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ON THE BEAT: WHERE THE MAYORAL CANDIDATES STAND ON POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY 06

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

EVENTS 4.12 – 8pm

Colin Stetson with special guest Sarah Neufeld (of Arcade Fire)

SOUND SERIES: DEERHOOF, WITH SPECIAL GUEST PEOPLE GET READY Tickets $18/$15 Members & students Media sponsor: 91.3FM WYEP

4.13 – 2pm AUTHOR TALK AND BOOK SIGNING, THANK YOU ANDY WARHOL BY CATHERINE JOHNSON Tickets FREE

5.11 – 8pm Tickets $15/$12 Members & students FREE parking in The Warhol lot visit www.warhol.org or call 412.237.8300

The Warhol welcomes Montreal-based saxophonist, Colin Stetson for an evening of forward-thinking, genredefying, multi-phonic, melodic and layered compositions. On a tour supporting his third solo full-length album on Constellation Records, Stetson visits The Warhol, following extensive touring with an array of musicians and bands. Sarah Neufeld, of Arcade Fire, opens the show.

4.19 & 4.20 – 8pm OFF THE WALL 2013: NORA CHIPAUMIRE: MIRIAM Kelly Strayhorn Theater Co-presented with Kelly Strayhorn Theater Tickets $15 – 25 Media Sponsor: Pittsburgh City Paper

4.27 – 8pm OFF THE WALL 2013: SANDRA BERNHARD: I LOVE BEING ME, DON’T YOU? Byham Theater Co-presented with Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Tickets: $35 – 40 Media Sponsor: Pittsburgh City Paper

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Belle & Sebastian with special guests Yo La Tengo 7.13 – 8pm

5.3 – 5pm YOUTH INVASION 2013 Teens take over The Warhol Tickets $3 students/$5 adults

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Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets: $35; Visit www.ticketmaster.com or Stage AE Box Office

5.14 – 10am-5pm

The Warhol partners with PromoWest North Shore and Opus One Productions to present Belle & Sebastian at Stage AE for their Pittsburgh debut. Since emerging out of Glasgow, Scotland in ’96, the band has been hugely influential in the broad realm of indie-pop, with multiple albums in the UK top 20. They will be supporting their latest release The Third Eye Centre, a compilation of B-sides from the past decade. The dynamic indie-pop/rock trio Yo La Tengo from Hoboken, NJ will open the show.

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

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{EDITORIAL}

04.10/04.17.2013 VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 15

[NEWS] “What I hope is that we get a new mayor 06 who first and foremost demonstrates a political will to support the work of the board.� — Citizen Police Review Board Executive Director Beth Pittinger on the importance of police accountability in this year’s mayoral race

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“If Gov. Corbett flip-flops on Medicaid, as it looks like he may do, he is really going to be in trouble.� — Bruce Castor spokesman Joe Stern on the threat Corbett faces from right-wingers

[TASTE] interest had as much to do with 16 “Our its location — the historic train station — as with its old-school continental menu.� — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review JG’s Tarentum Station Grille

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, JEFF IHAZA, JOHN LAVANGA

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

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“We used to have meetings at the public library in Steubenville.� — Hip-hop producer 4th Disciple, on where he first met RZA

{ADMINISTRATION}

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{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] each pelvic thrust, each ‘Roger 33 “With Rabbit’ attempted in her primary-color bodysuit, she gets better, stronger, funnier.� — Michelle Fried describes Jenn Gooch’s contribution to art exhibit Mean Girls

[LAST PAGE]

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“Working for the Nuttings, like being a Pirates fan, was full of head-scratching moments.� — Charlie Deitch on his career working for the Nutting family

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 38 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 46 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 48 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 51 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is palatable, good-hearted entertainment, with many quietly stirring moments along with a share of sappy ones.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Harry Kloman, reviewing the film 42

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INCOMING

“HOW THE NEW MAYOR DEALS WITH THE ISSUES FACING THE POLICE DEPARTMENT WILL BE CRUCIAL.”

RE: Spreading Its Wings: Thunderbird Café owners want nightclub to grow, but expansion plans don’t sit well with Lawrenceville residents (April 3) I live on Fisk Street, too, and I am in favor of allowing them to expand. I enjoy going to Thunderbird and in no way think that the jerks that stumble around Larryville and break bottles in the neighborhood come from there. What they are planning with this expansion is nothing like what has happened in South Side. They are creating a destination venue, not just another place to drink cheap vodka drinks and Miller Lite. — Web comment from “Nathan Iverson.” Everyone in Lawrenceville is for organic and sustainable development, but the T-Bird project is completely socially irresponsible. … The 95 percent of residents who live within 1,000 feet of the T-Bird and oppose its expansion aren’t anti-business, and we aren’t anti-music. The issue also isn’t the kind of clientele the T-Bird attracts. It’s simply too big for the streets and the neighborhood to handle. — Web comment from “Halito” I have lived in Lawrenceville for over 20 years and [I’m] all for this expansion[.] [I]t was not long ago that people would die before they put a [business] in this neighborhood, so all of the people who just started living here, please check out a little history of what this place was like [before] all the people started investing in this town. — Web comment from “Kenny Kelly” The choice doesn’t have to be, “Either accept a 1,200-capacity venue in your neighborhood or move to the suburbs.” It’s possible to have a successful venue that fits into a residential area. The Thunderbird is doing it right now. — Web comment from “Jerry Maloney “ I am [definitely] FOR them expanding. … Thunderbird is very annoyingly cramped. ... [I]t’s a shame because it’s a cool joint that brings in cool bands ... it would be much cool[er] had they the extra room and capacity. [B]eyond me why anyone would expect it to be a quiet area when it’s such a 20-something hive as it’s been turning into ... — Web comment from “Alan Smithee”

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ETH PITTINGER, the executive director of Pittsburgh’s Citizens Police Review Board, says she has one hope for this year’s mayoral election. “What I hope is that we get a new mayor who first and foremost demonstrates a political will to support the work of the board,” Pittinger says. “I think that sort of public endorsement is long overdue.” Support for the CPRB, which investigates claims of police misconduct, is just one public-safety issue facing the next mayor. In the past year, the department has seen Chief Nate Harper forced out and indicted for stealing public funds. There are concerns about “secondary employment” policies that allow police to provide security to bars and sports facilities while off-duty. And there have been a series of incidents in which officers — some with long histories of controversy

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

— have been accused of using excessive force and violating police procedures. “How the new mayor deals with the issues facing the police department will be crucial,” says David Harris, a professor of law at the University of Pittsburgh who specializes in issues of policing.

The city’s police bureau will be a top priority for Pittsburgh’s next mayor {BY CHARLIE DEITCH AND CHRIS POTTER} Picking a new chief, he adds, “will be one of the signature moments of the new administration.” Polling data suggests the once-crowded field of mayoral candidates is becoming a two-man race between Pittsburgh City

Councilor Bill Peduto and former state auditor general Jack Wagner. The field is rounded out by state Rep. Jake Wheatley and self-described community organizer A.J. Richardson. When it comes to issues as sensitive as policing, candidates often hedge their bets, making differences hard to pin down. But the candidates do emphasize different priorities: Wagner, for example, has repeatedly said he hopes to hire the next chief from within the department, while Peduto, in calling for a nationwide search, has stated no preference about where the candidate comes from. What are the candidates’ other policing priorities?

Bill Peduto While hiring the right police chief is important, Peduto says, “it’s not as important as hiring their boss” — the public-

safety director. Both Wagner and Wheatley have suggested that the position, currently held by Michael Huss, is a needless layer of bureaucracy, but Peduto says it is vital. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need a professional running our emergency services, not a politician,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You want someone with a deep understanding of law enforcement and security issues.â&#x20AC;? When it comes to selecting the chief of police, Peduto says he will conduct a national search to ďŹ nd the best candidate, though he says the new chief could come from within the Pittsburgh bureau. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inherently unfair given the criticism that this department has come under to believe that there are only 100 people on this earth [the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current police brass] that could be the new chief,â&#x20AC;? Peduto says. Peduto has said he favors â&#x20AC;&#x153;decentralizingâ&#x20AC;? command decisions, giving more leeway to zone commanders to decide on tactics. At the same time, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d use intelligence-based policing â&#x20AC;&#x201D; also known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;cops on dotsâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to station ofďŹ cers in high-crime areas, and make sure crime stats are instantly available to the community. Such data, he says, would make it easier to hold zone commanders accountable. He also wants to bar the practice of having lower-ranking ofďŹ cers â&#x20AC;&#x153;leapfrogâ&#x20AC;? over superiors by getting promotions. Such promotions have led to claims of favoritism in the past. Peduto says he would work to restore the trust in the police bureau, shoring up relations with the community at large, while also building conďŹ dence among rank-and-ďŹ le ofďŹ cers. Morale, Peduto says, is currently â&#x20AC;&#x153;at the lowest levels.â&#x20AC;? The Citizens Police Review Board, he says, is a cornerstone for building greater transparency. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the present administration has been hostile in dealing with the CPRB,â&#x20AC;? Peduto says, pointing to practices like leaving openings on the board unďŹ lled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As the mayor, I will make sure that the CPRB has all the tools it needs.â&#x20AC;?

lice brutality in this city is not just an African-American issue, it faces all Americans,â&#x20AC;? says Richardson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an issue of hate that needs to be addressed in a swift and timely fashion. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be in a public ofďŹ ce, then you have to be held accountable.â&#x20AC;? Richardson says he knows about accountability issues. He was arrested last week and charged with driving under the inďŹ&#x201A;uence. Hours after telling reporters he was the victim of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;feeble attempt to discredit me,â&#x20AC;? he announced that he would plead guilty to charges. Richardson says he wants to see more ofďŹ cers patrolling on foot getting to know the community they are serving, and that he will open a satellite mayoral ofďŹ ce in an inner-city neighborhood. Richardson also says he will institute â&#x20AC;&#x153;Project X,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;a straight-up, hardcore war against drugs.â&#x20AC;? The approach involves painting a large â&#x20AC;&#x153;Xâ&#x20AC;? on locations where drug crimes are being committed.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;WHAT I HOPE IS THAT WE GET A NEW MAYOR WHO FIRST AND FOREMOST DEMONSTRATES A POLITICAL WILL TO SUPPORT THE WORK OF THE BOARD.â&#x20AC;?

A.J. Richardson Richardson, of Sheraden, says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s running for mayor speciďŹ cally to deal with policing issues, particularly the issue of police brutality. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Judging what took place on St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day weekend [when complaints about two ofďŹ cers providing security on the South Side generated headlines], po-

Jack Wagner From the outset of his campaign, Wagner has said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d prefer the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next police chief to come from within the department. That preference help earned him the backing of the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fraternal Order of Police. Days after the endorsement, Wagner told City Paper that while he may have to hire from outside the bureau, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my hope that the [right] individual is within the department. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a military veteran, a Marine Corps veteran,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I understand the importance of leadership, and if at all possible, [if] you can ďŹ nd that qualiďŹ ed person within the bureau, I think it creates an esprit de corps within that organizational structure.â&#x20AC;? Wagner has directed much of his criticism at city ofďŹ cials for not monitoring the bureau more carefully. At an April 6 forum held by black community groups, he allowed that while â&#x20AC;&#x153;thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no doubt there have been serious problems within that department, there are also serious problems structurally with how the city functions.â&#x20AC;? For example, Wagner says that the money police earned from offduty security details should never have been handled within the bureau. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can see that from 30,000 feet,â&#x20AC;? he says. (Some money from so-called secondary details was allegedly redirected into non-ofďŹ cial accounts at a police credit union. Federal

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Like Peduto, Wheatley says it’s critical to have a national search to find the city’s new top cop, though he also says the new chief could come from the department’s ranks. “You need a police chief … who understands when to partner with communities … and not one who believes in occupying” those neighborhoods, Wheatley said at the April 6 forum. Wheatley, too, says the new police chief will report directly to him and not to a public-safety director. Wheatley says there must be more positive interactions between police and

the public. “For a lot of people, the first time they see an officer is at a crime scene,” he says. Wheatley says he favors forming Police Athletic Leagues where officers interact with the public to build strong relationships. Funding, he says, would have to come from public/private partnerships and not taxpayer dollars. Wheatley also says there needs to be a clear path for promotion within the department based on “what you know and not who you know.” In particular, he says, there should be more minority and female officers in command positions. At the Pitt debate, he worried that black officers “feel like they’re under attack” for Harper’s alleged misdeeds. “These issues with police brutality and the incident with the former chief aren’t things that cropped up overnight,” Wheatley says. “They are institutional and structural issues.” When it comes to the CPRB, Wheatley says he favors a strong, independent citizen review. At the April 6 forum, he faulted police for appearing at reviewboard hearings and refusing to speak; he suggested that under his administration, “any officer would be forced to testify.” Such an approach could run afoul of rules that protect public employees against self-incrimination during internal investigations. But Wheatley says that in establishing more police accountability, “We need to make it clear that it’s not an us-versus-them situation.” C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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officials have accused Harper of spending nearly half of it — more than $30,000 — on personal items.) At a University of Pittsburgh forum last week, Wagner said that “If the need exists, I will have the chief of police report directly to the mayor,” complaining that the current structure has too many levels of bureaucracy and “needs to change.” Wagner has also said he’s displeased about reports of “the reassignment of officers from neighborhoods when there are special events like a Steelers game … or certain duties in isolated areas of the city.” Asked about the CPRB at the April 6 forum, Wagner called it “a very important organization,” but said little about his vision for it, discussing instead policerecruitment strategies.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

{BY MATT BORS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

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IN 2011, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl’s chief of staff, Yarone Zober, spent three days biking around Minneapolis with two of Pittsburgh’s strongest cycling advocates: Scott Bricker, executive director of the nonprofit An example of what the city’s Bikeshare BikePGH, and Steve Patchan, the city’s bicycle might look like. bicycle-pedestrian coordinator. The three men used bikes acquired New cyclists, who also drive, tend to dethrough Minneapolis’s Nice Ride bike-share velop new appreciation for the rules of the program, and after Zober’s return, city of- road, he adds. Bike shares also broaden the interest ficials began seeking funds to launch bikesharing here. Last month, they reached in cycling by targeting non-enthusiasts — their $3 million goal for startup funding, primarily commuters, tourists and others thanks to federal grant money and private interested in shorter urban trips. Zober says “people Downtown might support. Planners now hope to launch Pittsthink it’s a hassle to go to the Strip District burgh’s program by the summer of 2014. “It dawned on me that [bike-sharing] for lunch,” since walking, taking a bus and applied to more than just cyclists,” Zober finding parking all take time. “If you can recalls. “This was about changing a trans- get on a bike, you can be in many, many different communities within five or 10 portation culture in a city.” Bike shares work much like car-sharing minutes. I see the potential of this program in making the city memberships: Members more accessible.” can check out a bike from “I SEE THE Organizers also hope one location and return it POTENTIAL OF bike-sharing will extend the at another location. MemTHIS PROGRAM IN reach of the Port Authority, berships typically cost beMAKING THE CITY filling gaps between bus, tween $60 and $100 a year; rental fees may also be MORE ACCESSIBLE.” work and home. Planners are considering a combinacharged on usage. The bike-share program will increase tion transit/bike-share pass. Having a larger and more diverse cythe number of cyclists on city streets: City planners expect to start the program with cling community could also boost the effec500 bikes at 50 stations across the city, and tiveness of groups like BikePGH. Cyclists have already “started to see predict an additional 250,000 bike trips in some real progress,” Bricker says, citing its first full season in 2015. And, bicycle activists say, changing the the growth of bike lanes and signage. With perception of cycling in the city — as the bike-sharing, “We’re going to be attracting a Minneapolis experience did for Zober — is lot of new people.” Indeed, Andy Clarke, president of the potentially the most powerful promise the League of American Bicyclists, says bikebike-share program holds. Pittsburgh’s cycling community is sharing “is a game-changer” at reshaping growing already: 1.6 percent of the city’s the public debate. Washington, D.C.’s bike-share program population commuted by bike in 2010, up threefold since 2000, according to the U.S. — the first in the country — started with Census. But tensions between motorists 120 bikes in 2008. It now has more than and cyclists have also increased. As City 1,600 bikes; last month, it set a new riderPaper reported in December, 2012 was the ship record when nearly 10,000 people used most dangerous year on record for city cy- it in a single day. “When the system came online, all of clists, topped by the deaths of two cyclists a sudden, the bikes were everywhere — hit by motorists within a single week. But Patchan says the new cyclists perfectly normal people doing perfectly should make the streets safer. In other cities normal things on these visible red bikes,” with bike shares, he says, crashes decrease Clarke says. As a result, he says, cyclists are part of the as the number of cyclists increase. “Motorists become more sensitized,” mainstream conversation on transit issues. Bike-sharing, Clarke says, “takes us out Patchan says. “They expect cyclists. [They] become more used to sharing the road.” of the realm of a special-interest group.” A B ROW N @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

AS GOV. Tom Corbett heads into the backstretch of his term, he’s garnered a reputation as someone willing to do almost anything for the big-money players. The drilling industry gives him campaign contributions, UPMC gives him hockey tickets … and supposedly he rolls right over. We should be so lucky. The truth is, Corbett is dithering over a plan to increase medical coverage for the poor — a plan supported not just by unions and activists, but by hospitals too. At issue is an Obama administration proposal to expand state Medicaid programs, which cover healthcare costs for low-income Americans. Accepting the offer to expand Medicaid could provide health coverage to some 650,000 Pennsylvanians, with the feds footing most of the bill. The Hospital Association of Pennsylvania, which represents hospitals like UPMC, backs the proposal: “Medicaid expansion would provide substantial benefit to the physical and fiscal health of Pennsylvanians, the Commonwealth and its hospitals,” Association CEO Andy Carter has said. It’s probably one of the few positions the association has in common with healthcare unions. Corbett hasn’t rejected the proposal, exactly. Instead, he’s spent months saying he needs more information, even after a meeting last week with an Obama cabinet secretary, Kathleen Sebelius. During his February budget address, Corbett insisted that “Washington must provide a clear answer about what this expansion would cost the taxpayers of our state.” As it stands “at this time,” he added, “I cannot recommend a dramatic Medicaid expansion.” Actually, we have a pretty good idea of what the costs will be. While the feds have pledged to pay 100 percent of the costs through 2016, the state will have to help pay a share afterwards. The RAND Corporation estimates the state’s share will rise “substantially” — by about 10 percent of what it currently spends. But RAND, in a study compiled for the Hospital Association, also notes the state will get an extra $2.5 billion in federal money each year, helping shore up some 35,000 medical jobs. Any way you slice it, Pennsylvania comes out ahead. What’s really going on here?

Corbett is showing all the symptoms of someone worrying about his re-election. He’s facing a potential GOP primary challenger next year: Montgomery County Commissioner Bruce Castor. “If Gov. Corbett flip-flops on Medicaid, as it looks like he may do, he is really going to be in trouble,” Castor spokesman Joe Stern told me last month. “I would liken it to Arlen Specter’s flip-flop on [President Obama’s 2009] stimulus bill, which effectively ended his career.” You might not think such threats would faze Corbett: The only people who don’t hate him are the right-wingers Castor claims to speak for. While only a third of voters approve of the job Corbett is doing, a January survey by Public Policy Polling shows that self-identified “very conservative” voters back him by a 50-to-28 margin. Meanwhile, arch-conservative governors elsewhere — Arizona’s Jan Brewer, Florida’s Rick Scott, New Jersey’s Chris Christie — support the Medicaid expansion. But Corbett, having alienated everyone else in Pennsylvania, can’t afford to lose conservatives. And even if he did sign off on expanding Medicaid, it might not pass the Republican-controlled legislature. Already, a handful of Harrisburg legislators have issued a statement fretting about how “corporate interests urge spending to supposedly help the poor; spending that … puts money into their own pockets.” Apparently, in today’s GOP, greed is OK as long as it only helps rich people. Big employers can get anything they want … except policies that might benefit the rest of us too directly. The Republicans also fretted that federal promises to pay for Medicaid “are dubious at best, especially considering … the federal government’s finances.” After all, they write, the government is already “withdrawing the deployment of an aircraft carrier group to the Persian Gulf.” And if we can’t spend untold sums playing cops in the Middle East, how can we afford a luxury like health care for our own people? Perhaps the worst thing about Corbett is that he isn’t as bad as the GOP gets. And the more you realize that, the more you almost feel … sorry for him. There, I said it. Let the healing begin! In fact … seriously, Governor. When it comes to expanding Medicaid: Let the healing begin.

IN TODAY’S GOP, GREED IS OK AS LONG AS IT ONLY HELPS RICH PEOPLE.

C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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A startup company in Austin, Texas, also serving San Francisco, promises to take its customers’ incoming U.S. mail three times a week, photograph it and deliver it back to the customers via mobile phone app, for $4.99 a month. The company, Outbox, provides some value-added services, removing the customer from junk-mail lists and paying bills. Still, Outbox’s unorthodox business model assumes that a growing number of people absolutely hate opening, filing or discarding pieces of paper. Co-founder Will Davis told CNN in February that at least he does not fear competition: “No one is crazy enough to do what we’re doing.”

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Between 2002 and 2010, according to the March BJU International (formerly British Journal of Urology), an estimated 17,600 patients came to U.S. hospital emergency rooms reporting genital injuries from trouser zippers (presumably by accident, but researchers took no position on that). Seven authors (six from University of California, San Francisco) took credit for the report, funded by a National Institutes of Health grant, and found that “zip” wounds were only about one-fifth of emergency penile injuries.

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Robert Burton, 34, got a 15-year prison sentence in February for forcing women into prostitution, with evidence including a police report quoting Burton’s 7-year-old son, who was in the car with Burton and two women when Miami police stopped them. The kid had earnestly identified the women: “Those are my daddy’s hoes.”

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I N K . N E T OR WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

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Professor Peter Froehlich, who teaches computer-science classes at the highly competitive Johns Hopkins University, contractually grades “on a curve,” automatically marking the highest grade an A, with other grades trailing based on their proximity to the class’ best. One clever student tried to organize the entire class for December’s final exam, to persuade everyone to do no work at all — thus rendering the “highest” grade a zero, meaning an A for everyone. (Of course, if a single student broke ranks, everyone except that student would receive an absolute zero.) Fortunately for the students, according to InsideHigherEd.com, the class held together, and a shocked professor Froehlich nonetheless honored his contract, giving everyone an A (but subsequently closing the loophole).

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Thieves broke into the home of Earlie Johnson in Muskegon, Mich., in February and made off with several flat-screen TVs. But what really irked him was that they also stole his entire DVD pornography collection, consisting, he said, of the films of every African-American porn star since the 1970s. (“I’m not no scumbag guy, pervert, or nothing like that,” he told WZZM-TV. “I just thought it was cool to own my own porn collection. It keeps my relationship [with his fiancée] fresh and tight.”) As soon as the news of Johnson’s misfortune spread, several adult-video companies donated DVDs to help restore the collection.

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Sex Is Dangerous: (1) Officers from the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority reported in March that a lion had

RED

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

attacked a couple having sex in the bush, killing the woman and sending the man dashing down a road wearing nothing but his condom (which reduced his chances of receiving help from motorists). (2) Near Daytona Beach, Fla., in February, Ms. Asia Walker, 30, driving her boyfriend around, could not resist his amorous advances and soon lost control of the car. It left the road and plowed completely through a vacant house. She was briefly hospitalized, but her boyfriend was not hurt.

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Even though the British government refused to grant trademark protection to the Italian maker of “Jesus Jeans” because it would be “morally offensive to the public,” the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office had no such qualms and approved the application in 2007. Since then, according to a February Wall Street Journal story, the company has prevented a dozen other companies from using such clothing names as “Jesus First,” “Sweet Jesus,” “Jesus Couture” and, most recently, “Jesus Surfed.”

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Humans’ belief that fragrances improve their allure can seemingly never be overestimated. Dutch-based artists Lernert Engelberts and Sander Plug told The N ew York Times in March that they recently created a concoction to call attention to our neediness for artificial scent. Noting the deluge of new industry creations in 2012, Engelberts explained, “Our point is, why do you need nearly 1,400 new scents in one year?” The pair created Everything, which they claim contains a bit of every one of the year’s fragrances they were able to obtain (including Fame by Lady

Gaga and Justin Bieber’s Girlfriend), dumped into one bottle and left to marinate — and they offered it for sale for the equivalent of about $39,000.

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Not Ready for Prime Time: (1) Paul Masters, 47, was charged with a roof-entry burglary of a Roses department store in Lexington, Ky., in March. Those burglaries are common, but almost always nighttime jobs, when no one else is on the premises. Masters, though, dropped in just after lunchtime. After police swarmed the store, Masters eventually fell through a drop ceiling and was arrested. (2) Jarad Carr, 37, was arrested in Chippewa County, Wis., in March after he persisted in demanding a refund for the computer printer he said he had bought at a Walmart (though he lacked a receipt). While examining the printer, the Walmart employee noticed a sheet of paper still inside — showing two counterfeit $100 bills — and called police, who arrived while Carr was still haggling for a refund.

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A judge in Racine, Wis., granted bail for Tyree Carter, 20, for his March arrest for “lewd and lascivious conduct” in the Racine Public Library, but among the conditions of his release was that, until trial, Carter “stay out of all the libraries on the face of the Earth.”

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In a ruling that lasted less than a week, England’s Mid Devon District Council had decreed in March that henceforth, no street name could contain an apostrophe, e.g., St. George’s would be St. Georges. Outraged punctuationists swung into action, causing the council to quickly reverse itself.

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THE STEAK WAS MARINATED IN MELTED BUTTER, THEN SEARED ON A “WHITE HOT” SKILLET

TEA TIME {BY ANDY MULKERIN} At first glance, Nate Pantalone, owner of Dobrá Tea House in Squirrel Hill, doesn’t cut the profile you’d expect. The tea room is comfy, with Eastern influences in its décor and music. But Pantalone is a softspoken, clean-cut 24-year-old who went to school for … chemical engineering. “I got out of school and didn’t find a job at first, and I decided that this was what I wanted to do,” says Pantalone. Dobrá is a growing brand, with four other locations throughout the country; the first was in Burlington, Vt., and Pantalone came across a Dobrá shop in Madison, Wis., where he went to college. He opened the Pittsburgh shop in mid-March. Dobrá, the story goes, was founded in Prague, by men who were tea smugglers before the fall of communism. In 2003, the Burlington shop opened. All of the U.S. locations stock only Dobrá teas, supplied by the Prague company. Right now, Dobrá doesn’t serve tea to go — one of the distinctions Pantalone draws between his shop and the nearby Te Café — and the shop generally caters to the stop-and-stay-awhile crowd. Tea is served in small pots appropriate to the type of tea (everything from green and black to yerba maté and herbal tisanes). In the early weeks of Dobrá, Pantalone says there’s not a specific bestseller. “It depends on the weather,” he says. “The other day, it was cold and gray, and that was a black-tea day.” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

1937 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-449-9833 or www.dobrateapgh.com

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FEED

Among Pittsburgh’s unique ue signs of spring: the Pedall Pale Ale Keg Ride. Registration is now open for or this beer-and-bike vernal celebration, on Sat., April 27, 7, in which fresh beer is towed d bike to a by bik mystery location myste cation and enjoyed a njoyed there. Ride begins at East End Brewing’s new facilities at n 147 Julius St., in Larimer. Full details and sign-up: www. eastendbrewing.com/2013KegRide.

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ALL ABOARD {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

I

T CAN BE difficult to tease apart the

appeal of food and atmosphere. Of course, we go to restaurants to eat, but also to enjoy an experience that is different from that of cooking and dining at home. Thus, our interest in JG’s Tarentum Station Grille had as much to do with its location — the historic train station of this old Allegheny River town — as with its old-school continental menu. We found the exterior of the station immaculately restored, with a new little building beside it, presumably to handle some kitchen duties. The bar end of the building ended at a pleasant patio with seating, while we scored an intimate table in a tiny sun porch tucked beneath the eaves on one side of the building. It lacked a rail-front view, but afforded the opportunity to study an elaborate mural that traced the area through time, from Native Americans tracking in Penn’s Woods through early settlement, to the town’s heyday and its current Gatto Cycle glory. Its encyclopedic attention to local history was fascinating.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

Chicken Louisiana

Inside, the menu was dominated by traditional fine-dining fare, mostly with an Italian pedigree. But the 21st century made itself known through occasional American ingredients such as habañero and poblano peppers. There were also a few dishes that,

JG’S TARENTUM STATION GRILLE 101 Station Drive, Tarentum. 724-226-3301 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sat. 4-10 p.m. PRICES: Soups, salads and appetizers $4-10; entrees $18-30 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED if not up-to-the-minute, at least expanded on the choices we would have had a generation ago. For example, coconut shrimp is hardly a trendsetter, but who could complain about shellfish this plump and juicy, or the fiery habañero-pineapple jelly that set off its briny sweetness? The soup du jour, a crab-corn chowder,

wasn’t precisely seasonal, but was chockfull of sweet crabmeat and corn as well as plenty of other vegetables. It was tender-crisp in a broth whose glossy sheen suggested cornstarch thickener, but was neither too pasty nor too heavy for the morsels it held. A New York strip steak done Pittsburgh rare was an opportunity for a little cultural history. We knew the story about millworkers cooking steaks on the searing-hot surfaces of steel furnaces, but harbored some doubt about the veracity of the tale. Jason’s uncle had joined us and confirmed that yes, in his mill days, workers did indeed heat meals using both equipment and freshly rolled steel. Score one for folk history. JG’s kitchen marinated the steak in melted butter before searing on a “white hot” skillet, and we applauded the results: The crust was crackling without too much bitter char, and the near-raw interior was tender and flavorful, with excellent seasoning throughout. Jason’s dad, also visiting, noted that it was better and far cheaper than the steak he’d had a

few days before in Manhattan. Alas, his veal medallions in vermouth sauce, a house specialty, were less successful, the meat too chewy and the sauce too mild. However, an array of chicken dishes restored our faith in the kitchen’s competence. Linguine alfredo included moist morsels of white meat in a sauce that was thick without being heavy or impossibly rich. Chicken Louisiana featured a blackened breast, which fortunately wasn’t the brutal blackening associated with this once-trendy preparation; JG’s kitchen has given it a mere healthy sear, allowing the breast meat to remain moist within. Sweet morsels of crab formed a perfect contrast, while a slightly spicy sauce around the chicken balanced the rich béarnaise poured atop the crab.

It was a treat to find a dish like this that offered something different done well, without necessarily pushing any boundaries. Much the same could be said for a special of chicken poblano ravioli, in which poblano peppers contributed a subtle heat to both a tomato sauce and the filling of the ravioli themselves. Two chicken breasts, pounded flat and tenderized, formed the substance of this dish, but the pleasure was in the flavors of the sauce, enlivened also by prosciutto, garlic and onions. “George Washington slept here” may be the gold standard for historic sites, but we’re more interested in “Taft ate here.” After all, what president is more associated with gustatory pleasure? President Taft did once visit Tarentum, and if he could have enjoyed a meal at JG’s Station Grille, we’d like to think he would have given it his seal of approval. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

A STATE OF FERMENT Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week comes back for a second round Just how popular is beer in Pittsburgh? When Commonwealth Press partnered with the Gateway Clipper fleet to offer a three-hour-long river cruise featuring an all-you-can-drink assortment of beer from more than a dozen craft breweries, tickets sold out in less than four minutes. And when the servers crashed because they hey were overloaded with ticket requests, the trip sold out again, requ after aft organizers added a second o boat to accommodate the demand. The river trip is a highlight of the second annual Pittsburgh Craft Beer Week, a celebration of artisanal breweries that runs from April 19-27. “Everybody saw the success of it last year and wanted to get involved,” says Andy Rich, head brewer at Penn Brewery and chair of the Pittsburgh Craft Beer Alliance. He says that the collaborative beers build camaraderie among the brewers, something that serves to strengthen the local beer community as a whole. “We have a lot of support from the local community, from wholesalers to bars to restaurants,” says Colleen Leary, a PCBA board member. Leary says that events, which will again number in the “several hundreds,” are organized by individual establishments, but she and the rest of the team of volunteers are “here to lend ideas and support.” Local partnerships are popular this year. Last year a handful of area brewers worked on three collaborative brewing projects: This year the official list expands to five beers produced by 15 different breweries. There are also a slew of unofficial collaborative projects. For example, regional brewers Lavay teamed up with hometown favorites Full Pint. Fatheads, Rivertowne and Butler Brew Works partnered with Burgh Bees for a tasting of locally made honey beer; Penn Brewery and Arsenal Cider produced a beer-hopped hard cider. All of this bodes well for the future of craft beer in Pittsburgh, organizers say. “It’s exciting for the region,” says Rich. He adds that, as big as the event seems now, “it’s just going to keep growing and building.” INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

See pittsburghcraftbeerweek.com/ calendar for a full list of events.

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

So thern South rn Hospititalit Hosp lity. Who said you can’t find

Real Soul Food in Pittsburgh?

HEY BROWN BAGGER, EAT YOUR LUNCH AT STEELHEAD! Pittsburgh Marriott City Center 112 Washington Place, Downtown 412-471-4000 for Reservations www.thesteelhead.com

Come See Uncle Troy! Soul Food at Monroeville Mall Located in the Food Court Scan to View Steelhead Menus

412.858.5155

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ABAY ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 130 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412661-9736. At Pittsburgh’s original Ethiopian restaurant, the cheerful down-to-earth atmosphere creates the perfect setting for a dining experience. The vegetarian items are just as robust and richly flavored as the meat dishes. KF AVENUE B. 5501 Centre Ave., Shadyside. 412-683-3663. This intimate corner restaurant has only a brief, seasonal menu, but its offerings are all tantalizing, each combining several pedigreed ingredients. Such selections include piquillo-pepper lasagna with a different filling in each layer; green-bean and sweetpotato tempura; and fresh pasta topped with beef short ribs, chard and crisped cipollini onions. LF BURMA-TOKYO RESTAURANT. 320 Atwood St., Oakland. 412-8026163. This tiny restaurant run by two siblings offers sushi as well as a selection of cooked dishes from their native Burma and several neighboring countries. Among the intriguing selections: The Burmese shan tribe noodles, with a distinctive, intensely flavored sauce and varied vegetables; and the Kyae oae soup, with rice vermicelli, mustard greens, a variety of meatballs and tofu. JF

“Show up at Benjamin’s in jeans or in post-party formalwear, and you’ll feel equally at home. The atmosphere is comfortable and welcoming, the food is simply outstanding…”

Wai Wai {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

dust atop duck cannoli or deepfried gnocchi. KF KAYA. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. 412-261-6565. Kaya is a local culinary mainstay, offering inventive Caribbean-inspired contemporary cuisine. The menu, much of which is vegetarian, changes frequently. But it remains divided into tropas — tropical tapas — and entrees. KE

FUEL & FUDDLE. 212 Oakland Ave., Oakland. 412-682-3473. The ambience conjures the nostalgia of Route 66 road trips. Much of the reasonably priced THE MIGHTY OAK BARREL. fare is in the “goes well with 939 Third St., Oakmont. beer” category, and the beer list 412-826-1069. Set in a renovated includes a couple of house brews. bar surrounded by tiny houses, But there’s plenty that’s new: the Barrel combines fine Pizza, baked in a wood-fired dining with a comfortable brick oven, comes with neighborhood feel. Dishes run everything from Jamaican the gamut from veal jerk chicken to hummus; tenderloin porcini to a entrees include glazed game platter with salmon and “truckelk and venison. stop sirloin.” KE The menu is Italian . www per in sensibility, but it a p ty pghci m HABITAT. 510 Market changes frequently: If .co St., Downtown. you like something, you 412-773-8800. Located in better hurry back. KE the handsome Fairmont Hotel, this restaurant — with OVER THE BAR BICYCLE a marvelously open kitchen CAFÉ. 2518 E. Carson St., South — utilizes local and seasonal Side. 412-381-3698. This twoingredients. The emphasis is wheel-themed café and bar on the kitchen’s ability to offers a creative pub-grub menu adapt and update traditional (with many offerings named dishes from around the world, for bicycle parts). The salads are such as tandoori chicken tacos more impressive than those and rare-tuna-and-avocado you’ll find at most bars, and the spring rolls. LE menu features vegetarian and vegan options. Try the battered KALEIDOSCOPE CAFÉ. 108 zucchini planks wrapped around 43rd St., Lawrenceville. 412melty cheeses. JE 683-4004. This intriguing menu refracts contemporary trends PAMELA’S. Multiple locations. in sophisticated casual dining www.pamelasdiner.com. There are while still offering an atmosphere so many reasons to recommend of off-the-beaten-path funkiness. this popular local diner miniWhile some dishes emphasize chain: the cheery atmosphere; the unusual juxtapositions of old-fashioned breakfasts featuring ingredients, such as a lobsterraisin French toast, fried potatoes and-white-bean purée alongside and corned-beef hash; and light, fish, or fig in a “rustic marsala crispy-edged pancakes so good sauce,” other dishes are of that President Obama had them the moment, with pistachio served at the White House. J

FULL LIST ONLINE

– Pittsburgh City Paper

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

A Taste of Dahntahn {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} the family photos) with friendly service. The menu is classic Italian — no wacky ingredients or preparations — but only a few entrées seem lifted from the Standard Italian Restaurant Repertoire. Specialties are crab and veal. L

CHICKEN LATINO. 155 21st St., Strip District. 412-246-0974. This quick-serve chicken joint serves up Peruvian-style, woodfired and deliciously seasoned rotisserie chicken. Besides the bird, hamburgers and the occasional special (pork, ceviche), sides include such south-of-the-border staples as plantains, refried beans and fried yucca. J DAVIO. 2100 Broadway Ave., Beechview. 412-531-7422. Davio is a cozy restaurant (down to

offMenu

PENN AVENUE FISH COMPANY. 308 Forbes Ave., Downtown. 412-562-1710. This Downtown fish restaurant fills the gap between humble lunch counter and snooty steakhouse — modern, funky and moderately priced. Much of the restaurant’s menu is casual fare such as sandwiches (hardly ordinary), sushi and tacos, with a rotating selection of a half-dozen higherend dishes. Try the shrimp and crab pizza. KF

AUTHENTIC THAI CUISINE

Planned South Side eatery trying out meat-pie recipes on bar patrons IT WAS LATE at night when the heads at the packed

English meat pies are tested on regulars at Piper’s Pub. {PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

YO RITA. 1120 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-904-3557. This venue offers Mexican-inspired cuisine unlike anything else in the city. The humble taco here is the vehicle for everything from traditional ingredients like chorizo, avocado and tongue, to softshell crab, quail’s egg and veal tartare. Also available: ceviche, blue corn dogs and Mexican-style corn-on-the cob. JE

STR TRIIP HE S TH P N T IIN

MEET PIES

A TASTE OF DAHNTAHN. 535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-224-2240. Despite the jokey moniker, there’s nothing déclassé about this restaurant, which offers both a kitchsy and refined menu of American comfort food. Fried green “tuhmaytuhs” are Parmesanand panko-crusted and topped with whipped cream cheese. Among the revamped entrees: a rich and distinctive Londonbroil meatloaf, feta-stuffed peppers and Tillamook cheddarspinach ravioli. LE

WAI WAI. 4717 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-621-0133. Eschewing the epic list of dishes most Chinese-American restaurants proffer, this attractively decorated storefront venue sticks to a modest number of basics with a few less-typical dishes, such as Singapore mai fun (a dish of stir-fried rice noodles) or sha cha (a meat-and-vegetable dish from China’s Gansu province) JF

ANGKO

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

SIX PENN. 146 Sixth Ave., Downtown. 412-566-7366. Open late for the Downtown theater crowd, this cheery restaurant satisfies theater buffs, families and young professionals alike. The seasonal menu offers lively updates on comfort food from lobster mac-n-cheese to braised short ribs. Gourmet burgers and pizzas make for quick meals. Linger for homemade desserts, or stop by after the show. KE

THAI CUISINE. 4625 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-688-9661. This Thai restaurant in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Little Italy serves up authentic dishes with warm, friendly service. The restaurant also offers an updated vegetarian menu that features mock duck, vegetarian pork and other meat substitutes, as well as the more familiar non-meat offerings of tofu and vegetables. KF

Little

Piper’s Pub on the South Side all turned to watch a tray of English meat pies being carried toward the front of the restaurant. “It’s pie time!” yelled one of the regulars, as a mob formed over them. The pies — intended to be street food, handed over to be eaten without knife or fork — were delivered by the cooks behind a soonto-be-open, very-Britishstyle chip shop. While such tastings for new restaurant menus are usually a behind-the-scenes experiment conducted with staff, the recipes for the Pub Chip Shop — expected to open in mid-May next door to Piper’s — are being tested weekly on a bar crowd that has been gathering at the same time each week for more than a year-and-a-half. “The Thursday-night crowd is an incredibly loyal crowd and [the owner] wanted to reward them,” says Mindy Heisler, the chip shop’s general manager. The goal is not to give away a free meal, but to get feedback on the recipes; the trial fillings have included: lamb, steak and ale, pierogies, chicken curry, vegan curry and chicken mushroom. Those will be narrowed, ultimately, to six or seven regular menu options, with occasional surprises offered as specials. Critical to the structure of the pies is the unusual crust. Head baker Kenny Houser started working with an English recipe for hot lard dough about six months ago; Heisler helped tweak it. It requires pouring boiling water over lard and dry ingredients to form the dough ball. “Philosophically, it goes against everything you’ve ever been told about pie dough,” Heisler says. “But structurally, it’s beautiful.” The fillings have to work, too, not just in flavor but in function. “They are ... designed to be eaten by hand,” Heisler explains. “Which means we have to make sure that when you bite into that pie, you’re not taking a face full of whatever.” Piper’s guinea pigs have few complaints. And Rebecca Roell, 29, a South Side Slopes resident, already has a favorite. “The curry is like lightning bolts of love,” she says.

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LOCAL

“PITTSBURGH BASICALLY WAS THE WEEKEND SPOT. I’D GO OUT ONCE, TWICE A WEEK.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

Si Lewis is characteristically soft-spoken about how his band, Amplifiers, came to record its new album, Everything Obsolete, with Casey Crescenzo of The Dear Hunter. “I ended up befriending Casey, and building him a custom guitar,” says bassist and singer Lewis, who started the band with guitarist Jon Davis. “I built him a Bass VI like mine. He’d joke and say, ‘I really ought to have you guys come out to my studio.’ Then finally he said, ‘Feel free to say no to this, but why don’t you guys come out and record with me?’” Amplifiers have been around since 2007, but Everything Obsolete is their first full-length. They released an EP, but this is their first effort in their finalized lineup — Davis and Lewis, plus drummer Tim Evans and guitarist Andrew Brest. The four live in various parts of Western Pennsylvania, including Carnegie, Sharon and Grove City, making it a pretty big commitment — for some, driving to band practice takes an hour or more. The band runs the gamut from epic instrumental rock to earnest rockers and post-hardcore-style stuff that highlights Lewis’ powerful vocals. The album wasn’t recorded completely with Crescenzo, Lewis explains. About two-thirds was recorded at home by the band before the last third came together on the West Coast. Crescenzo added backing vocals and the like himself, and mixed the record while he had a few other things on his plate. “The whole time, he was on tour while this was going on,” says Davis, “bouncing back and forth from New York to California.” “At the time, he had just finished a record for K Será, then he went immediately to working with us, then immediately to some reunion dates with The Receiving End of Sirens, then to [the Bamboozle Festival in Asbury Park, N.J.], then started recording Migrant, the new Dear Hunter album. “His work ethic is like no one I’ve ever met. We’re really lucky he took the initiative to work with us.” AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AMPLIFIERS CD RELEASE with THROUGH THESE WALLS, DOOMSDAY INITIATIVE, RED HANDS, KID DURANGO. 5 p.m. Sat., April 13. Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $10-12. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com

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Make some noise: Amplifiers

TURNING IT UP A NOTCH

SECOND CHANCES The Tao of the Steubenville Public Library: RZA

{BY RORY D. WEBB}

R

ZA IS KNOWN worldwide as one

of hip hop’s pioneering figures: Wu-Tang Clan member, MC and producer, actor and director. On April 18, he appears as part of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures’ speakers series, talking about, among other things, his 2009 book The Tao of Wu. In it, he discusses a largely undocumented era of his life — in which Pittsburgh played a role RZA, born Robert Diggs, grew up in the New York City projects, at one point living with 18 relatives in a two-bedroom apartment. At age 9, he was introduced to hip hop at a street block party. By 11, he was challenging other MC’s throughout the city to rap battles. “I definitely had a confidence that my talent level was amongst the greatest,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

you know what I mean,” he says with a laugh. “It’s like Bruce Lee fighting all the time, nobody could do what he did, he developed his own [style]. I felt that’s what Wu-Tang had.”

RZA “WISDOM OF THE WORD” TOUR MODERATED BY TERRANCE HAYES

7:30 p.m. Thu., April 18. New Hazlett Theater, Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-65. All ages. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

Even at that early age, he and fellow Wu-Tang member Ol’ Dirty Bastard

believed they were destined for greatness, he says. “By the time we was 11 or 12, definitely by that age, I would talk to Dirty like, ‘We’re here for something. We’re here for a special reason, I can feel it. We’re gonna do something great.’ We kind of had that feeling and belief in both of us.” In 1990, RZA, in his late teens, left his home in New York City to live with his mother in Steubenville, Ohio. His stepfather ran a convenience store in Pittsburgh, in the Hill District. “Pittsburgh basically was the weekend spot,” he says. “My pops, he would stay the whole week running the store, and maybe I’d go out once, twice a week or whatever. Met some cool dudes out there, pretty tough.

“At that time everybody was into the rough life, shall we say.” In The Tao of Wu, he touches on some of the major stories from his time in Steubenville, including a descent into petty crime and drug-dealing. It culminated in an attempted murder charge — he was facing up to eight years in prison, but was acquitted. “I had a chance to get off that path of hell,” he says. “My moms seen it and she just told me, this is my second chance. I don’t really smile a lot, I don’t smile in none of my pictures or whatever, but I had a smile on my face that was stuck for at least about 10 hours. The joy of walking out of that situation, and the understanding that, you know what, this is a second chance — I took heed to it. I made that second chance count.” It was in Steubenville, too, that RZA became involved with 4th Disciple, who produced for Wu-Tang-affiliated group Killarmy and helped RZA produce WuTang’s 1997 album Forever. He had been a schoolmate of RZA’s younger brother, Freedom, who had moved to Steubenville before RZA. “We used to have meetings at the public library in Steubenville,” recalls 4th Disciple. “Everybody would bring information to the table — whether it was Islam, or whatever was spiritual. Everybody would bring it to this table and share information. Freedom had brought RZA to one of the meetings, early in its inception, and that’s when we all first met RZA. “I don’t think he even knew I did music in the beginning. It was purely an intellectual, spiritual relationship at first.” Fellow Wu-Tang Clan members Ghostface Killah and Ol’ Dirty Bastard also came to spend time in Steubenville, as a getaway from New York City. They would record demos on a four-track in a makeshift studio in 4th Disciple’s grandmother’s basement. “I had a hanger with a stocking cap over it that we used for a wind screen,” 4th Disciple says with a laugh. “We had a regular, old hand-held, stage-type mic. The mic stand was even broke, so the mic was, like, taped to the mic stand.” RZA crossed paths with some Pittsburgh heads, including McKeesport rapper Sam Sneed, at a hip-hop contest outside Steubenville in 1990. “I had my group Rougher Than Most,” Sneed says. “So, when this contest comes up, we drive up to see what it’s about. I had gotten a couple of my artists in it to perform. And that’s when I met RZA, when he performed.”

NEW RELEASES

JASIRI X ACENSION (WANDERING WORX)

While at the core, this album remains consistent with the path that Jasiri X has taken to this point — calling out, and taking action against, corruption in politics and society — Jasiri mixes in some of the raw elements of hip hop that have influenced his rap career. On “42 Bar Thesis,” you’ll find him attacking fraudulent rappers, while on “Warrior” he reflects on his rise in the ranks of hip hop. Fellow conscious rappers Brother Ali and Rhymefest are featured. BY RORY D. WEBB

See FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com, for an interview with Jasiri X.

MARK MANGINI THE COLOR BANDS (SELF-RELEASED)

Five tracks of shimmery soundscape work by the solo artist, packed in a hand-watercolored, limited-edition case. Beautiful, minimalist stuff, with the tracks named only “Color Band One,” “Color Band Two,” etc. (For the record, the bands on the cover are blue, red, yellow, coral and aquamarine. That might help those of you with synesthetic powers.) BY ANDY MULKERIN

THE POINTILLISTS AFTER THE FIREWORKS (SELF-RELEASED)

Foreboding goth-y shoegaze rock with lots of bass and a deep-voiced singer. Shades of everything from The Velvet Underground to Sonic Boom come up. Some points, like the two-part “Graceful Degradation” are downright pretty, though at times the performance, especially the rhythm section, can feel a bit amateurish — think Bauhaus in someone’s basement. BY ANDY MULKERIN

CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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SECOND CHANCES, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

“There were some Pittsburgh guys that came down and battled, and that’s where I met those brothers,” RZA adds. “So, me and Sam Sneed, we stayed friends. I knew him from Pittsburgh. I mean, I helped him get out of town.” Sneed says RZA cottoned particularly to one Pittsburgh rapper, Joe T. “[Joe T.] was the most lyrical, and he had a song called ‘Slaughterhouse,’” says Sneed. “RZA really liked that song. It’s crazy because the first time I ran into RZA out in California, the first thing he asked was, ‘What happened to that guy with “Slaughterhouse”?’” Sneed would later move to California and sign to Death Row Records, working with Dr. Dre. “Those [Pittsburgh] guys,” says RZA, “I’ve seen their humble beginnings as well. I recall them trying to do what they was trying to do, and when they did make it to the mainstream I was really proud of them.”

“BY THE TIME WE WAS 11 OR 12, I WOULD TALK TO DIRTY LIKE, ‘WE’RE HERE FOR A SPECIAL REASON, I CAN FEEL IT.’” Sneed and RZA’s paths continued to cross. After they connected at a Source Awards event, RZA invited Sneed to make a cameo in fellow Wu-Tang member Raekwon’s music video for the single “Ice Cream.” Sneed can be seen throughout the video wearing a bandana and button-up Pittsburgh Pirates jersey. In the mid-’90s, Sneed parted ways with Death Row, in part due to frustrations with the label not releasing his album. Even then, RZA didn’t forget about that Pittsburgh kid he’d met in Steubenville. “After the Death Row thing fell apart, I was still in touch with RZA and I was telling him how I was having a situation where I was trying to get a drum machine,” Sneed reflects. “So I’m talking to RZA about it … and he’s like, ‘Man, you should’ve been told me about that.’ “The next day he sent me 10 grand to get a drum machine and a keyboard — an MPC-3000 and a Triton keyboard.” “I gave him some money and gave him a chance, you know,” says RZA. “I thought he was a good dude and shit.” I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

WE KNOW

GUITARS

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED! GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KRISTIAN EMDAL}

Copenhagen boys: Iceage

GLOBAL COOLING {BY IAN THOMAS} ON ICEAGE’S sophomore album, You’re

Nothing, the Copenhagen band wages war upon itself, demonstrating a range which teeters between melodious beauty and animal violence. Middle ground is hard to come by, so it is not even sought. In its jagged assemblage of post-punk, goth and hardcore, the band creates not a fusion, but a unique sonic space in which those elements cohabitate wholly, rather than piecemeal. This is achieved, to great effect, through dramatic shifts in tone within — not among — You’re Nothing’s 12 short songs.

mandates of genre convention, the sound is more muscular, less artificial. Despite the diversity of sound on offer, Iceage delivers with a truer focus than most bands dedicated to just one genre. The band’s ethos is functionality above all else. While that may sound like a grim affair, it’s the kind of grim affair you can dance to. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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These shifts occur organically, of their own accord. A plodding march to death can be torn asunder when the bass line picks up tempo and finds Elias Bender Rønnenfelt’s ragged voice, tracing the melody of his vocals, as it does on the song “Morals.” Suddenly, the listener is somewhere else entirely. When an intelligible phrase emerges from the midst of the shouting, it is all the more profound. When synchronicity emerges from the discord, it is revelatory. In ignoring the conventions of song structure, Iceage signals its ambition, and the boldness to execute it. Though conventional wisdom may dictate otherwise, this approach yields a robust, full result. The songs are efficient, built to the task at hand. Because they are not beholden to the N E W S

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{PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIN HARRIS}

CRITICS’ PICKS

People Get Ready

[INDIE FOLK] + THU., APRIL 11 If ever there were a moment for Last Good Tooth to make a stand, it’s now: The upstateNew York-based quartet just released a new full-length, Not Without Work and Rest, and its trademarks — an Americana sound, shouts and fiddles — happen to be the currency of a lot of pop music in 2013. This band’s a little more raw and eccentric than your Lumineers, but Edward Sharpe fans should still take note. Last Good Tooth opens for Providence duo Brown Bird tonight at Club Café. Andy Mulkerin 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10-12. 412-431-4950 or www. clubcafelive.com

It’s a bill that sounds a little like a Saturdaymorning cartoon: Baby Dee and Little Annie. But don’t expect cartoon fare. Cleveland-based harpist, pianist and songwriter Baby Dee is one of the great unique voices in music today, and has collaborated with the likes of Will Oldham and Andrew WK. Her latest is a collaboration with Little Annie, who’s been tangential to groups like Crass and Nurse With Wound; both play tonight at the First Unitarian Church in Shadyside. AM 8 p.m. 605 Morewood Ave., Bada$$ Shadyside. $12-15. All ages. 412-361-2262

People Get Ready blurs the line between music and performance in a remarkable fashion. It’s the product of a collaboration between Steven Reker and Luke Fasano, who came together to create a group that Joey is half band, half performance-art troupe. Reker is a dancer and guitarist from David Byrne’s band, and handles most of the performance-art aspect; Fasano was a drummer for Yeasayer. The duo’s music is melodic, emotional indie rock at its best, and the performance aspect is tightly choreographed. They’ll be playing at The Andy Warhol Museum with noise-poppy outfit Deerhoof. John Lavanga 8 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $18 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

[ACOUSTIC] + FRI., APRIL 12 He may be young, but he’s good: As a teenager, Daniel Bachman became a protégé of the late guitarist Jack Rose; today, he carries on the American-primitive tradition of his teacher and those who came before him. Bachman is on tour with mustachioed singer

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

[AVANT-GARDE] + SAT., APRIL 13

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH WEHLE}

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., APRIL 12

and guitarist Milo Jones, and the pair stops at Acoustic Music Works in Squirrel Hill tonight. Local guitar wizards Pairdown open. AM 8 p.m. 2142 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. $8 suggested donation. All ages. 412-422-0710 or www.acousticmusicworks.com

[HIP HOP] + TUE., APRIL 16

To say that 18-year-old Joey Bada$$ is a look at both the past and future of hip hop might seem like a contradiction in terms, but the talented young rapper makes it work. He and his crew, Progressive Era, have modeled themselves after ’90s masters of boom-bap rap like Nas — a fact that separates their style from rap’s other up-andcomers. Perhaps more importantly, he emulates the ’90s “keep it real” attitude in his lyrics, forgoing aggrandizing for more emotional rhymes about day-to-day struggles in the city. The whole package makes his album 1999 feel like time travel. At Altar Bar with Flatbush Zombies, The Underachievers and DJ Statik Selektah. JL 7 p.m. 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District. $16. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

OPUS ONE PRESENTS

04/20 RED WANTING BLUE 04/26 CROWDER 04/30 STEVEN WILSON (OF PORCUPINE TREE) 04/12 CHRISTOPHER MARK JONES (EARLY) 04/12 DON STRANGE & THE DOOSH BEARS, 04/13 04/18 04/19 04/19 04/24

CAROL BLAZE AND PAUL LABRISE (LATE) THEMETOOS & MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE (LATE) HOLY GHOST TENT REVIVAL MAIA SHARP WITH BILL DEASY (EARLY) GENERATIONALS SETH GLIER & LIZ LONGLEY

04/17 DELICIOUS PASTRIES, LASER BACKGROUND & SPORTS METAPHORS 04/24 DISAPPEARS

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

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ROCK/POP THU 11 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CLUB CAFE. Brown Bird, Last Good Tooth. South Side. 412-431-4950. LAVA LOUNGE. Boulevard of the Allies, These Lions, Gary Musisko. South Side. 412-431-5282. PENN BREWERY. Big Leg Emma. North Side. 412-237-9400. SMILING MOOSE. Cousin Sleaze, Sikes!, Slaves BC. South Side. 412-431-4668.

FRI 12

The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hottest Live Music Scene!

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

SHOWS K THIS WEE Thu Fri Sat Sun

4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14

Visit jergels.com/calendar for a complete list of shows & to buy tickets!

The Family Stone // Ticketed Event // 8 pm // $29/$35 Dancing Queen // 70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 80â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dance // 9 pm // $7 House of Soul // dance // 9 pm // $7 Jazz Conspiracy // jazz // 7 pm // $5

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

31ST STREET PUB. Crash Diet, The Cheats, Crucified Barbara, Snakeskyn Whiskey. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 6119 PENN AVE. Iceage. East Liberty. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Deerhoof, People Get Ready. North Side. 412-237-8300. BACKDRAFT. Alter Ego. Baldwin. 412-885-1239. BRILLOBOX. Purling Hiss, Young Man, Axis: Sova. BloomďŹ eld. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Don Strange & the Doosh Bears, Carol Blaze, Paul Labrise. South Side. 412-431-4950. HAMBONEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. The Girlie Show feat. Jenny Morgan, Deborah Heaton Brown. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Dirty Charms, Thundervest, The Bessemers. BloomďŹ eld. 412-682-0320. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Caress of Steel City. Rush tribute. 412-381-3497. Rush Tribute. South Side. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Los Amigos Invisibles. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OBEY HOUSE. Badd Newz. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PALACE THEATRE. Michael W. Smith. Greensburg. 724-836-8000. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Metro. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. SMILING MOOSE. The Supervillains OWS, Trickshot , The Shakes, Hich Compression, Bartlow Brothers Band. South Side. 412-431-4668. SUCCOP THEATER, BUTLER COMMUNITY COLLEGE. Beatlemania Magic. Beatles tribute. Butler. 724-284-8505. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Steelesque, Jumping Jack Flash. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 13

ALTAR BAR. Sevendust. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. One Night of Queen. Munhall. 412-368-5225. CIPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. G-13. Dormont. 412-668-2335. CLUB CAFE. Jeffrey Foucault, Cold Satellite, Little Otis (early). Cold Satellite CD Release Tour. TheMeToos, Masters Of The Universe, The Tilt Room (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOUSE. Trainwreck. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Baby Dee & Little Annie, Period Sex. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. FRANKIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. Lyndsey Smith & Soul Distribution, Astro Kinetic, Jess Sides, The Locals. Squirrel Hill. 412-223-7634. GOOSKIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. The Love Letters, Spazâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paul Lynde 451 Tribute, Junk Fingers. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658.

HAMBONEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. Ray Lanich Band, Highway 4. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVARD & HIGHLAND. The Red Western, Adam & Woody of Triggers. East Liberty. 412-363-7675. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Haggard Wulf, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo. BloomďŹ eld. 412-682-0320. KOPECâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. Xanopticon, Speak Onion, Redhat, Watabou, Requiem. Visuals by Cakeosaurus. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0892. MOONDOGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PENN ROD & GUN CLUB. Wicked. Penn. 412-418-9839. THE R BAR. The Dave Iglar Band. Dormont. 412-445-5279. RAMADA INN HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTER. Twisted Fate. Greensburg. 724-552-0603. ROCKYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROUTE 8. Austin Drive. Shaler. 412-487-6259. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. Daniels & McClain. Bridgeville. 412-221-1543.

MP 3 MONDAY STOSH JONJAK

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offering comes from Stosh Jonjak; stream or download â&#x20AC;&#x153;See You in the Yucatanâ&#x20AC;? for free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

ROYAL PLACE. Caress of Steel City, Tenique & These Guys. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000. SEVEN SPRINGS. The Holidays, Southside Jerry. Champion. 1-800-352-2223. SMILING MOOSE. Light Years & Safe Whats Eating Gilbert, Diamond Youth, The Here & Now (early) Carousel, Thunderfist (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Consider the Source. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 14 CLUB CAFE. Denison Witmer, Noah Gundersen. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. JBM, Brad Yoder, Emily Rodgersl. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. The Young Rapids, Young Brokaw. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. STAGE AE. STS9, Russ Liquid. North Side.

MON 15 ALTAR BAR. The Acacia Strain. Strip District. 412-263-2877. SMILING MOOSE. Xerxes. South Side. 412-431-4668.

TUE 16 222 ORMSBY. American War, cbend, Nothing Special, Sam Rockwell Machete Champion, Highwayyys. Mt. Oliver. 412-706-1643. 31ST STREET PUB. Inertia, Boxed Warning, Patricia Wake. Boxed Warning CD release. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CLUB CAFE. The Appleseed Cast, Muscle Worship, Nevada Mountains. South Side. 412-431-4950. MR. SMALLS THEATER. JJ Grey & Mofro, Sister Sparrow & the Dirty Birds. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260.

FRI 12 ALTAR BAR. DJ Shadow. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. BELVEDERE’S. Dj Zombo Sexplosion! Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Ray Lugo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

Thomas, Harley Dy$e, Pittsburgh Atomik, Statement Records, more. 24 hour event celebrating & showcasing Pittsburgh’s independent hip hop & r&b artists. Braddock.

TUE 16 6119 PENN AVE. Turquoise Jeep. East Liberty.

BLUES FRI 12 MOONDOG’S. Jill West & Blues Attack. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE WOODEN NICKEL. The Witchdoctors. Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

SAT 13

CLARION HOTEL. Shot O’ Soul. New Kensington. THE HOP HOUSE. BELVEDERE’S. Jill West & Blues Humanaut Presents Attack. Green Tree. “Out of Order”. . w w w 412-922-9560. Lawrenceville. paper ty ci h g p INN-TERMISSION 412-687-2555. .com LOUNGE. The Rhythm BRILLOBOX. Title Town Aces. South Side. Soul & Funk Party. Rare MR. MIKE’S PUB. King’s Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. Ransom. Irwin. 724-864-0444. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. RICH’S PARKSIDE DEN. Bobby 412-621-4900. Hawkins Back Alley Blues. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday McKeesport. 412-896-1966. Night Meltdown. Top 40, SEWICKLEY SONS OF ITALY. Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. Sweaty Betty. Sewickley. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. 412-741-3722. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Motown Night. w/ PghSoulDj. Classic Motown, Rare Soul, Funk. ANDYS. Joe Negri. Downtown. South Side. 412-431-5282. 412-773-8884. MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan Diego VII. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & Salsa & Latin music. Downtown. The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-980-7653. 412-642-2377. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. South Side. 412-431-2825. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Downtown. 412-392-2217. 412-481-7227. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Down412-231-7777. town. 412-773-8884. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. IMAGINATION. Henry Grimes Electro, post punk, industrial, new Trio. Garfield. 412-636-3550. wave, alternative dance. South JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAKEASY. Kinetic. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Bridgette Perdue. BELVEDERE’S. DJ T$. Downtown. 412-392-2217. Lawrenceville. 724-312-4098. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S ECLIPSE LOUNGE. DJ Zan Naz, DJ GUILD. The Brecker Brothers Band Outtareach. Lawrenceville. Reunion. North Side. 412-322-1773. 412-251-0097. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo, Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. SHALER AREA MIDDLE SCHOOL. DJ Outtareach. East Liberty. Miles Jackson Trio feat. Don Aliquo 412-363-8277. Sr., CAPA Jazz Bands, Shaler Area BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Middle School Jazz Band. 6th Jazz Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Extravaganza. Free & open to all. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. Glenshaw. 412-486-0211. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001. ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. SQUARE ONE HIP HOP 412-281-6593. COMPLEX. B. Brixx, Pheni, Landon

SAT 13

FULL LIST E N O LIN

JAZZ

CJ’S. Brother to Brother, The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Alton Merrell Quartet Jessica Lee, Mark Strickland, Roger Humphries, Chris Hemingway, Jay Willis, Dave Pellow. Jessica Lee CD release. North Side. 412-996-5736. LITTLE E’S. Ken Karsh. Downtown. 412-392-2217. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269.

WED, APR 10 • 8PM ROCK

BAND NIGHT Every Thursday!

APRIL 11 BOULEVARD OF THE ALLIES, THESE LIONS, GARY MUSISKO APRIL 18 ATLAS, THROUGH THESE WALLS, PATRON SAINT APRIL 25 THE CATASTROPE, DOOMSDAY INITIATIVE, BEFORE YOU.

SUN 14 ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Steve Davis w/ w/ Max Leake, Dwayne Dolphin, Roger Humphries, James Moore. North Side. 412-904-3335. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. Warrendale. 412-256-8234. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. UP MODERN KITCHEN. Dave Roth. Jazzed-up brunch. Shadyside. 412-688-8220.

THU 11

$1.75 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

CONTINUES ON PG. 28

GIVING TREE BAND FRI, APR 12 • 9PM ROCK/BLUES

STEELESQUE WITH JUMPING

JACK FLASH SAT, APR 13 • 9PM ROCK/JAZZ/FUSION

CONSIDER THE SOURCE MON, APR 15 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG KING TUES, APR 16 • 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES FT. BEN OPIE AND THE THOTH TRIO WED, APR 17 • 8PM AMERICANA

THE HOWLIN BROTHERS OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

SUN 14

FRI 12

WED 17 222 ORMSBY. Sean Bonnette, Ian Graham, Meridian. Mt. Oliver. ALTAR BAR. Millionaires. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BRILLOBOX. Delicious Pastries, Laser Background, Sports Metaphors. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. The Mavericks. Munhall. 412-368-5225. CLUB CAFE. HEM. South Side. 412-431-4950. ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Howlin Brothers, Height & Friends, Black Honey Rollers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

DJS

TUE 16

Experience the music from one of the most enchanting films of all times with lasers!

WED 17

DON’T MISS THESE LASER SHOWS: 1R'RXEWÝ1LUYDQDÝ6NULOOH[ %RE0DUOH\Ý3LQN)OR\G Pricing: $2 member/$8 non-member; $5 non-member add-on

SAT 13

THU 11 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. DJ Desus. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

N E W S

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 12

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^㛛½ãÊóÄFILM FACTORYò›Äã͗d«›®Ù›‘ãÊÙ͛ÝW®ã‘« April 20

11:00 AM

Point Park University, GRW Theater

Come learn about the film industry and be inspired as the top 5 writers (selected from over 250 entries) compete and pitch their short film ideas to our panels of entertainment industry professionals. The Panelists for this event will be: Chris Keyser, the president of the Writers Guild of America, West and creator or Party of Five Aaron Harberts and Gretchen Berg: Producers of Revenge and Executive Producers of Pushing Daisies * Events often sell out so reserve your tickets early! Visit :

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

TUE 16 ANDYS. Mark Strickland. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Nicholas Payton. Downtown. 412-325-6769. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. Ben Opie & the Thoth Trio. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

These tours aren’t coming to Pittsburgh — but maybe they’re worth a road trip!

WED 17 720 RECORDS. James Johnson, Paul Thompson, Cliff Barnes. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. ANDYS. Juan & Erika Vasquez. Downtown. 412-773-8884. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Daval/ Stater Guitar Duo. Sewickley. 412-427-9979.

WASHINGTON, D.C. {SAT., MAY 18}

!!!

ACOUSTIC

Black Cat

THU 11

PHILADELPHIA

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Blake & Dean. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

{TUE., JUNE 18}

The Rolling Stones Wells Fargo Center

CLEVELAND, OHIO

FRI 12

AN EVENING WITH

ANTHONY BOURDAIN

ERIC RIPERT

BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Kim Richey, Heather Kropf. Harmony. 724-452-0539. CLUB CAFE. Christopher Mark Jones. South Side. 412-431-4950. ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. OAKMONT TAVERN. Blake & Dean. Oakmont. 412-828-4155. RUNWAY RESTAURANT. Tom Panei. Butler. 724-586-6599.

CENTER. Slim Forsythe. North Hills Communtiry Outreach Annual Pasta Dinner. Millvale. 412-487-6316.

SAT 13

SAT 13

OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. Ryan Melquist. North Side. 412-237-9400.

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Agway Shoplifters. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

CLASSICAL

WED 17

THU 11

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-596-2743. PENN HILLS COFFEEHOUSE. Songwriter Showcase. Penn Hills. 412-798-2127.

{TUE., JUNE 25}

LL Cool J Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica

GREEN LIGHT SAXOPHONE QUARTET. Pittsburgh Mennonite Church, Swissvale. 412-271-2104.

FRI 12

MUSICAL JOURNEY OF BISHOP MARTINEZ COMPANON W/ CHATHAM BAROQUE. Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-621-6204. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY www. per a p ORCHESTRA. Bell Plays pghcitym o .c Bernstein feat. Joshua PENN BREWERY. The Bell, violin & Juanjo Flow Band The Flow Band. Mena, conductor. Heinz Hall, North Side. 412-237-9400 x120. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

REGGAE FRI 12

FULL LIST E N O LIN

COUNTRY THU 11

PALACE THEATRE. Branson’s Ozark Jubilee. Feat. comedian & fiddler Doofus Doolittle & entertainers performing songs by George Jones, Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, Tammy Wynette, more. Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

FRI 12 www.GoodvsEvilTour.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

MILLVALE COMMUNITY

SAT 13 BUTLER COUNTY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4, Grieg’s Suite No. 1 in G Major, more. Feat. Enrique Graf, pianist. Butler Intermediate High School, Butler. 724-283-1402. CHATHAM BAROQUE W/ TOM ZAJAC. Renaissance & Baroque. Synod Hall, Oakland. 412-361-2048. OAKLAND GIRLS CHOIR & CHAMBER LIGHT PLAYERS. Feat.

Laura Knoop Very, soprano. First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-267-7707. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Bell Plays Bernstein feat. Joshua Bell, violin & Juanjo Mena, conductor. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. THE WESTMORELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Brilliant Brahms w/ pianist Angela Cheng. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

SUN 14 THE PENNSBURY HIGH SCHOOL CONCERT CHOIR. Shadyside Presbyterian Church, Shadyside. 412-682-4300. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Bell Plays Bernstein feat. Joshua Bell, violin & Juanjo Mena, conductor. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

MON 15

BELLA HRISTOVA. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakla��� 412-621-6566. THE EBÈNE QUARTET. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 13 LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

MON 15

HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

April 10 - 16 WEDNESDAY 10 Dream of Autumn

QUANTUM THEATRE East Liberty. 412-362-1713. Tickets: quantumtheatre.com or 1-888-71-TICKETS. 8p.m. Through April 28.

THURSDAY 11 The Family Stone

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Kalob Griffin Band REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

SOUND SERIES: Deerhoof, with special guest People Get Ready ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. 8p.m.

guests Patron Saint & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Artie Lange

Consider the Source

Gabriel Iglesias: Stand-Up Revolution Tour

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

One Night of Queen: Performed by Gary Mullen & The Works

BYHAM THEATER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

DJ Shadow

THE MANOR THEATER Squirrel Hill. 412-992-5203. For more info and tickets visit jfilmpgh.org. Through April 21.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Queen Beats, Blackdaddy & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9p.m.

FRIDAY 12 Joshua Bell

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. Through April 14.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666. Tickets: trustarts.org or livenation.com. 7:30p.m.

KAUFMANN CENTER Hill District. 412-281-1026. Tickets: kaufmanncenter.com. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Xerxes, Born Low & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Snarky Puppy

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com 8p.m.

SUNDAY 14

Joey Bada$$

STS9

Sevendust

STAGE AE North Side. With special guest Russ Liquid. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 7p.m.

GABRIEL IGLESIAS

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special

SATURDAY, APRIL 13 BENEDUM CENTER

PITTSBU RG H’S L ARG EST SELECTI O N O F N EW BAL AN CE SH O ES I N SIZES AN D WI DTHS +

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ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Flatbush Zombies, The Underachievers & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

WEXFORD

10616 PERRY HWY 724-940-2400

Step into a new breed of shoe with the 1765 a premier fitness walker offering a premium ride with elite technologies, ultimate comfort and best in class support wrapped up in a fast athletic shell.

TA S T E

MONDAY 15

TUESDAY 16

SATURDAY 13

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REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com 8p.m.

The Acacia Strain

Month of Jazz - Tania Grubbs & Company

e m o S t u P ” G N I ! p e t “SIPnR S r u to Yo N E W S

An Evening of Bluegrass

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

JERGELS RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

JFilm Festival

newbalancepittsburgh.com

WATERFRONT 112 W. BRIDGE ST 412-464-1002

OAKLAND

3810 FORBES AVE 412-697-1333 newbalancepittsburgh.com

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MIND THE ART {BY AL HOFF}

42 IS PALATABLE, GOOD-HEARTED ENTERTAINMENT WITH MANY QUIETLY STIRRING MOMENTS

Trance is a glossy neo-noir from Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire) that so very badly wants to wrap you up in its spell. So much so, that like its greedy, conniving protagonists, it just doesn’t know when to stop, turning an entertaining whodunit into an exercise in watch-checking. The McGuffin is a valuable painting, stolen by an art auctioneer (James McAvoy) who then can’t remember where he hid it. The gangster (Vincent Cassel) he stole it for is angry, and the pair consults a hypnotherapist (Rosario Dawson) to look for the answer in the auctioneer’s tranced-out brain.

JACK BE

NIMBLE

Art on the brain: James McAvoy

After an intriguing start, Trance becomes a loop-de-loop of reality, memory, false memory, good old-fashioned lies and manipulative bed-hopping. The point of view shifts between the three protagonists, but none is a reliable narrator. And there are simply too many “shocking” reveals (and too many delivered as monologues), rendering our experience increasingly distant. We must dutifully wait for Boyle to flip over his final card in order to effectively process what we’ve seen. There is pleasure to be had when such sleight-of-hand is done well, but here the dealer is noisily overplaying. Trance isn’t as nearly as trippy or action-oriented as the trailer suggests, but it still relies heavily on “indie flash” — colored lights, thumping soundtrack and swooshing fast-forwards and flashbacks — not to mention trying our patience with its game-playing. y g Starts Fri.,, April p 12. AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM AHOFF@PGHCITYPAP ER.COM

As long as spooky moviess get endless sequels, equels, it’s only fair ir that the follow-up p mockery continues ues as well.

Scary Movie 5 takes on n the recent batch off demon-inmy-house ouse films — all the groaner roaner jokes you love, ve, plus Charlie Sheen heen and Snoop oop Dogg. gg. Starts Fri., April 12

Batter up: Jackie Robinson (Chadwick Boseman)

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

W

ILL SOMEONE please explain to me how racism works? How do you look a man in the face and tell him that he’s less than you? That he can’t do what he’s good at because he’d have to do it alongside white people? That he can’t even use the urinal next to the one you’re using? Jackie Robinson was good at playing baseball. He was better than some and not as good as others, and he was black while some of the ones he was better than were white. Nonetheless, he had to play in a special league just for people like him. And the white people who played in their own special league still thought they were the best at what they did. It’s that simple, and so were — so are — the people who still think like this. The story that writer/director Brian Helgeland tells in 42 — about how Robinson (Chadwick Boseman) and Brooklyn Dodgers executive Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford) integrated Major League baseball in 1947

— almost seems like science fiction today. But it isn’t an allegory or a metaphor. 42 is exactly what I expected it to be: a palatable, good-hearted entertainment, with many quietly stirring moments along with a share of sappy ones. Everything small and intimate in 42 works well, including the coolly charismatic Boseman and, in a surprisingly

42 DIRECTED BY: Brian Helgeland STARRING: Chadwick Boseman, Harrison Ford Starts Fri., April 12.

CP APPROVED enjoyable character performance, the usually listless Ford. It’s unfortunate that most of the movie’s racists are caricatures because that doesn’t help us understand them very much. But again, it’s what I expected. Helgeland’s speechified dialogue

is sometimes trite but usually very thoughtful. Robinson learns that a white man can get angry at an insult, but a black man has to behave like a “gentleman” or they’ll blame him for the provocation. So he swallows a lot of pride, and eventually, he realizes that he’s taking these insults for the tens of millions of African Americans who will benefit from his breakthrough. Much of 42 counts on two modes of attachment: our disgust at the sound of racism, and our affection for the iconography (i.e., clichés) of baseball and baseball movies. How could America’s pastime ever have been so un-American? When an old white man sings the National Anthem before Robinson’s first Major League game, Helgeland slowly moves in on Robinson’s face. He’s fighting back tears, but we don’t know whether it’s because he’s moved by a song about the land of the free, or because America, despite its self-image, still wasn’t. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NEW GINGER & ROSA. This coming-of-age story from Sally Potter is set in early-1960s Britain, against the backdrop of nuclear-weapons proliferation. At home, 16-year-old Ginger (Elle Fanning) endures her squabbling parents: Dad (Alessandro Nivola) is a “free-thinker” (code, really, for selfish and neglectful) and mum (Christina Hendricks) is unhappily suspended between domesticity and desiring something more. Ginger finds distraction in roaming around the countryside with her best pal, Rosa (Alice Englert), and joining the burgeoning Ban the Bomb campaign. But Ginger’s anxiety about the bombs she fears will destroy her are misplaced — it’s the personal, not the political, that will rock her world. Despite its geopolitical trappings, Potter’s film is a small-scale affair, reflecting the oftenpainful transition into adulthood. The film nicely captures the easy, slightly frantic looseness of being The Place a teen-age girl intoxicated Beyond by a youth shared with the Pines a best friend. But it’s not so surefooted when the betrayals come, where the more experiential nature of the first half gives way to something more melodramatic. The film’s final third finds Potter both overreaching (conflating abstract events into the domestic) and skimping (reaching a conclusion that doesn’t feel wholly earned). Not in doubt is Fanning’s fine performance: She’s been working since she was a toddler, but this is really her breakout role. Starts Fri., April 12. Regent Square (Al Hoff) JFILM. Formerly known as the Pittsburgh Jewish-Israeli Film Festival, JFilm opens its 20th season. Eighteen films — from dramas and comedies to documentaries, all rooted in the Jewish experience — screen at various venues through Sun., April 21. Some individual films are reviewed below. 412-992-5203 or www. JFilmPgh.org for complete schedule.

My Brother the Devil MY BROTHER THE DEVIL. Writerdirector Sally El Hosaini’s debut comingof-age drama is set in the gritty London neighborhood of Hackney; the landscape is dominated by public housing and the streets

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Ginger & Rosa teem with working-class immigrants and their oftenrestless offspring. Among them, two Arab brothers: Rashid (James Floyd), a low-level but charismatic hood, and his adoring, teenage brother Mo (Fady Elsayed). But as Mo pines for the excitement of street life, Rashid seeks to get out, especially after befriending a man from outside his gang. In time, each brother feels betrayed by the other, and any resolution is further compromised by the ongoing cultural confusion of what it means to be an Arab man in contemporary Britain. The plot is a bit shaggy (and some of the mumbled slang hard to decipher), but the two young actors, particularly Floyd, ably carry this material that occasionally threatens to tumble into movie-of-theweek melodrama. Starts Fri., April 12. Harris (AH) THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES. Derek Cianfrance’s (Blue Valentine) drama about fathers and sons, and the choices that relationship inspires (or demands) is told in three interconnected tales. In the first, Ryan Gosling portrays an itinerant stunt motorcyclist who, after discovering he’s fathered a child, decides to stick around Schenectady, N.Y., and be a dad. Drawing support from a weirdo mechanic father figure, he takes to robbing banks to provide cash. On the other side of town, a young, ambitious cop (Bradley Cooper) discovers that the ugly reality of his job creates distance between himself, his young son and the older cops who mentor him. The third act plays out in the future, as the two now-teen-age sons of the cop and the robber collide with the messy history left unfinished by their dads. At times, the work has an agreeable sprawl, particularly in the motorcyclist’s story, where the dead air surrounding his life feels palpable, and is countered only by daredevil behavior, vividly captured in a few verve-filled action pieces. But as Pines goes on, it grows more bloated and even hokey; too many plot points feel convenient to the larger thematic arc rather than organic. Gosling’s story is the most interesting — and he’s an old hand at delivering that wounded-and-dangerous-but-stillcharismatic thing. Cooper simply doesn’t have the acting chops to convey the cop’s emotional struggles, and by the third tale, the two teens are barely more than TV-movie cut-outs, playacting predictable turmoil. Starts Fri., April 12. (AH) COLOR. I loved Shane Carruth’s CP UPSTREAM previous film, the low-budget time-travel morality play Primer (2002), which defiantly teetered between logic and head-scratching because that tension was part of the experience. After nine years, Carruth delivers his second film, which is even more CONTINUES ON PG. 32

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“SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE” AND “127 HOURS”

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ambitious and more obtuse. I’m not kidding when I say it involves identity theft, strange flowers, worms, Walden, sound engineering and the souls of kidnapped humans transplanted into pigs. Some of it makes sense over the course of the film, and some of it seems to exist simply for the viewer to experience, or to reflect on later, or to be intentionally discomfited by. Because one clearly discernible theme of Carruth’s film involves asking what happens when an individual is removed from his or her deepest moorings — including identity and emotions. What passes for plot follows two people — a woman (Amy Seimetz) and a man (Carruth) — who have undergone the human-to-pig transfer, and have seemingly been reduced to empty husks. But they find each other, recognize similar distress, and begin a slow process of rebuilding and reclaiming their selves. Or perhaps newer, hybridized forms of self, as the film also seems interested in bio-engineering or cyclical mutations. This isn’t an easy to film to categorize: It’s got aspects of sci-fi, romantic drama and nonnarrative mood piece. And plenty of people will just be annoyed and frustrated by its lack of story, slow pace and assorted trippiness. Even I’m not sure exactly why I liked it, but I found it compelling to watch and have enjoyed mulling it over since. Fri., April 12, through Mon., April 15. Melwood (AH)

REPERTORY FACES OF MEDIA. Carnegie Mellon’s annual International Film Festival runs through April 13. This year’s theme is Faces of Media. From Nikolaus Geyrhalter (Our Daily Bread) comes the essay Abendland, about life after dark in various European cities (5 p.m. Wed., April 10). The Punk Syndrome is a doc about a Finnish punk band whose members are mentally challenged (7 p.m. Thu., April 11). Back to the Square catches up with how life has

LILIES OF THE FIELD. Sidney Poitier stars in this heartwarming film about a handyman who helps a group of nuns build a chapel. Ralph Nelson directs this 1963 film, for which Poitier won the Best Actor Oscar. Screens as this month’s Cine-Brunch. 11 a.m. Sat., April 13. (Brunch at 10 a.m.) Oaks. $6 (film only); $12 (film and brunch) AKA DOC POMUS. Peter Miller and Will Hechter’s bio-doc looks at the life and career of prolific songwriter Doc Pomus, born Jerome Felder, in Brooklyn. Pomus, who was crippled by polio, turned his joys and frustrations into some of R&B and 1950s pop’s biggest hits (“Save the Last Dance for Me, “This Magic Moment,” “Teenager in Love”). Friends, family and performers reminisce, sharing great (if possibly apocryphal, but who cares) stories from the less-illuminated songwriting corner of popular music. A must for anyone who’s ever shed tears playing a 45. 7 p.m. Sat., April 13. Manor (AH)

Upstream Color — and hasn’t — changed for young participants in the Tahrir Square demonstrations (7 p.m. Sat., April 13). Films are in English or various languages, with subtitles. McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland. For complete schedule, see www.cmu.edu/ faces. $8 ($5 students/seniors) YOU’VE BEEN TRUMPED. Anthony Baxter’s documentary follows several years of struggle in Aberdeen, Scotland, as a handful of farmers and other country folk fight to keep Donald Trump from building a luxury golf resort immediately adjacent to their homes. And the proposed resort’s impact goes beyond a few property-owners: The land in question is a pristine wild coastal dune, among the last remaining such eco-systems in Great Britain. It’s a David-vs.-Goliath battle: Both sides are stubborn and media-savvy, but Trump’s side clearly has the influence of money and political connections. Screens as part of CMU’s Faces of Media festival. 7 p.m. Wed., April 10. McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland. www.cmu.edu/faces. $8 ($5 students/seniors) (AH)

Bell. To be followed by a Q&A with Bell himself. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 11 a.m. Fri., April 12. Rodef Shalom Congregation, 4905 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $10. 412-992-5203 or www. JFilmPgh.org (AH) THE BALLAD OF GENESIS AND LADY JAYE. Marie Losier’s bio-doc of longtime avant-rocker and provocateur Genesis Breyer P-Orridge is sort of haphazardly put together, and relies mostly on the intrigue of its subject. There’s music and art, of course, but the focus is on the recent quest of Genesis and his late wife, Lady Jaye, toward “pandrogyne,” in which the pair underwent surgery to achieve a shared third gender. Screens as part of CMU’s Faces of Media festival. 7 p.m. Fri., April 12. McConomy Auditorium, CMU campus, Oakland. www.cmu.edu/faces. $8 ($5 students/seniors) (AH)

THE HUMAN CARGO. In August 1991, some 20,000 Albanians swarmed a cargo ship and forced the captain to sail to Bari, Italy, where they hoped to find a new life. But upon arrival, these castaways — men, women and children — were trapped in a chaotic and desperate situation, imprisoned at the dock and a sports stadium, pending inevitable repatriation. Daniele Vicari’s documentary recounts this event, interviewing Albanians and Italians, and stitching together archival footage. The scale and intensity of this single mass immigration rivals any seen, and the disastrous response to it seems more like a harbinger of the future rather than an isolated incident from the past. Screens as part of a festival of recent Italian films, presented by the University of Pittsburgh. In Italian, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., April 18. Alumni Hall, University of Pittsburgh campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org/pittsburgh (AH)

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PARIS-MANHATTAN. An attractive Paris pharmacist gives up on the dating scene, preferring to seek comfort in Woody Allen films. Until she meets a mildly grumpy security-system installer who hasn’t seen any of Allen’s films. Things take an amusing, if predictable, turn in Sophie Lellouche’s low-key rom-com that offers a winning performance from lead actress Alice Taglioni and one notable surprise. The film opens the JFilm festival. In French, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., April 11. Manor. $50 in advance by April 5 or $75 at door; includes openingnight reception with food, drinks and music. Also, 5:45 p.m. Thu., April 18. Manor. $10 (AH)

THE RETURN OF THE VIOLIN. Haim Hecht’s documentary relates a fascinating tale of mostly Polish Jewish classical musicians, connected across time and continents by a love of music, resistance to the Nazis, the formation of the Israeli Philharmonic by Bronislaw Huberman and one well-known Stradivarius — now owned by famed violinist Joshua

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MY AUSTRALIA. In the 1960s, 10-year-old Tadek and his older teen-age brother, who amuse themselves in an anti-Semitic gang, get an abrupt awakening. Their single mom is moving them from Poland to Israel (not Australia, as promised), and they’re Jewish, and they’ll be living on a kibbutz. Ami Drozd’s coming-of-age story focuses mostly on the feisty Tadek, who takes to his new life with measured enthusiasm. In Polish and Hebrew, with subtitles. 1 p.m. Sun., April 14. Manor. $10. 412-9925203 or www.JFilmPgh.org (AH) THE KILLERS. Burt Lancaster and Ava Gardner star in Robert Siodmak’s broody, dramatically shot crime pic, adapted from Ernest Hemingway short story, about a double-crossing hoodlum waiting for his killers. The 1946 film continues a month-long, Sundaynight series of classic film noir on 35 mm. 8 p.m. Sun., April 14. Regent Square

ONE DAY MORE. A ladies man finally meets a woman he wants to pursue, but she’s set to move to New York. Massimo Venier directs this romantic comedy, which screens as part of a festival of recent Italian films, presented by the University of Pittsburgh. 7 p.m. Thu., April 11. Frick Fine Arts, Pitt campus, Oakland. Free. www.italianfilmfests.org/ pittsburgh

DARK OF WINTER. In writer-director David C. Snyder’s new horror thriller, an assassin is bedeviled by otherworldly events during a job. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 11. Hollywood. $5

OUT IN THE DARK. In Michael Mayer’s drama, two young gay men meet in a Tel Aviv nightclub, but their burgeoning relationship has many obstacles. One is from a well-connected Jewish family, the other a Palestinian student from Ramallah, whose brother is in an armed resistance group. When the relationship becomes public, things quickly go from good to bad to very bad. In Arabic and Hebrew, with subtitles. 9 p.m. Sat., April 13, and 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 18. Manor. $10. 412-992-5203 or www. JFilmPgh.org (AH)

The Return of the Violin ANIMAL HOUSE. Toga! Toga! Toga! Party like it’s 1962, as the brothers of Delta House unleash alcohol-fueled academic mayhem. John Landis directs this 1978 National Lampoon comedy starring John Belushi as everybody’s favorite college cut-up, Bluto. Midnight, Sat., April 13. Manor

WE ARE ALIVE! THE FIGHT TO SAVE BRADDOCK HOSPITAL. Tony Buba’s latest film, a documentary shot with Tom Dubensky, tells the story of UPMC’s 2009 decision to close Braddock Hospital, the fight to save it and its ultimate destruction. One of many chapters in this country’s ongoing struggle to balance health care, profits and people. The film opens the Battle of Homestead Foundation’s monthly film screening, featuring works related to labor and economic issues. 7:30 p.m. Thu., April 18. Pump House, Homestead. Free. 412-831-3871

[BOOK]

I WAS PUNCHED A GOOD 100 TIMES BEFORE I FINALLY WALKED AWAY

ROUGH ROADS The final program in the August Wilson Center’s series “Great Collaborations: The Alliance Between Blacks and Jews in the Twentieth Century” is the August Wilson Center Dance Ensemble’s Paving the Road of Survival. It features two moving works inspired by dark chapters in the human experience. The first, Christopher Huggins’ gripping, Holocaust-themed “The List,” was premiered by Dance Alloy Theater in 2010. The 20-minute work for four dancers, inspired by Steven Spielberg’s 1993 film Schindler’s List, is set to music from the film’s soundtrack. “The List” chronicles a Jewish family’s ordeal, from eviction from their home in Krakow to their deaths in a Nazi gas chamber. “The piece is daunting physically and emotionally,” says AWCDE dancer Annalee Traylor, who portrays the eldest of the family’s two daughters. “There’s a lot of collapsing to the floor and we get pretty bruised and battered. Emotionally there is a progression throughout in the realization that you are going to die.” This will be the last mainstage production for the company for Traylor, an AWCDE founding member. She is preparing to journey to another stop on the Jews’ road to survival, moving to Israel to apprentice with Kibbutz Contemporary Dance Company. The program’s second half, choreographer Kevin Iega Jeff’s “Dedication” (1982), was inspired in part by another tragedy: 1979-81’s “Atlanta Child Murders,” in which 28 African-American children, adolescents and adults were killed. The 18-minute modern-dance work will take viewers on a spiritual journey. It was also influenced by a trip the then-22-year-old Jeff made to Africa, and by his work with mentor Lee Aca Thompson. “The dance metaphorically makes a connection to ancient African civilization,” says Jeff by phone from his Deeply Rooted Dance Theater studios, in Chicago. The first of three sections in the work, “Oluwa,” is set to music by Quincy Jones from the TV miniseries Roots. Jeff describes it as “a duet about an ancestral elder passing on a legacy of life to a child of the new world.” The final two sections, set to music by Claus Ogerman and Patti Austin, respectively, are about the child passing on that legacy to his peers and their celebration of that knowledge. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AUGUST WILSON CENTER DANCE ENSEMBLE performs PAVING THE ROAD OF SURVIVAL 8 p.m. Fri., April 12, and 8 p.m. Sat., April 13. August Wilson Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $1530. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org N E W S

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August Wilson Center Dance Ensemble dancers {PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

{BY STEVE SUCATO}

[ART REVIEW]

LITTLE BULLIES {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY MICHELLE FRIED}

Aloof: “ We Are Not You,” by Sonja Sweterlitsch

L

OCAL CURATOR Jill Larson invited 10

women from around the country to create art about girl bullying. The resulting exhibition, Mean Girls, at Space Gallery, includes works in various media from painting and drawing to video and performance, all meant to cultivate discussion and build awareness about bullying among young American women. Having once been a girl, I know how mean they can be. Cruelty, manipulation, backstabbing, physical and mental abuse … and that was before lunch period. I try to look back in humor, but make no mistake: Girls can be twisted. And if seeing this often-downplayed side of girls expressed as art was an intriguing prospect, I still felt I had to keep my guard up. Sonja Sweterlitsch’s “We Are Not You” features three life-sized paintings of blonde ladies in white gowns. Reminiscent of classical portraiture, the figures are heroically posed and back-dropped in lush, textured gold. Their expressions and posturing are neither confrontational nor chaste, but aloof. In the context of Mean Girls theme, I feel irritated, not awed, by the ease with

ture a tenderly crafted identity. Triangularly arranged with their backs to each other, they seem to guard the space between them, while simultaneously exposing their “guts.” Too sentimental to be aggressive, these bodies instead become sources of both sacredness and defense; they are protective and protecting. In “Do the Left/Right Thing,” a twoMEAN GIRLS continues through April 28. Space channel video, Jenn Gooch delivers a vicGallery, 812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. torious counterblow. On the left, dressed 412-325-7723 or www.spacepgh.org as pro boxer wearing headphones, Gooch punches the viewer head-on while whimSimilarly, Julia Cannon’s untitled grid pering, inaudibly through a frothy mouthof 24 drawings of pretty faces suggests guard, lyrics from Public Enemy’s “Fight that Cannon has a quiet obsession with the Power.” On the right: a re-enactment of the opening to Spike Lee’s Do the Right beauty. Each belabored pout and delThing (1989) featuring dancing Fly icate doe-eyed look is a meditation MORES Girl Rosie Perez. Gooch sardoniof remuddled “perfection.” To O T PHO E cally captures Perez with clumsy Sweterlitsch and Cannon, ideIN ONL w. but unrelenting accuracy. I laugh alism and beauty become their at ww per pa pghcitym at her as bullying thoughts comnemesis, a figurative bully. .co pulsively, if momentarily, control Vanessa German evokes quite my mind. Gooch slyly transforms a contrast with her three foundher viewers into bullies. But I get hypobject statuettes. African masks are surrounded by meticulously arranged natural notized. Her self-awareness starts to make and man-made objects, giving each sculp- way for genuine effort. With each pelvic which my eyes trace down their long bodies, admiring their airy purity. The paintings are positioned against the gallery’s backmost wall: They anchor the entire show, lending them an off-putting authority. The gallery’s own “mean girls,” I presume?

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The Former Park Schenley Restaurant at The Royal York, in Oakland 3955 Bigelow Blvd.

JON Fosse SARAH Cameron Sunde by directed and translated by

thrust, each “Roger Rabbit” attempted in her primary-color bodysuit, she gets better, stronger, funnier. I was punched a good 100 times before I finally walked away. Traci Molloy’s photo diptych “Bullycide: Girls” and “Bullycide: Boys” functions like a memorial to those who have committed suicide as a result of bullying. The two large ghost-like faces are a composite of the victims’ portraits forming indeterminate identities, one male, the other female. The intended anonymity creates a dramatic confrontation that is further intensified by how the name and age of each victim is physically cut away — subtracted — from the portrait. It’s painful to see the ages, one as young as 9.

For directions, dining options, special events, and tickets visit quantumtheatre.com To order by phone, call at 1.888.718.4253 Jen Gooch’s “Do the Left/Right Thing”

Other Mean Girls artists include Alison Stehlik, Andrea Sherrill Evans, Barbara Schreiber, Marian Barber and Randie Snow. The exhibition’s interactive sculpture (untitled and uncredited) invites us to share our own bully stories. On two six-foot-tall cutouts in the shape of the universal “girl” symbol, we are asked to write our experiences in Sharpie: the bullied on one form, the bullies on the other. I would think most visitors would write on both. After contributing my stories, I step back to read of my past crimes and victimhood and those of others. One statement reads simply: “Bullies are bullied too.” This confession reveals something important: Mean Girls places most, if not all, of its focus on victimhood. Since bullying is commonly about power, aggression and pain, I wonder what the art of a bully would tell us. Art is capable of ripping apart sanitized, newsbite-worthy stereotypes to expose how ugliness, like bullying, is constructed and perpetuated. Mean Girls definitely takes us in the right direction by showing how some women experience bullying while calling attention to the issue. Although virtuous and pensive, Mean Girls is too shy about taking us down the dark alley that can rattle us into passionate discord. On the other hand, perhaps I came ready to fight when I should have come prepared to listen. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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[COMEDY]

RAW LAUGHS {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

“I come out on stage and still talk about the fuck-ups”: Artie Lange

Through April

A lot has happened to comedian Artie Lange since he last performed here, in 2008. Then, he was co-host of the Howard Stern Radio Show, an actor and comedian whose nights and weekends were spent packing theaters. “I left the Stern show in a way that I would not suggest anybody leave a job,” says Lange with a short chuckle. “I just went through a living hell that included stays in psych wards and rehabs, and it took me a yearand-a-half to get back into the game. “I was doing so much heroin that it had to stop. It had to come to a head.“ It did so in January 2010, when Lange stabbed himself nine times in the stomach with a kitchen knife. But 18 months later, he was back on the radio doing a sportsbased talk show. (Lange says it’s about all guy stuff.) It airs 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. on DIRECTV, SiriusXM Satellite radio and via live stream at artielangeshow.com. He’s also back touring the country with his brand of raw standup. Despite a few slips with alcohol, “I am clean now, I have to be,” he says seriously. “With heroin, it’s a life-or-death situation.” For as often as Lange, 45, has screwed up, his fans and show business have always welcomed him back — to even his surprise. “The gigs are still there and the crowds are still great,” he says. “I’m very blessed to have been able to come back a few times, but who knows if I keep tempting fate.” Lange’s comedy has always come from his life — the good and the bad. It’s all part of who he is, and fans can expect him to talk about it honestly and openly. That is, after all, where the best comedy comes from. “I come out on stage and still talk about the fuck-ups,” says Lange. “Richard Pryor could always take these tragedies and turn it into great comedy, but he never got out of the woods and it was sad. “Hopefully I can have best of both worlds where I can stay clean completely but make the kind of comedy that only comes from a guy who has fucked up big. Hopefully I can get the last laugh instead of letting those tragedies get the last laugh over me.” CDEITCH@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ARTIE LANGE 8 p.m. Sat. April 13. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $42.50-62.50. 412-456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

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UPCOMING 7 4 4 R E B E C C A A V E N U E WORKSHOP:

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221 BUILDING INTERIOR WALLS

SATURDAY, APRIL 13 • 10-11:30am

If you are adding some walls in the basement or re-thinking a space, visit us as Stephen Shelton of Shelton Masonry + Contracting will cover things you need to know about building interior walls. This workshop is FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

412-471-5808

WINNER! BEST MUSICAL REVIVAL 2011 TONY AWARD® {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

[PLAY REVIEWS]

GRAVE MATTERS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} THERE’S A CLICHÉ that one’s life passes before one’s eyes before death. That’s only the slimmest description of Quantum Theatre’s Dream of Autumn. The production is the world premiere of Sarah Cameron Sunde’s translation of a 1999 play by Norway’s Jon Fosse — a play that looks at love and death in a landscape (dreamscape?) floating freely in time and space.

DREAM OF AUTUMN continues through April 28. Quantum Theatre at the former Park Schenley Restaurant, 3955 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. $18-48. 888-718-4253 or www.quantumtheatre.com

The life is that of a nameless Man, lost in his life and in his relationships with his equally nameless Woman, Mother and Father. Never fear: Somebody with a name comes along eventually — not that it matters — and chronological details are collected, if not added up. (The parents’ costumes could be from the 19th century, the others’ from a modern mall, and none of the attire seems particularly appropriate.) OK, a European — nay, Scandinavian — depiction of people stalking through death/dream is a class of cliché by itself. But Autumn has humor and even warmth to fight the coldness of Life. Martin Giles imparts a perplexed sensibility to the everyman totally clueless about the women

in his life, and detached from the men. Karla Boos plays and poses as his seductress, saying far more in body language than in dialogue. Laurie Klatscher and Gregory Lehane (a real-life married couple) bring comic relief and pathos as the parents. Jennifer Tober provides a shadowy presence and some backstory as Gry, the Man’s first wife and child bride. Quantum’s vast setting, in Oakland’s former Park Schenley Restaurant, almost but not quite swallows the cast, directed in near-choreography by Sunde. Scene/costume designer Narelle Sissons has added remnants of antique furniture and paint to the exposed rebar and dust of a once-posh restaurant, creating a monochromatic conception of a cemetery. Or at least that’s where the characters think they are, only occasionally waking up to the raging improbability of it all. Joe Pino’s sound and C. Todd Brown’s lighting assist both the illusion and the audience’s attention. The haunting visuals tell a story sometimes at odds with the words. The truth may be somewhere in between.

ILLUSTRATION BY ROBERT RODRIGUEZ

Karla Boos in Quantum’s Dream of Autumn

Directed and Choreographed by

Starring

RACHEL YORK

I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

GIRL TALK

KATHLEEN MARSHALL "PURE

"A DELUXE CANDY BOX OF

MAGIC!"

COLE PORTER'S

BEST SONGS"

{BY TED HOOVER} SOMEWHERE IN the middle of Elaine Murphy’s Little Gem — now at City Theatre — I was startled to realize that, in a lifetime as a professional audience member, this was the first play I’d ever seen by an Irish woman. I’m not sure what, if anything, that means. But after several thousand CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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evenings lost in innumerable theaters, it’s a remarkable factoid. Little Gem is three interwoven monologues from members of the same Dublin family: grandmother Kay, mother Lorraine and daughter Amber. Over the course of the story, they will see some old relationships transform and new ones begin. The danger of plays written as monologues is that, with all that recollecting of past events, they can feel removed and already resolved. But Murphy cleverly has the women discovering the events as they’re happening: All the verbs are in the present tense. It may seem like a small thing, but it helps tremendously.

LITTLE GEM

by Tadeusz Slobodzianek In an English version by Ryan Craig Directed by Aoife Spillane-Hinks A Pittsburgh Premiere! April 10–May 4, 2013 Henry Heymann Theatre in the Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland

Tickets at picttheatre.org or call 412.561.6000 x207

T H E A T R E

Professional Theatre in Residence at the University of Pittsburgh

PR ODUC TION SPONSOR

Richard E. Rauh

Photo provided by Philip Howard.

continues through May 5. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $22-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

There is a streak of easy sentimentality running through Murphy’s writing, especially in the second act. But judging from the audience, my reaction might be based more on my own bitchiness than Murphy’s talents. Director Kimberly Senior nearly trips herself up before the show even starts. The quaintness of the Lucky Charms preshow music coupled with Jack Magaw’s frowsy, antiques-store-like set suggests an entirely different play than the one about to begin. But once Senior gets underway, she proves incapable of further missteps. Little Gem is a sincere, unadorned tale, and Senior gets authentic and moving performances from her cast. Cary Anne Spear’s turn as the grandmother is as entertaining as it is because Spear makes us understand that Kay has no idea how funny she can be. Hayley Nielsen plays Amber as a frightened young girl whose false bravado (bravada?) leads her into a too-adult situation. The role of Lorraine, it must be said, is like something you’d see in an Oprah network TV movie. But after Robin Walsh gets done electrifying it with so much emotionally shattering life, you’d swear you’re watching a documentary. When all’s said and done, Little Gem is a highly engaging opportunity to hear women narrating their own lives. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

UNSAFE WORDS {BY MICHELLE PILECKI} ALAS, NOTHING is so taxingly certain as man’s inhumanity to man, and it’s dif-

ficult to get such tales to grab and hold the public’s attention. The University of Pittsburgh Repertory Theatre’s ambitious City of Asylum aims at hearts, minds and all the senses with a multimedia “stage performance,” so labeled by Cynthia Croot, theater-faculty member. She conceived and directed the chapters of this one-act, which shares snapshots of the lives and works of four writers who defied death and dictators in their home countries before finding shelter with the titular Pittsburgh nonprofit. With an amazingly talented undergraduate cast and a highly imaginative design team, Croot creates an absorbing and often entertaining experience. Asylum presents the quartet in reverse chronological order, ending with possibly the greatest poet to be hosted by City of Asylum/Pittsburgh, and certainly the most heartening figure in this production. Huang Xiang (a cheerfully convincing Weiqi Li), a post-revolutionary giant in China, is perhaps best known to English-speaking locals for his “House Poem,” the glorious façade of his former home on Sampsonia Way. After a stigmatized childhood and long life of hardships, Xiang has triumphed with poetry of ethereal beauty.

CITY OF ASYLUM continues through Sun., April 14. University of Pittsburgh Repertory Theatre in the Charity Randall Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland. $12-25. 412-624-7529 or www.play.pitt.edu

Two young actors step into the spotlight for El Salvadoran author/essayist Horacio Castellanos Moya: Connor Shioshita Pickett as the self-aware writer and Kyle Mark Ryan as his outrageously funny literary creation. Similarly, Melissa Italiano and Chelsea Faber create Burma’s Khet Mar as the happy child in the countryside and the intellectual rebel tortured for her political activism and writing. Lucy Clabby, a remarkably poised freshman, starts the narrative with the story of current writer-in-residence, Israel Centeno of Venezuela. Croot and her directing team (grad students Vivian Appler and Ric Walker, undergrad Julie Anne Evans) mix biographical snippets with excerpts from novels, poems, etc. Julie Ray creates a versatile set with a few pieces of stage furniture and the evocative lighting design of Annmarie Duggan. Andrew Sours’ sound design and stage manager Kait Samuels complete the theatrical picture. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

PIT TSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTR A

A CONCERT OF THOUSANDS

PR E SEN TED BY TR IB TOTA L MEDI A

4.20.13 AT 7:30 PM

University of Pittsburgh Petersen Events Center

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will open the Music for the Spirit Festival in grand fashion with “Singing City,” a large-scale, historic concert event. “Singing City” marks a cultural milestone for the city of Pittsburgh and will feature Music Director Manfred Honeck and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in performance with a choir of thousands from Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. Repertoire will include selections from Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, Verdi’s Requiem, and Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man. Other highlights include a world premiere, an audience singalong and the inaugural Festival address by Cardinal Donald Wuerl.

ADULTS - $20 STUDENTS - $10 CHILDREN UNDER 12 - $5

FOR TICKETS, CALL 800-745-3000 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG/SINGINGCITY N E W S

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FOR THE WEEK OF

04.1104.18.13

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LYDIA WHITE}

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

APRIL 13 Embracing the Accidental

{MUSIC}

Rami Shamir

+ THU., APRIL 11 {STAGE} Greed, lust, deceit, forgery, gossip, assumed identities — just a day’s work for the 18th-century London aristocracy. But that Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s classic The School for Scandal is a comedy there can be no doubt; not with character names like Lady Sneerwell, Sir Benjamin Backbite, Mrs. Candour and, not least, Lady Teazle. Another name associated with Point Park University’s Conservatory Theatre Co.’s new production is the show’s director, Alan Stanford, recently named interim artistic director of Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Continues through April 21. Pittsburgh Playhouse, 222 Craft Ave., Oakland. Preview: $12 (other shows: $18-20; April 13 show is pay-what-you-will). 412-392-8000 or www. pittsbughplayhouse.com

+ FRI., APRIL 12 {WORDS} Tonight, Chatham University hosts two Ugandan women, Joan Ahimbisibweand and Teddy Namuyiga, who will tell of their experience with the nonprofit organization

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nationally recognized retailers. Saturday’s activities include the museum-wide Pittsburgh Vintage Mixer vendor fair (for fashion, housewares, artwork, etc.) and an appearance from Get Smart star (and Pittsburgh native) Barbara Feldon. The weekend’s activities are in conjunction with the museum’s 1968: The Year That Rocked America exhibit. JI 7 p.m. ($30). Mixer: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., April 13 (free with regular museum admission.) 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. www.heinzhistorycenter.org

BeadforLife. BeadforLife: Eradicating Poverty One Bead at a Time features the women discussing how the organization has helped impoverished women in Uganda by organizing global markets for recycled paper jewelry and shea products. The free event is part of BeadforLife’s six-city Opportunity Tour. Jeff Ihaza

Joshua Bell is among classical music’s biggest stars. He’s a local favorite, too, and returns tonight to perform Leonard Bernstein’s “Serenade” with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Bell recently became the first American to be appointed music director of Great Britain’s venerable Academy of St. Martin in the Fields. Another star on tonight’s program is Spanish maestro Juanjo Mena, on one of his frequent U.S. tours and making his Pittsburgh

APRIL 15 Anne FFadiman An adi diman an

2 p.m. Chatham campus, Shadyside. Free. 412-365-1139 or www.chatham.edu

{FASHION} Out with the new and in with the old is the idea behind Vintage Pittsburgh, a celebration of ’60s culture this weekend at the Heinz History Center. The event starts with today’s ’60s Fashion Show, showcasing a “Mad Men” style aesthetic and both local and

debut. Mena leads the PSO in Composer of the Year Mason Bates’ “Desert Transport” and Brahms’ Third Symphony. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., April 13, and 2:30 p.m. Sun., April 14. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-93. 412-392-490 or www.pittsburghsymphony.org

{PUPPETS} The man known as Ishi was a Yahi Indian who, though

{PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHELLE BELAN}

sp otlight On July 10, 1941, half the inhabitants of the Nazi-occupied Polish town of Jedwabne were massacred by their neighbors. Most of the dead were burned alive in a barn, and all of them were Jews; the killers were Catholics. Jan Gross’s 2000 book about the atrocity, Neighbors, drew challenges to its accuracy. It also partly inspired Tadeusz Slobodzianek’s play Our Class. Our Class (English translation by Ryan Craig) debuts locally at Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. The season-opener is PICT’s first without co-founder and artistic director Andrew Paul, who was abruptly fired last month. The play follows 10 classmates for eight decades, starting in 1925, when they are children singing songs and pondering their futures. “It’s really about what neighbors do to neighbors … in the face of extreme desperation and fear,” says the U.S. born, Ireland-based director, Aoife Spillane-Hinks. The show features a cast of 10 (playing five Jews and five Catholics) and live klezmer music by clarinetist Susanne Ortner-Roberts. On closing weekend, author Gross will visit for a talkback and panel discussion. But Spillane-Hinks emphasizes that the play is fiction, and that it actually addresses the issue of multiple perspectives. “It’s the deepest stuff of our own lives: Who gets to tell our story?” Bill O’Driscoll Thu., April 11-May 4. Stephen Foster Memorial, Forbes Avenue at Bigelow, Oakland. $25-48. 412-561-6000 or www.picttheatre.org

APRIL 12 BeadforLife

residing in California, lived ed his life completely outside e of European culture untill a few years before he died, d, in 1916. Moved by Ishi’s story, ry, Baltimore-based artists Lisa sa Krause and Eamon Espey have turned the narrative of “the the last wild Indian” into the “science-fiction ritual” Ishi’s Brain, enacted with shadow puppets, ppets, a marionette, masks and an original soundrack. Tonight’s ht’s Puppet Happening event at ModernFormations Gallery ry y also features excerpts from the e new work-in-progress by puppet pet impresarios Tom Sarver and nd Mike Cuccaro, an adapta-tion of Aristophanes’ play y Peace. BO 8 p.m. 4919 Penn Ave., Garfield. $10. 412-362-0274 or www. puppethappening.com

+ SAT., APRIL 133 {ART} A luna moth as a pendant nt in opal and moonstone. A ladyslipper orchid pendant nt of sapphire, blue zircon, black ack diamond, coral and abalone one pearl. A spider brooch in opal

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and white gold. These — and Pittsburgh are into community other, more fanciful creations resilience, and that means inspired by nature — are learning how to fix stuff. among 60-some original works Moreover, it means teaching each other how. So today, in Garden of Light: Works at the Carnegie Library’s by Paula Crevoshay, y a new Squirrel Hill branch, exhibit at the Carnegie learn about repairing Museum of Natural clothing, bikes or History. The show, computers — or opening today, all three — from juxtaposes APRIL 13 people who jewelry artist Garden of Light know. Maria Crevoshay’s McDonough works with minteaches eral and

insect specimens from the museum’s collection and even suggests ecosystemic relationships. BO O 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Aug. 11. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $11.95-17.95. 412-622-3131 or www. carnegiemnh.org

hand-stitching and repair for rips, tears, buttons and more (12:30 p.m.). Chris Chirdon does bike duty (2 p.m.). And Josh Savage tackles desktop computer problems, from replacing optical drives and memory to ridding your machine of dust (3 p.m.). BO O 12:30-5 p.m. 5801 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. www. meetup.com/transitionpgh

{FIXES} The folks at Transition

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articles have appeared in Harper’s, The New Yorker and The New York Times. The daughter of renowned TV personality Clifton Fadiman won a National Book Critics Circle Award for her 1998 book The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors,

It’s a weekend for indie bookstores and the writers who love ’em, centering on novelists and publishers Rami Shamir and Maggie Craig. Today, their Embracing the Accidental reading tour hits Copacetic Comics (along with locals moon baby and Carolyne Whelan). On Sunday, Shamir (an Occupy Wall Street veteran) and Craig (“a freak, a queer and a punk”) join a panel of distinguished locals for Having Our SAY and Eating it, Too: A Panel on Indie Publishing in the Age of Amazon, at East End Book Exchange. Smallpress advocate Karen Lillis moderates. BO Copacetic: mod 5:30 p.m. (3138 Dobson St., Polish Hill; free; 412-251-5451). Polis Panel: 2-4 p.m. Sun., April 14 Pane (4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield; (475 free; 412-224-2847).

with Boulet, but it’s really more of a discussion with this French cartoonist and comics star. Boulet (a.k.a. Gilles Roussel) is known for his strip “Raghnarok,” for pioneering the comic-strip blog in France, and for his acclaimed 24-hour comic book Darkness. Tonight, City {PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHEL ANDERSON}

{WORDS}

APRIL 12

Ishi’s Brain

+ MON., APRIL 15 {MUSIC} {MU The Pittsburgh Chamber Music Society ends its seaMus son with Ebène Quartet. Tonight’s program includes Toni Mozart’s Divertimento; Moz “Salzburg Symphony No. 3”; “Sal Mendelssohn’s Quartet; and Men Tchaikovsky’s Quartet No. 1. Tcha The show at Carnegie Music Hall Ha is the Pittsburgh debut for fo the Ebène Quartet, 2004 winner of the ARD 2 International Competition In Munich and the 2005 winin M ner of the Forberg-Schneider Foundation’s Belmont Prize. A Foun pre-show lobby recital features prethe Montgomery Fellowship Quartet. JI 7:30 p.m. 4400 Qua Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15Forb 412-624-4129 or www. 35. 4 pittsburghchambermusic.org pitts

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and the Collision of Two Cultures. Tonight, capping the 13th season of the University of Pittsburgh’s Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series, Fadiman speaks at the Frick Fine Arts Building, in Oakland. The talk is free. JI 8:30 p.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. Free. 412-624-6508 or www.pghwriterseries.wordpress.com

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of Asylum/Pittsburgh hosts him in conversation with local cartoonists (and Tell Me Something I Don’t Know podcast co-conspirators) Jim Rugg (Afrodisiac, The PLAIN Janes) and Jasen Lex. Seating is limited, so RSVP. Boulet also appears at the April 20 Drawing Power comicsand-zines conference at the Carnegie Museum of Art. BO 7:30 p.m. (7 p.m. reception). 330 Sampsonia Way, North Side. Free. RSVP at 412-323-0278 or ehutton@ cityofasylumpittsburgh.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

Where:

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

EVERY TUESDAY 9-11pm

What:

TRIVIA NIGHT with “Big Tom”

Why: To prove how smart you are and win awesome prizes – DUH! $5 Evil Drinks

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Complimentary “Bloody Brain” shot for all trivia participants!

JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

Sat. Thru April 27. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ANYTHING GOES. Broadway revival of Cole Porter’s classic. April 16-21. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. BLOWIN’ IN THE WIND. Feat. music of Peter, Paul & Mary, The Mamas & Papas, John Denver, Simon & Garfunkle, more. Presented by Pohl Productions. Sat, Sun and Fri., April 19. Thru April 21. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. BUS STOP. Presented by the Bobcat Players. Thu-Sat. Thru April 20. Beaver Area High School, Beaver. 724-494-1680. BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE. Romantic comedy by Leonard Gershe. Presented by Smithfield Street Theatre. April 11-13. Smithfield United Church of Christ, Downtown. 412-251-7904. CITY OF ASYLUM. Play by Cynthia Croot giving a voice to the work of exiled artists from China, El Salvador, Burma, & Venezuela.

Tue-Sun. Thru April 14. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-624-7529. DREAM OF AUTUMN. Two former lovers face the forces of the past & future. Presented by Quantum Theatre. 3955 Bigelow Blvd., Oakland. Wed-Sun. Thru April 28. 1-888-718-4253. GODSPELL. Musical based on the Gospel According to St. Matthew. Thru April 14. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-384-0504. I’M NO ANGEL. A 1-act play about the life of Mae West. Thu., April 11, 7 p.m. Penn Hills Library, Penn Hills. 412-795-3507. IT’S MY PARTY & I’LL DIE IF I WANT TO. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Every other Sat. Thru April 27. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. LEND ME A TENOR. Opera comedy by Ken Ludwig. Presented by the CCAC–South Campus Theatre. Thu-Sat. Thru April 13. CCAC South Campus, West Mifflin. 412-469-6219. LITTLE GEM. Three generations of

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Straub Maibock is the third of our limited-release seasonal beers celebrating our 140 year-old brewing heritage. This all-malt brew is a pale-colored bock beer, known by several names including Helles Bock and Maibock. “Helles” is pale in German, and “Mai” is May, signifying this as a beer released for the spring. AVAILABLE ON TAP AT THESE LOCATIONS:

BRILLOBOX DIAMOND MARKET BAR & GRILL RIVERTOWNE INN VERONA AND IN BOTTLES AT YOUR LOCAL BEER DISTRIBUTOR

middle-class Irish women tell the story of one extraordinary year. Tue-Sun. Thru May 5. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. LORDY, LORDY MARTY’S 40. Audience participation dinner theatre. Proceeds benefit the St. Barnabas Free Care Fund. Sat., April 13, 7 p.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. MARCH. Two witches dwelling in a high school basement are forced to deal w/ a newcomer after centuries of tradition. Presented by the Red Masquers. April 11-13 and April 21-23. Peter Mills Theater ( Duquesne, Rockwell Hall ), Uptown. 412-396-6000. PHANTOM OF THE OPERA. Presented by Avonworth High School. Fri, Sat. Thru April 20. Avonworth School, Emsworth. 412-366-6360. THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL. Witty look at the art of gossip, feat. trysts & elaborately fabricated stories as the pastime of 18th century Londoners. Thu-Sun. Thru April 21. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000.

PUBLICNOTICES P U BL I C NOT ICE S @P GH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

When:

THEATER ANNE OF GREEN GABLES. Fri,

YOU SAY TOMATO, I SAY SHUT UP! A 21st century love story where “Happily Ever After” meets “It’s Complicated” Wed-Sun. Thru May 5. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

COMEDY THU 11 THE BIG PAULIE PUMP SHOW. 9 p.m. Firehouse Restaurant & Lounge, Pitcairn. 412-373-4636. COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu. Thru April 25 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. NOODLEBOWL COMEDY SHOW. 9 p.m. James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, North Side. 412-605-4807.

THU 11 - SUN 14

RALPHIE MAY. April 11-14 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 12 IMPROV W/ SHEETCAKE. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. THAT’S WHAT JEANNE SAID! LIVE. Improvised Talk Show. Benefits Girls on the Run. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. TOM RYAN. Clean Comedy Club. 7 p.m. Community Alliance Church, Butler. 724-283-3198.

FRI 12 - SAT 13

BOB GOLUB. April 12-13 Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 13 THE AMISH MONKEYS. Improv sketch comedy. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. GABRIEL IGLESIAS. 7:30 p.m. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. JAMES HAMILTON, DAN JENNICHES, PARIS KNIGHT, MATT LIGHT, MARK MAMMONE, AMBER SCHIEFER, MORE. Forever Strong Comedy Event benefiting Matt Taylor. 8:30 p.m. The Praha, Tarentum. 724-224-2112.

MON 15

TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 16 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030. CONTINUES ON PG. 41

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past curatorial staff, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities. Folk art objects illustrating the power of women working together to provide for their families, educate their children, promote equality, & give back to their communities. ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY BugWorks. Feat. beautiful HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military photography of insects, amazing artifacts and exhibits on the specimens, & live bugs! Garden Allegheny Valley’s industrial of Light: Works by Paula heritage. Tarentum. Crevoshay. Feat. nearly 70 724-224-7666. fine art jewelry pieces. ANDY WARHOL Ongoing: Earth MUSEUM. Regarding Revealed, Dinosaurs Warhol: Sixty Artists, In Their Time, more. Fifty Years. Juxtaposing www. per pa Oakland. 412-622-3131. prime examples of pghcitym .co CARNEGIE SCIENCE Warhol’s paintings, CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl sculpture, & films with Digital Dome (planetarium), those by other artists who Miniature Railroad and Village, reinterpret, respond, or react to his USS Requin submarine, and more. work. North Side. 412-237-8300. North Side. 412-237-3400. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, collection of automatic roll-played Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely musical instruments and music rare examples of pre World War II boxes in a mansion setting. iron-making technology. Rankin. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-464-4020 x.21. 412-782-4231. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. University of Pittsburgh Jazz 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards of the Heinz Architectural Center. from the International Hall of Feat. timeline highlighting Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. important exhibitions & events, ELLIS GALLERY AT CARNEGIE a display of 20 objects from the MELLON UNIVERSITY. Museums collection selected by current or

WED 17

JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST ONLINE

VISUALART Painting by Paul Rouphail from Where I Live at be Galleries

NEW THIS WEEK CRUCIBLE BUILDING. Live Archive. Collaboration of 1st & 2nd year MFA students from Carnegie Mellon University & the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Opening reception: April 12, 7 p.m.-midnight & April 13-14, 7-9 p.m.; April 19, 26, 5-9 p.m. Strip District. EASTSIDE GALLERY. New Door. Work by Joan Downing, Bernie Pintar, Phiris Kathryn, Sickles, more. Opening reception: April 12, 5:30-8 p.m. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. SHAW GALLERIES. Luminous Realism. Paintings by Paul McMillan. Opening reception: April 12, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884.

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. Whatever Works: A Hang Your Own Art Exhibition. Work by Robert Drakulic, Brent George, Robyn Graham, Michael Hegedus & James Miller. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 3RD STREET GALLERY. Visions of Nature. New works by Nan Hought & Pat Patterson. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 707 PENN GALLERY. Adult Arcade. New works by Marc Burgess. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. In Cast of Characters. Curators Vicky Clark & Cindy Lisica bring together 6 diverse artists to question the nature of our everyday existence & our relationship to

larger-than-life heroes & gods. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BARCO LAW BUILDING. The Art of Japanese Noh Drama Tsukioka Kogyo, 18691927. Japanese woodblock prints from the collection on Richard & Mae Smethurst. Oakland. 412-648-1490. BE GALLERIES. Where I Live. Paintings by Paul Rouphail, poems by Maria Rouphail. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BFG CAFE. Support Local Artist Exhibit. Group show, through April. Garfield. 412-661-2345. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Follow Your Dreams. Work by Pamela Price & Karen McKee. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Shed. Mixed media collage by Tate Hudson. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. THE BREW HOUSE. 42.8864° N, 78.8786° W. Feat. work by 10 artists from the Buffalo (NY) Arts Studio. Part of the Distillery 7 Exchange Program. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Japan is the Key: Collecting

Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Laura Jean McLaughlin, Jane Ogren. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EAST END BOOK EXCHANGE. The Surreal Banana Peel: Whimsical Collage Wizardry. Work by Joel Brown. Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. FE GALLERY. Austerity & Self-Sustainability. Installation by John Eastman & Donovan Widmer. Lawrenceville. 412-860-6028. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. E Block. Photography by Mark Perrott. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10thcentury splashware, buffware, slip-painted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. The Classic Collection: European & American Classical & Academic Styles. Early 19th & 20th century paintings. Oakland. 412-716-1390.

of the Future. Showcase of concepts students have explored & developed for a thematic new museum for the future. Oakland. 412-268-1970. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FORT PITT MUSEUM. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War and American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. What We Collect: Recent Art Acquisitions, 2007–2012. Botanical illustrations from the early 19th century through the present. Oakland. 412-268-2434. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Eat, Drink & Dance fridays & saturdays

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04.12 Sash Bash Leather Community Event 04.13 Hanging Garden Goth Industrial Night Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net

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blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

42

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. EVENT: Gab Cody University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. and Lori Roper’s play 412-624-6000. , OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, August Wilson Center, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. Downtown 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. CRITIC: This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion , 56, a banker site features log house, blacksmith from Downtown shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. WHEN: PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Tonight’s show was amusingly intellectual; it’s funny Oakland. 412-622-6914. and at the same time thought-provoking. The plot is PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Cameras this sort of juxtaposition between two people from & the Famous Photos They Took. drastically different backgrounds and their perspective Including a copy of Daguerre’s first camera, James Bond’s mini on the shared history that they have. The actors are Minox spy unit, the Big Bertha that just stellar, and since we are in this enclosed theater, caught Bill Mazeroski rounding the entire atmosphere became really intense and very third base in 1960 Winning Series, moving at the same time. It was definitely a show that more. North Side. 412-231-7881. makes you think, and on a beautiful night in Pittsburgh, PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG at the very nice August Wilson Center, I’d say this was AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many quite the show. endangered species. Highland BY JEFF IHAZA Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos Penn, Downtown. 412-562-0290. and artifacts of her life & work. BIGGIES BULLIES EXTENDED Springdale. 724-274-5459. KALEIDOSCOPE ARTS FESTIVAL. HAPPY HOUR. 6-9 p.m. Carson City RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL Dance, music, theater, & visual Saloon, South Side. 412-481-3203. HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the arts showcase. April 15-28 Slippery PULSEATIONS: HEART OF THE Homestead Mill. Steel industry and Rock University, Slippery Rock. CITY. Silent auction, cocktails, community artifacts from 1881724-738-4586. more. Benefits Pittsburgh Urban 1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. Leadership & Service Experience. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY 7 p.m. Union Project, Highland CENTER. 1968: The Year that Park. 412-361-0124. Rocked America. Nearly a dozen WORDS WITHOUT WALLS interactive video presentations PAVING THE ROAD OF FUNDRAISER. Readings from & more than 100 evocative SURVIVAL. The August Wilson The Outsiders, silent auction, artifacts that explore how the year Center Dance Ensemble journeys more. Benefits the creative writing 1968 helped shape our modern through two distinct times in project at Allegheny Co. Jail. world. From Slavery to Freedom. history, representing our individual 7-10 p.m. Unsmoke Art Space, Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the and collective strengths gained Braddock. 601-937-1577. anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: through our heart-wrenching Western PA Sports Museum, Clash pasts. April 12-13 August Wilson of Empires, and exhibits on local Center for African American BARK SHADYSIDE PUP WALK. history, more. Strip District. Culture, Downtown. Begins at Liberty School Parking 412-454-6000. 412-258-2700. Lot, Ellsworth Ave. & Ivy St., SENATOR LOWRIE Shadyside. Benefits the Animal HOUSE. The Civil War Rescue League Shelter & Wildlife in Pennsylvania. Butler. . w w w Center. 9-11 a.m. 412-682-1298. 724-283-8116. aper p ty ci h g p CINDERELLA. Ballet DESSERT TASTING FOR A CAUSE. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS .com presented by the Benefits The Kris Wilson Foundation HISTORY CENTER. Carnegie Performing Arts & The Polite Way Foundation. Museum commemorates Center. April 12-14 Andrew Information on pre-tasting & VIP Pittsburgh industrialists, local Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, reception at www.facebook.com/ history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. Carnegie. 412-279-8887. events/567315326612544/ 7:30ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. 10:30 p.m. The Clemente Museum, Features 5,000 relics of Catholic Strip District. 412-621-1268. saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. YOU DRINK .. WE DANCE. EARTH GIRLS ARE EASY WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Continuum Dance Theater BENEFIT SCREENING. Benefits Learn about distilling and presents excerpts of a work-inThe Hollywood Theater’s digital coke-making in this pre-Civil progress. and Tue., May 21 Bar projection campaign. 7 p.m. War industrial village. Scottdale. Marco, Strip District. 412-471-1900. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 724-887-7910. 412-563-0368. PITTSBURGH WORLD FEST. Food, music & crafts from local refugee groups, student groups, more. 5TH ANNUAL INCLUSIVE Benefits Anzar Exchange & other OAKLAND FOREVER. Carnival VOICES LUNCHEON. Benefits the participating nonprofits. 3-7 p.m. rides, A Taste of Oakland, more. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. Program to Aid Citizen Enterprise. 4-9 p.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-683-2669. 412-683-6243. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Omni William

The Sisters Gray

Anthony Paravati

Sat., April 7

SPIRIT OF ST. ANTHONY BREAKFAST. Benefits St. Anthony School Programs. 9 a.m. Rivers Club, Downtown. 724-940-9020 x 103. TASTE OF MARKET SQUARE. Food-sampling showcase of downtown restaurants. Benefits Market Square’s lunchtime summer concert series. http://www. marketsquarepgh.com/events3. html 2 p.m. Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511. VIRTUOUS ACADEMY FUNDRAISER. Comedy, live music, poetry reading, more. Presented by Praise II Entertainment. 7 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-430-2820.

SUN 14 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. COOKIES4CHRIS. Luncheon & vendor show. Benefits Chris4Life Colon Cancer Foundation. 11 a.m.3 p.m. South Hills Country Club, Whitehall. 412-885-2374. MIKEY BOWL. Bowling event benefiting The Mikey’s Way Foundation. 1 p.m. FunFest Entertainment Center, Harmarville. 412-826-9430 x 1400.

MON 15 - WED 17

TUE 16

DANCE

POLITICS

FRI 12 - SAT 13

WED 17

SAT 13

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 12 SUN 14

TUE 16

FESTIVALS

FUNDRAISERS

FRI 12

FRI 12

FASHION FOR KIDS’ SAKE. Fashion show & raffle benefiting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Pittsburgh. 6 p.m. Carlow University, Oakland. 412-363-6100.

PITTSBURGH MAYORAL Q&A. Hosted by South Side Community Council. 6:30 p.m. Brashear Center, South Side. 412-467-6735.

LITERARY THU 11 BOUND TOGETHER BOOK CLUB. The Hare w/ Amber Eyes by Edmund De Waal. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3288. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. AN EVENING OF POETRY W/ RINA FERRARELLI. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. PITT-GREENSBURG WRITERS FESTIVAL. Feat. Scott Silsbe, Tony Buba, Scott McClanahan, Yona Harvey, Aaron Smith, more. Thru April 11 University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. 724-836-7481. POETRY WORKSHOP. Presented by the LAB. 7-8:30 p.m. East End Book Exchange, Bloomfield. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

GALLERIE CHIZ. Flying Bird to River Town & More. Paintings by Tim Menees & ceramics by Holly Van Dine. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Salon Show 2013. Group show feat. work selected from 100s of entries. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. April in Paris. Photography by Scott Davidson. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Illumination. Juried exhibition by the Pittsburgh Society of Artists & Greensburg Art Club. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. SAFE LIGHT. Multi-media collaboration between Nick & Dennis Childers. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. unwrapped. Shibori-dyed quilts by Jan Myers-Newbury. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Basement Miracle. Masters of Fine Arts candidates present their final work.

FRI 12

CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. LOIS GREENBERG & ERIKA SIMILO. Mad Fridays Reading Series. 7 p.m. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030. OAKLAND OPEN MIC. Poetry, music & political speeches welcome. Second and Fourth Fri of every month, 7 p.m. 610-731-1804. WRITERS’ OPEN MIC NIGHT. All genres of written/spoken word welcome. Second Fri of every month, 7-9 p.m. Reads Ink Bookshop, Vandergrift. 724-567-7236.

Feat. Scott Andrew, Felipe Castelblanco, Craig Fahner, Steve Gurysh, Luke Loeffler, Dan Wilcox & Erin Womack. Oakland. 412-268-3618. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Four Suites. The artwork of Susan Constanse, Jean McClung, John Morris, & Laurie Trok. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Work by Nancy Adams, Marilyn Andrews, Ronit Dagan, Eric Boos, Barbara Poole, Frank FLynn, Lavon Williams, more. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PANZA GALLERY. ARTaBet. Work by members of the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. POINT PARK UNIVERSITY. Point Park Project 1: Kaleidoscope. Work by Di-Ay Battad, Katie Mackowick, Chris McGinnis, & Daniel Luchman. Downtown. 412-391-4100. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin Turner: New Work. Sculpture. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 15. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White & Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints,

SAT 13

CATHERINE JOHNSON. Book signing & talk w/ author of Thank You Andy Warhol. 2 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

SUN 14

IMOGEN BINNIE. Reading w/ author of Nevada. Also feat. poetry by Soham Patel. 7 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-721-8619.

MON 15 OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THIRD ON THIRD. Seated readings

Drawings & Photographs. 35-some works on paper from the museum’s collection, from photographs to lithographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Mean Girls. Work by Jenn Gooch, Sonja Sweterlitsch, Randie Snow, Vanessa German, more. Artists’ Talk: March 23, 1 p.m. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Small Shrines. Juried exhibit feat. 2D & 3D works made in honor, dedication or celebration of an individual, a group of people, a place, a thing or an idea. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. The Art of Akira. Production art from Katsuhiro Otomo’s film. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRINITY GALLERY. Evolution. New work by Matt Gatto. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2458. UNDERCROFT GALLERY, FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. Watercolors by Phiris. A solo exhibit of watercolor paintings by Phiris Kathryn Sickels. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. THE UNION HALL. Light/ Dark: Shades of Self & Surface. Paintings by Rachael Ryan. Strip District. 412-471-1900. UNSMOKE ART SPACE. Faster Than Walking. Work by Lindsey Peck Scherloum & Sarah Leavens. Braddock. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. An Art(ist) in Motion. Work by Aaronel deRoy Gruber. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WHITEHALL ARTS. Spring Art Exhibit. Paintings in various mediums, all for sale. Mt. Lebanon. 412-668-0573. WILDCARD. everyday balloons. Work by Chris Bencivenga & Becki Hollen. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

KIDSTUFF THU 11

OTAKU-LEBO. For middle & high school students who are ardent fans of anime, manga & J-pop culture. 3:15 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPRING COMICS CLUB. Learn about the visual & narrative elements of comic strips & graphic novels. Thu, 4-6 p.m. Thru May 23 Assemble, Garfield. 773-425-1531.

THU 11 - WED 17

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CHARLIE & KIWI’S EVOLUTIONARY ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as he travels back to the Age of Dinosaurs to discover how evolution works. Feat. story theater & discovery area. Presented by Commonwealth Connections Academy. Tue-Sun. Thru May 12 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MOVE WITH ART. Pull levers to move a 10-foot wooden man, create images on a giant Kaleidoscope, feed rubber balls to a life-size wooden cow & much more. Thru May 12 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am • Sun: 3pm-2am

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS

SAT 13 CELEBRATE SCIENCE W/ SID THE SCIENCE KID. Film screening, giveaways, more. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. SATURDAY CRAFTERNOON: YARN COIL BASKETS W/ ASHLEY CAPPS. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

TUE 16

SUN 14

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. LUIS CARLOS MONTALVÁN. Discussion w/ author of Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior & the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

APRIL 16-20

OVERNIGHT ADVENTURE. Hands-on projects, museum tours, games, more. Ages 6+. 7 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131.

SAT 13 - SUN 14

WED 17

Mary Carey

FRI 12

of screenplays written by local screenwriters. Every third Mon, 7 p.m. Thru June 17 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233.

JAPANESE CONVERSATION CLUB. First and Third Tue of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. STEEL CITY POETRY SLAM. Third Tue of every month, 9 p.m. Shadow Lounge, East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

NEXT WEEK: XXX Film Star & “Celebrity Rehab” Alumni

VIDEO DJ’S

10:30PM -2AM

SWORD IN THE STONE. Sat, Sun. Thru April 28 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

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THE PITTSBURGH SUPER STROLL. 1-mile walk feat. local performers, community awareness fair, superhero costume contest, more. Presented by Heroiks. 12-4 p.m. O’Hara Student Center, Oakland. 904-540-1565.

Pinnacle Vodka Drinks for $3

MON 15

BROWN BAG LUNCH BUNCH. A lunchtime story for kids ages 3-6. Mon, 12:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. GET YOUR GAME ON TEENS! Play videogames, board games, cards & more with other teens. Third Mon of every month, 3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141.

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CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

[LITERARY] CHESS CLUB. For kindergarten7th grade. Every other Tue, 6:30 p.m. Thru April 16 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. TUESDAYS WITH TESS. Tue, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

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www.livelinks.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

FRI 12

OUTSIDE SAT 13 GLACIER RIDGE TRAIL ULTRA-MARATHON & TRAIL RUN. Choose distance between 30 KM, 50 KM & 50 MI. http://www. glacierridgetrailultra.com/html/ registration.html 6 a.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 724-368-8811. LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL QUEST. Sat. Thru May 25 412-255-0564.

SUN 14

WILDFLOWER WALK. 2-4 p.m. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

Three times I have seen the one I love cuffed and jailed. Arrested ones are always loved by someone, the way soil and weather love weeds, offer home for roots, space and place to flower. … The cop throws the one you love against a wall or door, jerks his arms back — arms you’ve caressed, hands you’ve kissed — locks the cuffs in place in seconds. They must train for this, like roping a calf to see how fast they can do it. In the dark you watch the car take him away.

TUE 16

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 17 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 11

make a real connection

to $40,000 if filing jointly or up to $20,000 if filing as an individual. Appointments are available Mon & Tues afternoons through April 15. Call for appointment. Thru April 15 NHCO North Boroughs, Bellevue. 412-307-0069.

TUE 16

3 RIVERS VENTURE FAIR. Keynote speaker Josh Linkman. www.3rvf.com Thru April 11 PNC Park, North Side. 412-323-5000. AARP TAX HELP. Free tax preparation and assistance to low & middle income taxpayers. Thu. Thru April 11 Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. THE BIG PICTURE: RETHINKING DYSLEXIA. Film screening followed by Q&A w/ experts on dyslexia. 7 p.m. Chartiers Valley Stadium 18, Bridgeville. CHINESE CONVERSATION CLUB. Second Thu of every month, 6-7 p.m. and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. CITY DHARMA. Soto Zen Meditation. jisen@deepspringzen. org Thu, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. DOUG DUBOIS LECTURE & BOOK SIGNING. Reading from his acclaimed monograph, All the Days & Nights . 7-9 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-391-4100. GO GREEN 2013! “Green” information booths, hands-on activities, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Ten

— Exerpt of “Wild Ones,” by Sheryl St. Germain, from Let It Be a Dark Roux: New and Selected Poems, Autumn House Press

AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH MEETING. Speaker: Mark Kochte. 8 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400. ISHI’S BRAIN. Puppet show by Baltimore’s Lisa Krause & Eamon Espey. Also feat. excerpts from Peace, by Tom Sarver & Mike Cuccaro. Presented by Puppet Happening. 8 p.m. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-657-7513. STORYTELLING & HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM. Discussion panel, breakout groups, more. Keynote speaker: Drew Kahn. Presented by Global Solutions Pittsburgh & the Point Park United Student Government. 2-6 p.m. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-471-7852.

SAT 13

$10 RABIES CLINIC. Presented by the Butler County Humane Society. 2-4 p.m. Slippery Rock Park, Slippery Rock. 724-789-1150. THE BREW GENTLEMEN BEER CO. INVESTOR INFORMATION SESSION. Wed, Sat. Thru April 13 The Brew Gentlemen Beer Co., Braddock. 412-206-9243. DOG-FRIENDLY PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR. Begins at South Side Dog Park, Riverfront Park at 18th St. 12 p.m. education & advocacy for the 412-391-2060 x 237. LGBTQ community, family & EARTH DAY PARTY. 1-5 p.m. friends. Second Thu of every Fresh Heirlooms, New Kensington. month, 7 p.m. Covenant 412-512-5098. Presbyterian Church, Butler. GOLD LEAF TECHNIQUES. 412-518-1515. French Master Guilder Youss Kadri PINOT & PAINTING. Ages 21+. & instructor Linda Wallen teach 6:30-8:30 p.m. Sweetwater how to use gold leaf for creating Center for the Arts, Sewickley. shimmering artwork. 11 a.m.412-741-4405. 2 p.m. Trust Arts Education RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Center, Downtown. Learn a variety of dances from INDIAN CLASSICAL DANCE the 15-17th centuries. Porter CLASS. Sat. Thru April 20 Mookshi Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Wellness Center, Regent Carnegie Mellon University, Square. 412-407-7829. Oakland. 412-567-7512. KOREAN FOR SCREEN & BE SEEN: BEGINNERS. Korean DARK OF WINTER. grammar & basic Q&A after screening w. w w conversation. Sat, w/ the filmmakers. er hcitypap g p 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, 7:30 p.m. Hollywood .com Theater, Dormont. Oakland, 412-622-3151. 412-563-0368. KOREAN II. For those TAKING ACTION & MAKING who already have a basic CHANGE FOR SUSTAINABLE understanding of Korean & are COMMUNITIES. Speaker: Majora interested in increasing proficiency. Carter. Inspire Speakers Series. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, 412-622-3151. Oakland. 412-431-0709. LIVE LIFE! Healthy living seminar. WEST COAST SWING. Swing 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Crossroads United dance lessons for all levels. Thu, Methodist, Oakdale. 412-818-1952. 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, OUTRAGEOUS BINGO. Feat. drag Bloomfield. 412-681-0111. performances, more. Benefits Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh & Shepherd Wellness NORTH HILLS COMMUNITY Community. and Sat., May 4 Rodef OUTREACH FREE TAX PREP. To Shalom Congregation, Oakland. qualify, your 2012 income was up 412-621-6566.

St. Germain and others present a reading on the theme “Outsiders” at a fundraiser for Words Without Walls, a partnership between Chatham MFA students and the Allegheny County Jail. The evening also features a draw-athon, wood-fired pizza and more. 7 p.m. Fri., April 12. Unsmoke Systems Artspace, 1137 Braddock Ave., Braddock. www.wordswithoutwalls.com

Thousand Villages, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-2160. HAUNTED STATES OF AMERICA. Film screening & Q&A session w/ the Pittsburgh Paranormal Society. 7 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LIVE FROM UB: SCREENING OF SHORT FILMS COVERING MONGOLIAN ROCK MUSIC. 8 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-589-3998. LUNCH & LEARN: BOTANICALS IN ART & SCIENCE. 10:30 a.m.1 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. THE MARIDON WORLD TOURS: MYANMAR. Speakers: Jack & Carole Fruehstorfer. 6:30 p.m. Maridon Museum, Butler. 724-282-0123. MEET ‘N MAKE. Open crafting night. Second Thu of every month, 6-8 p.m. Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse, Homewood. 412-473-0100. MUSIC 101: CHRIS ALLEN, PSO PERCUSSIONIST. Lecture & performance. 12:30-1:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-361-3346. PFLAG BUTLER. Support,

FULL LIST ONLINE

THU 11 - MON 15

SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCRABBLE TOURNAMENT. 9 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS AS A FARM/FOREST ENTERPRISE. Presented by Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture. 12:30-4 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-2985. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target - East Liberty, East Liberty. 412-362-6108. SPRING PREVIEW PARTY. Gardening workshops, live music, refreshments, more. 9 a.m. Michael Bros. Nursery, Cheswick. 724-265-1222. STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY. 6 p.m. Romp & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 412-486-4117. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569. THOMAS MERTON AWARD RECEPTION HONORING MARTIN SHEEN. Food, entertainment, more. 5-8 p.m. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 412-361-3022.

SAT 13 - SUN 14 TANGER TASTE & STYLE. Fashion show, live music, food trucks, more. April 13-14 Tanger Outlets, Washington. 724-225-8435.

SUN 14 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. ITALIANO-ESPRESSO. Italian conversation club. Presented by Mondo Italiano. Sun, 11 a.m. Thru June 30 Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-478-3682. PITTSBURGH REPTILE SHOW & SALE. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Futules’ Harmar House, Cheswick. 724-516-0441. REALITY & REALITY: THE METAPHYSICS OF A COURSE IN MIRACLES. The Theosophical Society in Pittsburgh. Woodland Hall, room 103. 1:30 p.m. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-462-4200. SONIC VALLEY GUITAR SHOW. Buy, sell, trade. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Ramada Inn Hotel & Conference Center, Greensburg. 724-719-4535.

MON 15 MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE

N E W S

& CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MT. LEBANON GENEALOGY SOCIETY. Seniors only. 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

HOUR. 6 p.m. Union Pig & Chicken, East Liberty. 412-980-2720. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

TAKE BACK THE WOODS

While non-native plants are sometimes introduced to habitats for beneficial reasons, exotic species — there are more than 1,000 in the U.S. — can grow aggressively, putting native plants in danger. Jennings Environmental Education Center invites volunteers age 12 or older to help battle invasive plants, Sat., April 20, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch will be provided. Call 724-794-6011 by April 12 to register.

SCREENPLAY PLOT DEVELOPMENT COURSE. Presented by Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Mon, 6:45 p.m. Thru April 29 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282. TEEN ADVISOY BOARD MEET-UP. Learn about marketing, fundraising, more. If interested, email Nina@assemblepgh.org 6 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

TUE 16 CREDIT & DEBIT CARD FRAUD SEMINAR. Speaker: Darlene Hannes. 11 a.m. The Legacy Theatre, Allison Park. 412-635-8080. DARREN MILLER. Discussion w/ Ocean’s Seven Challenge swimmer. 7 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. KNOW THE SHOW BEFORE YOU GO: ANYTHING GOES. Pre-performance information session w/ theater critic, Chris Rawson. 6:30 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666. PROCESSING FOR ARTISTS WORKSHOP. 7-9 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. SAMOVAR SALON. An Evening of mixology & photography. Try whiskey samples & some work to share. 6:30 p.m. Wigle Whiskey, Strip District. 412-431-1810. SLOVAK LESSONS. For beginning students. Sponsored by the Western PA Slovak Cultural Association. Tue. Thru June 4 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-2990.

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Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SPANISH II. Geared toward those who already have a basic understanding of Spanish & are interested in increasing proficiency. First and Third Wed of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

the script. Appointments strongly recommended. Bring a photo & resume if available. The Theatre Factory, Trafford. 724-454-7193. UNSEAM’D SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. Open Auditions for The Tempest & The Enchanted Isle. April 20. All roles open, AEA & Non-Union. Call for appointment. Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 412-621-0244. WASHINGTON WILD THINGS BASKETBALL TEAM. Auditions for National Anthem singers for the upcoming season. April 13. Call for appointment. CONSOL Energy Park, Washington. 724-746-1178.

MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions for The Music Man. April 27 & 28. Teens ages 14-18 should prepare a broadway song & bring sheet music. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-384-0504. THE PITTSBURGH SAVOYARDS. Seeking a Stage Director for Fall 2013 production of Princess Ida. Gilbert & Sullivan or other Operetta experience preferred. Resumes & letters accepted through April 20 to directorsearch @pittsburghsavoyards.org. 412-734-8476. PITTSBURGH SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS. Auditions for Romeo & Juliet. April 20. AEA/ non-union actors, prepare a brief Shakespearean monologue. Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. 412-404-8531. STEEL CITY IMPROV THEATER. Auditions for the Steel City Improv House Team. April 13. Register for audition time at http://www. steelcityimprov.com/auditions Shadyside. 412-404-2695. THE SUMMER COMPANY. Auditions for 2013 season. April 13-14. Men/women age 17+, 2-min. contemporary monologue. Non-equity, walk-ins welcome. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412–243-6464. THE THEATRE FACTORY KIDWORKS. Auditions for the musical “The Kid Who Ran For President.” April 11. Ages 5 & up. Prepare a short, age appropriate song & be prepared to read from

SUBMISSIONS ART ALL NIGHT: LAWRENCEVILLE. Submit one (& only one) piece of artwork or sign up to perform. Registration & other info at http://www. artallnight.org 412-235-1950. BRICOLAGE THEATER. Seeking stories that are true, funny, & between 1,500 to 2,000 words for WordPlay, a new storytelling event. Email submissions to alan@ olifson.com. THE HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ARTS. Seeking artists for the 40th Annual Hoyt Regional Juried Art Exhibition scheduled May 7-31. Registration is in person on Saturday, April 13, from 10-4pm. http://hoytartcenter.org/for-artists Hoyt Institute of Fine Art, New Castle. 724-652-2882.

JOHNSTOWN FILM FESTIVAL. Seeking original short films of 30 min. or less. For complete rules & entry form, visit www. johnstownfilmfest.org. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Seeking vendors for the Garden Mart to sell plants, products, more. Call for details. 724-266-4500 x 114. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Seeking entries for 8 x 8 PHOTO PARTY showcase. One digital submission per person. Digital, film, or cell phone cameras allowed. http://silvereye. org/8x8registrationform.pdf 412-431-1810. VERONA’S CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking artists, food & product vendors for marketplace running MaySeptember. Call for more information. Verona Borough Building, Verona. 412-721-0943. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@ wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WRONG WAY PRESS. Seeking illustrated stories & fables. http:// www.wrongwaypress.com

AUDITIONS COMTRA THEATRE. Auditions for Disney’s Beauty & the Beast. April 13-14. Call for more info. Cranberry. 724-591-8727. DISCOVER ME! Looking for actresses between 18-30 years old for the movie production “Discover Me!” Call Robert for further details. 412-904-2954. THE JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Spring auditions for 8th-12th grade singers for the 2013 season. April 13. Contact MaryColleen to schedule an audition. mcseip@ themendelssohn.org Westminster Presbyterian Church, Upper St. Clair. 724-263-5259. LATSHAW PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Viva Las Vegas. April 14. Female dancers only. Call for more information. 724-853-4050. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Auditions for all voice parts. Volunteers May 8 & 9. Professional Core members May 10-12. Review the audition criteria at www.themendelssohn. org email or call MaryColleen. mcseip@themendelssohn.org Third Presbyterian Church, Oakland. 724-263-5259.

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Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I’m a gay man who has been seeing a devout Christian gay guy. We have many of the same interests and respect each other’s feelings and beliefs. However, I am not that religious, and he is an Orthodox Christian. Some of his friends oppose gay marriage and think that being gay is immoral. Since I am not a devout Christian, his friends say we should not get married. Other friends say God does not love him because he is gay. Sadly, he sometimes thinks that God really does hate him. I try to reassure him, but he feels this way because of what his “good friends” say. I think he should dump these assholes. Is our relationship going to work? Should he dump these bigots? DEVOUTLY GAY WASHINGTONIAN

We’ve had all sorts of guest experts in the column over the years: sex researchers, sex workers, medical doctors, academics, marriage activists, trans activists and on and on. But this week’s guest expert is a first. “As a Bishop of the Church, first let me say that I am convinced that God loves DGW’s boyfriend, loves DGW, loves me, loves all of us beyond our wildest imagining,” said the Right Reverend Gene Robinson, Episcopal Bishop (Retired) of New Hampshire, the first openly gay priest to be elected bishop in a major Christian denomination. (Bishop Robinson is the first member of the historical episcopate — the first in the Apostolic Succession stretching back to Saint Peter — to appear as a guest expert here.) I asked Bishop Robinson to look at your question, because I thought the advice of a fellow believer might carry more weight with your boyfriend than the advice of an atheistic twatsquat like me. “This young man faces a couple of problems — one that touches on religion and one that touches on what it means to be in a healthy relationship,” said Bishop Robinson. “His boyfriend seems wed to a religion and to friends who espouse the Church’s traditional teaching condemning homosexuality. The most alarming thing he said is that his boyfriend is listening to them. Surely this must cause him a great deal of pain.” But it’s pain your boyfriend no longer has to endure. “The Church has gotten things wrong before — support for slavery, and using scripture to denigrate and subjugate women — and we are living in a time when the Church is realizing it has also gotten it wrong about LGBT people,” said Bishop Robinson. “Today, there are oases of acceptance and inclusion even in the most oppressive and condemning churches. If DGW’s boyfriend wants to understand how one can read the Scriptures and believe that homosexuality is part of God’s wonderful plan of diversity, he can find such a church, even in a faith that officially condemns LGBT people. But this is work he needs to do for himself. DGW can’t do it for him.” As for your relationship, DGW, Bishop

Robinson agrees that your boyfriend’s inability to break from his friends is a bad sign. “If DGW’s boyfriend is listening to the condemnation of his Church and his friends, it makes me wonder how much joy he can take in their relationship,” said Bishop Robinson. “How free is he to be the gay man he knows himself to be if that is accompanied by guilt and shame? It sounds like DGW’s boyfriend needs to deal with his own internalized homophobia before he can commit to anyone.” In other words, you may need to tell your boyfriend that he can have you or he can have his orthodoxy, his awful friends, and a lot of self-inflicted spiritual wounds. If your boyfriend can’t break away from these people, if he refuses to find a church that welcomes him (and you!), then you may need to DTMFA. Bishop Robinson’s latest book, God Believes in Love: Straight Talk About Gay Marriage, is in bookstores now. Follow him on Twitter: @ BishopGRobinson. I’m a 22-year-old straight girl with a lovely boyfriend of four years. My problem: I’m bored with our sex life, and I don’t know why. He’s a generous lover, he always makes sure I come (which is not always an easy task), and he isn’t insecure when I have to use my own fingers or a vibrator to get off. I know I’m lucky, but even after I come, I feel unsatisfied. I don’t have any kinky fantasies, but the lack of passion and interest in our vanilla sex is killing me. I’m only 22! My sex life shouldn’t be boring already! He’s voiced concerns about how I don’t initiate sex with him often enough. It’s just that I don’t want the hassle of waiting for him to make me come when I can do it faster — and doing it myself means I don’t have to worry about him getting tired or bored. Our sex drives are probably around the same, frequencywise. I just need to know how to make things more interesting.

“WE ARE LIVING IN A TIME WHEN THE CHURCH IS REALIZING IT HAS ALSO GOTTEN IT WRONG ABOUT LGBT PEOPLE.”

BORED IN BED

Having a partner who focuses like a laser beam on our pleasure sounds ideal. But always being the focus of sex, always being expected to come first, always being expected to come — that gets exhausting after a while. So order your boyfriend to focus a little more on his own pleasure and a little less on yours. If he worries about being selfish, you can tell him that a study conducted at Kwantlen Polytechnic University found that people with selfish sex partners reported higher levels of sexual satisfaction. (“Emerging Adulthood: An Age of Sexual Experimentation or Sexual Self-Focus?” (2010), by Hayley Leveque and Cory Pederson.) I suspect that once the focus is off you — once you no longer have to live in fear of a forced march to orgasm every time you have sex — you’ll be able to relax and enjoy sex more. You might even initiate once in a while. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

04.10-04.17

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

ARIES (March 21-April 19): German theologian Martin Luther (1483-1546) was a central figure in the rebellion against the Catholic Church that led to the Protestant Reformation. You’ll never guess where he was when he was struck by the epiphany that became the core axiom of his new religion. I’ll tell you: He was sitting on the toilet in the Wittenberg Monastery. The Holy Spirit gave him the crucial knowledge then and there, or so he testified. In this spirit, Aries, keep a very open mind about where you will be and what you will be doing when your illuminations arrive this week.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your task is to uncover the semi-happy ending that was hidden back in the story’s beginning. Once you do that, you may be able to create a graceful and honorable climax. In fact, I don’t think you will be able to bring about the semihappy ending any other way. It’s crucial that you return to the original flash of inspiration — the time when all the plot lines that eventually developed were first germinating. You need to remember fate’s primal promise. You’ve got to read the signs you missed in the early going.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you play poker, the odds are one in 649,740 that you will get a royal flush. That’s an ace, king, queen, jack and ten of one suit. As for drawing a straight flush — any five consecutive cards of one suit — the odds are one in 72,192. Judging from the current astrological omens, Gemini, I’d say your chance of getting one of those hands is far better than usual — maybe one in 88,000 for the royal flush and one in 8,888 for the straight flush. But those still aren’t great odds. On the

other hand, getting a flush — all five cards of the same suit — is normally one in 509, but these days it’s pretty likely for you. The moral of the story, not just for when you’re playing cards, but in whatever you do: Expect really good luck, but not miraculous, out-of-this-world luck.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Wherever you stand, be the soul of that place,” wrote the poet Rumi. This is excellent advice for you right now, Cancerian. You are nearing the peak of your power to express yourself with beautiful accuracy. You have more skill than usual at understanding and conveying the interesting truth. As a result, you’re in a position to wield extra influence. People are receptive to being moved by your heart-felt intelligence. So please do more than simply push for greater efficiency, order, and discipline. Those things are good, but I hope you will also be a radiant role model who exemplifies what it means to be soulful.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Golden Rock is a Buddhist holy site in Burma. It’s a small pagoda built on top of a giant boulder

that in turn seems to be precariously balanced at the edge of a down-sloping bed of rock. How does the boulder remain stationary? Why doesn’t it roll off the edge? It appears to defy gravity. Legend says that it’s held in place by a single strand of hair from the Buddha’s head. I suspect that many of you Leos will soon have access to a tricky asset with resemblances to that magic strand. True, it might be merely metaphorical. But if used correctly, it could become a key element in a future foundation.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s Soul-Searching Season: a good time to go in search of your soul. To aid your quest, I’ll offer a few lines from “A Few Words on the Soul,” a poem by Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska. “We have a soul at times,” she says. “No one’s got it non-stop, for keeps. Day after day, year after year may pass without it. For every thousand conversations, it participates in one, if even that, since it prefers silence. It’s picky: our hustling for a dubious advantage and creaky machinations make it sick. Joy and sorrow aren’t two different feelings for it. It attends us only when the two are joined. We can count on it when we’re sure of nothing and curious about everything. It won’t say where it comes from or when it’s taking off again, though it’s clearly expecting such questions. We need it but apparently it needs us for some reason too.” (Translation by Stanislaw Baranczak and Clare Cavanagh. Read the whole poem here: http://tinyurl.com/ SearchSoul.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I do not believe in God,” said Mexican painter Diego Rivera, “but I believe in Picasso.” My poetmusician friend Tanya has a similar philosophy. “I don’t believe in God, or even Goddess, for that matter,” she says. “But I do believe in Patti Smith.” Do you have a God-substitute, Libra? Or, if you do have faith in a Cosmic Wow, is there also a more approachable, second-tier source of divinity you love? According to my reading of the astrological omens, you would really benefit from feeling an intimate kind of reverence right now — a tender devotion for something higher and brighter that awakens the sleeping part of your lust for life.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This would be an excellent time to stage staring contests with yourself in the mirror. There’s a high likelihood that you will win every time. I think you’ll also have great success whenever you try to read your own mind. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ve got an uncanny knack for plucking buried secrets and self-deceptions out of their hiding places. One more thing, Scorpio: Have you ever considered how fun it might be to wash your own brain and kick your own butt? Now would be an excel-

lent time to experiment with those radical acts of healing.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “It’s so hard to forget pain, but it’s even harder to remember sweetness,” writes novelist Chuck Palahniuk. “We have no scar to show for happiness. We learn so little from peace.” Your assignment in the coming days, Sagittarius, is to prove Palahniuk wrong. As the surges of sweetness flow through you, as your secret joy ripens into bright blooming bliss, imprint the sensations on your memory. Vow to remember them for the rest of your life. Make these breakthrough moments into talismans that will serve as magical spells whenever you need rejuvenation in the future.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein had his priorities straight. This is what he said about his profession: “In philosophy the race is won by the one who can run slowest — the one who crosses the finish line last.” It’s my belief, Capricorn, that a similar rule should apply to you in the coming days — no matter what project you’re working on or goal you’re trying to accomplish. Proceed slowly enough to be absolutely thorough, meticulous and conscientious. As you make your way to the finish line, be as deep as you dare.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

In Samuel Beckett’s novel Molloy, the main character talks about a long overland journey he took on foot and by bicycle. Before the trip, he had read somewhere that when people are lost in a forest, they often imagine they’re moving in a straight line when in fact they’re going in a circle. That’s why, during his own travels, he intentionally walked in a circle, hoping thereby to go straight. Although this might sound like a loopy strategy, Aquarius, I think it will make sense for you to adopt in the coming week. Your apparent path may be very different, maybe even opposite, to your actual path.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you in competition with someone who is doing mediocre work? Do you find it incomprehensible that anyone would pay attention to that weak expression instead of flocking to your beautiful vibe? If so, here’s my advice. Withdraw your attention from your inferior opponent. Don’t waste a minute feeling jealous or resentful or incredulous. Instead, concentrate your energy on making your production so strong and smart and irresistible that you simply overshadow and overwhelm your rival’s. I’m guessing that many of you will soon be discovering secrets about where you came from. Report results to Freewillastrology.com.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 49 + STUDIES 50 + WELLNESS 52 + SERVICES 54 + LIVE 54

WORK HELP WANTED Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

HELP WANTED

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

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Paid In Advance! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.thehomemailer. com (AAN CAN)

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

ARTIST

Do you like to work on the issues you care about? Would you like to prepare for your future? Want to get paid to make a difference?

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

Tattoo Artist wanted.

Well established shop seeks artist to supplement our crew. Portfolio and experience a must.

724-226-1999

Established female band doing Country, Classic rock, Top 40. Need lead female vocalist. 724-322-3515

$1,400/Month Health Care and Child Care $5,550 Education Award and Federal Student Loan Deferment Hands on Leadership Development, Coaching, and Nonprofit Career Based Training

Spokesmodel National Promotional agency is seeking Spokesmodels to conduct promotions for a leading tobacco product within nightlife and retail establishments in Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. This part time position is ideal for attractive, outgoing young men and women who are looking for an interesting, challenging position within the nightlife and retail scene that will allow them to make good money and have fun.

WHERE: Hyundai Club West Lounge WHEN: Thurs. April 11 from 4pm-8pm and Sat. April 13 from 9am-1pm Park at the Carnegie Science Center for $6 or take the “T” to Allegheny Station

Concessions Catering Ticket Takers Ticket Sellers Seat Attendants Maid/Porter Club Attendants Suite Attendants Event Security Merchandise Guest Services Elevator Operators

Information Sessions will be held from March – May

Position Requirements: • 20 – 25 hours of daytime and/ or evening availability over 3 – 7 days per week. • Clean neat appearance and outgoing personality excellent verbal and people skills • Prior Face-to-Face Promotional Experience preferred • MUST be at least 21 years old

For more information, visit www.publicallies.org or Contact Branden Ballard at 412-258-3022 or brandenb@publicallies.org

Responses can be sent to HR@MSPromotions.com and must include resume, references and comp card/recent photo.

Application Deadline May 24th

GREAT

Drivers

PAY

WANTED

FOR

Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

ONE Gain valuable stadium operations experience in a fast-paced, exciting environment. Come to the Heinz Field Job Fair to apply for event day positions for Pittsburgh Steelers games, Pittsburgh Panthers games, concerts and other exciting events!

DAY!

Must have a full-size truck/van. CONTACT >> 412.316.3342 x173 Jim for an application

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! N E W S

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STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Your Classified Ad printed in more than 100 alternative papers like this one for just $1,150! aTo run your ad in papers with a total circulation exceeding 6.9 million copies per week, call City Paper Classifieds at 412-316-3342. No adult ads. (AAN CAN)

Your ad could be here

CLINICAL STUDIES

Female Smokers Wanted The University of Pittsburgh’s Alcohol & Smoking Research Lab is looking for women who currently smoke to participate in a research project.

You must:

CLINICAL STUDIES

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

ASTHMA? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

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IBS? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

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• Be 40-60 years old, in good health, and a Native English speaker • Be willing to fill out questionnaires • Be willing not to smoke for 5-hours before the session

Earn $60 for participating this study.

412.316.3342

CLINICAL STUDIES

412.363.1900 CTRS

Do you or someone in your family have schizophrenia? This UPMC research study examines the effects of schizophrenia on cognition. We are seeking families affected by schizophrenia to take part. Participation involves 1-2 visits; during these visits, you will complete diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, provide a blood sample, and complete a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI). Participants will be reimbursed $175 for completing all study procedures.

CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

For more information, please call 412-246-6356 or 1-800-994-8182

Healthy Controls Needed for Research Study (UPMC Oakland) This study of cognition and schizophrenia is looking for healthy controls of European descent over the age of 30. Participation involves 1-2 appointments lasting a total of between 5-9 hours and the completion of diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, donation of a blood sample, and taking part in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI). Participants will be reimbursed $175 upon completion of study procedures. Men and women ages 40 and above with no history of psychotic illnesses and no current problems with substance abuse may be eligible.

For more information, please call 412 246 6356 or 1 800 994 8182

Are you interested in a long-term method of birth control? YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE IF YOU:

See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ads and our of ign des the both satisfied with I have w kno I n Whe the response they evoke. the 24-35 in s ject sub arch rese for to advertise k of using the City age group, I immediately thin Paper.

For more information, call

412-624-8975

— Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

5900 Penn Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 50

Schizophrenia Research Study Participants Needed

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

• Are a non-pregnant woman between 16 and 35 years old • Are in need of contraception • Have regular periods • Are willing to come to Magee-Womens Hospital to complete up to 14 or more visits over a five year period The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study of an investigational contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD). Participants will receive study-related exams and study-related birth control at no cost. To see if you qualify, please call the Center for Family Planning Research at 412-641-5496 or visit our website at www.birthcontrolstudies.org.Participants will be reimbursed up to $1030 over five years.

Learn more at www.GoNovum.com

Ink Well

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

TRIPLE FEATURES

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

ACROSS

1. Gem 6. Places for piercings 11. Flight coordinators in a union busted by Reagan: Abbr. 14. 2011 hurricane that hit New York City 15. Submit an April return, the modern way 16. “___ Carter” (Lil Wayne’s fourth record) 17. With 34-Across, petulant dynast of Rebecca Black’s empire? 20. Discharge 21. “Dies ___” (Day of Wrath) 22. “Keep your pants on” 27. Each of the titles in this puzzle’s theme answers, e.g. 30. Her image was stolen in 1911 and recovered in 1913 33. Military academy freshmen 34. See 17-Across 36. Leader who was born in Burma and who died in Myanmar 37. With 50-Across, renegades working for a network of backpacking lodges? 46. Line on a check 49. Game that required the Zapper 50. See 37-Across 52. Gem surfaces 53. Gernreich who designed a scandalous monokini 54. Sound of laughter 57. Weapon recovered from a preserved body at Area 51? 65. The Wings, on the scoreboard 66. “I can have this?”

67. Test outcome that once might have classified someone as a “moron” 68. Dreyer’s partner in ice cream 69. Late-night host with a self-titled show 70. Hamlet’s cousins?

DOWN

1. Brand that’s not for peanut allergy sufferers 2. “Uhh ...” 3. Twice, Chinese dissident artist Ai’s given name 4. Doors classic, with “The” 5. Agriculturalist’s field? 6. Member of the inaugural class of inductees to the National Toy Hall of Fame 7. “The Wizard ___” 8. One may help you clean up your junk 9. 2003 Will Ferrell holiday movie 10. Deep body, often 11. Palpitating 12. “The Work of Art in ___ of Mechanical Reproduction” 13. Drew and Mariah 18. “#!*@% paper cut!” 19. Like many a bathroom floor 22. Mischievous World of Warcraft figure 23. Neither partner 24. ___ Nuevo (Spanish New Year) 25. Morvan of Milli Vanilli (i.e., the one who’s still alive) 26. Leader of leaders? 28. Tech school for crossword champ

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Tyler Hinman 29. Skilled at something, in slang 31. Hentai, e.g. 32. Having broken out as a teenager? 35. Streaming TV site 37. Sportscaster and NBA Hall of Famer Brown 38. Musician who’s probably going to end up in your grid when you’ve got 33 3-letter words 39. Babe’s milieu 40. Protagonist in the highest-grossing film of 1985 41. Letters for the wanted 42. Chemical featured at some modern dispensaries 43. French street 44. Pick, briefly, in football 45. Cadillac luxury

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vehicle introduced in 2013 46. Chafe 47. Torn to bits, as by a lion 48. David Bowie’s “Space ___” 51. Reject rudely 55. Austen novel adapted by the BBC in 2009 56. “Right on, preacher” 58. Org. where Dallas is in the East and St. Louis is in the West, for some reason 59. Remark while on grass? 60. Noted threeingredient sandwich 61. Head across the pond? 62. “The otters are holding hands!” 63. Aural affront 64. Messes with the bass, say, as a DJ {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}

412-316-3342

Clinical Research Study Type 2 Diabetes A 26-week research study is evaluating the safety and efficacy of a new investigational insulin in people with type 2 diabetes. Qualified participants will receive all study-related care and study medication at no cost and may be compensated for time and travel. You may qualify if you: ✓ Are 18 years or older ✓ Have a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for at least 6 months ✓ Have undergone continuous treatment with basal insulin regimen (insulin detemir; insulin glargine; insulin NPH), for at least 3 months ✓ Have an HbA1c level between 7.0% and 10.0% ✓ Have body mass index (BMI) of 40.0 kg/m2 or less

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SUBOXONE TREATMENT Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

Addiction & Recovery Health Services

JADE Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL -

a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS Includes Med Management & Therapy

SUBOXONE We Treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addictions

• Group and Individualized Therapy • NOW Treating Pregnant Women

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

COUNSELING

MIND & BODY

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe. com.

;;;;;;;;;;;;

Oakland, PA Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA West View, PA Butler, PA

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

www.ThereToHelp.org

Now Hiring for LPC/LCSW

We Accept:

MONROEVILLE, PA

- UPMC for You - United Health - And Many Others

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS

WELLNESS CENTER

412-400-7159

Chinese Tuina Massage

selfesteemworkshops.com

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

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Xie LiHong’s

3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

MIND & BODY

MIND & BODY

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

massage Therapy

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

MIND & BODY Zhangs Wellness Center

Mingkun Massage DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE • $40 per 60 min massage • 2hr free valet parking at the Concourse with the purchase of a 60 or 90 min massage 125 W. Station Square Dr. Station Sq. Freight Shops

LOCATIONS IN:

412.434.6700

WELLNESS

412-401-4110 $40/hr DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Phoenix Spa New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily

PH. 412.389.8637

4309 Butler Street

minkunmassage.com

412-621-3300

(Lawrenceville)

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

STAR Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530

412-316-3342

4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116 52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

Judy’s Oriental Massage

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

$40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Accepting All Major Cards

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

get your

yoga on! Light your practice on fire at Inner Hearth Yoga, offering alignment-focused group classes in Point Breeze.

Arm Balance Workshop: Saturday, May 11 2pm-4pm $30 if you register by April 30 $40 after April 30 4519 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield 412-335-1332

$5 Session Preview Week April 8-14!

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SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTION

Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

The Think And Grow Rich of the 21st Century! Revolutionary breakthrough for success being released! For a FREE CD, please call 1-800-385-8470 (AAN CAN) Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper. REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $24.99/mo. FREE HD/ DVR Upgrade to new callers. CALL 1-866-7553285 (AAN CAN) CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

ART/ARTISTS

CLASSES ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN) Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Public Hearing CPRB #12-242 Wednesday, 4/24/13 @ 6:00pm Same Location as Above

Questions may be directed to: 412-765-8023 CPRB PITTSBURGH

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ROOMMATES

MOVING SERVICES

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

BREATHTAKING HISTORICAL HOME

HAULING

Located in Shadyside. This 3 story, 5 BR, 3.5 Ba. 9 room home features large formal dining room, open foyer, new kitchen, mother-in-law suite and 2 car integral garage.

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates Call NOW

412-877-0730

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!!!

412.316.3342

Call George E Lucas 412-771-8400 #1 Choice Real Estate

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

DANCE INSTRUCTOR

Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and deposited at the School District of Pittsburgh, Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, on May 7, 2013, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for:

Public Hearing Notice Regular Board Meeting: Tuesday, 4/23/13 @ 6:00pm City Council Chambers 510 City County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

LIVE

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN)

NOTICES

CITIZEN POLICE REVIEW BOARD

Your ad could be here

Window Replacement Work Pittsburgh Obama 6-12 Asbestos and General Primes

PITTSBURGH STEEL CITY STEPPERS CHICAGO-STYLE STEPPIN’ DANCE LESSONS Wednesdays 7 -8:30 PM Wilkins School Community Center CONTACT: steelcitysteppers@ hotmail.com “friend” us on Facebook and Meetup.com

Courtyard Water Infiltration Repairs Pittsburgh CAPA 6-12 General Prime

Install Exhaust Fans Pittsburgh West Liberty Pre K-5 Mechanical and Electrical Primes Project Manual and Drawings for bidding purposes will be available for purchase by Contractors April 8 at Modern Reproductions, 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Modern Reproductions may be contacted by Phone at 412-488-7700 or Fax at 412-488-7338 to determine the cost of the Project Manual and Documents. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 04.10/04.17.2013

We are an equal rights and opportunity school district. Parent hotline: 412-622-7920/www.pps.k12.pa.us

HOUSE FOR SALE

HOUSE FOR SALE

Your Classified Ad printed in more than 100 alternative papers like this one for just $1,150! aTo run your ad in papers with a total circulation exceeding 6.9 million copies per week, call City Paper Classifieds at 412-316-3342. No adult ads. (AAN CAN)

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper.

New Price $ 360,000 - Mexican War Street Totally Renovated3-story, brick, 3 BR, 2 BA home. Original details, mantels, with 5 fireplaces. Beautiful woodwork & copper downspouts. Extra lot included. Call George E Lucas to see. 412-771-8400

Cheaper than Rent $ 47,900 - Stowe Twp. Well Maintained - 2 BR, Frame Cape Cod set on a large level, fenced-in lot. Features a gas furnace with central air. Ready to move in. Call George E Lucas Today. 412-771-8400

AFFRONT OFFICE

You think Pirates fans have suffered at the hands of the Nuttings? Try working for them! {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} I LOVE BASEBALL. And for the past 20-plus years, I have loved

the Pirates. As a kid, I actually grew up as a fan of the Los Angeles Dodgers. But when I left home for college in the late 1980s — and then really left home, for places like Wisconsin and Louisiana — I found myself following the Pirates as a way to stay connected. Yet despite having been a fan for more than half of my life, I’ve never had a chance to enjoy a winning season. Every Pirates fan alive can tell some version of this story, of course. But I have a layer of scar tissue many fans don’t have. A special reason to feel sympathetic with the hapless players out on the field. I used to work for the Nuttings, too. I didn’t work directly for Bob Nutting, the current president and majority owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates. But I was the managing editor of a Nutting-owned publication located in an Ohio River town — one of about 40 newspapers owned by the family. In baseball parlance, I was manager of one of the organization’s minor minor-league teams, like the Jamestown Jammers or the Gulf Coast Pirates.

For starters, there’s the franchise’s bottom-line approach to staff. The Pirates’ 2013 payroll of $62.5 million ranks them 26th out of Major League Baseball’s 30 teams. And when they do spend money, it’s often for questionable hires. Brandon Inge? Jonathan Sanchez? Casey McGhee for Chad “Fucking” Qualls?!?! At press time, the Pirates were 1-5, and despite some strong outings from pitchers A.J. Burnett, Wandy Rodriguez and James McDonald, the offense has been nonexistent. So far this year, the Pirates have a league-worst team batting average of .119 — 56 points lower than the next-worst team — and only two players hitting above .200. Also, it’s hard not to be reminded of my reprimand every time the Pirates front office devotes so much energy to kneejerk responses. Remember Andrew Kurtz, the pierogi racer who was fired — and later reinstated, after a wave of nationwide mockery — for criticizing Pirates management on Facebook? Or Estelle Aveersa, the Kennedy Township bar-owner who earned the wrath of the Pirates front office — and a call from Pirates general manager Frank Coonelly — for offering a drink

IN SOME WAYS, WALKING AWAY FROM A JOB CAN BE EASIER THAN WALKING AWAY FROM A TEAM THAT YOU ARE INVESTED IN. Working for the Nuttings, like being a Pirates fan, was full of head-scratching moments. It wasn’t just the right-wing opinionpage commentary. Decisions were made based purely on the bottom line, with personnel hired not because they were the most talented people out there, but because they were the cheapest. But at least saving money was a management strategy I could understand. Other front-office priorities were tougher to figure. One Thanksgiving, I wrote a column that used the phrase “fart jokes.” When I returned from the holiday, I was told by my publisher how upsetting such language was, and that it would not be tolerated. I was then presented with a written reprimand I had to sign. I assume it’s still sitting in my personnel file, socked away inside a special vault in Wheeling. A few months later, I found better work elsewhere and left the company. Sort of. Because for the past several years, trying to love this Pirates organization has made me feel like I’m working for the Nuttings all over again.

special for each Pirates loss during a 2011 winless streak? Despite it all, I will dutifully trudge out to the ballpark a dozen times or so this season. I’ll watch every game I can on TV. I’m not a fan of how the Nuttings do business — any business. But in some ways, walking away from a job can be easier than walking away from a team that you are invested in. I know it sounds crazy. If you’re not a sports person, you won’t get it. But owners always have us over a barrel. Baseball fans, like too many employees, have only one option if they don’t like management decisions: heading for the exit. And even if we did stop attending games, the Pirates would still get our money, thanks to their taxpayer-funded stadium. Major League Baseball needs a way to punish owners who don’t spend enough on their teams, who seem content with mediocrity. If the Nuttings can reprimand me for mentioning flatulence, Major League Baseball should be able to punish them for stinking up the North Side. C DE IT C H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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NEW MEMBER

BUFFET

Earn 250 same day base points on day of sign up and receive a FREE Grand View Buffet Buffet offer will be valid on your NEXT visit. Earn 250 same day base points beginning at 6am. You must return to the Rush Rewards Players Club to see if you have reached your point threshold to receive your buffet voucher. Offer valid on all days except Friday nights Seafood Buffet. Must be a Rush Rewards Players Club member. Rush Rewards Players Club cards are free and available to any member of the public at the Rush Rewards Players Club. Must have valid state ID.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.


April 10, 2013