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FEBRUARY 2014

VETERANS:

Call on Ottawa to halt Veterans’ Affairs office closures

Bill PHILLIPS/Free Press Highways Minister Todd Stone and Nechako Lakes MLA John Rustad announce that Highway 16 and Highway 97 from Prince George north has been redesignated as Class A, meaning more robust snow clearing and maintenance.

Highway 16 becomes Class A Bill Phillips editor@pgfreepress.com With a slew of fatal accidents on Highway 16 this winter and expected increased industrial traffic, the province is changing the highway’s designation. Transportation Minister Todd Stone announced January 21 that the highway, from Prince Rupert to the B.C./Alberta border and Highway 97 north from Prince George, will be moved from a Class B designation to Class A, changing how snow removal and maintenance is conducted.

“A Class A highway has more patrols,” Stone said during a press conference at the CN Intermodal facility in Prince George. “Patrols will take place every four hours as opposed to every eight hours. The maximum amount of snow accumulation that is permitted on the highway before it has to be removed is quite a bit less … four centimetres, as opposed to six centimetres. There will be more snow removal, more plowing, there will also be more salt and sand applications. All told, it represents a heightened level of winter road maintenance.” It will also mean renegotiating contracts with the six highways maintenance contractors that are responsible for maintaining the stretches of highways. Stone expects the

changes will cost the province between $2 million and $3 million per year. “Those dollars I have found within our ministries,” he said. He said the province has looked at the number of accidents and fatalities along Highway 16, in addition to traffic volumes, in making the decision to reclassify the highways. “It is absolutely the right time to reclassify Highway 16 and Highway 97,” he said. “It will immediately improve safety in those corridors.” The province has put $129 million into Highway 16 improvements for past four years. The changes are expected to be in effect by mid-to-late February.

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Education key to future Aboriginal mining group tries new approach Bill Phillips editor@pgfreepress.com It’s no secret that First Nations youth often have a tougher time getting through high school. That results in a tougher time getting into a good career. The solution, says Laurie Sterritt, President and CEO of the B.C. Aboriginal Mining Training Association, lies in the education system. “An effective approach has been to focus on developing individualized education plans,” she told about 300 delegates at the Premier’s B.C. Natural Resources Forum in Prince George in January. “The traditional approach in the education system says that everyone should be treated equally. (Our) experience it totally the opposite of this … Individual education plans are a must-have, not a niceto-have.” The approach is working for the B.C. Aboriginal Mining Training Association, which is tasked with getting aboriginals into the mining industry. “We do our best to get rid of the things that hold people back,” Sterritt said. The association has, in four years, helped 650 First Nations people secure employment. The average wage of those they have helped is about $53,000 per year, 30 per cent are female, and 43 per cent are under the age of 35. It is a challenge, but one that needs to be met, she said, as they battle the obstacles of low self-esteem among aboriginals, fear, and a sense of not belonging. Bill PHILLIPS/Free Press “Think of how hard it would be to achieve a Laurie Sterrit says a one-size-fits-all approach to education isn’t the best way to prepare First Nations youth. personal goal if you didn’t think you deserve a chance to even imagine a personal goal,” she said. “Since we’re often working with canShe says it costs about the same to put a person through “We see success as a transformed country,” she said. “One didates who have not been in the high school system, we’re their program as it does to have that person collect social aswhere aboriginal people participate fully in the Canadian often awakening the ghost of failure.” sistance for a year, so the money is well spent. economy.”

Veterans take office fight to Ottawa Bill Phillips editor@pgfreepress.com Bruce Moncour is a veteran who served in Afghanistan. He was severely injured there … accidentally strafed by an American A-10 Warthog. The injury, a penetrating wound to the head, resulted in doctors removing five per cent of his brain. He was in Ottawa last week, along with other veterans of the Canadian Armed Forces, calling on Ottawa to reverse the planned closure of Veterans’ Affairs offices across the country. “We’re calling on the government to halt the policy of ‘delay, deny, die,’” he said from Ottawa. Joining him were a handful of veterans from across the country, including Les Dammann, a former Canadian Ranger who lives in the Prince George area. “Since the Prince George office closed there has been a tremendous strain on veterans,” he said. “Veterans aren’t getting the services and benefits they are entitled to. What message does that send to our veterans?” They were among a delegation of veterans and Public Service Alliance members who were expecting to meet with Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino Tuesday evening. Fantino reportedly arrived late for the meeting and then dismissed the veterans, without discussing the issue. He has since apologized for how he treated

the veterans. The Prince George office was closed in January 2012, resulting in the loss of two client service agents. The office had two case managers in 2007, but when they left they were not replaced. Veterans are now serviced out of Service Canada offices. Veterans say the Veterans’ Affairs offices were geared towards veterans, and that Service Canada offices often deter veterans because they lack private consultation areas needed for veterans who may be suffering from post traumatic stress disorder or other injuries. They say it is a reduction in service. Prince George-Peace River MP Bob Zimmer doesn’t agree. “To say that Canada’s veterans will receive diminished service because of the VAC closure is simply not true, as the same services are available at the Service Canada desk,” he said in a letter to the Prince George Free Press. “In Prince George the Service Canada desk is located in the same building as the old Veterans Affairs office.” Zimmer said help will be available at every one of Service Canada’s 600 locations across the country, a dramatic increase from the 33 Veterans Affairs Canada offices located only in urban centres. Each Service Canada location will have staff trained by Veterans Affairs Canada to help people with their benefit applications, answer questions, and assist them in accessing other services, Zimmer said. Cariboo-Prince George MP Dick Harris said

in December he knew about the Veterans Affairs offices being closed across the country, but wants people to wait and see what the results will be.

“They’re trying different ways to deliver help to the veterans in whatever way they can. This is probably the biggest transformation Veterans Affairs has undergone.”

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Wet’suwet’en seek Crown consultation on liquefied natural gas “We still have more work to do though,” Clark said. “I think that was reflected in the letter. First Nations have waited far too long to be a part of our economy and we want to make sure they are included and benefiting from economic development.” While not saying she would meet with the Wet’suwet’en, Clark said she wants to meet with as many First Nations communities as she can. Skeena-Bulkley Valley MP Nathan Cullen said that Clark is playing lip service to the Wet’suwet’en. “That seems to be the deficit of this premier who wants to do the photo-ops but doesn’t want to do the hard work of actually negotiating with people who matter,” Cullen said. Ogen said that while the Wet’suwet’en are waiting for Bill PHILLIPS/Free Press meaningful Crown consulta- Premier Christy Clark meets reporters during the Premier’s B.C. Natural Resources tion, the province has been Forum in Prince George last month. meeting with LNG industry economic component’ and that choices about the use to “behind closed doors” and expects taxation, royalty and which our aboriginal title lands will be put are the right of regulatory legislation will be unveiled in the spring sitting our community to make,” said Ogen, of the legislature. “By proceeding unilaterally to develop a new industry “Wet’suwet’en people have taken our case to the Supreme on the backbone of our territory, the province is running Court of Canada in the landmark Delgamuukw case where roughshod over those constitutional guarantees.” the Court held that aboriginal title has an ‘inescapable

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The rush to get going on liquefied natural gas has seemingly gone right past the Wet’suwet’en First Nation … through which pipelines will surely run. And they are not happy. In August the Wet’suwet’en sent a letter to Premier Christy Clark requesting a meeting so Crown consultation on the new LNG export industry could begin. According to Wet’suwet’en Chief Karen Ogen, they are still waiting for a meeting. “Time is running out,” said Ogen. “If Wet’suwet’en is to participate meaningfully in the LNG industry choices and plans for our aboriginal title lands, the BC government must provide us with the necessary information to begin Crown Consultation on the new LNG industry. Taking First Nations support for granted and treating consultation with Wet’suwet’en First Nation as an inconvenient after thought is not consultation in good faith.” The Wet’suwet’en had given the province until Jan. 31 to provide information to the band or it will “pursue the steps necessary to ensure that the province fulfills its constitutional obligations.” Clark, who was in full LNG promotion mode in Prince George last month at the Premier’s B.C. Natural Resources Forum, said the Wet’suwet’en are just one of many First Nations groups the province is seeking to consult with. “We have been deeply engaged with aboriginal communities across the province,” Clark said. “There’s a lot of them. Different communities see different levels of consultation. Effectively, we’re meeting with all of them.” While Clark hasn’t sat down with the Wet’suwet’en personally, she said Aboriginal Affairs Minister John Rustad has.

ONGMA

editor@pgfreepress.com

RICHARD

Bill Phillips

CITY BOUNDARY

ABOUT US

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It has been a relatively normal flu season in the North this year, but that doesn’t mean you should let your guard down. “We are asking all members of the public to take proper precautions,” Dr. William Osei, Northern Health Medical Health Officer, said recently. “Some people still need protection.” In the previous week, he said, Northern Health had seen 16 more cases of H1N1 flu, bringing the total this winter to 63. That is on par with last year when 156 cases were reported throughout the entire winter season. He said there have been no deaths from the flu so far this year in the North. With the province announcing in late January that there may be shortages of vaccine, Mary Margaret Proudfoot, regional manager for Public Health’s Communicable Disease program, says the North is in good shape. “The clinics are still continuing,” she said. “We have an adequate supply.” She said Northern Health received 80,000 doses and Northern Health clinics have administered 20,000 shots. A good portion of the 80,000 doses have been distributed to pharmacies and doctors and Proudfoot said they won’t know until the end of the season exactly how many doses pharmacies and doctors have administered. In the meantime, British Columbians who have not been vaccinated this season are encouraged to take the usual preventive measures, such as regular hand washing, staying home when sick, and avoiding contact with those who are at high risk to develop complications from influenza. This year’s influenza season is not more severe than past seasons, and the vast majority of those impacted by influenza make a complete recovery after seven to 10 days of illness. The relatively rare, more serious complications of this year’s strain have affected a younger-than-usual segment of the population. In addition, B.C.’s PharmaCare program has expanded the coverage criteria for antivirals for the 2013-2014 influenza season to include anyone with lab-confirmed influenza A or B, or with influenza symptoms. Physicians can now write prescriptions

for people experiencing these symptoms. Antivirals can help reduce the symptoms of flu and help people recover more quickly. Public health officials are recommending that anyone with an underlying health condition that can increase the risk of a serious complication, such as heart or lung disorders, kidney disease, chronic liver disease, diabetes, cancer or a weakened immune system, discuss receiving a prescription for an antiviral drug with their health care provider. Should they develop influenza symptoms, they should contact their health care provider for advice on whether they should fill the prescription. Residents of northern B.C. can receive their flu shot from their local health unit, pharmacists, and select family physician offices or care providers. Eligibility for free vaccinations has also been increased to include those born after 2009 and those with underlying chronic conditions.

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Kirk McLean signs photos of his days in the Vancouver Canucks nets for members of the College Heights Scotiabank AtoMc team. McLean visited a number of local teams at the Kin Centres as part of Hockey Day in Canada, before heading to CN Centre for the game between the Cougars and Edmonton Oil Kings.

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Valentine play for Valentine’s Day After a successful sold-out run in Kelowna, Actors Studio is pleased to bring its critically, and audience, acclaimed production of Shirley Valentine to the Interior. Shirley Valentine, written by Willy Russell, will be at the Prince George Playhouse, February 14 (7:30 p.m.) and February 15 (1 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.). Stuck in a life where the highlight of her day is talking to the kitchen wall while she prepares her husband’s dinner, housePhoto submitted wife Shirley Bradshaw decides to break free on an Patricia Burns will be the lead in Shirley Valentine when it comes adventure to Greece where to the Prince George Playhouse on Feb. 14 and 15. “Shirley provides a peek at the talent and she rediscovers love and the girl she used to be: emotional range of an exceptional actress. Since Shirley Valentine. coming to Kelowna Actors Studio in 2004, Patricia After debuting the role to Kelowna audiences Burns’ roles have covered every end of the theatriin 2006, Patricia Burns returned to the stage in cal spectrum. September of 2013 to star in the Actors Studio She has played a mentally challenged woman in production, directed by Margaret Gobie. Although she has acted for the camera, the stage Lost in Yonkers, and was a dramatic force in The Laramie Project and The Miracle Worker, to name is Burns’ first love. She has performed to both aubut a few. Her ability as a character actor has made dience and critical acclaim in numerous live productions including Vancouver and Kelowna, where her stand out in large casts such as Hello Dolly, while the experience of watching her comedic she has made her home for the past 12 years. She character grow within the show in productions has won several dramatic awards, including Best like Steel Magnolias and The Odd Couple make Actress in KAS’ One Act Festival for her porher a perfect choice for Shirley Valentine.” trayal of Jessie in A Scent of Honeysuckle, and she Tickets are $33 at the Studio 2880 Ticket Centre. garnered a Theatre BC Mainstage Best Supporting Actress award for her adaptation of The 8 Female Greek Chorus in How I Learned to Drive. ‘I’m very excited to bring our show to Prince George,” says Nathan Flavel, general manager and owner of Kelowna Actors Studio. “I grew up in Prince George and my very first performance with P.G. Theatre Workshop was at the Playhouse in Beauty and The Beast ASK FOR DETAILS prior to the theatre renovations. It feels full circle for me. Touring WE NOW BOOK Patricia’s Shirley ValenCARRY YOUR EYE tine here was a natural. NATIVE EXAMINATION I am sure Interior audiences are going to love TODAY! EYEWEAR her as much as Okanagan ones did.” WE WILL BEAT “Shirley Valentine is a remarkable story of self- ANY COMPETITOR’S discovery. Our heroine WRITTEN QUOTE finds romance and a new awareness of who (When purchasing complete pair) DIGITAL LENSES she is and what her life O R 5 0 % ASK ABOUT THE LATEST O F F DESIG can be with just a little DIGITAL LENS TECHNOLOGY (Some restrictions NER FRAME S apply) of the courage from her youth,” said Gobie. “We DIRECT get to laugh and cry INSURANCE complete along with her on this BILLING FREE EYEGLASS EGLASS CLEANER FOR LIFE With eyewear purchase. Ask for details journey through life and love, always with a sense Spruceland Mall of humour.” 250-564-0095 Randy Leslie, Artistic Managing Director of Pine Centre Mall Kelowna Actors Studio, 250-564-0047 who originally directed Toll Free: 1-855-564-0047 Best Burns in 2006, has worked with the actress on many projects, www.visionsoptical.com

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country fields. It’s been a busy few months for Rankin, who did a Christmas tour is support of his Tinsel Town album, and is back on the road now, with a new album, Backroad Paradise, due out in the spring. The first single, Cool Car, is set to be released in February. Tickets for Jimmy Rankin’s show on April 22 at Artspace are available now at Books and Company or at the door.

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Hip-hop, R&B all part of JRDN Allan Wishart allanw@pgfreepress.com It’s no surprise there are a lot of different styles coming through in JRDN’s music. “Hip-hop kind of raised me,” the singer says from Toronto, where he was doing some studio work, “but my first love was R&B. And then there’s some soul splashes in there.” Prince George will get the chance to hear a lot of those styles when JRDN opens for Hedley on Feb. 14 at CN Centre. Given his style and Hedley’s style, it may sound like a strange mix, but he says it isn’t. “It’s definitely a little bit different, but Hedley’s doing a little bit of R&B themselves now, getting some of that sound.” While JRDN has only played one previous date

with Hedley, he’s somewhat more familiar with the other opening act, Alyssa Reid. “I’ve done shows with her, and we actually just finished up a duet. I think it’s going to be on her next project, which comes out the same day as my new EP.” Having a mix of musical styles can make it easier to find songs, he agrees, but it also makes it easier to adapt songs. “I might hear a song that’s really soft rock and I start thinking how it could sound, so I’ll mix it and fuse it with some R&B.” Sometimes, though, the musical genres thing can get a bit mixed up. “i don’t rap, but I do sometimes write hooks for rappers. I give them something that sounds good, and they go from there. “There are a lot of collaborations going on. I work

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with hip-hop people, I work with R&B people.” Lately, JRDN has been focusing on his writing. “I’m still pretty new at it. I’ve only been writing for about six years. I just haven’t had the time before to really sit down and just do some writing.” Now, he’s still not finding it easier, but it’s easier to get things flowing sometimes. “Most of the time when I’m writing, I’ll work with the melody. I’ll get something that sounds good, and I’ll start trying different things. “If I’m lucky, the words will start coming while I’m still on the melody. Sometimes it ends up being a verse that I get going, sometimes it’s the chorus. You never know.” And sometimes, even when he thinks a song is finished, something changes. “I was back home in Nova Scotia a couple of weeks ago, back where I came from, and I caught the vibe of growing up there. “It was the first time I’d been home in months, and it just felt right when I started putting the song together.” Then he got back to the studio in Toronto. “I came back, went into the studio,

and the melody got changed. The concept of the song is the same, it’s still about the same thing, but the song itself changed. It just felt like a better fit. “That’s how it goes. Sometimes it’s the atmosphere, it’s the mood you’re in, it’s the kind of wine you drank.” If you’re expecting a lot of glitz and glamour when JRDN takes the stage on Feb. 14, you’ll be disappointed. If you’re expecting good music, you won’t be. “It’s just me and a three-piece band. I’m not a dancer, so there won’t be a lot of moving around. I just stand there and belt it out.” He figures some of the people in the audience that night might not know who he is, so he’ll start with some of his older tracks, “stuff they may remember hearing on the radio.” Then it will be onto some newer stuff, and he says people will notice a difference. “There’s a slight change in tempo on the new stuff. I stayed away from the uptempo songs. “I’m more of a laid-back guy.” Tickets for the Feb. 14 show at CN Centre with JRDN and Alyssa Reid opening for Hedley, are on sale at all Ticketmaster locations.

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Northern Health is pleased to announce new grant funding that aims to support community groups across northern B.C. These grants will support communities that have ideas for projects to improve the health and well-being of their residents. We are asking those groups or organizations who are interested to submit an expression of interest. Community energy and commitment can create lasting and effective improvements to the health and well-being of those living, working, learning and playing in northern BC. With this in mind, this new grant funding is available to three separate audiences: 1. Existing Partnering for Healthier Community Committees: We want to empower existing committees to use their local knowledge and expertise to administer small granting programs of their own for their communities. This grant will be up to $10,000 and must be requested by February 28, 2014. 2. Communities currently without a Partnering for Healthier Community Committee, but who are poised to establish one: Communities who are ready to start a committee will benefit

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Students Step Up in video Former Kelly Road students put together anti-gang message A pair of former Kelly Road students have been recognized for a video that presents an antigang message. Chelsey Cherkas and Kayla Thorell were named as the winners of the Step In/Step Up antigang video contest. Step In, Step Up is a multidimensional youth program designed to encourage youth in the community to Step In, by getting involved, and Step Up, by leading the charge to prevent gang activity and recruitment in our community. One aspect of this project was an ‘anti-gang’ themed video contest open to youth aged 13 to 18. The video had to be a 60second public service announcement with an anti-gang message. In all, 14 entries were received and from that, five finalists were selected. The winning video was professionally reproduced and

made into a public service announcement for local television. On Friday January 17, the winning entry was revealed at the Cineplex Theatre in Prince George. Cherkas is currently living in Alberta where she plans to enroll in a criminal justice program in the fall, with the hopes of eventually going to law school. Thorell is currently attending the College of New Caledonia and hopes to enroll in the nursing program this September As a reward for winning the competition, both were involved in the professional production of the video and received a $250 gift certificate for London Drugs. Kelly Road Secondary School received a digital video prize package valued at over $1,200. Photo courtesy Prince George RCMP The winning submission beChelsey Cherkas, teacher Rob Bennett and Kayla Thorell attended the screening of the anti-gang video at the Cineplex Theatre recently. gan airing on CKPG

Full slate of events for Black History Month in Prince George CNC and the Prince George African Heritage Society are once again teaming up to present a number of events during the 17th annual Black History Month Celebration in February. Organizers say the events are a way of celebrating aspects of African culture in a wider Prince George context.

“Black History Month celebrates the diverse roots of the nation and country we call Canada,” said George Kaweesi, CNC instructor and Black History Month organizer, in a press release. “These events remind everyone that our community is made up of those from near and far and they share a common goal of trying to make it

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• February 18 – Caribbean Cooking Demonstration 7 p.m. First Baptist Church, 483 Gillette St. Email pgafricanheritage@gmail.com. Tickets $20 available at CNC Bookstore and Chances Are Consignment Store, above Books & Company. Call Colleen Dyson 250-613-6239. • February 22 – Main Event at CNC: Dinner 6:30 –7:30 p.m. Presentation: Mandela: The Man and His Legacy 7:45 p.m • February 25 – South African Cooking Demonstration 7 p.m.: First Baptist Church, 483 Gillette St. E-mail pgafricanheritage@ gmail.com. Tickets $20 available at CNC Bookstore and Chances Are Consignment Store, above Books & Company. Call Colleen Dyson 250613-6239. • February 28 – Cultural performances, music, food at CNC from noon to 2 p.m.

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better.” Kaweesi added Black History Month also serves as a reminder that people of African heritage have made some significant contributions to this community. “These events help us appreciate and recognize the contributions of people with African heritage and reminds everyone that we should all work together to build a better society.” Schedule Of Events • February 1 – First annual Black History Soccer Tournament and Dance. DJ is Kay Kay Obi • February 8 – Night of Song at First Baptist Church at 7 p.m. Tickets $10 • February 15 – Family Day at CNC from 2 to 5 p.m. Free admission children, adults welcome. Contact Jacob Madjitey, 250-564-4820 or e-mail pgafricanheritage@gmail.com

Tuition hike at CNC The College of New Caledonia’s Board of Governors voted Jan. 24 in favour of raising tuition and mandatory fees by up to two per cent this fall. The move is predicted to generate about $100,000, depending on enrolment. “It will help a little bit, but frankly it’s a drop in the bucket as we look to cut another $1.2 million from our budget once again this year,” said CNC interim president Bryn Kulmatycki, in a press release. “We’ve had to cut millions from our budget for several years now and it has become very difficult to do.” The college is working to resolve a predicted $1.2 million budget shortfall for the 2014/15 fiscal year, due to rising costs and overall

funding, which has been stagnant. “We will continue to look for cost savings with our usual measures, such as reducing expenditures, reallocating unused budgets, as well as early retirement incentives and voluntary severance packages,” Kulmatycki said. “But we have been doing that for years and it likely won’t be enough anymore, which means we will likely have to look at further efficiencies and reductions.” Colleges are required by provincial legislation to plan for a balanced budget every year, which means changes to the budget are necessary in order to deal with the projected shortfall. Final 2014/15 operating budget approval will occur at the board meeting April 25.


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Royal Wood got what he wanted from his new album, The Burning Bright. “I wanted to be fulfilled artistically,” the Canadian singer-sognwriter says from Leduc, Alta., one of the stops on a tour which saw him at the Prince George Playhouse on Jan. 28, as the feature performer in Smokin’ Hot Vocals, part of the Coldsnap Festival. “I’m at a different place in my life than I was for my last album (We Were Born to Glory). This album is the most honest I’ve ever done. “There was no filter on the songs this time.” Born to Glory came out in 2012 and was a huge success. Wood saw his marriage break up in early 2013, and that was one of the reasons he roamed far and wide in the production of the new album. “On the last album, we did it in a limited time, and it ended up feeling like just a project. This time, I did it for me.” That meant spending some time in Ireland, his ancestral home, as well as in Los Angeles, working with Bill Lefler. “I didn’t set out to write songs with a Royal Wood specific topic,” he says. “I just found things “I was very curious what the company was going coming out as I was feeling them. to think. I think they were worried, and I was a “At the end, I kind of stepped back and went, little worried about that, but in the end, everyone ‘Wow’.” felt the opposite. They were all fully behind it.” Some of the songs reflect the time spent in IreForever and Ever, the first single off The Burning land, with a very Celtic feel to them. Others don’t, Bright, is a much ‘pop’-pier song than many of the and Wood says one big decision was made. others on the album, but Wood says he thinks it “I was thinking about doing a double album, was the right choice. Listeners seem to agree. with the songs split, but then I thought it would “Forever and Ever has been my most successful be more powerful if the two sides were mixed tosingle ever,” he says. “If you can show a different gether. I’m a big fan of the concept record, but this side of you, fans will love it. It gives them a better didn’t feel like the one for that approach.” picture of who you are.” With We Were Born to Glory having topped the charts, Wood wasn’t sure how the record company CLEAN • COMFORTABLE • AFFORDABLE • QUIET would react to the new SPECIAL! style he was finding on STAY 9 The Burning Bright. NIGHTS “It started out in a GET 1 NIGHT very honest, unfiltered FREE manner. As I started *Some conditions apply to let more and more economyinnpg@gmail.com DISCOUNT OFF REGULAR WITH people in, we tried new 1915 3rd Ave, Prince George ROOM RATE COUPON 250.563.7106 things, but we kept it ONLY 14 www.economyinn.ca *Expires Feb. 28, 2014 honest.

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STK# 14Q14919

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2014 RAM HD C/CAB 4X4 BEST IN CLASS BY FAR!

2014 JEEP CHEROKEE

2014 DODGE DART AR ART

$123

$89

Bi-Weekly @ 4.29% 96 months

Weekly

@ 4.29% 96 months

$15,888

STARTING AT:

STARTING AT:

$21,888

$34,888 STARTING AT:

STK# 14JC5313

STK# 14DD9102 14DD91

NEW!

STK# 14C20470

2014 DODGE G JOURNEY O

STARTING AT:

7 PASSENGER

$18,888

$105

Bi-Weekly @ 4.29% 96 months

RAM IS CANADA’S A’S #11 SELLING HD TRUCK

37,000lbs GCWR!

1-800-945-1935 STK# 14DJ6436

DISC DISCLAIMER: All prices and payments plus taxes and fees ON APPROVED CREDIT. Prices above include $589 Administrative Fee which is mandatory on purc purchase of New vehicles. Lowest cash prices and payments using all dealership incentives. All Vehicles available at time of selection for printing. Vehi Vehicles may not be exactly as shown. File photos used on some vehicles when required. 1)2014 Ram Q/cab $19 ,888 $0 down, $111 bi-weekly, x 96 months @ 4.29%. Cost of borrowing: $3585, total obligation: $23,139 before taxes. 2) 2014 Jeep Cherokee -$21 ,888 $0 down, $123 bi-weekly, x 96 months @ 4.29%. Cost of borrowing: $3951, total obligation: $25,505 before taxes. 3) 2013 Dodge Dart $15, $15,888 $0 down, $89 bi-weekly, x 96 months @ 4.29%. Cost of borrowing: $2873, total obligation: $18,405 before taxes. 3) 2014 Dodge Journey $18, $18,888 $0 down, $106 bi-weekly, x 96 months @ 4.29%. Cost of borrowing: $3425, total obligation: $21,955 before taxes. Factory Incentives subject to change as new Chrysler Retail Incentive Programs are announced. See Dealer for details. subj

DL# 30541

AD EXPIRES 28.02.14

Prince George Free Press - Big North - February 2, 2014  

Prince George Free Press - Big North - February 2, 2014

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