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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

A LOOK AT THE YEAR THE WORLD DIDN’T COME TO AN END — ALMOST DESPITE ITSELF 06


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013


IT AIN’T OVER YET.

EVENTS 1.5 – 2pm GALLERY TALK: LESLIE GOLOMB, ARTIST AND INDEPENDENT CURATOR Free with Museum admission/ Free for Members

1.11 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS Free with Museum admission/Free for Members

1.25 – 8pm OFF THE WALL 2013: TAMMY FAYE STARLITE: CHELSEA MÄDCHEN Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

1.31 – 8:30pm JOHN WATERS: INTIMATE GALLERY TALK REGARDING WARHOL, 60 ARTISTS, FIFTY YEARS Tickets $150 (30 person capacity)

2.1 – 8pm JOHN WATERS: THIS FILTHY WORLD Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

2.26 – 8pm image: Andy Warhol and his Christmas tree in the Factory, 1964, photographer unknown

SOUND SERIES: BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, TITLE TK Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Museum of Art, in conjunction with the exhibition Cory Arcangel: Masters Tickets $18/$15 Members

TOP OFF 2012 — AND THE HOLIDAYS — WITH A SPECIAL TRIP TO THE WARHOL ON MONDAY, DECEMBER 31ST. Why so special? We haven’t been open on a Monday since, well, 2011. So bring yourself, bring your family, bring your friends and maybe even your friends’ friends to end the year in good art, style and fun. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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{EDITORIAL} Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns CATHERINE SYLVAIN, AMANDA WISHNER

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At a campaign stop in Bethel Park, GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney disses a plate of cookies supplied by Bethel Bakery: “Did you make those cookies? You didn’t, did you? No. No. They came from the local 7-Eleven bakery or wherever.” — Check out this and other top headlines of 2012 in our Year in Review

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“The film is a Giant Blinking Light that Earth’s glaciers are melting and disappearing at an astonishing pace.” — Al Hoff, reviewing the new doc Chasing Ice

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INCOMING

FROM A TRAGEDY AT THE ZOO TO SANTORUM’S (THANKFULLY BRIEF) RUN FOR THE WHITE HOUSE, 2012 BROUGHT A DIVERSE CROP OF HEADLINES

Off the Wall’s Gruesome Playground Injuries (Dec. 19) “Although I haven’t seen this production, I have read the play, and I found the playwright’s titular conceit much more effective than this reviewer did. Mr. Hoover also seems to have missed the more unique (and related) dimensions of this exploration of ‘familiar material.’” — Web comment from “AcademicsAnonymous”

FINAL REVIEW

Driving in Pittsburgh with a light coat of snow? I’d rather the world end than deal with everyone going 10 mph.

One last look at our last year on Earth {BY CITY PAPER STAFF}

— Dec. 21 tweet from “Andrew Wyvratt” (@wyvratt23)

Does anyone know where the Mayan bars in Pittsburgh are? This might be my only chance to use ‘end of the world’ pick-up lines — Dec. 21 tweet from “Adam Sedlak” (@adamsedlak)

Circle of Life (clockwise from top left): Ravenstahl pays a wager; City Council honors drag queen Sharon Needles; Rich Fitzgerald has a busy year; Obama cruises back into the White House; Occupy Pittsburgh gets evicted; and right-wing poster boy Rick Santorum gives us all a scare.

JANUARY

JAN. 1: The August Wilson Center Dance Ensemble starts the year off on the right foot by earning a spot on Dance Magazine’s annual “25 to Watch” list. JAN. 3: Democrat Rich Fitzgerald is sworn in as county executive.

News from Pittsburgh during this Apocalypse. Cold and snow with a 98% chance of living through the day. — Dec. 21 tweet from “Gray Thylacine” (@GrayThylacine)

JAN. 5: Fitzgerald, who campaigned by strongly opposing a court-ordered countywide property reassessment, tosses out court-ordered 2012 assessment values for property owners, sending out 2002 valuations instead. From here, things start getting kind of weird. JAN. 8: The Pittsburgh Steelers lose to Tim Tebow’s Denver Broncos in overtime, dashing their Super Bowl hopes. On Jan. 10, Mayor Luke Ravenstahl dons a Tebow jersey and strikes the famous “Tebow” pose, to honor a bet with Denver’s mayor. The Ravenstahlsigned jersey nets $1,400 for the Pittsburgh Promise scholarship fund.

JAN. 18: Faced with a $64 million budget deficit, the Port Authority announces plans for a 35 percent service reduction. Unless funding can be found by September, it warns, it will cut 46 routes, severely reduce the remaining lines, layoff 500 and shut down at least one operating division. JAN. 19: Pennsylvania’s most famous right-wing nut-job, Rick Santorum, emerges from the ashes of his former senatorial career to win the Iowa caucuses. For a brief — though not brief enough — moment, he has to be treated as a serious contender for the GOP’s presidential nomination. JAN. 21: At the Byham Theater, nationally touring monologist Mike Daisey performs his popular show The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs, about his love/hate relationship with Apple and its overseas labor practices. Two months later, Daisey apologizes after it’s revealed he fabricated parts of the monologue. JAN. 24: For-profit education titan Education Management Corp. tells employees that it will

be streamlining operations. Two days later, it will lay off 400 employees, beginning a long, difficult year for the company and its workers.

FEBRUARY

FEB 8: Six days after a court-ordered eviction, members of Occupy Pittsburgh declare a victory and depart the Mellon Green encampment which they had been occupying since Oct. 15, 2011. The site is still fenced off, nearly a year later. FEB. 9: Pitt’s theater department and Pittsburgh Playwrights premiere The Gammage Project, a docudrama by Buck Favorini and Mark Clayton Southers revisiting the infamous 1996 death of motorist Jonny Gammage during a traffic stop by local police. FEB. 13: The University of Pittsburgh receives a bomb threat — the first in what becomes almost an almost daily disruption for most of the semester. In August, federal authorities charge Scottish man Adam Stuart Busby for making 40 threats. CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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FINAL REVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

MAY

FEB. 18: The Distinctively Dutch festival brings three months of performances and exhibitions by contemporary Dutch artists. U.S. and world premieres hosted by the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust include Diespace and avant-garde composer JakobTV’s multimedia opera The News.

PofE T the

WEEK

MAY 2: Gov. Tom Corbett announces that UPMC and Highmark have agreed to extend a contract giving Highmark customers innetwork access to all UPMC hospitals and physicians. For now.

FEB 29: At the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, more than 375 testify against proposed Port Authority cuts while directing their rage toward Gov. Tom Corbett for failing to produce a statewide transportation funding plan.

MARCH

MARCH 2: The Center for PostNatural History opens on Penn Avenue, drawing capacity crowds.

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

North Shore Connector launches.

MARCH 8: Gunman John Shick walks into Western Psychiatric Institute in Oakland and opens fire, killing one and wounding seven others before being fatally wounded by Pitt police. A wide-ranging discussion of gun control and mental-health policies utterly fails to ensue.

against Melani were withdrawn after he completed an anger-management course. The Port Authority of Allegheny County launches the North Shore Connector, a 1.2mile extension of the light-rail system from Downtown to the North Side. The project started in the mid-1990s.

MARCH 13: Officials unveil the relocated and restored “Pittsburgh Recollections,” Romare Bearden’s large-scale mural, in the Gateway Center light-rail station.

MAY 18: State Supreme Court Justice Joan Orie Melvin is charged with nine criminal counts for allegedly using state resources for campaigning. The Supreme Court suspends her while the case plays out. Her sister, state Sen. Jane Orie (R-McCandless) will receive a 10-year prison sentence on related charges.

MARCH 31: Six months after the Sports & Exhibition Authority voted to demolish the Civic Arena, the iconic Igloo disappears from the city’s skyline. Sen. Jane Orie

MARCH 14: A Republicancontrolled state legislature passes a bill requiring all voters to show photo identification when voting, starting with the Nov. 6 election. In May the ACLU and other groups sue to overturn the law, arguing that it would disenfranchise nearly 750,000 voters.

Stars -

MAY 5: City Theatre hosts the local premiere of POP!, a carnivalesque new musical about Pittsburgh native Andy Warhol and his legendary Factory, revolving around his nearfatal shooting, in 1968. The show features Broadway star Anthony Rapp as Warhol.

MARCH 15: Gov. Tom Corbett dismisses criticism of the state’s proposed mandatory ultrasound bill, which would require a woman seeking an abortion to have an invasive ultrasound — and have the image projected on a screen. Women who don’t want to watch, Corbett says, “just have to close [their] eyes.”

Animal Friends rescued Stars in July, and she’s still waiting for a home! This sweet girl loves to give kisses and walks politely on her leash.

APRIL

APRIL 10: Citing his daughter’s health, and facing a likely thumping from GOP voters in his home state, Rick Santorum drops his presidential bid. APRIL 16: Carnegie Mellon’s Laptop Orchestra joins six other universities in the U.S. and U.K. for a video-chat concert. APRIL 18: At a campaign stop in Bethel Park, GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney disses a plate of cookies supplied by Bethel Bakery: “I’m not sure about these cookies,” he says. “Did you make those cookies? You didn’t, did you? No. No. They came from the local 7-Eleven bakery or wherever.” Some pundits begin to wonder if maybe, just maybe, Romney lacks the “common touch.”

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

Sharon Needles Day

JUNE

JUNE 8: Art-rock band Squonk Opera debuts the GO! Roadshow, its prop-festooned concert mounted on the bed of a fully operational flatbed truck, at the Three Rivers Arts Festival. JUNE 19: A state law goes into effect requiring state abortion providers to comply with new stringent regulations that women’s health activists say would force clinics to close. Two clinics do close in the wake of the regulations; other clinics are given an additional six months to meet the code.

APRIL 28: The site of Homestead’s old U.S. Steel works hosts Pyrotopia, Pittsburgh’s first-ever festival of the fire arts. The event is spearheaded by artist Eric Singer, whose fire-spitting contraptions join fire-dancers, fire-eaters and more.

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000 {PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

Protesting transit cuts

MARCH 25: Highmark CEO Ken Melani is arrested after barging into the home of his mistress’ estranged husband in Oakmont, and starting a physical altercation with him. The event would touch off a long week for the $4 million-a-year CEO, who would be fired from his post on April 1. In June charges

APRIL 30: After running their nationally known store for 20 years, Mystery Lovers Bookshop founders Richard Goldman and Mary Alice Gorman introduce new owner Laurie Stephens, a Dallas-based arts manager and former librarian, who formally takes over later in the year. APRIL 30: Bloomfield-based drag queen Sharon Needles wins reality television show RuPaul’s Drag Race, reviving a local controversy about her acts inclusion of Nazi and racist imagery. Even so, Pittsburgh City Council names June 12 “Sharon Needles Day.”

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

Demolition of the Civic Arena

JUNE 20: Local officials join members of the clergy and UPMC employees to rally outside of UPMC Shadyside, then crash a UPMC board meeting to discuss unionization efforts, which they say the health-care giant is trying to fight off. JUNE 24: The Andy Warhol Museum opens Factory Direct, an unusual exhibition displaying CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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the results of residencies by locally and nationally based artists with local businesses ranging from Construction Junction to Bayer and Alcoa. It takes up half a floor at a selfstorage facility in the Strip. JUNE 29: After 35 years, Opera Theater of Pittsburgh abandons its traditional season format for Summerfest, 18 days of music and more at Shady Side Academy in Fox Chapel. The result? OTP has its highest-revenue season ever. JUNE 30: Gov. Corbett signs a law providing massive tax credits for petrochemical companies willing to take advantage of the state’s Marcellus Shale gas boom. The credit was created to entice Shell Oil to build a “cracker” plant in Beaver County. Shell could get a tax break as high as $66 million. Critics note the incentives aren’t tied to actual job creation; Shell has still not made a final decision about building the plant.

JULY

JULY 20: After filming in the city for a month in 2011, The Dark Knight Rises opens nationwide, giving movie audiences a glimpse of what the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Gotham City looks like. JULY 31: Complying with a federal consent decree, ALCOSAN releases a $3.6 billion plan to halt most wet-weather sewer overflows. Critics say the plan ignores cheaper “green” solutions to keep stormwater out of the system in the first place.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

2010 during an altercation in which Miles was severely beaten and arrested. However, the jury deadlocks on other charges of excessive force and false arrest, setting the stage for another trial next year. AUG. 19: Amalgamated Transit Union Local 85 approves a tentative contract with the Port Authority of Allegheny County, to generate an estimated $60 million in savings through wage freezes and other concessions. The deal will pave the way for state assistance for the cash-strapped transit agency. AUG. 21: The other shoe drops on the Port Authority rescue: State and local officials announce they have identified $35 million for the Port Authority to help avert service cuts. The county said it would provide $4.5 million for the agency through the drink tax and Allegheny Regional Asset District; while the state said it would contribute $30-35 million. AUG. 22: The American Civil Liberties Union sues the city of Pittsburgh, asserting that the Bureau of Police discriminates against black applicants to its ranks. The ACLU suggests bias is at work in almost every stage of the hiring process — from oral exams where white applicants get answers in advance, to a secret “chief’s roundtable.” The city denies the complaint, which is currently in a court-ordered arbitration process.

POSTGAME

GIVEAWAY

The Dark Knight Rises

Jordan Miles

AUGUST

AUG. 1: Bricolage Productions launches STRATA, an immersive, interactive show that’s the city’s most ambitious local theater production in memory. Participants are guided through a cleverly disguised Downtown office building housing a self-improvement “refitnessing center” — really a series of scripted encounters with performers, by turns semi-surreal, psychologically provocative and somewhat sinister. The Pittsburgh Pirates are in a heated battle for first place in their division, and are 16 games over .500. Fans begin to hope not only that the team’s string of 19 losing seasons will come to an end, but that it may even make the playoffs. AUG. 8: After a civil trial lasting nearly a month, a federal jury finds that city police officers Michael Saldutte, Richard Ewing and David Sisak did not maliciously prosecute Homewood resident Jordan Miles in January

AUG. 23: A woman police say was wearing hospital scrubs and pretending to be a nurse takes a 3-day-old infant from his mother’s room at Magee Women’s Hospital. After a nearly five-hour search, the baby is found and 19-yearold Breona Moore of the Hill District is charged in the kidnapping.

SEPTEMBER

SEPT. 1: Lead artist Tim Kaulen and longstanding collective the Industrial Arts Co-op unveil “The Workers,” a large-scale tribute to the city’s steelworkers made from scrap metal, at South Side Riverfront Park. The project took 15 years to complete. SEPT. 10: Citing tight budgets and declining corporate sponsorship, Allegheny County pulls the plug on the 20-year holiday tradition that is the Celebration of Lights, at Hartwood Acres. SEPT. 12: A baby black rhino is born at the Pittsburgh Zoo, becoming an instant sensation on social media and national news reports. CONTINUES ON PG. 12


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SEPT. 21: Klein Michael Thaxton updates his Facebook page frequently while holding a hostage in Three Gateway Center. Among his posts: “i cant take it no more im done bro,” and: “how this ends is up to yall bro real shyt”. After five hours, Thaxton releases his hostage unharmed and is arrested. The city’s film renaissance gets another boost with the premiere of The Perks of Being a Wallflower, the locally-shot, oung-adult novel locally-set adaptation of the young-adult en Chbosky. by Upper St. Clair native Stephen Chbosky, who also directed, celebrated with a visit to Dormont’s Hollywood Theater for a screening of Perks’ own touchstone film, The Rocky Horror Picture Show. SEPT. 28: West Penn Allegheny Health System cancels a $475 million deal in which Highmark Inc. would ying have acquired the network, saying Highmark wanted to force the hospital system into bankruptcy.

OCTOBER

OCT. 1: After winning just 19 of their last 57 games — one of the greatest late-season collapses in sports history — the Pirates rack up their 20th straight losing season. And no playoffs, either. OCT. 2: In a case that went to the state Supreme Court and back, Commonwealth Court judge Robert Simpson puts the state’s voter-ID law on hiatus for this year. Republicans brace for an onslaught of foreign-born ACORN zombies at the polls. The zombies never arrive, but that just shows how sneaky Democrats are.

Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

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The Perks of Being a Wallflower

OCT. 6: Volunteers stage Figment, a local incarnation of an outdoor arts-fest model that eschews corporate sponsorship.

A hostage crisis broadcast on Facebook

OCT. 16: Following an unfavorable performance review, the Carnegie Museums announ the departure of president John announce Wetenh The news, which is accompanied Wetenhall. tattle by tattle-tale press accounts of Wetenhall’s controv controversial decision to wear blue jeans to work one day, iis the latest in a series of shake eups at the Carnegie. Carneg shakeups A OCT. 18: About 1,300 delegates under the age of 30 from coun 180 countries converge on fo the international the city for Youn World One Young conference Dignitaries in conference. attendance include former Bi Clinton, U.N. President Bill Ko Annan and Secretary Kofi celebrity chef Jamie Oliver.

NOVEMBER NOVEM

NOV. 3: After virtually ignoring the state for months, Mitt Romney declares that Pennsylvania is in play. Vice-presidential candidate Paul Ryan asks a crowd in Harrisburg, “Hey, Pennsylvania, you going to help us win this election?” Apparently not. NOV. 4: Two-year-old Maddox Derkosh is mauled to death by African painted dogs at the Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium after falling off a ledge. NOV. 6: Election Day: Barack Obama soundly defeats GOP challenger Mitt Romney by capturing 332 electoral votes. In Pennsylvania, Kathleen Kane becomes the first woman and the first Democrat elected attorney general; U.S. Sen. Bob Casey defeats Tea Party Republican Tom Smith; and Republican Keith Rothfus defeats incumbent Mark Critz to represent the 12th Congressional District. NOV. 14: During the 2012 election cycle, $6 billion was spent nationwide on political advertisements. A City Paper analysis of ad buys shows at least $34 million was spent on political advertising at local television stations. (City Paper itself earned considerably less.)

OCT. 8: Convicted child molester and former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky releases an audio message from jail on the eve of his sentencing, proclaiming his innocence. The next day, he is sentenced to 30-60 years in prison.

NOV. 20: Officials at the Community College of Allegheny County confirm that they will be cutting hours for 400 part-time workers to 29 hours per week. The move means the employees will not be eligible for health care under the Affordable Care Act; covering them would have cost the school $6 million.

OCT. 11: As the NHL season is scheduled to begin, owners and players seem far apart on a labor deal to end the lockout. As of press time, they still are.

DEC. 2: After losing to the lowly Cleveland Browns just a week earlier, Homestead native

DECEMBER

CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013


public transit

Every weekday, Port Authority's buses and railcars keep thousands of cars off the road. Next time you’re driving during the morning rush hour, count the buses you see. Multiply that number by 40, the average number of riders per bus. Then imagine your commute with thousands more cars jamming the road. The typical commuter already spends the equivalent of eight full workdays sitting in traffic. How much more time would you spend if even a portion of the nearly quarter-million daily Port Authority commuters started driving to work? Transit is a public asset that plays a vital part of our community. Everyday.

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FINAL REVIEW, CONTINUED FROM PG. 12

and Pittsburgh Steelers third-string QB Charlie Batch leads the team to an emotional 23-20 win over the Baltimore Ravens in what many believe will be Batch’s final season. DEC. 8: Gov. Corbett tells reporters covering the annual Pennsylvania Society Events in New York that he has a transportation funding package prepared to announce in 2013. As usual, however, he doesn’t discuss details.

Do you have high cholesterol? You may be able to take part in a clinical research study testing an investigational drug to treat people with coronary heart disease and high cholesterol.

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Physical examinations ECGs (tracing of your heart’s rhythm) Laboratory tests Investigational drug Compensation for your travel may be available

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Monroeville resident and Navy SEAL Nicholas D. Chesque is shot and killed in Afghanistan while trying to rescue a U.S. doctor held captive by the Taliban. DEC. 11: Pittsburgh City Council passes a law to use billboards to shame the owners of blighted properties across the city to clean them up. DEC. 12: Pittsburgh City Council declares it “Wiz Khalifa Day” in honor of the rapper, a.k.a. Cameron Jibril Thomaz, a graduate of Allderdice High School. Gov. Tom Corbett says the state will not establish its own health-insurance exchange under the Affordable Care Act, instead allowing the federal government to implement the new system. DEC. 13: City Councilor Bill Peduto comes clean about the worst-kept secret in city politics — that he will challenge Mayor Luke Ravenstahl in the 2013 mayoral race. DEC. 14: In Newtown, Conn., 20-year-old Adam Lanza enters Sandy Hook Elementary School and opens fire with a semi-automatic rifle, killing 20 students and six adults. The tragedy is felt nationwide with renewed calls for gun control. Locally, schools increase

security, including the addition of armed officers in schools. Pittsburgh-based Dick’s Sporting Goods suspends the sale of semi-automatic rifles like the one Lanza used. DEC. 18: Pittsburgh City Council gives the green light to Riverfront Landing, a retail and residential development the Buncher Company wants to build on 55 acres adjoining the Strip District. The plan is blasted by Pittsburgh City Councilor Patrick Dowd, who faults it for, among other things, partially razing a historic Strip District produce terminal. Sheena Monnin, a Cranberry Township resident and former Miss Pennsylvania is ordered to pay $5 million to billionaire Donald Trump for saying the Miss Universe pageant — owned by Trump — was “fraudulent, lacking in morals, inconsistent, and in many ways trashy” on her Facebook page. Isn’t that part of Trump’s charm? DEC. 19: Actor Tom Cruise comes to town for a relatively low-key screening of his new locally shot film, Jack Reacher. The original, more extravagant Dec. 15 red carpet event was cancelled out of respect for the victims of the Newtown school shooting. The National Labor Relations Board files a complaint against UPMC, alleging the health-care company violated federal law in efforts to squash attempts by non-clinical employees to unionize. DEC. 21: Pittsburgh somehow avoids the cataclysm predicted by the ancient Mayan cataclysm. Unless, of course, this is just one more trend we’re going to catch onto a few months later than everyone else. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{BY MATT BORS}

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

IDIOTBOX


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JOIN THE ENERGY SURGE AT PTI EARN YOUR OIL AND GAS ELECTRONICS DEGREE START CLASS JANUARY 22 Come catch that holiday glow at Winter Flower Show, where you can stroll along candlelit pathways, marvel at a miniature World’s Fair-themed Garden Railroad, and take in the beauty of seasonal blooms and festively trimmed trees. Then head outside to explore our dazzling new Winter Light Garden with luminous orbs, “dripping” icicles, and a sparkling fountain. For details, visit phipps.conservatory.org.

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1.800.784.9675 pti.edu For graduation rates and other important consumer information, please visit us online at www.pti.edu/disclosures.

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AT TENTION

RETAIL

EMPLOYEES:

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD} The governing Council of Brentwood, England, professes a “reputation as one of the most transparent” in the country, but in N ovember, responding to a Freedom of Information request for documents on a government contract, it merely released 425 totally-blackened (“redacted”) pages. The official explanation was that all of the papers concerning construction of a movie theater were deemed “commercially sensitive” and “not in the public interest.” (Following an outcry, the Council re-thought the FOI request and disclosed “considerably more information,” according to the Daily Telegraph.)

Tiffany Hartford, 23, and George Sayers Jr., 48, were charged in Bethel, Conn., in December with selling unauthorized videos of Hartford having sex with another woman. That other woman charged, and a DN A test confirmed, that Sayers is Hartford’s father and that the two have a baby (although both deny knowing they were father-daughter at the time they had sex).

Michigan Egos On Parade: (1) Detroit police chief Ralph Godbee was suspended in October after an affair with a subordinate became public. Godbee’s predecessor had been fired for the same reason (among other reasons), and in fact, Godbee had previously had an affair with the same subordinate who had been implicated with his predecessor. (2) The former mayor of Flint, Don Williamson, who resigned in 2009 while being targeted in a recall election, recently erected a large bronze statue of himself outside his home in Davison Township. (3) In June, former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, having served 99 days in jail on obstruction-of-justice charges and still awaiting a federal corruption trial, asked Michigan prison officials to relieve him of “community service” parole obligations — because he had a number of paid speeches scheduled out of town.

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Police in Geraldton, Australia, reported in N ovember that they had captured a thief they were chasing in the dark through a neighborhood’s backyards. As the thief came to a fence and leaped over it, he happened to land on a family’s trampoline and was propelled backward, practically into cops’ laps.

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ARE YOU OWED

OVERTIME? Workers’ rights attorneys are currently investigating allegations that some employers may have underpaid certain of their employees by unlawfully failing to pay time and 1/2 overtime compensation. Specifically, certain companies may have unlawfully paid employees only 1/2 their regular rate, as opposed to time and ½ for hours worked over 40. If, at any time between December 1, 2009 and the present, you worked over 40 hours per week and were paid less than time and a half for overtime compensation, immediately call: (855) 4CLASSLAW to speak with an attorney. Joseph Weeden, Esq., Arlington, VA.

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The head of the Perse School in Cambridge, England, recently instituted a “10-Second Rule” for minor disciplinary infractions: Students could avoid punishment if they quickly produced a clever explanation for their misbehavior. “Getting children to talk their way out of a tight corner in a very short period of time,” said Ed Elliott, encourages creativity and could produce a generation of British entrepreneurs. Said a supporter, “Often the ones who get further are the artful dodgers,” who “bend the truth.” (Elliott warned, though, that “out-and-out falseness” would not be tolerated.)

Guy Black, 76, was charged in Turbotville, Pa., in October with threatening housemate Ronald Tanner with a chainsaw. Tanner, defending himself with the only “weapon” within reach — an umbrella — managed to pin Black with it as the chainsaw jammed. (Most people who bring an umbrella to a chainsaw fight would be less successful.)

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Deputy N YPD Commissioner Paul Browne told reporters in November that, in the 24 hours of Mon., Nov. 26, not a single criminal shooting, stabbing or slashing was reported in the five boroughs. Browne said no police official could remember such a day, ever. (The city is on track to finish 2012 with fewer than 400 homicides — compared to the record year of 1990, when 2,245 people were murdered.)

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“Braco,” a Croatian-born “healer” (although he rejects the term), seems to make legions of sick or troubled believers feel better merely by gazing at them in silence for a few minutes before leaving the room. (A Washington Post reporter, seeking allergy-relief, attended a 100-person session in October, but found no improvement.) “Whatever is flowing through him,” said one transfixed fan, “is able to connect with a part of us.” Said another enthusiast, “The thing that makes Braco unique is he really doesn’t do anything.”

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In October, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals petitioned Irvine, Calif., to create a roadside memorial for the truckload of live fish that had perished in a recent traffic accident. On the other hand, the traffic casualties that day were en route to the Irvine Ranch Market to be sold as food.

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Shortly after drug-possession suspect Patrick Townsend, 30, was arrested in Lakeland, Fla., in N ovember and had allegedly confessed into a detective’s digital recorder, Townsend managed to snatch the unattended recorder from a table, took a restroom break, and flushed it down the toilet. Townsend’s subsequent advice to the detective: “Tighten up on your job, homie.” (“Destroying evidence” was added to Townsend’s charges.)

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Casey Anthony was acquitted by a jury in Orlando in 2011 of killing her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee, in part because investigation of her computer did not yield incriminating evidence (e.g., suspicious search terms in her Internet Explorer’s history). However, in November 2012, with Anthony protected by the Constitutional prohibition against “double jeopardy,” investigators admitted they had overlooked the computer’s other web browser (Firefox). There, on the date of Caylee’s disappearance, were pages containing such search terms as “fool-proof suffication” (sic) and “asphyxiation.”

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High School Inspirations: (1) Trent Bauer became a mid-season replacement as starting quarterback for Paul Laurence Dunbar High School (Lexington, Ky.) after beginning the season merely as the team’s bulldog-costumed mascot on the sidelines. In his first game, in October, he threw two touchdown passes in a 22-19 victory. (2) Also in October, South Plantation (Fla.) High School’s third-string quarterback, Ms. Erin DiMeglio, was voted the school’s homecoming queen. In her first game this season, she had come off the bench in a brief stint and completed two passes.

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@E A RT HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013


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ON

STRAIGHT-UP SOUTHERN BARBECUE OF CHICKEN, BEEF AND PORK, WITH ALL THE EXPECTED SIDES

LOCAL EXOTIC PIEROGIES {BY LAUREN DALEY} Thomas Guentner and Jeff Newman know that Pittsburghers take their pierogies seriously. When they’re making their own version in the kitchen of InnTermission Lounge in the South Side, the occasional nebby passerby has poked in to observe — and critique their methods. That’s because the pair behind Peddlin’ Pierogies doesn’t make a traditional dumpling. All of their products are sourced locally and organically; the dough, for example, starts with spelt flour from nearby Clarion River Organics. Besides the traditional cheesy potato, the flavors are diverse: jalapeño cilantro; black bean and corn; and kraut and Swiss. Their autumn selections included a Thanksgiving ’rogie with local potatoes, sage stuffing and organic cranberry sauce, and a pumpkin and pesto dumpling. (They also offer a delicious vegetarian chili.) The Peddlin’ dumpling exterior is nutty and crisp from the spelt and from being pan-fried; you can taste the distinct flavor combinations within the dough pocket. Peddlin’ currently serves at the InnTermission, on Mondays from 6-10 p.m. and Fridays from 8 p.m.-1 a.m. — just walk back to the kitchen and place your order for eat-in or take-out. You can also find the dumplings at Ruggers Pub, in the South Side, and the pair pops up selling along East Carson Street and the Strip District on weekends. The locations can be followed on Twitter via @PeddlinPierogie and Facebook. Look for them selling the dumplings via bicycle in the new year. LDALEY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

www.peddlincompany.com

the

FEED

Number of people in line at the Penn-Mac cheese counter, Friday before Christmas:

114 18

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

P

LENTY OF restaurants come with

a backstory, but the tale behind Robbie’s Super-Stuff Super-Licious BBQ is more like a saga. It begins almost a century ago, when an Italian boy in Monroeville befriended an African-American kid whose family came into his father’s shop. Decades later, Vincent Chianese was running Vincent’s Pizza Park, a Forest Hills landmark, while Robert Chambers worked on the Union Railroad and fought for civil rights in the east suburbs. When Robert’s son — Robbie Jr. — opened a barbecue place in Homewood, his dad’s old friend Vincent would stop in for takeout. But the barbecue restaurant had its own story, not all of it triumphant, and the younger Chambers went on to work in sales, based in Chicago. While Robbie traveled, Chianese had trouble keeping occupants in a second restaurant building on his Ardmore Boulevard property,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Seasoned half-chicken with cornbread, collard greens, and macaroni and cheese

and tried to convince Robbie to return to the grill. Six years ago, the younger Chambers finally agreed, opening the flamboyantly named barbecue next door to the old Vinnie’s space.

ROBBIE’S SUPER-STUFF SUPER-LICIOUS BBQ 1000 Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills. 412-823-4003 HOURS: Tue.-Sat. 2-10 p.m. PRICES: Single wings and ribs $1.25-3.25; sides $2.75-6; slabs, half and whole chickens, and combos $7.50-21.99 LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED Robbie’s offers straight-up Southern barbecue of chicken, beef and pork, with all the sides you’d expect. We ordered up a full rack of pork ribs, with sauce on the side so that we could taste

the meat first. Good call: Robbie’s delivered the smoke, and while his sauce — a customization of KC Masterpiece, as per the menu — was a pretty good condiment, with a touch of heat to offset its sweet base, the meat was good enough to eat unaccompanied. We’re not big believers in fall-off-thebone ribs: Too often, that’s synonymous with meat that’s cooked beyond tender and clear into mushy territory. We found Robbie’s ribs to be on the other side of that equation: The meat was tender, but there was significant chew, and someone — whether it’s you at the table or a canine friend sampling leftovers — will have a good time working the last few morsels from the bone. While the rib meat needed some pull, we really were able to liberate the chicken meat from the bone practically just by looking at it. The cooking method — grill-smoked, then finished in an CONTINUES ON PG.20


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BBQ TIME, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

oven — resulted in flabby skin. But the flavor — mustardy and with just a hint of spice — was excellent. While the spices stayed on the skin, the smoke permeated the moist, juicy meat, and it was worth pecking through the half-bird in search of every last morsel. We ordered some of Robbie’s mustard sauce on the side in hopes it would add some Carolina-style tang, but it turned out to be a fairly standard honey-mustard mixture. For us, the chicken was more than good enough without any sauce. Macaroni and cheese was less noteworthy, with bland cheese melted into the noodles in place of a creamy sauce, but the browned bits from the top added welcome toasty flavor. Angelique was much more impressed with the greens, whose long simmer in pork broth had tenderized without disintegrating them, and infused them with deep, salty, smoky flavor. We loved that Robbie put actual corn in his cornbread, but we found it too sweet, and its texture was closer to that of a moist cake than to a fluffy bread. As with so many restaurant cornbreads, it seemed better suited to dessert than to soaking up the hearty flavors of a savory meal.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

HOLIDAY SPIRIT Local seasonal beers offer additional holiday treats

Vincent’s is closed now, but Robbie has installed the booths from the legendary pizzeria in his store, just one more commingling of the Chianese and Chambers families. Robbie reports that Vincent’s relatives are working to reopen the pizzeria. If they succeed, the legacy will continue, with both families once again serving up food, side by side. In the meantime, a lengthy construction project on Route 30 hid Robbie’s driveway behind orange cones for much of this year, dampening business somewhat, but long-time customers know how to find their way in. Construction is now finished, allowing barbecue-seekers old and new easy access to Robbie’s Super-Licious ribs of repute.

Beer is becoming almost as seasonal as salad. Much as a mix of spinach and pears yields the plate to kale and beets, pumpkin beer has ceded local taps to a variety of holiday brews. “There are no rules” with winter concoctions, says Barrett Goddard, a brewer at Full Pint Brewery. “You You can have fun. There’s usually spice involved, but there some spic to be.” doesn’t have h The brewery’s “Festivus” b named for the — nam once fictional, now pseuon nce fi do-real do o-rea holiday invented during du uring an episode of Seinfeld Sei Se infe — is a malty brown b rrow ale with hints of cinnamon and nutmeg. cciinn The T bold holiday spice in tthe aroma gives way to t a more subtle flavor. Not many people have hav been airing h grievances with the grie brew, which has brew quickly developed a quic loyal following. “We’ve done 15 30-barrel batches, which is more than double than we brewed last year,” says Goddard. Penn Brewery, Pittsburgh’s oldest craft-beer house, has been brewing its ruby St. Nikolaus Bock for 20 years. The wild, festive Santa on the label dares consumers to be a bit naughty. For the last five years, Penn Brewery has also rolled out St. Nikolaus Brewer’s Reserve. The beer, a silver medalist at the 2011 Great American Beer Festival, is a “bigger, darker, stronger version of the St. Nick Bock,” according to brewer Nick Rosich. And if you’re looking for sweeter holiday cheer, the brewery introduced Nut Roll Ale this year: It’s a lactofermented beer steeped in cinnamon and vanilla. Then there’s Troegs Mad Elf Ale, brewed in Hershey, Pa. “It’s pretty much the standard,” says D’s Six Pax and Dogz manager Rena Agostinone. The boozy blend of malt, honey and sour cherries packs a powerful punch at 11 percent alcohol by volume. But if you’ve already grown weary of spiced beer hogging the taps, the season of cinnamon and nutmeg is fleeting. The dark days of February are better suited for mellow, roasty stout beers. “There’s a beer for every occasion and a beer for every season,” says Rosich.

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE GREENS’ LONG SIMMER IN PORK BROTH HAD TENDERIZED WITHOUT DISINTEGRATING THEM, AND INFUSED THEM WITH DEEP, SALTY, SMOKY FLAVOR.

20

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2013 New Year’s Eve

This year it’s on December 31 Three great four-course prix fixe menus for you and the ones you love, with optional wine or microbrew pairings and a champagne toast.

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22

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Little

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

1947 TAVERN. 5744 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-1947. This Shadyside venue offers a sophisticated take on simple, satisfying food. It’s sandwiches, salads and mac-and-cheese, but the meat is roasted in house, and the pasta is local (and served with veggies, short rib or bacon). Thus does 1947 combine two foodie fashions — artisanal preparations and comfort food. KE BARCELONA AT RIVERS EDGE. 4616 Allegheny River Blvd., Verona. 412-793-1777. A fantastic location and Mediterranean flavors make this venue high atop the Allegheny River a worthy stop. The menu is unambiguously Spanish (with a little bit of Portuguese and Italian thrown in), with traditional dishes, like paella, and Spanish-accented local classics, like lobster crab cakes with blood-orange buerre blanc and pico de gallo. LE BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE

Savoy {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Strip steak, pork chops, coq au vin and duck, are generously proportioned, with tasty vegetable and potato sides. KE IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-344-4123. This popular neighborhood café serves Neapolitan-style pasta and pizza, including the scandalously cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. The front room overlooks bustling Washington Avenue; in season, lucky diners can enjoy the rear garden courtyard. KE

structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or lasagne with house-made chive pasta. KE SAVOY. 2623 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-281-0660. The Strip District now has a swanky spot for brunch and dinner. The artfully prepared cuisine suggests a cross between current fine-dining culture (locally sourced foods, sous vide meats), lounge favorites (sliders and fish tacos) and Southern comfort (chicken with black-eyed peas and greens, watermelon salad). LE

JOSEPH TAMBELLINI RESTAURANT. 5701 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-6659000. The menu at this convivial white-linen Italian restaurant straddles the ultra-familiar — the five choices in the chicken and veal section are trattoria staples — and the SMILING BANANA LEAF. more unusual. There’s a strong 5901 Bryant St., Highland emphasis on fresh pasta and Park. 412-362-3200. At inventively prepared this absolute jewelseafood, such as crusted box of a restaurant, Chilean sea bass in the menu emphasizes an orange buerre authentic Thai blanc and berry dishes rather than . www per marmalade. LE Thai-inflected a p ty pghci m Chinese food. Grilled .co NINE ON NINE. 900 meat appetizers are Penn Ave., Downtown. beautifully seasoned, 412-338-6463. This elegant and the pad Thai offers a restaurant and lounge offers lively balance of ingredients. a maturation of contemporary The assertively spicy pumpkin American cuisine, effortlessly curry features a special variety shifting from refined of Thai gourd. JF Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. SPADAFORA’S. 3932 Route Instead of showy creations, 8, Allison Park. 412-486-1800. the kitchen produces dishes Though little more than an that instantly seem right, unassuming concrete-block box such as miso cod or thymeon the outside, inside this is a roasted Amish chicken with warm, welcoming family-run asparagus flan. LE trattoria offering Southern Italian specialties as well as ItalianTHE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, American fare. Quality ingredients, Forbes Avenue and Schenley thoughtful preparation and Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. friendly service make this An attractive wood-and-stone restaurant stand out. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE

Il Pizzaiolo {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} BRASSERIE 33. 5863 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-3090. The food is unpretentious but not dumbed down in this classic French brasserie. The appetizers offer a greatest-hits collection of French food, from escargot and charcuterie to rillettes of rabbit and Roquefort flan. Entrees, including New York


STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight Road, Ross Township. 412-3695380. There is an art to making a really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ

offMenu

Happy New Year

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

aGift for You

SOURED NO MORE

Eating sauerkraut the right way eases a lot of bad memories

TASTE OF INDIA. 4320 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-7700. Yogi Berra groused about the restaurant nobody went to — because it was always too crowded. Taste of India is the opposite: Everyone goes there partly because you can always get a table. The atmosphere is almost surreally quiet, but the food is consistently good (try the paneer). Portions are ample, prices reasonable. JE

I REMEMBER the date: Jan. 1, 2011. And the moment exactly: I was with my husband and it was our first trip to Salt of the Earth in Garfield, a few days after we got the keys to our new place in Pittsburgh, having moved back here from the South. Salt didn’t have its regular menu that day. It offered just one dish: pork and sauerkraut. I almost vetoed the idea. I grew up in Pittsburgh and for most of my first 18 years — when it was impossible to avoid — I choked back the store-bought versions of sauerkraut that always appeared in a slow-cooker with kielbasa and hot dogs. Full of preservatives that inhibited the bacteria that make sauerkraut sauerkraut, the bagged stuff always tasted off. But I didn’t know the reason then, or that what I was tasting wasn’t how it was supposed to be. I just knew I hated sauerkraut.

TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch counters, train stations and family kitchens. From salads containing burdock root and rice balls to cabbage pancakes and stir-fried noodles, this dinerstyle venue lets casual eaters expand beyond sushi. KE

OPEN NEW YEAR’S EVE Until 10pm. Make Reservations Soon.

Buy 1 Dinner get the 2nd Dinner 1/2 off * OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE. MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY ONLY.

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UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675. This lively familystyle BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder and chicken) are “dry” (with sauces at table), and the sides are well-prepared classics: mac-andcheese, baked beans, collard greens and coleslaw. Prices are higher than a roadside stand, but the quality is top-notch. KE

Pork and sauerkraut, at Salt of the Earth {PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

But my husband didn’t grow up eating pork and sauerkraut on New Year’s Day. And he really, really wanted to try this place out. I decided I could do what I had perfected as a kid and eat around the sauerkraut in the dish. Instead, as my husband watched in awe, I devoured it. Made from scratch — cabbage and salt, fermented in a barrel — it was an entirely new experience. “It’s a very traditional sauerkraut that we doctor up at the time of the service,” says Salt’s chef and owner, Kevin Sousa. He adds the kraut to sautéed onions and then includes caraway seeds, apple-cider vinegar, sugar and dark beer, while letting it cook down a bit further, he says. Inspired, last week I made my own batch of sauerkraut, with the help of Trevett Hooper, chef and owner of Legume, who offered his followers on Twitter and Facebook a free early-morning class. Like Sousa’s recipe, the ingredient list was simple: cabbage, salt and a mix of chopped root vegetables. We massaged it all, drawing out the water, and sealed it in a canning jar. It will be ready New Year’s Day 2013, and I now have no qualms about enjoying the local tradition. We’ll have sauerkraut again. As it should be.

WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 Bower Hill Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1232. At this cozy, contemporary, candlelit cottage, the Italian- and Mediterranean-inspired menu changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest in-season ingredients. The menu offers fewer than 10 entrées, each matched with a small suite of carefully selected sides. Expect quality ingredients — dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, lamb, steak — and exquisitely prepared meals. LF THE WINE LOFT. 2773 Tunnel Blvd., SouthSide Works, South Side. 412-586-5335. A wellcurated wine list, cozy seating options and an expanded menu make this a convivial spot for socializing. Share a pizza — or try an entrée such as filet sliders, Hawaiian tuna tartare or pumpkin ravioli. Wines include unusual varietals alongside the more familiar chardonnays and shirazes. KE

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LOCAL

“IT’S PRETTY MUCH ALL ABOUT MAKING NEW FRIENDS AND EATING NEW SANDWICHES.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

RARE TALENT

ON THE

STUMP IN 2013

{BY AMANDA WISHNER}

L

EGS LIKE Tree Trunks vocalist and gui-

It’s about touching lives: Palermo Stone

In 2009, Palermo Stone was touring the country — as Mac Miller’s hype man. A couple years later, Miller had made the big time, but Stone had already settled into working on a solo career. “I felt like it was the right time in his career for me to move away,” Stone says, recalling the conversation he had with Miller about moving on. “It was a pursuit to have something for myself.” Sure, if he’d stayed on board, Stone would be rolling in cash now — but then he wouldn’t be heading up his own company, R.A.R.E. Nation, and he wouldn’t have his third solo record, R.A.R.E., available now. And he wouldn’t be touching lives back at Woodland Hills High School, of which he’s a 2008 alum, the way he is now. Stone’s new album includes an insert with work from several local artists, some of whom are current Woodland Hills students. “When I first started with music,” he explains, “I was a senior in high school. And when you say you’re going to do something against the grain … “ He trails off, then changes gears: “I had a great education there, that led me to what I’m doing as an entrepreneur, so I wanted to give back.” Giving back means helping out those students interested in music and visual arts, via gallery shows, concerts and eventually, Stone hopes, a scholarship in his name for a performing-arts student from the district. That’s what R.A.R.E. Nation is about, on top of being an artistmanagement company. For now, Stone is supporting R.A.R.E., the album. (It stands for “Revitalizing Art, Reinventing Emotion.”) It came out Fri., Dec. 21, and features 15 tracks, many produced by Stone’s collaborator Jazz Logic, a U.K. producer who makes beats with live instrumentation rather than samples. Other producers include Hitt of MCM Studios and Big Jerm of ID Labs. If R.A.R.E. sells, Palermo Stone will be happy — but his main focus isn’t on his own success. “The attention and quote-unquote fame is cool,” he says, “but the things that are gonna last are the things that are gonna touch people’s lives.”

tarist Matt Holden has never really had one specific place to call “home.” After spending most of his childhood in New Zealand, Holden moved to England, then across the pond to Boston and Philadelphia. He finally made his move to Pittsburgh to get his degree in sociology at Pitt. “I’m a firm believer that the music you create is inspired by literally everything you’ve ever come into contact with,” he says, “be it other people or music or movies — any type of creative endeavors.” It’s the same sense of adventure and exploration that defines Legs Like Tree Trunks. It was during his sophomore year that Holden, now 21, met the three other musicians that would eventually form the indie band. Bassist Dave Shepherd responded to one of Holden’s Craigslist ads, and the two began playing together as an acoustic guitar-and-upright bass duo. They would later recruit drummer Tyler Donaldson, who had previously played with Holden in a band called Ready Room, and Dave Cerminara to play guitar. Now, less than two years later, the fledgling band is preparing for its upcoming week-long winter tour, scheduled around conflicting winter breaks and real-world jobs. Maintaining a balance between work and music is tough, Holden says. “We can’t really get nearly as much done as we want to or could be able to. If we weren’t all in school, we’d be [on tour] six months out of the year, but we can only get a week here or a week there.” It’s a time period of personal evolution for them all, he says. With most either having already graduated from college or preparing to, they’re each undergoing some serious life changes — something Holden

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

24

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

{PHOTO COURTESY OF OHAD CADJI}

Holding up the Brillo box: Legs Like Tree Trunks (clockwise from top left: Matt Holden, Dave Shepherd, Tyler Donaldson, Dave Cerminara)

says is reflected in the new material the band is writing for its upcoming full-length record, expected sometime this summer. Although its most recent record, Future Reference, was just released in September, it’s actually been over a year in the making.

LEGS LIKE TREE TRUNKS WINTER TOUR More info at www.facebook.com/ legsliketreetrunks

The band started recording the drums for the five-track album during the summer of 2011 but had to wait almost an entire year to return to the studio and finish it. It all comes down to distance, which makes

writing and recording difficult for Legs Like Tree Trunks. Cerminara and Holden both live in Pittsburgh, but the rest of the band’s members spend most of their time in different cities — as far away as Philadelphia. “If we play two weekends a month on the road, then we can get by without practicing, so that’s kind of been how we’ve been making it work,” Holden says. The four musicians combine an eclectic mix of influences and backgrounds in jazz, hip hop, metal and music theory to create what the band likes to call “mathy, folky indie rock.” The four friends are always sending demos back and forth. “But when we’re all able to get together it just ties it all together,” Holden says. CONTINUES ON PG. 27


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013


ON THE STUMP IN 2013, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

When the band released Future Reference, it opted to offer it online for free. “I think people buy physical copies of music to remember a specific [time] seeing a band play,” he posits, “which is why you have this kind of huge rise of bands putting their stuff on Bandcamp for free, and then touring and selling it on vinyl or tapes or CDs or whatever. It’s a totally different model nowadays, really.” The band’s members have one goal in mind: getting people to hear their music. That translates to playing shows anywhere and everywhere, despite having to sustain life on ramen noodles, scotch and the kindness of strangers. “It’s pretty much all about making new friends and eating new sandwiches,” Holden quips. For a bunch of 20-somethings, he admits, they’re all pretty responsible; it’s a struggle to think of any wild tour stories. “The challenge is leaving tour and coming back home and doing the real-life shit,” he says, “because I’d rather just escape from it all.” Although “home” for the four-piece might not always be Pittsburgh, Legs Like Tree Trunks owe much of its success to the local music scene. “The city is overwhelmingly young and creative,” Holden says, “and there’s also a lot of money being invested in the arts, which is really helpful for artists. There’s just a great kind of creative, collaborative energy here.” It’s the same family nature found in Pittsburgh that Holden says is really fostering the growth of indie bands, both locally and globally. There are more opportunities for bands to find and reach new audiences, and Legs Like Tree Trunks have done its best to take advantage of all it can. Recently the band recorded a session at the Daytrotter studios in Rock Island, Ill., released in October of this year. The studio and website invites bands — ranging from big names like Mumford & Sons to fledgling acts — to stop by while they’re out on tour and play a quick, raw acoustic set. According to Holden, the experience was a big deal to the band because the website has always been an outlet through which they’ve discovered some of their favorite bands. Daytrotter aims to cultivate and support emerging indie bands — something that Holden tries to do through Legs Like Tree Trunks. “That’s really what’s happening in indie music these days: Everybody’s paying it forward for the love of music,” he says. “We’re all relying on the kindness and energy and spirit of everybody else in this music scene all across the country, and the world in some aspects. Everyone’s helping each other promote their art and themselves instead of treating it like a competition.” INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

103 Slade Lane Warrendale, PA 15086


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RINGING IT IN {BY ANDY MULKERIN} THERE ARE MANY ways to ring in the New Year. There’s always the Megabus ticket to New York to see the ball drop, or the turnpike drive to Lebanon, Pa., to watch them drop a huge stick of bologna. Or you could go out on the town in Pittsburgh and see some music — and there are plenty of opportunities for that. Here’s a roundup of some of the notable events happening on the 31st. The biggest New Year’s Eve event in town is always First Night, Downtown. As usual, the Cultural Trust’s event features a good bit of live music. At the August Wilson Center (980 Liberty Ave.), AcoustiCafe is hosting a number of local singer-songwriters: Ben Shannon, Joy Ike, Mark Dignam and a slew of others play kidfriendly sets all evening. Elsewhere, WYEP hosts a stage at 121 Seventh Street that features local bands Broken Fences and Young Brokaw. Cello Fury plays a series of sets at 805 Liberty Ave., and the main-stage performance comes from headliner Dirty Dozen Brass Band, who will ring it in on the Highmark Stage on Penn Avenue. First Night isn’t the only place to find national headlining acts on New Year Year’ss Eve, though. ugh. At Altar Bar (1620 Penn Ave., ve., Strip District), allwoman Led Zeppelin tribute act Lez Zeppelin gets top billing. At Mr. Small’s (400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale), Foxy Shazam zam m plays (see Critics’ Picks, cks, page 31). At Round ound Corner Cantina (3720 Butler St., Lawrenceville), enceville), New Jersey’s Mike Simonetti is the big-name DJ; the Troubleman Unlimnlimited labell

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

owner founded Italians Do It Better, perhaps the best-known purveyor of contemporary disco. And if you go to Cantina before you hit 6119, the VIA space (6119 Penn Ave., East Liberty), you’ll get a discount at the door there to see Brooklyn bass producer Brenmar headline along with house DJ MikeQ. That bill is rounded out by Shisa, Lauren G, Edgar Um, Keeb$ and Aaron Clark, of Humanaut and Honcho. Plus, it’s a VIA event, so there will be visuals from plenty of local artists to help keep it weird. Or you could go the locavore’s route and ring in lucky ’13 with all-Pittsburgh music. At Thunderbird Café (4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville), City Dwelling Nature Seekers play with Triggers. A few blocks away at Cattivo (146 44th St., Lawrenceville), the Sinferno/Hanging Garden series welcomes guests The Bloody Seaman. Up the hill at Brillobox (4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield), an unexpected alliance is formed between country rockers The Harlan Twins, Pittsburgh Track Authority and the Pandemic DJs. At Howlers (4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield), The Bessemers headline. Down on the South Side, local-boysgone-west 28 North play, along with The Old E All Stars and Poogie Bell, at the Rex Theater (1602 E. Carson St.). In East LibE erty, Shadow Lounge (5972 (597 Baum Blvd.) hosts its last New Y Year’s Eve celebration as it prepar prepares to relocate to places yet-unknown; yet-un DJ Nate Da Phat Barber, Barbe Selecta, SMI and Big Phil Ph will be spinning there. And the punkest New punk Year’s Eve in town will be at The Shop (4312 (431 Main St., Bloomfield): Zeitgeist, Z Drug Lust Come Holy Spirit, D and a host of others play, in pirate-radio a benefit for pira station WSDR. DJ MikeQ

AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPA YPAPE R . C O M CIT

(FICTIONAL RECORDS)

This is the record from 2012 that I would’ve lost my mind over in 2002. Guitar rock reminiscent of Lonesome Crowded West-era Modest Mouse, Q and Not U, and sundry other late-’90s and early-’00s indie rock. Good writing, good recording, nice-looking album artwork; if 2012 saw Japandroids and Cloud Nothings bringing 2000 back, then 2013 is going to be a good year for Nevada Mountains. BY ANDY MULKERIN

THE MIXUS BROTHERS WESTWARD THE TIDE (SELF-RELEASED)

For a self-mixed and -mastered album recorded in Red Mixus’ basement, the ambitious 12-track debut from local duo The Mixus Brothers is impressive. Its hazy, chilled-out blend of folk rock and alt-country provides the backdrop for the two vocalists’ high and super-low harmonies. The brothers shine on their more heavily folk-influenced, foot-stompin’ tracks, but sometimes fall a little flat when the tempo chugs to a lull. Definitely worth a listen. BY AMANDA WISHNER

THE LONG TIME DARLINGS DEATH-O-SKETCH (SELF-RELEASED)

A final EP from the local rockers; as with past releases, there’s a heavy ZZ Top-and-GeorgeThorogood vibe going on. Some of this stuff is heavier and more metalinfluenced, though, putting it more on the AC/DC end of the spectrum. What these guys do is fun, and they do it really well. Not cerebral, but rockin’. BY ANDY MULKERIN


CRITICS’ PICKS

The Palace Theatre Coming Attractions! 2XU%R[2IÂżFHZLOOUHRSHQ:HGQHVGD\-DQXDU\DW$0 Order online 24/7 at www.ThePalaceTheatre.org

THE AMAZIN G

Foxy Shazam [HIP HOP] + FRI., DEC. 28

Shadyside’s urban-clothing and local-music store, Timebomb Shop, hosts its annual holiday party tonight at Ava Lounge. Highlighting the night’s bill is DJ Green Lantern, who will be providing hip-hop vibes for the night. This internationally known DJ gained recognition over the past decade on the mixtape circuit and as a radio host, most notably on Sirius XM’s Shade 45. Once signed to Eminem’s Shady Records label, Green Lantern has toured with the prominent rapper, and worked with Jay-Z and Nas, among others. Rory D. Webb 10 p.m. 126 S. Highland Ave., East Liberty. $5. 412-363-8277 or www.shadow lounge.net

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., DEC. 28

{PHOTO COURTESY OF EDU SANTAMARIA CASTRO}

Locals Instead of Sleeping are definitely a name to look out for in 2013. The band has evolved over the last few years into its own solid, melodic indierock sound. Since releasing its second fulllength album, The Reds, The Blacks, The Grays, in October, the quartet has been keeping busy playing shows throughout the tri-state area and recording new music, including new single “Two Chords.� Catch Instead of Sleeping tonight at Mr. Small’s with Maid Myriad, Amplifiers, Nevada Mountains and With No Disguise. Amanda

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Wishner 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $10. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[SAX] + SAT., DEC. 29

Forget the weird name; Moon Hooch is just a straight-up weird band. But in a pretty good way. The three-piece features a drummer and two saxophonists — not a particularly traditional set-up. But it works. The band’s full-length, The Moon Hooch Album, is a mix Moon Hooch of epic and dancey stuff, more interesting than you might expect from two sax guys. Tonight, Moon Hooch opens for Lotus at Mr. Small’s. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $22.5050. 412-8214447 or www. mrsmalls.com

Jan 19 Jan 26

Sat Sat

8PM 8PM

Feb 2

Sat

8PM

Feb 9

Sat

8PM

Feb 10 Feb 14

Sun Thu

2PM 8PM

Feb 18 Feb 23

Mon Sat

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Mar 2 Mar 3 Mar 13 Mar 16 Mar 17 Mar 20 Mar 24 Apr 4/5

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[GLAM ROCK] + MON., DEC. 31

Foxy Shazam can best be described as extravagant. From the band’s Queen-esque, theatrical rock sound to vocalist Eric Nally’s strange habit of eating cigarettes and climbing stages, it seems that nothing is off limits for the Ohio natives. They recently released their fourth studio album, The Church of Rock and Roll, earlier this year and have been touring almost nonstop ever since. Kick off the new year with Foxy Shazam tonight at Mr. Small’s; There There and The Semi-Supervillains open. AW 9 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25-50. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

TA S T E

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Westmoreland Cultural Trust: Amazing Kreskin Westmoreland Cultural Trust: Get The Led Out: The American Led Zeppelin Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra presents Beethoven’s Pastorale Carnegie Mellon Chamber Orchestra presents An Evening of European Dances WCT: Duquesne University Tamburitzans Latshaw Productions presents The Association & Jay And The Americans Elko Concerts presents Michael Bolton Westmoreland Cultural Trust presents Hollywood Party - A Salute to The Palace River City Brass presents Celtic Connections Westmoreland Cultural Trust: Gaelic Storm Westmoreland Cultural Trust: Vienna Boys’ Choir WSO presents Amadeus! A Mozart Celebration Live Nation presents Brian Regan Elko Concerts presents Jewel Vestry: Jesus Christ Superstar’s Ted Neeley University of Pitt-Greensburg presents Eleanor: An American Love Story River City Brass’ Big Band and Doo Wop Brass Latshaw Productions presents The Beach Boys Latshaw Productions: Branson’s Ozark Jubilee Latshaw Productions presents Michael W. Smith WSO: Brilliant Brahms w/Pianist Angela Cheng Elko Concerts: Pajanimals LIVE: Pajama Playdate Elko Concerts presents Tanya Tucker Latshaw Productions: Vicki Lawrence & Mama Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra presents Pops Concert - Around the World with Disney

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CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. FRANKIE’S. Anthony Rankin. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Sadgiqacea, Hive Lords, Slaves BC. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Rusted Root, Lucy Stone Band, Derek Woodz Band. Millvale. 866-468-3401. SHADOW LOUNGE. Facebox. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Dressed Frets, The Wheals, Fearless Beasts. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 28

ALTAR BAR. Josie McQueen. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. Nick Marzock, Nina Sainato (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. FRANKIE’S. Charm & Chain, Samantha Sears, Jen Beniex. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Mike & Frank from Lava Game. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. HARD ROCK CAFE. Ted Vigil. A Tribute To John Denver. Station Square. 412-481-7625. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Fearless Beasts, Buffalo Buffalo Buffalo, Lukas & Kurt, Sleepy V. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Occasional Reign. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Instead Of Sleeping, Maid Myriad, Amplifiers., Nevada Mountains, With No Disguise. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OBEY HOUSE. Lenny Smith & The Ramblers. Crafton. 412-922-3883. SHADOW LOUNGE. Sardonyx Productions Band Showcase. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Funk Ark. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Blue, Jay Wiley. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Total Package. Robinson. 412-489-5631. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. The Garnettes, Leonard Cohen Ensemble One, Dr. Fresh Butter. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Hoffman Road Band, Scott Fry Experience, Doug & The Iron Lung. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Modern Nature. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HARVEY WILNER’S. Gina Rendina & The Game Changers. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331. MOONDOG’S. theCAUSE. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. LOTUS, Moon Hooch. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE PRAHA. Groove Shakers. Tarentum. 724-224-2112. THE R BAR. Norm Nardini. Dormont. 412-445-5279. ROCHESTER INN HARDWOOD GRILLE. Waiting for Ray. Ross. 412-364-8166.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Bear Cub plus Meeting of Important People, Of an Empire. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SUN 30

THE DEAD HORSE CANTINA & MUSIC HALL. LoNero. McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295. SHADOW LOUNGE. Austen Leathers, Mute Point, Infinite Blue. Afton Band Showcase. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

MON 31

AMBRIDGE AMERICAN LEGION POST 341. The Enablers. Ambridge. 724-266-5623. BRILLOBOX. Harlan Twins, Pandemic, Pittsburgh Track Authority. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CATTIVO. The Bloody Seaman. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. FRANKIE’S. 8th Street Rox. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027.

MP 3 MONDAY

MY CARDBOARD SPACESHIP ADVENTURE

SAT 29

ALTAR BAR. Slim Forsythe & his New Payday Loners, Grain, Matt Augistine. Strip District. 412-263-2877. BLVD PUB & KITCHEN. The GRID. Canonsburg. 724-746-2250. BRILLOBOX. Shockwave Riderz, Puffy Areolas, DJ Eric Yeschke. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CLUB CAFE. Red Wanting

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local band. This week’s offering comes from My Cardboard Spaceship Adventure; stream or download it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.


EARLY WARNINGS

MOONDOG’S. Norm Year’s Eve w/ Norman Nardini. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Foxy Shazam, There There, The Semi-Supervillains. Millvale. 866-468-3401. OLD TRAFFORD SPORTS CLUB. Killroom, Lloyd Zac, Gods & Aliens. Trafford. 412-373-3036. SMILING MOOSE. Dethlehem, Derketa. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. City Dwelling Nature Seekers, The Triggers. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 29

SMILING MOOSE. INF.DIV.fest 2012, Hip Hopocalypse 2012. South Side. 412-431-4668.

FRANKIE’S. The Flashcats. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027.

SAT 29

BALTIMORE HOUSE. Churchview Saints. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-3800. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Billy Price. Shaler. 412-487-6259.

ALTAR BAR. The Classic Rock Experience. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

{FRI., JAN. 18}

THU 27

Atlas CD release

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Thursdays in AVA. Pete Butta, McFly, Bamboo, & Red. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Throwdown Thursdays w/ Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Transmission: Classic Alternative Dance Party. South Side. 412-381-3497.

JAZZ

(SAT., JAN. 27)

THU 27

Joy Ike CD release

New Hazlett Theater, Allegheny Square East, North Side (FRI., MARCH 08)

The Red Western/ Grand Piano split-LP release Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield

FRI 28

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. BACKSTAGE BAR AT Saturday Night Meltdown. THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-362-1250. 412-456-6666. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. BELVEDERE’S. Custody War 412-431-8800. Chest Benefit feat. Sneaky ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Do Mike Down n Derby Disco Skate. Sum’n Saturday Reggae w/ Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. Dan Dabber. Lawrenceville. CABARET AT THEATER 412-251-0097. SQUARE. Salsa Friday. Downtown. PEANUTZ. DJ AfterThought. 412-325-6769. Hosted by Pretty Girls Inc. CAPRI PIZZA AND North Side. 412-626-2851. BAR. Bombo Claat ROWDY BUCK. Fridays. Reggae/ Top 40 Dance. South dancehall w/ Vybz Side. 412-431-2825. Machine Intl. Sound www. per S BAR. Pete System, Fudgie a p pghcitym Butta. South Side. Springer. East Liberty. .co 412-481-7227. 412-363-1250. SHADOW LOUNGE. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. House Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Music w/ Hana. Lawrenceville. J. Malls & Skeme Richards. East 412-251-0097. Liberty. 412-363-8277. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. A Man A Break. Sunday night South Side. 412-431-2825. soul w/ DJ Ian Friend. Bloomfield. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night 412-682-0320. w/ DJ Connor. South Side. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara 412-381-1330. & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage 1139 PENN AVE. Hot Mass. Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Late Night Dancing. Disco, Electro, post punk, industrial, new House, Techno. 21+ BYOB. wave, alternative dance. South 2am-8am Sunday morning. Side. 412-431-4668. Downtown.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 30

SAT 29

MON 31

6119 PENN AVE. NYYE: New You Years Eve. Brenmar, Mike Q., Shisa, Lauren G., Edgar Um, Keeb$, more. Presented by VIA. East Liberty. GREATER PITTSBURGH COLISEUM. At Dawn We Rage, DJ Knowledge, Brotha Mike, Eric D., Naoko, Agent Smith, Kip Collins, more. Homewood. HAMBONE’S. NYE Party w/ DJ Romey, more. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. JEKYL & HYDE. Fuk Dat Party. South Side. 412-488-0777. SHADOW LOUNGE. The Final Countdown. DJ SMI, DJ Zan naZ, DJ Big Phil, & DJ Nate Da Phat Barber. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. WEST VIEW FIREMAN’S BANQUET HALL. Pierce DJ’s. West View. 412-931-7260.

TUE 01

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Groove Tuesdays. Djs provided by 720 Music. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 28

RIVERS CASINO. Lyndsey Smith. North Side. 412-414-5070.

PARK HOUSE. Ishtar. North Side. 421-224-2273.

HARD ROCK CAFE. John Denver Tribute feat. Ted Vigil, Steve Weisberg. Station Square. 412-481-7625. THE PRAHA. Andy Mangini. Tarentum. 724-224-2112.

DREW MENAS RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. The Fabulous Mr. B. North Versailles. 412-829-7022. SPEAL’S TAVERN. The Agway Shoplifters. Unknown.

Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield

FRI 28

FRI 28

MON 31

DJS

ACOUSTIC BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Juan Vasquez. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 28

TUE 01

WORLD

THU 27

BLUES Atlas

& SPEAKEASY. Lisa Ferraro. North Side. 412-904-3335.

SAT 29

FODI BROS. Gary Prisby. Shaler. 412-486-9919. MARS BREW HOUSE. Brad Yoder. Mars. 724-625-2555. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. Two Wheel Pass. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337. ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

MON 31

MAX & ERMA’S. Brad Wagner. Scott. 412-344-4449.

TUE 01

BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL. Singer Songwriter Night. North Fayette. 412-788-2333.

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FRI 28

LEMONT. Yolanda & Chris Pangekas. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 29

LEMONT. Groove Doctors. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

MON 31

CAFE NOTTE. The Piano Man Jerry Coleman. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. LEMONT. Groove Doctors & Judi Figel. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

HOLIDAY MUSIC THU 27

PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Cathasaigh. Oakland. 412-622-6914.

SAT 29 - SUN 30

AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. A Gershwinter Night. W/Eli Degibri, Roger Humphries, Alton Merrell, & Sean Jones. Downtown. 412-258-2700.

FRI 28

ANDYS. Judi Figel. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CROWNE PLAZA HOTEL. NAT w/ Walt Maddox. A tribute to Nat King Cole. Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. LITTLE E’S. Tony Depaolis Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo, Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235.

WED, DEC 26 • 9PM COUNTRY/BLUES /AMERICANA

GOLD HOPE DUO THUR, DEC 27 • 9PM ROCK

THE DRESSED FRETS PLUS

THE WHEALS & FEARLESS BEASTS

SAT 29

ANDYS. Lisa Ferraro. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. Robbie Edwards The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. CROWNE PLAZA HOTEL. NAT w/ Walt Maddox. A tribute to Nat King Cole. Bethel Park. 724-746-1178. LITTLE E’S. The Andrea Pearl Trio. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

DECEMBER 27

EMO NIGHT 9

BEAR CUB

S C R E E N

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CORONADO

NEW YEARS EVE PARTY

JANUARY 24

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017

+

JANUARY 17

PLUS MEETING OF IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND OF AN EMPIRE MON, DEC 31 • 9PM

WITH CITY DWELLING NATURE SEEKERS AND TRIGGERS $10 ADMISSION INCLUDES CHAMPAGNE TOAST AND MIDNIGHT BUFFET! OPEN FOR LUNCH

ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB

Every Thursday!

THE FUNK ARK SAT, DEC 29 • 9PM INDIE/ROCK

SUN 30

BAND NIGHT

FRI, DEC 28 • 9PM FUNK/SOUL

7

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

N E W S

OTHER MUSIC

E V E N T S

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THE DRESSED FRETS $1.75 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 C L A S S I F I E D S

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DUNa a\ Q\

IN PITTSBURGH

1RP 26 - 7N[ 1 WEDNESDAY # Bill Deasy’s Annual Boxing Day Show

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Harlem Globetrotters CONSOL ENERGY CENTER

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Downtown. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. 7p.m.

THURSDAY $ Rusted Root

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

FRIDAY % A Tribute to John Denver: Ted Vigil

SATURDAY & Gershwinter Night

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-338-8742. HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. Tickets: culturaldistrict.org. 8p.m. & 2p.m. Through 412-481-ROCK. With special Dec. 30. guest Steve Weisberg. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or Lotus 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 9:30p.m. MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale.

‘‘YOU’VE NEVER SEEN IMAGES LIKE THIS BEFORE... IT DESERVES TO BE SEEN AND FELT ON THE BIG SCREEN’’ –ROBERT REDFORD

412-821-4447. With special guests Moon Hooch. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

‘‘STUNNING IMAGES...TIMELY... A SOLITARY QUEST WITH GLOBAL IMPLICATIONS’’ SUNDAY – Neil Genzlinger, THE NEW YORK TIMES “–HHHHH ” Joe Neumaier, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. $5 Cover Charge. For more info visit jergels.com. 8p.m.

MONDAY A FILM BY JEFF ORLOWSKI www.chasingice.com • www.submarinedeluxe.com

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28

PITTSBURGH FILMMAKERS 1035 S Braddock Ave Regent Sq 412/682-4111



Jazz Conspiracy

Lez Zeppelin



ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

RUSTED ROOT

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27 MR. SMALLS THEATRE

Highmarks’s MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. First Night Pittsburgh Foxy Shazam

412-821-4447. With special guests There There & The Semi-Supervillains. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m.

CULTURAL DISTRICT Downtown. 412-456-6666. Featuring Dirty Dozen Brass Band. Tickets: Buy your button at Giant Eagle, Box Office at Theater Square or firstnightpgh.org. 6p.m.

Auld Lang Syne: New Years Eve Gala and Concert

TUESDAY 

CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-456-6666. Tickets: culturaldistrict.org. 9:30p.m.

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: trustarts.org. Through Jan 6.

Flashdance

CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

WINTER CLEARANCE 33-60% OFF STORE WIDE SAVINGS ON APPAREL, ATHLETICS, BOOTS AND SHOES!

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Faceb Facebook.com/GordonShoes

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013


40 AND HOLDING

A MOVING ADAPTATION, DIRECTED WITH RELENTLESS INTIMACY AND BEAUTIFULLY PERFORMED

{BY AL HOFF} This Is 40 is a comedy, and while there are a few laughs and some funny bit players, mostly I was thinking: This is the longest not-very-funny film I’ve ever sat through. Seriously, writer-director Judd Apatow’s film is two hours and 15 minutes, during which not much even happens: A married couple turning 40 (Paul Rudd, Leslie Mann) have mild freak-outs about aging, parenting, parents, marriage, work and money.

THE REVOLUTION

WILL BE

SUNG

Artisanal bikers: Robert Smigel and Paul Rudd

But good comedy comes from pain, and it’s hard to care about the mid-life crisis of perfectly toned people, who barely seem to work, have a palatial home and, despite lip-service, don’t really seem to care about money. (Twice, the sum of $12,000 is shrugged off.) This may be 40 for the Apatows (four of whom — his wife, two kids and an iPad — star in this film) but universality isn’t 40’s strong suit. Apatow’s self-indulgent comic spin on the familiar travails of domesticity falls flat, trading funny banter and likable characters for whining and squabbling dressed up in lazy, self-conscious dialogue. (Besides, Louis C.K. is already killing it on the small screen, with his funny but heartfelt examinations of being a 40-something parent, straddling hip and dead.) The film’s biggest laugh came when the end-credits blooper reel offered the unexpurgated scene-stealer, Melissa McCarthy. No disrespect to her takeno-prisoners rant, but shouldn’t we be laughing more during the film and not when it’s over? AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CLASSIC TRAILERS.

Use your “First Night” badge to gain admission to this continuously running program of movie trailers, compiled from over the last 40 years. Also, a good place to rest indoors and let Hollywood soothe you. 6:30-11 p.m. Mon., Dec. 31. Harris, Downtown. Free with First Night badge.

{BY HARRY KLOMAN}

We’ll always have Paris: Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway

M

ORE THAN 30 years after it debuted in Paris, the whole world now can dream the dream and shed the tear — all at once, and at popular prices — for Les Misérables, the pop opera (i.e., Broadway musical) based on Victor Hugo’s 1862 novel. And they should, for this is a moving adaptation, directed with relentless intimacy by Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech), and beautifully performed by (more or less) everyone in the cast. Hugh Jackman, Anne Hathaway, Eddie Redmayne and Aaron Tveit handle the heavy bits, with comic relief from the elastic Sacha Baron Cohen and the ever more garish Helena Bonham Carter. Only Russell Crowe, as the tenacious policeman Javert, sometimes feels out of place, his voice not equal to that of his peers, his scowl a bit too opaque. But his character is intriguing: Raised in poverty, he believes steadfastly in the fairness of the system of justice that’s

allowed him to advance. He’s Antonin Scalia or Condi Rice, and when he faces a moral dilemma, he’s too engulfed by his notions of right and wrong to adapt his thinking. The story, briefly: In 1815 France, after the revolution has dissolved back into a monarchy, and where poor is very poor,

LES MISÉRABLES

DIRECTED BY: Tom Hooper STARRING: Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway

CP APPROVED Jean Valjean (Jackman) gets out of prison after 19 years for stealing a loaf of bread. He jumps parole to start a new life, but he’s pursued by Javert. First he gets caught up in the life of Fantine (Hathaway) and her daughter, the waif Cosette (Amanda Seyfried), and then with a pack of young revolutionaries.

Hathaway performs the show’s takeaway song, “I Dreamed a Dream,” in one long take and in extreme closeup, an absorbing feat of musical acting — one of many in the film. Hooper’s direction is less effective when people sing in ensembles, largely due to the clumsiness of translating that particular element of theater spectacle to the screen. (It’s dated and jarring to hear large groups of armed movie characters break into song.) But the only number that truly bombs is “One Day More,” which all the major characters sing from different locations. Cutting back and forth between them deadens the effect this sort of capstone number has when you see it on stage (and not just because it means intermission is coming). The story’s themes — freedom, honor, love, justice, forgiveness, redemption — are heavy, yet rarely heavy-handed. And because this opera is Les Miz, it isn’t over until the dead lady sings. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW

PARENTAL GUIDANCE. It’s a clash of parenting styles when the old-school grandparents (Billy Crystal, Bette Midler) step in for the modern helicopter parents (Marisa Tomei, Tom Everett Scott). Andy Fickman’s tepid comedy is a pastiche of familiar (and now boring) comic set-ups, stitched together with nothing but contempt for the viewing audience. Any movie that opens by insulting women who aren’t model-gorgeous and ends with the least-inspirational and most unbelievable healing moment ever (kid recites the play-by-play from the Dodgers-Giants 1951 playoff game; tears flow) should simply be avoided. Also, Billy Crystal sings. (Al Hoff)

REPERTORY

DJANGO. In the canon of enigmatic gunshooter films, the opening to Sergio Corbucci’s 1966 spaghetti Western is hard to beat: a tall, brooding stranger walking across the desert, dragging a coffin behind him. That man is Django (Franco N eri), and though he quickly kills nearly half-a-dozen men, that coffin has other purposes. Django has come to town to settle a score with the Major — the details aren’t totally clear. But the Major leads a Ku Klux Klan-type group, and shoots Mexicans for sport. Django sets up alliances with the town’s brothel-keep, as well as a group of Mexican gangsters also angry at the Major. Despite the slow pacing, a fair amount of mayhem ensues, including whippings, shoot-

COLD HARD TRUTH

THE LAST UN ICORN . In this 1982 animated family film from Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin Jr., a unicorn and magician pair up to save other unicorns from an evil king. Alan Arkin, Jeff Bridges and Mia Farrow supply voices. The film is adapted from Peter S. Beagle’s novel, and Beagle will be on hand for a Q&A and book-signing at each screening. 7 p.m. Fri., Dec. 28; 2 p.m. Sat., Dec. 29; and 5 p.m. Sun., Dec. 30. Hollywood, Dormont

If you’d like to start the new year off worrying about something, you could do worse than screen Jeff Orlowski’s doc, Chasing Ice. It’s equal parts a profile of renowned nature photographer James Balog; gorgeous footage of exotic locales; and a derring-do adventure. But as a whole, the film is primarily a Giant Blinking Light that Earth’s glaciers are melting and disappearing at an astonishing pace. Skeptical? Well, Balog was, too. So, he decided to prove whether something was happening by establishing the Extreme Ice Survey. Orlowski documents EIS over the past few years, as Balog and his hardy assistants set up two dozen fixed cameras in Iceland, Greenland and Alaska that continually snap photos of glaciers. (The adventure part of this film is watching these guys get to these remote locations, or — hold your breath — lower themselves into bottomless glacial pits to get a good photograph.)

DON N IE DARKO. Writer/director Richard Kelly’s 2001 debut is a hard-to-categorize tale about a doomed teen. Over 28 days, Donnie (Jake Gyllenhaal) struggles to understand his suburban world, which is tilting toward madness, steered by a giant rabbit named Frank. Kelly excels at capturing Donnie’s dread with verve, yet he and Gyllenhaal ground this anxiety so firmly in the confusion and inarticulateness of ordinary adolescence that there’s no easy fantasy loophole. A hybrid of time-travel treatise, ’80s snapshot, troubled-kid drama and dark comedy. 9 p.m. Fri., Dec. 28; 8 p.m. Sat., Dec. 29; and 7 p.m. Sun., Dec. 30. Hollywood, Dormont (AH)

CP

Parental Guidance outs, some dismemberment, a deadly pit of quicksand and the reveal of the coffin’s true function. Django was once infamous for its graphic violence, but today’s audiences will barely notice. (The body count is pretty epic — well over 100 — but largely bloodless.) As a cult favorite, it also spurred many unrelated sequels and spin-offs, many simply incorporating the “Django” handle. Quentin Tarantino’s new film, Django Unchained, is among the “imitators,” even borrowing the original’s awesomely cheesy title song. In Italian, with subtitles. Through Sat., Dec. 28. Regent Square (AH) DUCK SOUP. “To war! To war!” The greatest of all the Marx Brothers comedies is an anarchic delight as the countries of Fredonia and Sylvania battle in this 1933 send-up of nationalism and warfare, directed by Leo McCarey. Wed., Dec. 26, through Sat., Dec. 29. Harris. Double-features with Horse Feathers; $8 for both films.

THE LADY VAN ISHES. In Alfred Hitchcock’s 1939 light comedy-thriller, a young woman on board a trans-European train is baffled when her carriage companion, a sweet old lady, simply disappears. 10 p.m. Fri., Dec. 28, and 3 p.m. Sat., Dec. 29. Oaks (AH)

CP

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK. In Steven Spielberg’s 1981 film our square-jawed hero, archeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), tackles everything from giant boulders to snakes and conniving N azis. The film kicks off a two-month, Saturday-night series of Oscar classics. Midnight, Sat., Dec. 29. Manor 39 STEPS. A wise-cracking Canadian, CP THE visiting Britain, finds himself scrambling across the Scottish moors while being pursued by criminals and police alike, in Alfred Hitchcok’s 1935 film. The 39 Steps was the director’s first international success, and its entertaining mix of light comedy, romance, intrigue and action would become familiar. 3 p.m. Sun., Dec. 30, and 7 p.m. Tue., Jan. 1. Oaks (AH)

Roman Holiday ROMAN HOLIDAY. A sheltered princess runs away from her handlers in Rome and finds amore with an American newspaperman. Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck star in William Wyler’s 1953 lightly comic romance. Tue., Jan. 1, through Thu., Jan. 3. Harris. Double-features with Breakfast at Tiffany’s; $8 for both films. BREAKFAST AT TIFFAN Y’S. Blake Edwards’ 1961 film is, at its heart, still Truman Capote’s simple tale of the rootless nature of America’s thenimpending future. Audrey Hepburn stars. Tue., Jan. 1, through Thu., Jan. 3. Harris. Double-features with Roman Holiday; $8 for both films. (Justin Hopper)

CP

{BY AL HOFF}

The iceman cometh: a member of the EIS, at a Greenland glacier

While we wait for the data to come in on this quixotic quest — the team has to return to the cameras mounted on wind- and snow-swept cliffs every few months to download the photos — Orlowski has some scientists weigh in on climate change and its likely effects. The film also incorporates news footage from the last decade’s alarming run of extreme weather events. (You’ll have to fill in the impact of recent Superstorm Sandy yourself.) Balog also talks about how his concern about climate change has intensified. It’s an issue he clearly approaches with both the trepidation of a citizen (“the air is changing”) and the excitement of documenting a massive, “invisible” set of circumstances. His proof is in EIS’ time-lapse photography of glaciers shrinking, collapsing — even disappearing — over just a couple of years. (One glacier in Alaska retreated so quickly that the camera had to be moved three times in three years, just to keep the glacier in frame.) Even climate-change deniers should be alarmed at the rate and scale of disappearing ice. And like Perry Mason, Balog has one last piece of devastating evidence up his sleeve: the biggest glacial collapse ever caught on film. It’s awesome visually, but, really, not a good thing to see.

CP APPROVED

FILM CAPSULES

HORSE FEATHERS. The Marx Brothers take on college football in this 1932 comedy directed by N orman Z. McLeod, with Groucho as the irascible Professor Wagstaff. Wed., Dec. 26, through Sat., Dec. 29. Harris. Double-features with Duck Soup; $8 for both films.

AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Starts Fri., Dec. 28. Regent Square.

36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013


JUST AS THE GAS PIPELINES RADIATE OUTWARD, SO DO THE SOCIAL EFFECTS OF DRILLING

[BOOK]

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} LAST CALL IN THE CITY OF BRIDGES. Salvatore Pane’s debut novel is an exciting first offering from local imprint Braddock Avenue Books. The University of Indianapolis professor’s protagonist is Michael Bishop, who on the eve of the 2008 presidential election is 25, working a dead-end cube-critter job as a DVD subtitler (for stuff like Lipstick Jungle) in Pittsburgh. He exercises his creativity on a web comic, and serves as an amusing guide to the lives of irony-drenched millennials. Michael is insightful almost in spite of himself. “We valued apathy,” he notes, even while pursuing a new girlfriend and struggling to retain friends similarly clinging to Super Mario Brothers and other comforting tokens of childhood. Movingly, this is a book about overeducated kids marinated in pop culture, seemingly tuned into everything about the world around them but unable to change even their corner of it. Priming for a cathartic night on East Carson Street after his boss suggests his career prospects might improve in Bangladesh, Michael says, “We wanted to get hammered and talk about Hitchcock references on The Simpsons until the polar ice caps melted and drowned us in our collective madness.” Yes. A FILM ABOUT BILLY. Daniel McCloskey’s unusual hybrid of a novel and graphic novel is classified by publisher Six Gallery Press as “apocalyptic YA.” It’s a coming-ofage story with sci-fi conspiracy overtones. The narrator is Collin Heart, a semi-reclusive recent high school grad living with his grandmother in Bloomfield while editing a documentary about a friend who committed suicide … all during a mysterious global suicide epidemic. McCloskey, who founded the Cyberpunk Apocalypse writer’s co-op, here offers a world-weary voice, the writing style clean. (“While my pants soaked and froze my ass, I fished a crisp white cigarette from my pack of Douglas Lights and shoved it in my mouth.”) The comics panels, meanwhile, tell another aspect of the same story in parallel, with an expressive drawing style that ranges from straightforward if edgy to (a peek at latter pages reveals) forays into horror and the surreal. Futuristic terror and military menace loom (with satiric touches). But from among Collin’s countless hours of tape of his dead friend and sad nights in a lonely room, McCloskey constructs a mostly low-keyed thriller about lost innocence, the tenuousness of friendship and the limits of art. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Fifty Pages reviews the first 50 pages of new books. N E W S

[ART REVIEW]

GAS GAUGED

In this photo by Lynn Johnson, Devon Navarro shows his coveralls stained by black fracking chemicals. Navarro, who has a family of six, has since lost his job after a downturn in gas prices.

{BY LEO HSU}

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N THE Marcellus Shale Documentary

Project exhibition, on display now at Filmmakers Galleries, hangs a picture by Scott Goldsmith, of a train carrying transport pipes for gas drilling; across the river sits Braddock and U.S. Steel’s Edgar Thomson Works. Surrounded by images that describe the growth of the Marcellus Shale gas industry and its effects on Pennsylvania communities, this picture makes a visual connection between the region’s industrial past and present. Same as it ever was: Industry continues to define our society’s growth even as it is defined by the way we think about the short and long term. Industrial practices still shape individual lives in ways both beneficial and harmful, both intentional and unintentional. The Marcellus Shale Documentary Project is a collaborative effort by six photographers (five of whom live in Pennsylvania) to document the impact of the gas industry in Pennsylvania over the last two years. Curated by Pittsburgh Center for the Arts director Laura Domencic, this powerful and well-conceived exhibition addresses a

timely issue with intelligence and honesty, and with an exceptionally high standard of visual storytelling. (Photographs from the project are also available, in different edits, as a book and online.) The exhibition’s introductory text notes: “Politically and socially, lines have been drawn. … You are,

THE MARCELLUS SHALE DOCUMENTARY PROJECT

continues through Jan. 6 (gallery is closed Dec. 26 and Dec. 29-Jan. 1). Filmmakers Gallery, 477 Melwood Ave., North Oakland. 412-681-5449 or www.pghfilmmakers.org

it seems, either for or against [gas drilling].” To the credit of the photographers and organizers, the project addresses the nuances of a complex situation, taking it far beyond a simple question of “for” or “against.” The entrance features photographs by Nina Berman that suggest powerful physical tensions: Methane bubbles through river water, rashes break a child’s skin, a

protester is compressed against a window. Tap water swirls grey and a methane flare lights the sky orange. The elements are disrupted; what’s expected to be naturally clear and clean has been grimly stressed, transformed, unnaturally enlivened. In the midst of it all is a bright picture of a teenage girl with a soap bubble, just bursting. Her water is contaminated, the caption tells us; the bursting bubble resonates visually with the surrounding distortions. Brian Cohen’s pictures present a different contrast, describing the struggles of families dealing firsthand with the economic and environmental changes brought on by gas drilling. One has been able to save their farm by leasing land for drilling at the cost of broken relationships with their neighbors; another fights illness and contamination. These pictures are juxtaposed with panoramic views of pastoral Western Pennsylvania landscapes, familiar but for the presence of drilling machinery sitting discretely behind trees or over a hill. One rig overlooks Pittsburgh Mills mall in Tarentum. Goldsmith’s wide-ranging exploration CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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GAS GAUGED, CONTINUED FROM PG. 37

In a photo by Nina Berman, taken in Springville, Susquehanna County, the glow from a methane flare illuminates an otherwise darkened road.

Just as the gas pipelines radiate outward, so do the social effects of drilling. Lynn Johnson’s pictures show how farreaching the consequences are: Residents of a trailer park deal with eviction after the

park is bought by a water-extraction company; an activist minister serves a congregation that includes gas workers and their families; a gas worker loses his job when gas prices fall. The exhibition ends with a series of large prints by Noah Addis, studied pictures of infrastructure alternating with larger-than-life portraits of individuals who suspect that their water was contaminated after drilling took place nearby. The last picture in the show is Addis’ intense portrait of Frank McIntyre. McIntyre was also one of Cohen’s subjects, photographed in his kitchen, having retreated to escape a wind that burned his throat. In Addis’s photograph, we know McIntyre differently, his enigmatic expression suggesting both accusation and disbelief. The success of the show is in Domencic’s ability to play to the strengths of each photographer’s mode of engagement, and in the photographers’ willingness to address the complexity of the issues. The overall effect is not of a single, concerted point of view, but rather, of six distinct perspectives, each defining the subject in its own way, and each using pictures and words to stimulate a different kind of knowledge. The resulting examination is a study of how everyday life is transformed under the shadow of the drilling rig. I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

[ART REVIEW]

WHITE IN {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

Michael Kukla’s sculpture “Beneath Sky.”

gives us a look at the workers and worksites, and lays out the visible aspects of the drilling process, while at the same time offering glimpses into the lives of one family that has been severely affected by drilling. Martha Rial’s images position a geographically spreading drilling industry alongside a small family farm, noting the increasing encroachment of the former on the latter, as well as such new phenomena as the growth of woman-owned businesses serving the gas industry.

“White” is a word with numerous meanings, some of which aspire to uniformity. But in art as in life, white covers a range of hues from arctic to bone, and can include subtle and not-so-subtle variations of surface, texture and other impurities. So it’s not {IMAGE COURTESY OF DM CONTEMPORARY} surprising that The White Show, guestcurated at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts by Vicky A. Clark, is far from monotonous. Though white is the shared characteristic, the unifying theme is subtlety: The exhibit is subtitled “Subtlety in the Age of Spectacle.” It’s an unusual organizing principle for an art exhibit, and it gives the viewer something to think about. The exhibit includes a solid mix of 20 artists, local and distant, and features works that are predominantly formal, conceptual and narrative. Understandably absent is “white” as a racial construct — that’s a whole other show, and one that may never be. Can a work be too nearly, completely white? John Noestheden’s “Pi Page Two” (2008) is simply some of the sequence of digits of pi pressed into the paper, but there’s a

suggestion of the sublimity and complexity of mathematics. Mark Franchino’s “Good, Better, Best Soap” (2012) seems a wry sendup of the purity promised by certain consumer goods. A few pieces might be described as anti-illusions, things that require close looking to perceive them. Jeremy Boyle’s “untitled (after charles ray)” (2003) is among the subtlest works, with a white disk spinning atop a white pedestal, and once noticed it amuses. “Pearl” (2011), by Delanie Jenkins, consists of painted scraps of paper peeling up at the edges, giving them a surprising richness of reflections and shadow as one moves past. Some pieces stand out by virtue of being not-all-that-white, such as Amanda Means’ “Water Glass #20” (2004), which contrasts a glass of milk against a black background. A different tack is taken by Eva Faye’s “Punctured Painting #6” (2011), a softly hued sheet of vellum that’s been cut, punctured and hung away from the wall to create an elaborate interplay with its own shadow. The mood throughout is largely contemplative. More breathing room in the white cube — as modern galleries are sometimes tagged — would have been even better, but the show’s fine the way it is. Catalog available. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE WHITE SHOW: SUBTLETY IN THE AGE OF SPECTACLE continues through Jan. 20. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

A holiday tradition carnegie trees and neapolitan presepio on view through january 6

Think once is enough to experience the Carnegie Trees? It’s a tradition with a new face every year, so be sure to catch this year’s splendor.

holidays at the museum are sponsored by

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for hours and information call 412.622.3131 or visit carnegiemnh.org/holidays


[ART]

ART FOR ART BASEL’S SAKE {BY SARAH HUMPHREY}

“WHEN I WAS introduced to him and shook his hand, all I could think was, ‘This was the hand he used to masturbate during his Seedbed performance in 1971,’” Pittsburghbased artist and Art Basel Miami Beach first-timer Terry Boyd said of meeting pioneering performance artist, writer and architect Vito Acconci at 3:30 a.m. outside a pop-up exhibition space in the Wynwood arts district of Downtown Miami. “Talk about being star-struck,” said Boyd. The recent work of high-profile art critics who expound ad nauseum on the uncoolness of commercial fairs like Miami Basel is equivalent to a three-volume treatise by Anthony Bourdain about his general contempt for Lunchables. A subminimal degree of insight is required to posit observations like “Conspicuous displays of exorbitant wealth are boring” and “The reduction of art to the status of commodity is offensive.” We can almost all agree that no one likes an oligarch shopping for Warhols like he’s at Walmart. But if you’re concerned about being under-dressed for Ke$ha’s Beach-Side Absolut Vodka Jousting Brunch, or the ultra-exclusive 36-hour Xylophone Mixer (hosted annually by Prince and Tampax at undisclosed highway over-passes), you could decline the invite and go see some art instead. Like Boyd and others in Miami Basel’s Pittsburgh contingent, you might find it’s worth your while. True, it’s easy to forget how physically, mentally and financially draining it is to see any of Art Basel Miami Beach or its 20-some simultaneous satellite fairs as an emerging artist, gallerist, journalist or curator on a budget. Dozens upon dozens of young local galleries, substantive private collections and major institutions open their doors, often free of charge, to visitors this time of year. Even when you can hire a driver and come home to a delightful mini-bar, the hundreds of pop-ups and the cuttingedge street-art culture must simply be too much to handle, because you assume you’ve already seen it all. So if you’re

{PHOTO BY SARAH HUMPHREY}

Jenny Holzer’s contribution to a text-based public-art series titled Plane Text, at Art Basel Miami Beach

among the few highly paid journalists or arts professionals who are seasoned veterans of the fair, you probably have access to all the artwork you care to see the other 51 weeks of the year. To you, things like “the ocean” and “sunshine” are also probably passé. But there are so many unpleasant things about the experience of Miami Basel that the familiar annoyances over Diddy parties, Marxist critique or lack of invitation to participate in these things come to feel like laughable luxuries. When looking at a Basquiat I’ve never seen before, knowing I’ll most likely never see it again, I’ve found that it’s possible to forget about the big crowds and bad lighting. In this, my fourth year at the fair (as a journalist and independent curator), I was in excellent company as far as Pittsburghers are concerned. I was proud to see the work of a few natives in my peer group represented by galleries both emerging and high-profile. But though we come from a city that takes enormous pride in providing a viable climate in which artists can live and make work, we continue to represent an inexcusably small percentage of participants at such events. Pittsburgh-based media artist Corey Escoto was the only current city resident who showed work this year at NADA, where he was represented by the rigorous, friendly and unpretentious proprietors of Regina Rex, an exhibition space

in Queens. NADA is the longest-running and arguably most important art fair to coincide annually with the staging of Miami Basel proper. It is distinct from other fairs, partly in that it’s free and open to the public. Its three exhibition sectors are open to both for-profit and not-forprofit organizations, as well as site-spe-

cific artist-run project spaces and artistresidency programs. Meanwhile, in a bold departure from the scene-y sort of events often hosted by major institutions during the fair, the curatorial team behind the 2013 Carnegie International threw a party at the South Beach VFW. The cynic in me was worried that this was an insincere or ironic gesture: an over-stated acknowledgement of the social annoyances associated with art fairs, or an attempt to say something about the people who attend them from Pittsburgh that just wasn’t accurate or relevant or possible. At worst, I worried it would be construed as insulting by the people to whom this space normally belongs. But instead I went to maybe the best party I’ve ever been to in Miami. After a really long day of looking at and writing about art, I played video games and talked about art and drank beer with all kinds of people I’d met or not met and liked or not liked before. I was reminded that taking offense to the incuriosity or decadence that inevitably surround us on occasion need not disrupt the business of lively engagement with any object or prevent us from simply just looking around. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

WHEN LOOKING AT A BASQUIAT I’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE, I’VE FOUND THAT IT’S POSSIBLE TO FORGET ABOUT THE BIG CROWDS AND BAD LIGHTING.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

12.27.1201.03.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

+ THU., DEC. 27 JAN. 03

{EXHIBIT}

The Chief

of a sympathy-challenged dude. “I told her she’s stupid for feeling that way / She’d be better off if she lost some weight / or cut that stringy hair.” Tonight, Travers headlines a Holiday Comedy Show at Club Café. Also appearing {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement is highlighted in From Slavery to Freedom. The long-term exhibition at the Heinz History Center, which opened this month, spans 250 years of African-American history in Western Pennsylvania. It is the result of four years of research by the Center. An immersive reconstruction of a slave ship opens the exhibit. The show includes the 1861 painting “Slaves Waiting for Sale,” by Eyre Crow; details Pittsburgh’s abolitionists and civil-rights activists; and ends in presentday Western Pennsylvania. Visit during the Center’s extended holiday hours, which continues through Jan. 6. Catherine Sylvain 10 a.m. -8 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. $10-15. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

DEC. 29 Sean Jones at A Gershwinter Night

ics) and kuumba (creativity) either instead of or alongside other seasonal festivities. Tonight, this Penn Avenue Arts Initiative rendering of the international holiday features a candle-lighting ceremony, catered community dinner and performances (by Balafon West African Dance Ensemble, Temujin the Storyteller and more), all hosted by performer Kim “Dr. Goddess” Ellis; the evening concludes with a screening of the Maya Angelou-narrated Kwanzaa documentary The Black Candle. On Saturday, neighborhood art galleries lead kids’ crafting activities all afternoon. BO 5-9 p.m. Crafting: 1-6 p.m. Sat., Dec. 29. Dance Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. 412-441-6147

{SCREEN}

+ FRI., DEC. 28 {COMEDY}

Mike Travers is in the spotlight since KDKA TV turned his musical YouTube homage “I Love You Pittsburgh” into a promo. The song celebrates stuff like parking chairs and Kennywood. But Travers, an acoustic-guitar-wielding comic, gets a little ruder on stage. “My girlfriend has low selfesteem,” he sings in the voice

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are Jeff Konkle and comedy magician Lee Terbosic. Bill O’Driscoll 17 p.m. 56-58 S. 12th St., South Side. $10 (21 and over). 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

{OBSERVANCE}

Grounded in traditional African customs, Kwanzaa is a cultural holiday, not a religious one. So tonight and tomorrow at Kwanzaa on Penn, celebrate umoja (unity), ujamaa (cooperative econom-

Peter S. Beagle is best known for his fantasy novel The Last Unicorn, which was adapted into a 1982 animated movie. The award-winning writer himself appears this weekend for Q&As at three screenings of The Last Unicorn in The Hollywood Theater. A percentage of sales benefits the cinema. Beagle graduated from the University of Pittsburgh in 1959. He also wrote the screenplay of the 1978 animated film version of The Lord of the Rings. Book-signings follow the screenings. Catherine Sylvain 7 p.m. Also 2 p.m. Sat., Dec. 29,


MainEvent

Regardless of whether it actually feels like winter yet, on New Year’s Eve Downtown again makes way for Highmark First Night Pittsburgh. The festival — the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s biggest one-day event — floods the streets, galleries and stages with everything from rock bands to puppet shows and 30-minute dance lessons. The alcohol-free, family-friendly event features more than 100 events and activities in 45 venues, including: live blues, jazz and singer-songwriters; dance and theater performances; visual art exhbits; hands-on craft-making; magicians, storytellers and puppet shows; and food trucks. Among the highlights: regional R&B favorites House of Soul; standup comedy by David Michael and Mike Wysocki; and the Fire and Ice Plaza — that’s ice-carving alongside fire performers, all set to music. American Idol’s Adam Brock and his band perform. The annual Resolution Sculpture is by artists David Bernabo and Lindsay Clark. The big First Night Parade — grand-marshaled by Curt Woottan and Chris Preksta, of “Pittsburgh Dad,” and featuring art cars, a bicycle armada, giant puppets and marching bands — rolls down Penn Avenue at 8 p.m. And at the main stage, you can count down till midnight to the funky sounds of New Orleans’ Dirty Dozen Brass Band. It’s all yours for the price of a First Night Button (with free vouchers required for some indoor events). Bill O’Driscoll 6 p.m.-midnight, Mon., Dec. 31. Downtown. Button: $8-10. www.FirstNightPgh.org

and 5 p.m. Sun., Dec. 30.1449 Potomac Ave., Dormont. $5-7. 412-563-0368 or www. thehollywooddormont.com

+ SAT., DEC. 29 {OUTDOORS}

The National Audubon Society’s Christmas Bird Count is the world’s longest-running citizen-science survey. For 113 years volunteers nationwide have helped compile data for conservationists measuring trends in bird populations. This is the first year Fern Hollow Nature Center has been involved. Environmental educator Stacey Widenhofer will compile the data for Franklin Park and needs volunteer birders to help monitor the area for the day. The count starts early in the morning for the owling portion and continues into the afternoon, with a potluck lunch at the Nature Center. RSVP via email, or phone for exact times. CS 1901

Glen Mitchell Road, Sewickley. Free. 412-741-7536 or stacey. fhnc@verizon.net

“Mars soil”; and more. There are live theater programs, too, including “Plant Pop Extreme.” MessFest is included in general admission; clean-up’s on you. BO 10 a.m.-5 p.m. North Side. $11.95-17.95. 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

{PHOTO BY JONATHAN OLEYER, COURTESY OF THE NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY}

{MUSIC}

A mostly local all-star lineup performs a night of jazz at the August Wilson Center for African American Culture. A Gershwinter Night celebrates the music of George and Ira Gershwin. The band features local luminaries Roger Humphries on drums; Dwayne Dolphin on bass; Alton Merrell on piano; and Sean Jones on trumpet. The special guest rounding out the Sean Jones International All-Star Quintet is Israeli saxophonist Eli Degibri, director of the Red Sea Jazz Festival. (You might not have known there was a Red Sea Jazz Festival.) The program features selections from the Gershwins’ landmark opera Porgy and Bess. There are performances tonight and tomorrow. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sun., Dec. 30. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown.

{STAGE}

If you are going to observe “Flashdance Day,” as Mayor Ravenstahl has decreed today, it will probably be by watching the PNC Broadway Across America world premiere of Flashdance — The Musical at Heinz Hall. The 1983 film about a Pittsburgh welder and bar dancer with professionaldance aspirations has been adapted as a stage musical. It includes 16 original songs (by Robbie Roth and Robert Cary) as well as the films’ ubiquitous hits “Gloria,” “Maniac,” “I Love Rock n’ Roll” and, of course, “Flashdance — What a Feeling.” Jersey Boys choreographer Sergio Trujillo directs and choreographs the show, which plays eight performances in Pittsburgh before embarking on a national tour. A Broadway version is also planned CS 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Jan. 6. 600 Penn., Ave., Downtown. $20-65. 412-3924900 or www.trustarts.org

DEC. 29

Christmas Bird Count

$25-45. 412-258-2700 or www.augustwilsoncenter.org

+ MON., DEC. 31 {PARTY}

The pressure to enjoy New Year’s Eve is already pretty

DEC. 27

From Slavery to Freedom

scary, so you might as well ramp it up by attending New Year’s Undead Eve. The party at Crowne Plaza Pittsburgh South is organized by Horror Realm, Pittsburgh’s modern horror convention, and marks the group’s fifth anniversary. The dress code is “ghoulish semi formal attire.” More traditional aspects include a DJ, cash bar, door prizes and a raffle in aid of Scares that Care, a nonprofit benefiting sick children. Admission covers snacks and a champagne toast at midnight. CS 10 p.m.-2 a.m. 164 Fort Couch Road, Bethel Park. $25 or $45 for couples. 412-215-6317 or www.horrorrealmcon.com

{STAGE}

Remember when Pittsburgh Public Theater said its 2011 run of The Chief would be the last? Yeah, we didn’t believe it, either. This one-man show featuring Tom Atkins’ portrayal of Steelers patriarch Art Rooney is the best-selling production in the Public’s long history. The charming play, written by

{FESTIVAL}

It’s a celebration of slop, goo and muck. Carnegie Science Center’s annual MessFest lets kids get hands-on with slimy oobleck; pack raw eggs so they don’t crack in the Egg Drop; finger-paint; create

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on the city’s North Side in the early 20th century to being Mean Joe Greene’s boss. Ted Pappas directs; the first of 12 performances is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Show continues through Jan. 12. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-65. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

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VISUAL

ART

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

THEATER FLASHDANCE: THE MUSICAL. Jan. 1-6. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. GRAND NIGHT FOR SINGING. Musical tribute to Rodgers & Hammerstein. Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 20. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. GRUESOME PLAYGROUND INJURIES. Two 8-year-olds’ lives collide in the nurse’s office, then continue to intersect over the course of 30 years. Thru Dec. 29. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-873-3576. SOUTH SIDE STORIES. Onewoman show portraying the dynamism of the Pittsburgh neighborhood. Tue-Sun. Thru Jan. 13. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489.

COMEDY THU 27

AMY CAPIROSS, CHRIS KEMP,

NICK FROEHLICH, JASON RUSS. Music by Shooting Ghost. Benefits Make-A-Wish Greater PA & Southern West Virginia. 9 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. 412-481-7625. COMEDY OPEN W/ DEREK MINTO. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. MIKE WYSOCKI, CHUCK KREIGER, TOM KUPIEC, TONE BOCK, BRAD RYAN, JEFF KONKLE. 7 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH IMPROV JAM. Thu. Thru Feb. 28 Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FRI 28

COMEDY SHOWCASE. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. THE HOLIDAY COMEDY SHOW FT. MIKE TRAVERS & LEE TERBOSIC. 6 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

CHARLIE MURPHY. Dec. 28-31 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 29

DERAY DAVIS, J.RUSS, BRUCE BRUCE, LIL DUVAL, T. ROBE, MORE. 7 p.m. Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland. 1-888-718-4253. MONDO! Improv show hosted by Rob Johnston of WPXI. 10:30 p.m. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. For new & experienced improvisers. Sat, 6:30 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, North Side. 412-322-1000.

MON 31

OPEN MIC COMEDY. Hosted by Aaron Kleiber. Mon, 9 p.m. Thru Dec. 31 Pleasure Bar, Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, North Side. 412-322-1000. OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

EVENT: Eluveitie concert, with special guests Wintersun and Varg, Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale

EXHIBITS AUGUST WILSON CENTER

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I came tonight because I heard how fantastic Wintersun are from a friend from California. They surpassed my expectations. They were beautiful. When they came out, it was like a great angelic bird flew into the room and caught everyone’s attention. With regard to the headline act: I can’t pronounce their name, and if you find a band whose name you can’t pronounce, you should probably check them out. They sounded like what hobbits would listen to. I didn’t like their drummer. He was talented but he kept playing the same breakdown beat. I don’t care for this newmetal stuff. I’m surprised how many people who came here tonight look like hobbits. There were people walking about with pagan emblems, and with teeth and arrowheads in their hair. It’s an archaic revival. My favorite thing about tonight was that all the bands were foreign. That’s the whole reason I go to shows. BY CATHERI N E SYLVAI N

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TUE 01

CRITIC: Dylan Smay, 28, a food-service worker from South Side

WHEN: Dec.

PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. The Nazi Olympics: Berlin 1936. An exhibit exploring 1936 Olympic Games including use of propaganda, the boycott debate, history of the torch run, & the historic performance of Jesse Owens. Curated by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851–1939. Furniture, metalwork, glass, ceramics, textiles, & jewelry produced by Herman Miller, Tiffany, more. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Neapolitan CONTINUES ON PG. 43

ONGOING

707 PENN GALLERY. After Dark. Mysterious & evocative images by Carolina LoyolaGarcia & Colter Harper. Downtown. 412-325-7017. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Radiant Circles: Ruth E. Levine’s Generous Life. Key work from Levine’s various artistic stages. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Deborah Kass: Before & Happily Ever After. A major mid-career retrospective of paintings, photographs & sculpture. Warhol:Headlines. A collection of works by Warhol based largely on headlines from tabloid news. Jeremy Kost: Friends w/ Benefits. Photography. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2012. National juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Preta. New paintings by Joshua Nickerson. Oakland.

BE GALLERIES. In the Words of Daria Sandburg. Sculpture & jewelry. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. The Collective Works of Joyce Werwie Perry. Oil & knife paintings. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. A Little Bit of Everything. Multimedia work by Mary Ann Saccomanno & Autumn Delellis Stankay. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Celebrate the Season. Group show feat. painting, jewelry, ceramics, more. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes. Cory Arcangel: Masters. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CATHOLIC CHARITIES BUILDING. Park Journeys: Yellowstone. Work by Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild students. Downtown. 412-456-6999. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Fractures. Paintings

Work by Daria Sandburg, from In the Words of Daria Sandburg at be Galleries by Eva Rorandelli. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Prints by Justseeds Artists Cooperative. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Ceramic Creatures. Work by Bernie Pintar. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. EVOLVER TATTOO ARTS. OnSIGHT Art Night. 3D paintings by Nathan Van Patter. South Side. 412-481-1004. FE GALLERY. Beautiful Dreamers: A Celebration of Pittsburgh Women. Portraits by Sonja Sweterlitsch. Lawrenceville. 412-254-4038. FEIN ART GALLERY. 5th Annual Holiday Show. Affordable art for the holidays. Curated by Kathleen Zimbicki. North Side. 412-321-6816. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Marcellus Shale Documentary Project. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Impressions of Interiors. Paintings by Walter Gay. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Moods of Pittsburgh II: Expired Mills, Inspired Landscapes. Group show. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Crossing Borders. Work by Peter Calaboyias, Manuela Holban, Japa, Marina Mozhayeva, more. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. The Sepia Show. New Works by Anthony Purcell. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Small Works from Norway. Paintings by Dylan Cridtchfield-Sales. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GAY & LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTER. Royal Portrait Show. Drag portraits. Downtown. 412-422-0114. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. IMAGEBOX. Wanderlust. International Travel Photography Exhibit by John Ubinger. Garfield. 412-592-8885. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Dolls3. Artistic doll interpretations by Joyce Compton, Emily Eckel & Chris Fondi. Garfield. 412-924-0634. JAMES GALLERY. NIGHT/LIGHT. Fire Drawings by Paul Chojnowski. West End. 412-922-9800. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. CONTINUES ON PG. 44


[VISUAL ART] Presepio. Nativity scene feat. more than 100 human & angelic figures, along w/ animals, accessories, & architectural elements. Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities. Folk art objects illustrating the power of women.BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Life: A Journey Through Time & Population Impact thru Jan., Winging It: Experimental Gallery About Birds thru March, Lord of the Crane Flies thru April. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. Mike Madsen’s “Mt Therion” CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome Though Cowboy House was formed in rural (planetarium), Miniature Ohio, the four-artist collective — whose members Railroad and Village, USS Requin are now spread among Ohio, Pennsylvania and submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. New York — chose The Mr. Roboto Project to host DEPRECIATION LANDS its debut exhibit. Comprised of Fred Frances, MUSEUM. Small living Jeff Gibbons, Matt Glove and Mike Madsen, the show history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the features a diverse mix of photography, printmaking, Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. comics and painting, all made within the past year. 412-486-0563. Show continues through Dec. 30. 5106 Penn Ave., FALLINGWATER. Tour the Bloomfield. Email info@therobotoproject.org or famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. visit www.therobotoproject.org. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. Trolley Theatre. Washington. saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL 724-228-9256. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CENTER. Ongoing: tours of PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Clayton, the Frick estate, with BOTANICAL GARDEN. Winter Vanka Murals. Mid-20th classes, car & carriage museum. Flower Show & Light Garden. century murals depicting war, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. Feat. poinsettias, evergreens, social justice and the immigrant FUTURE TENANT. Guns vs. whimsical lights & adornments. experience in America. Millvale. Butter. Posters detailing 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor 421-681-0905. struggles against war & military gardens feature exotic plants and THE TOONSEUM. Pittsburgh aggression feat. print work by floral displays from around the Scores! The Pro Scoreboard members of Justseeds, historical world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. Art of Kensington Falls pieces from Interference Archive, PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball Animation. Animations feat. & the Justseeds/Iraq Veterans museum & players club. West on the Jumbotron at Pirates, Against the War collaborative View. 412-931-4425. Steelers & Penguin games. portfolio “War is Trauma.”. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG Downtown. 412-232-0199. Downtown. 347-404-2677. AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour animals, including many this Tudor mansion endangered species. and stable complex, Highland Park. and enjoy hikes and 412-665-3639. HOLIDAY CO-OP. Showcase outdoor activities RIVERS OF STEEL of unique, handmade works in the surrounding NATIONAL HERITAGE for sale. Thru Jan. 6, 2013 www. per park. Allison Park. AREA. Exhibits pa 709 Penn Gallery, Downtown. pghcitym 412-767-9200. o on the Homestead .c 412-471-6070. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour Mill. Steel industry HOLIDAY LIGHT & MUSIC the other Frank Lloyd and community artifacts SHOW. Thru Jan. 2, 2013 Wright house. Chalk Hill. from 1881-1986. Homestead. Pittsburgh Technical Institute, 724-329-8501. 412-464-4020. Oakdale. 1-800-784-9675. MCGINLEY HOUSE & SENATOR JOHN HEINZ

N E W S

Monday, Dec. 31 Featuring Special Star:

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THE NUTCRACKER. Presented CONTINUES ON PG. 44

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

THU 27 - WED 02

HISTORY CENTER. Gridiron Glory: The Best of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. More than 200 football artifacts, rare photos, & one-of-a-kind documents. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Badges & Buttons, Waistcoats & Vests. Highlights badges by 20 makers from the US & the UK. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 12. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic

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FREE MIDNIGHT BUFFET, CHAMPAGNE TOAST & PARTY FAVORS:

HOLIDAY

FULL LIST E N O LIN

MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and

GERMAN SILVESTER NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION. Family-oriented celebration w/ fireworks, games, 5K run & 1-mike walk, more. 2-6 p.m. Harmony Museum, Harmony. 724-452-7341. HIGHMARK FIRST NIGHT PITTSBURGH. The region’s largest New Year’s Eve celebration. w/ a parade, live music, dance, fireworks display, more. Downtown. 6 p.m.-12 a.m. THE HOLIDAY SHOP. Feat. art & crafts from over 180 regional artists. Mon. Thru Dec. 31 Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, Shadyside. 412-361-0873. KUUMBA: AFRICAN SOLUTIONS AGAINST ENVIRONMENTAL RACISM/ KWANZAA CELEBRATION. 5 p.m.-12 a.m. Sankofa Village of the Arts, Point Breeze. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY & DANCE. Tanglewood Senior Center, Lyndora. 724-287-0021. RING IN THE ARTS. Artsy New Year’s Eve celebration, Downtown Butler. 6:30 p.m. 724-496-5293. Artsy New Year’s Eve celebration, Downtown Butler. 6:30 p.m. 724-496-5293.

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FRI 28

JIM BRICKMAN. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

MON 31

AULD LANG SYNE IV. Gala & concert presented by the Pittsburgh Opera. 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. 412-281-0912 x 225. BMNECC NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY. Live music, food, more. 4 & 8 p.m. Bulgarian-Macedonian National Education and Cultural Center, West Homestead. 412-531-4360.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 43

FRIDAY NIGHTS

by the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Fri-Sun. Thru Dec. 30 Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

FUNDRAISERS THU 27

SANDY HOOK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FUNDRAISER. Raffles, 50/50 & a portion of every check will go to Sandy Hook. Uno Chicago Grill, Homestead. 412-462-8667.

VIDEO DJ’S 10:30PM -2AM

FRIDAY NIGHT $3 Miller Lite 16oz Drafts

$3 Pinnacle Vodka Flavored Cocktails

$5 MARTINIS

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SUN 30

FRI 28

OAKLAND OPEN MIC. Poetry, music & political speeches welcome. Second and Fourth Fri of every month, 7 p.m. 610-731-1804.

SAT 29

UMBRA PITTSBURGH WRITERS SERIES. Writers workshop. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Carnegie Library, w paper Homewood. pghcitym .co 412-464-0321.

FULL LIST E ONLwIN w.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

LITERARY THU 27

PITTSBURGH WRITES. Weekly writer’s workshop. Thu Crazy Mocha Coffee Company, Sewickley. 412-708-3312.

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. Thu The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

TUE 01

KID’S BOOKS FOR GROWN-UPS BOOKCLUB. First Tue of every month, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

KIDSTUFF THU 27

EXTREME EVENTS. Explore how people, animals, & ecosystems have responded to natural disasters throughout geologic time. Ages 8-10. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288. MASTERS OF DISGUISE: MUSEUM DETECTIVES. Create costumes & disguises inspired by artworks in the museum’s collection, & find clues in the galleries to solve a museum mystery. Ages 6-7. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

THU 27 - WED 03

BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CHARLIE & KIWI’S EVOLUTIONARY ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as he travels back to the Age of Dinosaurs to discover how evolution works. Feat. story theater & discovery area. Presented by Commonwealth Connections Academy. Tue-Sun. Thru May 12 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MISSING LINKS (THE RAINBOW JUMPY). Bounce, jump, roll, run & walk through a 30-foot inflatable “jumpy” art piece created by Felipe Dulzaides. On loan from The New Children’s Museum, San Diego CA. Thru Feb. 3, 2013 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TOUGH ART. Interactive artworks feat. John Pena, Scott Andrew, Jonathan Armistead, Jeremy Boyle, Kevin Clancy & Will Schlough. Thru Jan. 13, 2013 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 42

Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Landscape Expressions. Work by Lynn Fero. Downtown. 412-392-8008. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Flat Files. Illustration & cartoon art by Wayno. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Mark Gualtieri & Friends: A Linear Conversation. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MICHAEL HERTRICH ART & FRAME. Out of the Woods. Paintings by Patrick Ruane. South Side. 412-431-3337. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Imperfect Health: The Medicalization of Architecture. Oakland. 412-268-4754. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Ghosts, etc. Work by David Bernabo, Ben Filio, Mark Mangini, Talon Smith, Emily Zuzack, more. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Cheers, Salute, L’chaim To The Next 50! Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Cowboy House Presents. Feat. work by Fred Frances, Jeff Gibbons, Matt Glove, & Mike Madsen. Bloomfield. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PANZA GALLERY. New Classic Images. Silk screens & limited edition prints by Dave Klug. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The History of Photography. Plus preservation and

FRI 28

DRAW WHAT YOU SEE. Draw & play games in the museum’s spaces. Experiment w/ traditional & unusual artist materials. Ages 8-10. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3288.

education exhibits. Shantytown - The Ed Salamony Photographs. Experience the Depression in Pittsburgh’s shantytown through this historic photographic documentary. North Side. 412-231-7881. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. White Show: Subtlety in the Age of Spectacle. Group Show. Romancing the Tone. Group show Small Step Giant Leap. Group show. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. American Idols. Exhibition by John Moran feat. glass busts of all 43 U.S. presidents. Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 12. Work by Melissa Cameron, Betty Vera, & Kevin Snipes. Strip District. 412-261-7003 x 12. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White & Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints, Drawings & Photographs. 35-some works on paper from the museum’s collection, from photographs to lithographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Romper Room. Work by Jae Roberto, Jacob Ciocci, Jim Lingo, Jen Cooney, Matt Barton & Thad Kellstadt. Curated by Ladyboy. Downtown. 412-325-7723. THE TOONSEUM. New Action Evolution. Impressionistic superhero paintings by David Leblanc. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Your Art Needs You. 177 faded or damaged works which visitors can adopt, funding restoration. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. The City & the City: Artwork by London Writers. Visual art by authors of experimental poetry, fiction, history & geography, exploring new ways to combine literature & art in an examination of the modern city. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

EXPLORING ANCIENT EGYPT. Translate ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics, interpret murals, write your own secret messages, more. Ages 11-13. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3288.


FRI 28 - SUN 30

[COMEDY]

THE LAST UNICORN. Screening of the 1982 animated film & Q&A w/ its creator, Peter S. Beagle. All ticket sales benefit The Hollywood Theater. Dec. 28-30 Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-563-0368.

TUE 01

MESSFEST. Finger painting, create “Mars” soil, make sidewalk chalk, more. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Carnegie Science Center, North Side. 412-237-3400.

OUTSIDE SAT 29

CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT. 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100. STEP INTO SNOWSHOES. Snowshoeing/skiing every Sat. w/ at least 4” of snow on the ground. Call Friday to confirm. Sat. Thru March 30 Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 01

CONNOQUENESSING CREEK POLAR PLUNGE. Harmony Canoe Launch, Jackson St., Harmony. 1 p.m. 724-452-7341.

OTHER STUFF THU 27

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512.

SAT 29

PSYCHIC FAIR. Last Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Chapel of Oneness, West Mifflin. 412-770-4961. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target - East Liberty, East Liberty. 412-362-6108.

SUN 30

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. STEELERS TAILGATE PARTY. Silkscreen printing, create LED glowing stickers, more. Warhol’s Rosa Villa Lot, Gen. Robinson & Sandusky Sts, North Side. 11 a.m.1:30 p.m. 412-322-5058.

MON 31

NEW YEAR’S UNDEAD EVE. DJ,

N E W S

MONDO! — this Saturday at the Cabaret at Theater

Square — might be an improvisational comedy show, but the rules are a little more complicated than your typical wacky-suggestion-from-the-audience format. A celebrity host — the “Mondo” — opens the show with personal stories, opinions and memories, providing the in-house improv troop with comedic fodder. This month’s host is Rob Johnson (pictured), host of “See and Be Seen” and “Rob on the Run” on WPXI.com. 10:30 p.m. Sat., Dec. 29. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $5. Call 412-325-6769 or visit www.trustarts.org.

door prizes, nacho bar, champagne toast at midnight, more. Hosted by Horror Realm. 10 p.m. Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 412-833-5300. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670.

TUE 01

2013 GOAL SETTING CELEBRATION. Join co-authors of Empowered in Pittsburgh in setting personal, professional & civic goals. 2-4 p.m. Embody Natural Health, Lawrenceville. 412-600-3088.

email mcseip@themendelssohn.org for information. Thru Jan. 9, 2013. 724-263-5259. THE REP. Equity principal auditions for Antarktikos. Sides from the script will be provided when making an appointment. Reader will be provided. Bring a picture & resume, stapled together. Call or email e-mail ademara@ pointpark.edu for appointment. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8141. UNSEAM’D SHAKESPEARE COMPANY. Filling positions for 20th Anniversary Season. Accepting resumés from stage managers, costumers, prop masters, lighting designers & set

aged 30+, who have published at least one full-length book of poetry, fiction, or non-fiction, to submit applications for a residency in Brussels, Belgium. More information at http://www. cityofasylumpittsburgh.org/. MCKEES ROCKS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION. Seeking qualified architect for design of the renovated facade & building exterior of the historic Roxian Theatre. For more information, email office_admin@mckeesrocks.com. 412-331-9901. PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST. Seeking artists to design & develop functional bicycle racks to be located in various locations within the Cultural District. For design requirements & other information: http://trustarts.org/visualarts/ bike 412-471-6070. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com. REGENERATIONS. Seeking local artists, environmentalists, historians & other interested parties for Homewood & Allegheny cemeteries tree reclamation-art project. Email kennthomas2@gmail.com for information.

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[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

THE LAB

Literary Arts Boom — or The LAB — is a creative-writing laboratory which offers free after -school programs for students ages 6 to 18, giving them the opportunity to improve skills in an exploratory and inventive way. The LAB, which operates out of Assemble, in Garfield, is always in need of volunteers to assist students, lead workshops, help with marketing and fundraising, and more. For more information, visit literaryartsboom.org.

AUDITIONS

DISCOVER ME! Looking for actors (men only), between the ages of 18-30 for auditions. Call Robert for further details. 412-904-2954. THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH. Mid-season auditions for all voices. Call or

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designers. Volunteers are also needed. Not seeking actors at this time. Please send resumes & inquiries to unseamdshakes@ gmail.com.

$2 WELL DRINKS 10PM - MIDNIGHT

2-4-1 LAP DANCES

SUBMISSIONS CITY OF ASYLUM/PITTSBURGH. Seeking writers from Western PA,

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Pittsburgh’s Best and Oakland’s Only Strip Club on the corner of Baum and Morewood

Monday: $2 Coors Light 9-11pm Tuesday: All Domestic Bottles $3 Until Midnight Wednesday: $2 Miller Lite All Night Thursday: $3 Well Drinks 9-11pm Friday: Ladies Night, No Cover For Ladies Saturday: Ladies Night, No Cover for Ladies, $2 Domestic Bottles until 9pm, $4 Jager Bombs All Night

Looking for Independent Dancers ATM on Site VIP Area for Private Dances

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280 Morewood Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-683-9000

Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

I just started an intense relationship with a guy who has a boyfriend. This guy and I love each other. However, he is uncomfortable with me meeting his boyfriend. I’ve asked if it’s OK that we’re fucking, and he said they’re in an open relationship. I asked if it’s OK that we’re in love, and he said yes. So why the secrecy? My lover’s explanation is that his boyfriend doesn’t want to know about the guys he fucks around with. The situation is starting to make me uneasy. I can’t figure out why I want to know more about his boyfriend. Is it so I can verify that he’s not cheating? I do know that I wish my lover would be more open with me. Should I just relax? THE OTHER PERSON

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

Monogamous couples have one rule about fucking other people — “don’t fuck other people” — but nonmonogamous couples have all sorts of rules, and sometimes a couple’s rules make it hard for a third to verify that the partnered person he’s sleeping with is, in fact, in an honest and healthy open relationship. That said, most couples with a “don’t want to know about the other people you’re fucking” rule — and that’s a pretty common rule — also have a rule against getting emotionally involved with the other people they’re fucking. So if it’s against the rules for the guy you’re seeing to introduce his boy-on-the-side to his boyfriend, odds are that swapping “I love yous” with his boy-onthe-side is against the rules, too. Either this guy is lying to you about being in an open relationship, or he’s lying to his boyfriend about not getting emotionally involved with other guys. Whichever it is, I don’t see a future for you with this guy — or much of a future for him and his boyfriend. To answer your question: N o, don’t relax. DTMFA.

In the meantime, fuck your girlfriend lots and hang out with other friends. And remember: When you’re feeling like the third wheel, it’s because you’re probably functioning as the third wheel. Thirds that make a decision to roll elsewhere generally wind up feeling better. My hubby is 62 and I am 52. We are experimenting sexually, but my blowjobs don’t do it for him. I’ve watched videos, read articles, and finally bought some flavored lube. He loves having his balls licked while I jerk him off. But what can I do about my blowjobs? HO HO HO

My advice: Lick your hubby’s balls while you jerk him off. Your husband either can’t get off from a blowjob alone — and there are men out there who can’t — or your blowjobs just don’t do it for him. In the interest of marital harmony, let’s give your blowjobs the benefit of the doubt and assume that your husband can’t be gotten off by blowjob alone. If you love sucking dick and your blowjobs are in no way traumatizing — if they don’t leave your husband curled up on the floor sobbing — then blow your husband. Telling him the blowjobs are for you will take the pressure off him. He may relax and enjoy the blowjob more. He might even get off. Bonus tip: You know that flavored lubes don’t do anything for the person being blown, right? They’re for people who don’t like the taste of dick, and it doesn’t sound like you’re one of those people. Until they come out with Chord Overstreet-flavored or Cheyenne Jackson-flavored lube, there’s no reason to slather your hubby’s dick with artificial flavorings and aspartame.

WHEN YOU’RE FEELING LIKE THE THIRD WHEEL, IT’S BECAUSE YOU’RE PROBABLY FUNCTIONING AS THE THIRD WHEEL.

I’m a feminine, submissive dyke. My girlfriend is absolutely amazing. The problem is I’ve formed a pretty tight trio with two hot, funny tops. I’ve got tiny, manageable crushes on them both. My girlfriend knows, but she’s secure enough that she isn’t bothered by it. The problem? My friends are fucking each other. They’re also in happy open relationships with other women. But even though they’re great friends, they leave me feeling like the third wheel once in a while. How can I gently remind them that, even though they’re not sleeping with me, I’d like a little more platonic attention? SATISFIED UNDER BUTCHES

I suppose you could sit your friends down and say, “Hey, when you two move out of your friends-in-open-relationships-with-benefits honeymoon phase, I could use a little more friendswithout-benefits attention.” But there’s almost no way to say that without coming across like a jealous, controlling bag of dykenuts. So hang back and trust that this honeymoon phase, like all honeymoon phases, will eventually pass, and these two friends will have more time for you in the future.

I’m a gay man in a four-year relationship. We’ve been very understanding and GGG. The problem: He wants me to piss in his ass. But peeing while erect is not my forte. I have to concentrate on peeing to actually go, and that just resulted in my going soft while inside him. By the time the urine was flowing, my dick was so soft that his sphincter was pinching my urethra, making it impossible to pee. I can’t think of what I can do to fulfill this fantasy. Is there an easier way? DRIPPING OUT URINE CONFOUNDS HIS ENEMA

I’m going to assume that you are in a committed relationship, that you’ve both been tested and have either no STIs or the same STIs, that neither of you is having unprotected sex with anyone else, that you rarely eat asparagus or beets, that you don’t plan on doing this in front of your pets, etc. OK, DOUCHE, I feel like Santa Claus now because I have the perfect toy for you. Go to forttroff.com, click “Enter,” search “ass tunnel,” then watch the video demo. It’s an after-Christmas miracle. (That link is NSFW. And, yes, I’m assuming DOUCHE and his BF celebrate Christmas. But only because all the piss-in-assers I’ve ever known were homeschooled Liberty University graduates.) Happy holidays, everybody!

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE


Ink Well

CLEAN CUTS

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

ACROSS

1. Dope hits 5. “Hollaback Girl” girl Stefani 9. Player way down the bench 14. Project’s basis 15. River of Normandy 16. Ring up 17. 21-/56-Across of a 2010 Cee Lo Green song 19. Singer/songwriter Mann 20. Airline on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange 21. With 56-Across, less offensive artistic reworking 23. Landon Donovan’s org. 26. “Ethereal wave” singer 28. Type of situation without bad outcomes 29. 21-/56-Across of the chorus in a 1992 Prince title 31. Grandpa Walton 33. Down Under airport letters 34. Check out, as a movie 35. Nowhere near R 38. 21-/56-Across of the chorus in a 2006 Akon title 42. He directed a 2012 movie about Abraham 43. Object sometimes waved by fans rooting for a series sweep 45. “Just one ___!” 48. Petraeus’s former org. 49. 21-/56-Across of a 1993 Nirvana single 50. Arrow that typically points

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

northwest 53. What crossword constructors typically work on 55. Team that finished last in the AL East in 2012 56. See 21-Across 58. Lefty cartoonist Ted 60. Away from one’s desk 61. 21-/56-Across of a 2009 Britney Spears single 66. One may be turned on the street 67. Internet expert Lawrence Lessig’s subject 68. 2012 gaming debut 69. Prevents from passing, in a way 70. Nautical bottom 71. Snake oil seller’s measure

DOWN

1. Creamy or crunchy brand 2. Craziness 3. The Celtic Sea, e.g., to the French 4. Wise one 5. Bombed 6. In a tonguein-cheek way 7. Brian who wrote the Windows 95 startup sound 8. Nine, in Paris 9. Wolfgang Puck restaurant 10. “Relax, bro” 11. Players 12. Having a racing mind, say 13. Feuded, in

hip-hop slang 18. Copper, e.g. 22. Company that owns Anheuser-Busch 23. Txt 24. Pope who kept Attila the Hun at bay 25. Austin music festival, initially 27. Landscaping flowers 30. Congressional affirmations 32. College founded by Henry VI 35. Shankar nominated for a 2013 Grammy award 36. Charlie Sheen’s life, generally 37. Brain folds 39. Late start? 40. Gut punch sounds 41. L’___ Vogue (Italian men’s mag) 44. Nation that

lost to Arg. in the 2010 World Cup 45. They might waft in 46. Email client named after an author 47. Jon Lovitz animated series, with “The” 49. ___ words (equivocations) 51. Simple weapon 52. Sounds from the pen 54. One unwilling to go to bed, say 57. Kids channel, familiarly 59. Blue 62. Antagonist 63. What a diver might come up for 64. Rapper with a self-titled autobiography 65. “I can really taste the rosemary!”

{LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

12.26-01.02

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 2013, I pledge to help you bring only the highest-quality influences and self-responsible people into your life. Together we will work to dispel any unconscious attraction you might have to demoralizing chaos or pathological melodrama. We will furthermore strive to ensure that as you deepen and fine-tune your self-discipline, it will not be motivated by selfdenial or obsessive control-freak tendencies. Rather, it will be an act of love that you engage in so as to intensify your ability to express yourself freely and beautifully.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

“Genius is the ability to renew one’s emotions in daily experience,” said French painter Paul Cezanne. What do you think he meant by that? Here’s one interpretation: Many of us replay the same old emotions over and over again — even in response to experiences that are nothing like the past events when we felt those exact feelings. So a genius might be someone who generates a fresh emotion for each new adventure. Here’s another possible interpretation of Cezanne’s remark: It can be hard to get excited about continually repeating the basic tasks of our regular routines day after day. But a genius might be someone who is good at doing just that. I think that by both of these definitions, 2013 could be a genius year for you Aquarians.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Home is not just the building where you live. It’s more than the community that gives you support and the patch of earth that comforts you with its familiarity. Home is any place where you’re free to be your authentic self; it’s any power spot where you can think your own thoughts and see with your own eyes. I hope and trust that in 2013 you will put yourself in position to experience this state of mind as often as possible. Do you have any ideas about how to do that? Brainstorm about it on a regular basis for the next six months.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

In the sci-fi film trilogy The Matrix, the heroes are able to instantaneously acquire certain complex skills via software that’s downloaded directly into their brains. In this way, the female hacker named Trinity masters the art of piloting a military helicopter in just a few minutes. If you could choose a few downloads like that, Aries, what would they be? This isn’t just a rhetorical question meant for your amusement. In 2013, I expect that your educational capacity will be exceptional. While you may not be able to add new skills as easily as Trinity, you’ll be pretty fast and efficient. So what do you want to learn? Choose wisely.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20):

Are you familiar with the fable of the golden goose? The farmer who owned it became im-

patient because it laid only one gold egg per day. So he killed it, thinking he would thereby get the big chunk of gold that must be inside its body. Alas, his theory was mistaken. There was no chunk. From then on, of course, he no longer got his modest daily treasure. I nominate this fable to be one of your top teaching stories of 2013. As long as you’re content with a slow, steady rate of enrichment, you’ll be successful. Pushing extra hard to expedite the flow might lead to problems.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

Here are some of the experiences I hope to help you harvest in the coming year: growing pains that are interesting and invigorating rather than stressful; future shock that feels like a fun joyride rather than a bumpy rumble; two totally new and original ways to get excited; a good reason to have faith in a dream that has previously been improbable; a fresh supply of Innocent Crazy-Wise Love Truth; and access to all the borogoves, mome raths and slithy toves you could ever want.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

In her gallery show Actuality, Reminiscence, and Fabrication, artist Deborah Sullivan includes a piece called “Penance 1962.” It consists of a series of handwritten statements that repeats a central theme: “I must not look at boys during prayer.” I’m assuming it’s based on her memory of being in church or Catholic school when she was a teen-ager. You probably have an analogous rule lodged somewhere in the depths of your unconscious mind — an outmoded prohibition or taboo that may still be subtly corroding your life energy. The coming year will be an excellent time to banish that ancient nonsense for good. If you were Deborah Sullivan, I’d advise you to fill a whole notebook page with the corrected assertion: “It’s OK to look at boys during prayer.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

For years, the gravestone of Irish dramatist Oscar Wilde was covered with kiss-shaped lipstick marks that were left by his admirers. Unfortunately, Wilde’s descendants decided to scour away all those blessings and erect a glass wall around the tomb to prevent further displays of

affection. In my astrological opinion, Leo, you should favor the former style of behavior over the latter in 2013. In other words, don’t focus on keeping things neat and clean and wellordered. On the contrary: Be extravagant and uninhibited in expressing your love for the influences that inspire you — even at the risk of being a bit unruly or messy.

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

In 2013, I hope to conspire with you to raise your levels of righteous success. If you’re a struggling songwriter, I’ll be pushing for you to get your music out to more people — without sacrificing your artistic integrity. If you’re a kindergarten teacher, I’ll prompt you to fine-tune and deepen the benevolent influence you have on your students. If you’re a business owner, I’ll urge you to ensure that the product or service you offer is a well-honed gift to those who use it. As I trust you can see, Virgo, I’m implying that impeccable ethics will be crucial to your ascent in the coming year.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

After Libran poet Wallace Stevens won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1955, Harvard University offered him a job as a full professor. But he turned it down. He couldn’t bear leaving his day job as the vice president of an insurance company in Hartford, Conn. I suspect that in the first half of 2013, you will come to a fork in the road that may feel something like Stevens’ quandary. Should you stick with what you know or else head off in the direction of more intense and unpredictable stimulation? I’m not here to tell you which is the better choice; I simply want to make sure you clearly identify the nature of the decision.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

In 2013, I will try to help you retool, reinvent and reinvigorate yourself in every way that’s important to you. I will encourage you to reawaken one of your sleeping aptitudes, recapture a lost treasure and reanimate a dream you’ve neglected. If you’re smart, Scorpio, you will reallocate resources that got misdirected or wasted. And I hope you will reapply for a privilege or position you were previously denied, because I bet you’ll win it this time around. Here are your words of power for the year ahead: resurrection and redemption.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Based on experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, a team of physicists in France and Switzerland announced last July that they had tentatively discovered the Higgs Boson, which is colloquially known as the “God particle.” What’s all the fuss? In her San Francisco Chronicle column, Leah Garchik quoted an expert who sought to explain: “The Higgs boson is the WD40 and duct tape of the universe, all rolled into one.” Is there a metaphorical equivalent of such a glorious and fundamental thing in your life, Sagittarius? If not, I predict you will find it in 2013. If there already is, I expect you will locate and start using its 2.0 version.

DELIGHT

To check out Part One of my three-part audio forecasts of your destiny in 2013, go to http:// bit.ly/BigPicture2012.

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GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 50 + LIVE 50 + STUDIES 51 + SERVICES 52 + WELLESS 53

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LIVE Classified Advertising Representative The Pittsburgh City Paper is currently seeking qualified candidates for a FULL TIME inside sales position. Previous web sales/inside sales experience is preferred. Pittsburgh City Paper offers a competitive wage and incentive package, medical, and 401K.

If you are looking for a challenging and rewarding career opportunity please forward your resume to Andrea James Classified Advertising Manager. Email: andreaj@steelcitymedia.com FAX: 412-316-3388

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FOR SALE

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ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse REAL ESTATE hundreds of online listSERVICES ings with photos and maps. Find your room20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40- mate with a click of Get 60 acres. $0-Down, the mouse! Visit: http:// $168/month. Money www.Roommates.com. back gaurentee. NO (AAN CAN) CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/ NAMASTE! Find a surveyed. Near El Paso, healthy balance of the mind, body and Texas. 1-800-843-7537 spirit with one of our www.SunsetRanches. massage therapists, com (AAN CAN) yoga, or spa busiAdvertise Here Today! nesses!

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013


STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

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SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

DANCE INSTRUCTOR Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

REACH 5 MILLION hip, forward-thinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http:// altweeklies.com/ads

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN) Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

CLASSES

PITTSBURGH STEEL CITY STEPPERS CHICAGO-STYLE STEPPIN’ DANCE LESSONS Wednesdays 7 -8:30 PM Wilkins School Community Center CONTACT: steelcitysteppers@ hotmail.com “friend” us on Facebook and Meetup.com

AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877492-3059 (AAN CAN) EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool. com

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

COMPUTERS

Over 3,000 good used tires on stock daily Guaranteed Lowest Prices on New Tires 2 Convenient Locations

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Citizen Police Review Board 2013 Meeting Dates and Host Neighborhoods

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The following calendar maintains the tradtion of meeting at 6:00pm on the fourth Tuesday of every calendar month except as noted. The several meetings proposed of Council Chambers attempt to respond to the public recommendation that meeting at a centralized location may encourage increased public attendance.

HAULING

All Meetings Scheduled to Begin at 6:00pm

412-979-4587

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates

Sealed proposals shall be addressed to and deposited with Mr. Peter J. Camarda, Executive Director, Budget Development, Management and Operations, at the School District of Pittsburgh Administration Building, Room 251, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, on January 29, 2013, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time, from the following Prime Contractor(s), building(s), location(s), and Project Site Work:

• Various HVAC Renovations • Pittsburgh Carrick High School • Pittsburgh, PA Off-site work shall be started on the Project no later than ten (10) days after the execution of a Contract with the Owner or as otherwise directed in writing. On-site work shall start June 18, 2013. The work shall be substantially completed and ready for Owner use on August 23, 2013. Punch List items must be completed 30 days after substantial completion. Details regarding: Pre-Bid Conferences, Substance Abuse, Eligible Business Opportunity Program, procedures for withdrawing bids, Pennsylvania Prevailing Wage Act, etc. are described in each project manual. Project Manual and Drawings for bidding purposes will be available for purchase by the Contractors December 21, 2012 at Modern Reproductions, 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, between 9:30 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Modern Reproductions may be contacted by phone 412-488-7700 or Fax 412-488-7338 to determine the cost of the Project Manual and Documents. The cost of the Project Manual and Documents is non-refundable.

The School District of Pittsburgh reserves the right to waive any informality in bids or to reject any or all bids. By Order of the Board of Public Education Dr. Linda Lane, Superintendent of Schools and Secretary

DATE

NEIGHBORHOOD

ADDRESS

January 22, 2013

Council Chambers

510 City-County Bldg 414 Grant St. Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-255-2142 - office

February 26, 2013

Council Chambers

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

March 26, 2013

Banksville Park

Crane Ave and Carnahan Rd Pittsburgh, PA 15220 412-255-2370 Z6

April 23, 2013

Council Chambers

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Call NOW

412-877-0730

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH

May 28, 2013

June 25, 2013

July 23, 2013 August 2013

Northside Senior Center

Freedom Unlimited, Inc. Director: Alma Speed Fox

Council Chambers Combined with September

5 Allegheny Center Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412-323-7239

Z1

2201 Wylie Ave Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-434-0922 - office 412-471-1313 - fax

Z2

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219 Combined with September

September 24, 2013

Council Chambers

510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

October 22, 2013

Homewood-Brushton YMCA

7140 Bennett St. Pittsburgh, PA 15208 412-243-2900

November 2013

Combined with December

December 3, 201

Council Chambers

CPRB PITTSBURGH

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013

Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

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OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

52

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE

Z5

Combined with December 510 City-County Bldg Pittsburgh, PA 15219

Adopted: October 23, 2012 (The public will be notified of any change of date or location through media publication) For Further Information: 412-765-8023 or Confidential TipLine: 412-255-CPRB


WELLNESS COUNSELING

MIND & BODY

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SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS 412-400-7159 selfesteemworkshops.com

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Chinese So Relax Massage

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GRAND OPENING

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Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

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LOCATIONS IN:

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

Oakland, PA Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA West View, PA Butler, PA

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

412-441-1185

412-621-3300

Includes Med Management & Therapy

• Group and Individualized Therapy

Shadyside Location

4309 Butler Street (Lawrenceville)

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addiction

• SUBOXONE

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

South Side

SUBOXONE

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

3348 Babcock Blvd. Pittsburgh

Addiction & Recovery Health Services

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

Your ad could be here

WELLNESS CENTER

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412.434.6700

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116 N E W S

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WE have been there WE know your pain Don’t Wait Any Longer!

www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - Gateway - United Health - And Many Others

MONROEVILLE, PA

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Xin Sui Bodyworks

TIGER SPA

Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

EARLY DEADLINE! THE HOLIDAYS ARE COMING and our DEADLINE has been moved up!

DEADLINE

GRAND OPENING!

Judy’s Oriental Massage

Thursday, December 27th @ 5pm for the January 2nd Issue

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950 Accepting All Major Cards

412.316.3342

Please make a note of these dates. NO late ads will be accepted.

Get Your YOGA On!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 12.26.2012/01.02.2013


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MORTGAGE MANIA JANUARY 1 – FEBRUARY 2 Swipe daily at any kiosk to win prizes and to earn your entries for a chance to win in our $300,000 Mortgage Mania Grand Prize Drawings! Start earning entries 6am, January 1 through 6pm, January 31. 25 base points = 1 entry. Must swipe at the kiosk each Saturday to earn 5x entries.

GRAND PRIZE DRAWINGS: January 31, February 1, and February 2 at 7:15pm

EVERY SATURDAY EARN 5X ENTRIES

WIN THESE LIFE CHANGING PRIZES EACH DRAWING 1 winner - cash prize could pay MORTGAGE or RENT for a year 2 winners - AUTO or CREDIT CARD LOAN assistance up to $10,000 3 winners - $100 Free Slot Play every week for a year Swipe your Rush Rewards Players Club card to activate entries from 2:00pm-7:00pm on each drawing day. For complete details visit Rush Rewards Players Club.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

December 26, 2012  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Issue 52

December 26, 2012  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Issue 52