients are saying

VAGINAL ASTHMA? DRYNESS? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412-650-6155

IBS?

I’ve In the past two years, the h bot h wit ed been very satisfi se pon res the and design of our ads to e hav I w kno I en they evoke. Wh in ts jec sub ch ear advertise for res ly ate edi imm I up, the 24-35 age gro er. Pap City think of using the

Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

412-650-6155

5900 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 N E W S

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SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN) Discover the “Success and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Success and Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1-800-7905752 (AAN CAN)

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069

Clinical Research Study Type 2 Diabetes A 26-week research study is evaluating the safety and efficacy of a new investigational insulin in people with type 2 diabetes. Qualified participants will receive all study-related care and study medication at no cost and may be compensated for time and travel. You may qualify if you: ✓ Are 18 years or older ✓ Have a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for at least 6 months ✓ Have undergone continuous treatment with basal insulin regimen (insulin detemir; insulin glargine; insulin NPH), for at least 3 months ✓ Have an HbA1c level between 7.0% and 10.0% ✓ Have body mass index (BMI) of 40.0 kg/m2 or less

Please Contact: 412-650-6155 60

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.24/05.01.2013

CLASSES

PROFESSIONAL Protective Services Ladies “I protect” Call Rich 412-339-8115

ADOPTION UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Open or closed adoption. YOU choose the family. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. Call 24/7. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Adopting your newborn would be life’s greatest joy. Will give a child life of security, endless love. Great family, education, wonderful home. Expenses paid. Please call Ria at

1-888-851-4935

AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN) Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper! EARN $500 A DAY. Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. Lower Tuition for 2013. www.AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

HEALTH SERVICES Drug & Alcohol Problems? TLC Outpatient Clinic. Individual & Group Therapy, Substance Abuse, Yoga, Art & more. 480-5771172 for information. Private Insurance or Reasonable Self-Pay/ Personalized Treatment Plans. (AAN CAN) Drug & Alcohol Problems? TLC Outpatient Clinic. Individual & Group Therapy, Substance Abuse, Yoga, Art & more. 480-5771172 for information. Private Insurance or Reasonable Self-Pay/ Personalized Treatment Plans. (AAN CAN)

HAULING

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates Call NOW

412-877-0730

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, on May 7, 2013, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for: Window Replacement Work Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 Asbestos and General Primes

Courtyard Water Infiltration Repairs Pittsburgh CAPA 6-12 General Prime

Install Exhaust Fans Pittsburgh West Liberty Pre K-5 Mechanical and Electrical Primes Project Manual and Drawings for bidding purposes will be available for purchase by Contractors April 8 at Modern Reproductions, 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Modern Reproductions may be contacted by Phone at 412-488-7700 or Fax at 412-488-7338 to determine the cost of the Project Manual and Documents. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920/www.pps.k12.pa.us


WELLNESS

MIND & BODY Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

COUNSELING

MIND & BODY

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe.com Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

AnExquisite Massage

MIND & BODY Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Licensed Massage Therapist CORAOPOLIS, PA. 15108

412-474-3236

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

www.anexquisitemassage.com

;;;;;;;;;;;;

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS 412-400-7159

massage

Xie LiHong’s WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Bodyworks

selfesteemworkshops.com

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

;;;;;;;;;;;;

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

MIND & BODY

Mingkun Massage DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE • $40 per 60 min massage • 2hr free valet parking at the Concourse with the purchase of a 60 or 90 min massage 125 W. Station Square Dr. Station Sq. Freight Shops

Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Phoenix Spa New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily

PH. 412.389.8637

4309 Butler Street

minkunmassage.com

412-621-3300

(Lawrenceville)

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

STAR Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896

• VIVITROL -

a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Weightloss Treatment Medical Bariatric Weightloss, LLC NO Start Up Fees NO Long Term Contract

• Group and Individualized Therapy

Therapeutic Massage

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

NO WAIT LIST

355 Fifth Ave. Suite 1120 Pgh, PA 15222 412.680.2064

Addiction & Recovery Health Services IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

Includes Med Management & Therapy

Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

SUBOXONE

We Treat: Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addictions

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

Downtown Pgh, PA ~ Bridgeville, PA West View, PA ~ Butler, PA

Now Hiring for LPC/LCSW

412.434.6700

MONROEVILLE, PA

(across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530

412-316-3342

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

• SUBOXONE

Zhangs Wellness Center

412-401-4110 $40/hr

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

412-380-0100

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

www.myjadewellness.com

412-595-8077

LOCATIONS IN:

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

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GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Judy’s Oriental Massage Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950 Accepting All Major Cards

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

get your

yoga on! Alignment-focused Hatha yoga in Point Breeze! We have Prenatal, Baby & Me, Yoga for Athletes, Flow classes & more. Drop in anytime OR sign up for a session!

www.innerhearthyoga.com 62

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Arm Balance Workshop: Saturday, May 11 2pm-4pm $30 if you register by April 30 $40 after April 30 4519 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield 412-335-1332


A SHOW OF HANDS In Oakland, Angel Mahnick teaches by example {BY ABBY MENDELSON}

ANGEL MAHNICK hunches down at a tiny blue table, sand-

wiched between five little kids: boys and girls, black and white, average age 4. The teacher’s aide doles out milk and water, pudding cups and cookies. Using her fingers, she counts out animal crackers for a small boy in a gray sweat suit. “Do you want to dunk your cookies?” she asks another. “Yes!” says Elijah, a slight child in a maroon shirt. He eagerly scoops out a dollop of vanilla pudding. Angel turns to Abby, a little girl all decked out in pink. “Want a lion?” she asks. “No,” Abby says with a shrug. Tying Abby’s shoes, Angel points to a pink frill on the girl’s top. “Can you eat that?” she teases. Abby smiles. It’s snack time, a scene repeated all over Pittsburgh, all over America. Except that here they aren’t speaking. Instead, they’re signing. Because everyone in the room is deaf: Angel Mahnick and her charges, and the rest of the 300-plus students at Oakland’s Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf.

fectly normal. I go to school. I go to work. I’m not intellectually disabled. I just can’t hear.” Angel likes the bustle. She’s working all around the region: teaching American Sign Language to hearing parents of deaf children, tutoring reading, working as an early-childhood aide, helping ferry deaf weekenders from eastern Pennsylvania, coaching elementary school volleyball and basketball. (For the latter, it’s all towel-waving and hand signals. “On the court,” Angel says, “we can sense when someone’s near us.”) “I’m very busy,” she says with a grin. “I want lots of moolah.” She’ll need it, if for nothing else than her suburban Pittsburgh home, which she and her boyfriend are remodeling themselves. Her goal is to teach full time at WPSD. “I want to work with deaf children,” she says. “I feel a relationship with them, especially younger students.” Like the ones in Ms. Katherine’s Room 214, where the décor is all bright colors and dinosaur decorations. Ms. Katherine sits at a small brown semicircular table, with the children and An-

“DEAF CHILDREN NEED TO KNOW THAT WE ARE THE SAME, THAT WE SHARE THE SAME EXPERIENCES. I WANT TO HELP THEM REALIZE THAT.” Deaf from birth, Angel is the child of deaf parents, one of four deaf siblings. To Angel, the sounds of silence are perfectly normal. She and her deaf boyfriend, with whom she lives, hope to have deaf children. She has many deaf friends, with whom Angel prefers to get together in clean, well-lit places — all the better to see the signing, she says. (“Deaf people are always the last ones to leave a restaurant,” Angel adds. “Because we’re always talking.”) And she also has many hearing friends, whom she tweets and sees on Facebook. Aside from emails and letters, for everything else she needs an interpreter. A WPSD alum who is pursuing an education degree, Angel is good with kids — kind, patient, helpful. More than that, she prides herself on being a deaf role model. “These people are exactly like me,” she says (or signs, actually, with WPSD staffer Vicki Cherney interpreting). “The kids need to know that they can do everything that normal people do. That I do. I’m per-

gel spread out before her. Val, a bearded man in a black shirt, comes in for an English and ASL lesson. The children are learning “I,” “see,” and “and,” and must focus on both languages. Elijah needs a bit of redirection, so Angel spins her hand, telling him to turn around, then points: Pay attention. He does, and when it’s Elijah’s turn to go to the front of the room and use the words and signs, he performs flawlessly. A flurry of hand gestures. Hurray! Angel exclaims. Music comes on, and the kids get up. It’s “The Alphabet Song,” the music so loud they feel the beat through the room. As they sign their ABC’s, Angel stands behind them, quick to snatch a tissue for a leaky nose, to refocus wandering attention. “I love working with kids,” she signs on the fly. “Deaf children need to know that we are the same, that we share the same experiences. I want to help them realize that.” “But more than that,” she points, “I just love kids. Period.” INF O @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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April 24, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 17

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