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Grand Valley State University   

Division of Student Services  2010‐2011 Unit Highlights 


Table of Contents 

Introduction  

Campus Recreation  

Career Center  

Children’s Enrichment Center  

Counseling & Career Development Center  

10 

Housing & Residence Life  

12 

LGBT Resource Center  

14 

Multicultural Affairs  

16 

Student Life: Community Service Learning Center  

18 

Student Life: Laker Leadership Programs  

20 

Student Life: Student Organization Services  

22 

Women’s Center  

24 

   


Introduction to the Student Services Division Highlights Report   Mission: The Division of Student Services connects students with opportunities to be enlightened, engaged and responsible lifelong learners, and productive global citizens. The Division of Student Services provides programs, services, and environments that enhance the personal, social, and intellectual growth of undergraduate and graduate students at the University. We provide a wide range of programs and services that enhance learning in critical thinking, communication, self-awareness, relationships, diversity, membership & leadership, citizenship, and sustainability. These co-curricular offerings and support services target undergraduate and graduate students, residential and commuter students, traditional and nontraditional age students, as well as full-time and part-time students at Grand Valley’s campuses and regional centers. As you will read in the following pages, the programs, events, services, and resources offered through the Student Services Units provide numerous opportunities for virtually every student to engage in learning, leadership, service/volunteering, and more! The Office of Student Life (Community Service Learning Center, Leadership, Student Organizations, Greek Life, Cultural Programming ), along with Housing & Residence Life, create supportive environments for students to live, learn, and grow, while interacting with and learning about students of diverse backgrounds and interests. In addition to support, the “Three Centers” (Multicultural Affairs, Women’s, LGBT Resource), along with the Veterans and Nontraditional Student Networks, provide space and/or opportunities for students with similar backgrounds to connect with each other. Additionally, the Children’s Enrichment Center provides a safe on-campus learning environment as an essential benefit for parents who attend Grand Valley State University. Wellness, healthy lifestyles, recreation and psycho-emotional support are spearheaded by Campus Recreation. Counseling and Career Development also supports wellness by providing screening opportunities, workshops, and services to help students in need. They also assist students with career exploration and planning in partnership with Career Services, the office that coordinates internships for undergraduate students, prepares students for effective searches and interviewing, and coordinates employer recruiting by hosting large career fairs and matching job seekers with employers. While we could not capture all of the contributions and activities of the Division of Student Services, we have identified some of the most important to highlight the breadth of these efforts.


Address: Rec Center, D001

Campus Recreation    

● Develop one departmental system that functions to report, assess, and track information for all areas of Campus Recreation. ● Collaborate internally to operate effectively as a team, fostering growth, improvement and success. ● Collaborate externally to connect with on campus and off campus organizations developing mutually beneficial relationships. ● Provide rich, inclusive environments and opportunities that attract and support a diverse staff and participant base. ● Maximize resources and minimize waste to efficiently and effectively market Campus Recreation programs and services. ● Be a leader on campus in providing quality programming to participants that support learning, development, health, well-being and the overall GVSU experience. ● Recruit, develop, and retain undergraduate, graduate, and professional staff members to take on opportunities that will develop skills to prepare them for their chosen career field. 

Intramural Sports: 616‐331‐3224 E‐Mail: gvintra@gvsu.edu  

Twitter: @GVSUcampusrec

Intramural Sports Participations

recreational divisions of play for both competitive and recreational skill levels.

Fitness & Wellness: Group exercise,

mind/body, and spinning classes are taught by a staff of certified instructors. Classes offer effective and safe workouts in a fun, friendly, and social atmosphere. To encourage healthy lifestyles, a variety of services include health Intramural Sports: Provides a quality screenings, massage, nutrition, wellness recreational sports experience in a safe, fun, and coaching, fitness consultation, fitness testing, sportsmanlike environment. Twenty different personal exercise program, and personal training. sports are offered during the fall, winter, and spring semesters in men’s, women’s, and co-

Learning Outcomes  Campus Recreation programs and services provide participants with the following benefits and learning outcomes:     

 

Stress reduction Enhance self-esteem' Build friendships Multicultural awareness

Improve health and well-being Expand awareness of healthy living Value in healthy choices

As a result of being a staff employee, students will learn and develop skills in:  Conflict resolution  Self-awareness  Customer service  Critical thinking  Effective communication  Healthy lifestyle  Leadership development  Problem solving  Teamwork  Organization  Self-confidence  Patience

Total Fitness Class Attendance 14000 13500 13000 12500 12000 11500 11000 10500 10000

7500 7000 6500

2011‐2012 Priorities

6000

● Implement a report to track unique numbers, gender, race, affiliation, and credit hours of participants in all program areas.

5500 5000 2008‐2009

2009‐2010

2010‐2011

● Plan collectively and enhance efforts for staff training, programs, events, and services.

Department Highlights  Program Increases Land/Spin Classes Mind/Body Classes Service appointments Intramural Participations

Diversity 54% 27% 32% 12%

Student Staff Development/Learning 

Upon graduation, 81% of student staff secured professional employment and/or attended graduate school.

intercultural learning. Collaboration 

Increase onsite housing events’ participation.

127% increase of housing affiliated teams as a result of implementing housing leagues.

Quality of Programs 

Monthly staff meetings/roundtable topic

 

Continue to increase diversity and support

Average of 88% satisfaction of all Campus

● Recruit and develop a staff that reflects diverse perspectives and incorporate intercultural learning into staff training.

Recreation programs.

discussions.

Sustainability

Utilize the Blueprint for success and offer internships to Movement Science students.

Increased offered LIB 100 programs.

● Expand relationships with additional departments and encourage staff to attend other department events.

Expanded electronic communication and marketing to be more productive and reduce waste.

Fitness & Wellness Programs and Services 

Intermural Sports Programs

1,664 Class Passes Sold

1,128 Service Appointments

3,580 Participants

898 Group

102 Nutrition Sessions

795 Teams

Exercise/Spinning Classes

298 Massages

1,771 Games Played

366 Mind/Body Classes

194 Exercise Check Sessions

1,947 Hours of Play

13,810 Total Class

174 Exercise Prescription

7,200 Participations

Attendance

Sessions

175 Participation Daily

 

Average 

● Utilize social media and other technology means to promote programs and services to reduce printed materials and promote sustainability. ● Enhance the quality of programs and services that meet participants’ satisfaction. ● Provide internal and external leadership opportunities for student staff.

 

  2008‐2009

E‐Mail: gildersb@gvsu.edu  

Number of Participants

Strategic Goals 

Campus Recreation creates programs that enhance the quality of life of the students and the community at Grand Valley State University. We strive to be a leader on campus and in the field by developing a culture that values student learning and academic success as well as lifelong health through services encompassing fitness, intramurals, and wellness.

 

Director: Bob Gildersleeve

Fitness/Wellness: 616‐331‐3659 E‐Mail: rec@gvsu.edu 

Department Overview 

Number of Participants

Mission Enhance the GVSU experience through co-curricular learning, development, and recreational opportunities that promote health and well-being.

Website: gvsu.edu/rec 

2009‐2010

2010‐2011

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Address: Rec Center, D001

Campus Recreation    

● Develop one departmental system that functions to report, assess, and track information for all areas of Campus Recreation. ● Collaborate internally to operate effectively as a team, fostering growth, improvement and success. ● Collaborate externally to connect with on campus and off campus organizations developing mutually beneficial relationships. ● Provide rich, inclusive environments and opportunities that attract and support a diverse staff and participant base. ● Maximize resources and minimize waste to efficiently and effectively market Campus Recreation programs and services. ● Be a leader on campus in providing quality programming to participants that support learning, development, health, well-being and the overall GVSU experience. ● Recruit, develop, and retain undergraduate, graduate, and professional staff members to take on opportunities that will develop skills to prepare them for their chosen career field. 

Intramural Sports: 616‐331‐3224 E‐Mail: gvintra@gvsu.edu  

Twitter: @GVSUcampusrec

Intramural Sports Participations

recreational divisions of play for both competitive and recreational skill levels.

Fitness & Wellness: Group exercise,

mind/body, and spinning classes are taught by a staff of certified instructors. Classes offer effective and safe workouts in a fun, friendly, and social atmosphere. To encourage healthy lifestyles, a variety of services include health Intramural Sports: Provides a quality screenings, massage, nutrition, wellness recreational sports experience in a safe, fun, and coaching, fitness consultation, fitness testing, sportsmanlike environment. Twenty different personal exercise program, and personal training. sports are offered during the fall, winter, and spring semesters in men’s, women’s, and co-

Learning Outcomes  Campus Recreation programs and services provide participants with the following benefits and learning outcomes:     

 

Stress reduction Enhance self-esteem' Build friendships Multicultural awareness

Improve health and well-being Expand awareness of healthy living Value in healthy choices

As a result of being a staff employee, students will learn and develop skills in:  Conflict resolution  Self-awareness  Customer service  Critical thinking  Effective communication  Healthy lifestyle  Leadership development  Problem solving  Teamwork  Organization  Self-confidence  Patience

Total Fitness Class Attendance 14000 13500 13000 12500 12000 11500 11000 10500 10000

7500 7000 6500

2011‐2012 Priorities

6000

● Implement a report to track unique numbers, gender, race, affiliation, and credit hours of participants in all program areas.

5500 5000 2008‐2009

2009‐2010

2010‐2011

● Plan collectively and enhance efforts for staff training, programs, events, and services.

Department Highlights  Program Increases Land/Spin Classes Mind/Body Classes Service appointments Intramural Participations

Diversity 54% 27% 32% 12%

Student Staff Development/Learning 

Upon graduation, 81% of student staff secured professional employment and/or attended graduate school.

intercultural learning. Collaboration 

Increase onsite housing events’ participation.

127% increase of housing affiliated teams as a result of implementing housing leagues.

Quality of Programs 

Monthly staff meetings/roundtable topic

 

Continue to increase diversity and support

Average of 88% satisfaction of all Campus

● Recruit and develop a staff that reflects diverse perspectives and incorporate intercultural learning into staff training.

Recreation programs.

discussions.

Sustainability

Utilize the Blueprint for success and offer internships to Movement Science students.

Increased offered LIB 100 programs.

● Expand relationships with additional departments and encourage staff to attend other department events.

Expanded electronic communication and marketing to be more productive and reduce waste.

Fitness & Wellness Programs and Services 

Intermural Sports Programs

1,664 Class Passes Sold

1,128 Service Appointments

3,580 Participants

898 Group

102 Nutrition Sessions

795 Teams

Exercise/Spinning Classes

298 Massages

1,771 Games Played

366 Mind/Body Classes

194 Exercise Check Sessions

1,947 Hours of Play

13,810 Total Class

174 Exercise Prescription

7,200 Participations

Attendance

Sessions

175 Participation Daily

 

Average 

● Utilize social media and other technology means to promote programs and services to reduce printed materials and promote sustainability. ● Enhance the quality of programs and services that meet participants’ satisfaction. ● Provide internal and external leadership opportunities for student staff.

 

  2008‐2009

E‐Mail: gildersb@gvsu.edu  

Number of Participants

Strategic Goals 

Campus Recreation creates programs that enhance the quality of life of the students and the community at Grand Valley State University. We strive to be a leader on campus and in the field by developing a culture that values student learning and academic success as well as lifelong health through services encompassing fitness, intramurals, and wellness.

 

Director: Bob Gildersleeve

Fitness/Wellness: 616‐331‐3659 E‐Mail: rec@gvsu.edu 

Department Overview 

Number of Participants

Mission Enhance the GVSU experience through co-curricular learning, development, and recreational opportunities that promote health and well-being.

Website: gvsu.edu/rec 

2009‐2010

2010‐2011

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


The Career Center  Get Connected! 

Allendale Location: 206 STU

Pew Location: 116B DeVos 

Director: Troy Farley

Phone: 616‐331‐3311

Phone: 616‐331‐6708 

Email: career@gvsu.edu

Facebook: GVSU Career Services Website: gvsu.edu/careers 

Twitter: @lakerjobs

Student Enrollment in Experiential Education Programs

Mission  Empowering students and alumni to attain career goals in support of a comprehensive and integrated liberal education.

 

Strategic Goals  Support and expand student participation in careerrelated experiences such as internships, cooperative education, and practicum. Increase student, faculty/staff or employer awareness, knowledge and usage of office services and resources, and increase employer recruitment of GVSU students and alumni. Review and revise office processes/services to most effectively and efficiently serve constituents. Increase the number of pre-seniors utilizing the Career Center. Improve staff knowledge, skills and abilities to best address career/employment for diverse student, alumni and employer bases.

8000

Department Overview   

The Career Center can assist students and alumni with career planning and preparedness, guiding them to helpful career resources. In today’s job market, employers hire candidates with a strong educational background combined with career-related experience. It is recommended that students gain the experience employers are seeking by

Educational and developmental benefits of completing an internship include: exploring career options; learning workrelated skills; and building professional networks. Nearly 7,000 GVSU students participate in an experiential program each year; as a result, many enter the work force immediately upon graduation. Our success rate is facilitated

completing at least one internship/co-op.

by our practical approach of engaging students at each stage of their education and beyond.

Learning Outcomes  The Career Center fosters student learning during each phase of the career development process: self-assessment, career research and exploration, career planning, and decisionmaking. Aligning with the Liberal Education & America’s Promise (LEAP) Essential Learning Outcomes, workshops, events, and one-on-one advising promote many LEAP outcomes, such as Foundations and Skills for Lifelong Learning, Integrative Learning, and Critical Thinking. For many programs, we collaborate with our academic counterparts, as well as the Office of Multicultural Affairs, Counseling Center, Student Life and other departments within Student Services. Some examples of our programs that support essential learning outcomes are: Career Fair Prep Session Resume Workshops How to Find an Internship

How to Ace the Interview Developing Leadership Skills Etiquette Dinner

7000 6000 5000 4000

6216 5281

3000

2011‐2012 Priorities

2000 1000 0 2006‐2007

2007‐2008

2008‐2009

2009‐2010

Department Highlights  

Develop an enhanced 2012/13 Career Guide and create a student and faculty internship guide

Served over 4500 students through individual appointments, workshops and classroom

Implement first year day-to-day operations of The Career Center, focusing on Liberal Arts and

presentations

Sciences majors

Hosted over 200 employers at events on campus

Collaborated with over 400 faculty members on programming and curriculum development

Coordinated over 1500 on-campus interviews

Increased employer career fair participation by over 10%

Developed institutional partnerships with seven area colleges and universities

Led the West Michigan Career Fairs attended by over 1200 students and over 150 employers (fall and winter)

Staff leadership involvement in Michigan Career Educator and Employer Alliance

 

Trend in Employment / Graduate School Activity 100%

Increase academic department usage of Internship Management System (IMS) Increase student interaction with Career Center social media and use of Lakerjobs Determine effective mechanism for recording all experiential education opportunities and establish baseline annual numbers

80% 60%

74.2%

75.0%

72.3%

70.6%

23.7%

20.9%

19.2%

17.0%

2006‐2007

2007‐2008

2008‐2009

2009‐2010

40% 20% 0% Graduate School

6811 5918

Employed

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


The Career Center  Get Connected! 

Allendale Location: 206 STU

Pew Location: 116B DeVos 

Director: Troy Farley

Phone: 616‐331‐3311

Phone: 616‐331‐6708 

Email: career@gvsu.edu

Facebook: GVSU Career Services Website: gvsu.edu/careers 

Twitter: @lakerjobs

Student Enrollment in Experiential Education Programs

Mission  Empowering students and alumni to attain career goals in support of a comprehensive and integrated liberal education.

 

Strategic Goals  Support and expand student participation in careerrelated experiences such as internships, cooperative education, and practicum. Increase student, faculty/staff or employer awareness, knowledge and usage of office services and resources, and increase employer recruitment of GVSU students and alumni. Review and revise office processes/services to most effectively and efficiently serve constituents. Increase the number of pre-seniors utilizing the Career Center. Improve staff knowledge, skills and abilities to best address career/employment for diverse student, alumni and employer bases.

8000

Department Overview   

The Career Center can assist students and alumni with career planning and preparedness, guiding them to helpful career resources. In today’s job market, employers hire candidates with a strong educational background combined with career-related experience. It is recommended that students gain the experience employers are seeking by

Educational and developmental benefits of completing an internship include: exploring career options; learning workrelated skills; and building professional networks. Nearly 7,000 GVSU students participate in an experiential program each year; as a result, many enter the work force immediately upon graduation. Our success rate is facilitated

completing at least one internship/co-op.

by our practical approach of engaging students at each stage of their education and beyond.

Learning Outcomes  The Career Center fosters student learning during each phase of the career development process: self-assessment, career research and exploration, career planning, and decisionmaking. Aligning with the Liberal Education & America’s Promise (LEAP) Essential Learning Outcomes, workshops, events, and one-on-one advising promote many LEAP outcomes, such as Foundations and Skills for Lifelong Learning, Integrative Learning, and Critical Thinking. For many programs, we collaborate with our academic counterparts, as well as the Office of Multicultural Affairs, Counseling Center, Student Life and other departments within Student Services. Some examples of our programs that support essential learning outcomes are: Career Fair Prep Session Resume Workshops How to Find an Internship

How to Ace the Interview Developing Leadership Skills Etiquette Dinner

7000 6000 5000 4000

6216 5281

3000

2011‐2012 Priorities

2000 1000 0 2006‐2007

2007‐2008

2008‐2009

2009‐2010

Department Highlights  

Develop an enhanced 2012/13 Career Guide and create a student and faculty internship guide

Served over 4500 students through individual appointments, workshops and classroom

Implement first year day-to-day operations of The Career Center, focusing on Liberal Arts and

presentations

Sciences majors

Hosted over 200 employers at events on campus

Collaborated with over 400 faculty members on programming and curriculum development

Coordinated over 1500 on-campus interviews

Increased employer career fair participation by over 10%

Developed institutional partnerships with seven area colleges and universities

Led the West Michigan Career Fairs attended by over 1200 students and over 150 employers (fall and winter)

Staff leadership involvement in Michigan Career Educator and Employer Alliance

 

Trend in Employment / Graduate School Activity 100%

Increase academic department usage of Internship Management System (IMS) Increase student interaction with Career Center social media and use of Lakerjobs Determine effective mechanism for recording all experiential education opportunities and establish baseline annual numbers

80% 60%

74.2%

75.0%

72.3%

70.6%

23.7%

20.9%

19.2%

17.0%

2006‐2007

2007‐2008

2008‐2009

2009‐2010

40% 20% 0% Graduate School

6811 5918

Employed

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Children’s Enrichment Center 

Address: 1 W. Campus Dr.

Website: www.gvsu.edu/child   Director: Sharalle V. Arnold

Phone: 616‐331‐KIDS(5437)

Fax: 616‐895‐7146 

E‐Mail: arnoldsh@gvsu.edu

Enriching the lives of Grand Valley’s youngest students!  

Mission  To educate children, families and students to shape their lives and societies in order to nurture habits of intellectual growth, curiosity and a love

Department Overview  diverse perspectives. Noted as the first site in Ottawa County to be recognized by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the CEC

for learning.

The Children’s Enrichment Center is situated on the GVSU Allendale campus, with the primary goal of educating Grand Valley’s youngest students. The CEC is committed to serving the community in a tradition that is rooted in

 

academic success, community involvement and

Valley’s youngest students!

Strategic Goals  • Implement a financial strategy that ensures fiscal solvency and accountability. • Merit campus / community recognition as a high quality facility and integral part of the university. • Develop premise to conduct or participate in an action research project. • Expand facilities and services to support families with diverse needs. • Award endowment scholarship to student families enrolled at the CEC in need of financial support. 

demonstrates a Grand beginning for Grand

Collaborative Learning Community  As part of the Grand Valley community, the CEC utilizes many campus resources, including the university library, athletics & recreation. Along with well-established collaborative efforts with the College of Education, Housing & Residence Life, Women’s Center and Kirkhof College of Nursing, this well-rounded community collaboration provides children with many

2011‐2012 Goals &  Priorities 

advantages to prepare them for the next stages of their lives, far beyond kindergarten readiness. Additionally, the CEC offers co- curricular laboratory opportunities for college students interested in closely related fields. Meaningful hands-on experience, preschool observations and practicum placements are done to support collegiate success.

Department Highlights  Nationally Recognized Since 2005:  The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is the largest nonprofit association in the United States representing early childhood education. NAEYC is a widely respected professional organization that supports quality assurance, above and beyond the minimum state requirements as it relates to early learning services for young children. NAEYC is dedicated to improving the

well-being of all young children, with particular focus on the quality of educational and developmental services for all children from birth through age 8. Nationally accredited centers like the CEC have specific strengths in 10 key areas, including Relationships, Teaching, Curriculum, Assessment, Health, Community Relationships, Teachers, Families and Physical Environment and Leadership.

"Whether or not children will be successful students depends greatly on the quality  of their experiences in early childhood.”  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003

• In partnership with the university business office, further develop and complete an initial business plan assessment. • Coordinate support group between the CEC Advisory Board and student families. • Pursue replication options of Endicott’s single parent program. • Submit Child Care Access Means Parents In School (CCAMPIS) federal grant application. • Partner with Ottawa County to strategically secure preschool placements for young children participating in the GVSU Great Start Early Childhood Scholarship program. • Design creative initiatives to draw support and raise awareness for the CEC endowment fund. • Research “Project Approach” as an instructional method and consider center-wide implication.

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University


Children’s Enrichment Center 

Address: 1 W. Campus Dr.

Website: www.gvsu.edu/child   Director: Sharalle V. Arnold

Phone: 616‐331‐KIDS(5437)

Fax: 616‐895‐7146 

E‐Mail: arnoldsh@gvsu.edu

Enriching the lives of Grand Valley’s youngest students!  

Mission  To educate children, families and students to shape their lives and societies in order to nurture habits of intellectual growth, curiosity and a love

Department Overview  diverse perspectives. Noted as the first site in Ottawa County to be recognized by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the CEC

for learning.

The Children’s Enrichment Center is situated on the GVSU Allendale campus, with the primary goal of educating Grand Valley’s youngest students. The CEC is committed to serving the community in a tradition that is rooted in

 

academic success, community involvement and

Valley’s youngest students!

Strategic Goals  • Implement a financial strategy that ensures fiscal solvency and accountability. • Merit campus / community recognition as a high quality facility and integral part of the university. • Develop premise to conduct or participate in an action research project. • Expand facilities and services to support families with diverse needs. • Award endowment scholarship to student families enrolled at the CEC in need of financial support. 

demonstrates a Grand beginning for Grand

Collaborative Learning Community  As part of the Grand Valley community, the CEC utilizes many campus resources, including the university library, athletics & recreation. Along with well-established collaborative efforts with the College of Education, Housing & Residence Life, Women’s Center and Kirkhof College of Nursing, this well-rounded community collaboration provides children with many

2011‐2012 Goals &  Priorities 

advantages to prepare them for the next stages of their lives, far beyond kindergarten readiness. Additionally, the CEC offers co- curricular laboratory opportunities for college students interested in closely related fields. Meaningful hands-on experience, preschool observations and practicum placements are done to support collegiate success.

Department Highlights  Nationally Recognized Since 2005:  The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is the largest nonprofit association in the United States representing early childhood education. NAEYC is a widely respected professional organization that supports quality assurance, above and beyond the minimum state requirements as it relates to early learning services for young children. NAEYC is dedicated to improving the

well-being of all young children, with particular focus on the quality of educational and developmental services for all children from birth through age 8. Nationally accredited centers like the CEC have specific strengths in 10 key areas, including Relationships, Teaching, Curriculum, Assessment, Health, Community Relationships, Teachers, Families and Physical Environment and Leadership.

"Whether or not children will be successful students depends greatly on the quality  of their experiences in early childhood.”  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003

• In partnership with the university business office, further develop and complete an initial business plan assessment. • Coordinate support group between the CEC Advisory Board and student families. • Pursue replication options of Endicott’s single parent program. • Submit Child Care Access Means Parents In School (CCAMPIS) federal grant application. • Partner with Ottawa County to strategically secure preschool placements for young children participating in the GVSU Great Start Early Childhood Scholarship program. • Design creative initiatives to draw support and raise awareness for the CEC endowment fund. • Research “Project Approach” as an instructional method and consider center-wide implication.

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University


Counseling and Career    Development Center  

Address: 204 STU

Website: gvsu.edu/counsel 

Interim Director: Amber Roberts, Ph.D.

Phone: 616‐331‐3266

Website: gvsu.edu/aces 

E‐Mail: gvcounsl@gvsu.edu

Department Highlights 2010‐2011  To enhance the healthy development of our diverse GVSU students through: • Consultation • Personal and career counseling • Education

Strategic Goals  • To promote student mental health and well-being via psychological counseling and group services, preventative education, and consultation. • To provide coordinated psychological care during campus crises and to aid individual students during acute mental health risk periods. • To offer services that are sensitive to diversity, knowledgeable about personal characteristics, and promote the success of all students. • To encourage staff development and selfassessment to ensure the improvement of services and continued innovative response to student needs. • To increase student awareness of rights and responsibilities in attaining

Department Overview  The Counseling and Career Development Center focuses on assisting students in developing the interpersonal and coping skills needed in today’s complex world. The staff members of the Center believe that it is important for students to feel empowered and develop a strong sense of self-efficacy while a student at GVSU. To assist with this, the Center offers psycho-educational

skill groups and individual and group therapy for those who may have personal and career concerns. The Center serves as a resource for faculty and staff regarding the mental health needs of students within the classroom and GVSU community. The Center also provides training opportunities for mental health and student affairs professionals.

Learning Outcomes  Self-awareness, Relationships, and Critical

Citizenship

Thinking • Students will learn the characteristics of healthy personal choices and will increase personal responsibility and coping across a domain of relational and mental health issues. • Students will learn self-care strategies and utilize support resources during times of acute stress.

• Students, faculty, and staff will increase their knowledge in responding to mental health concerns. Membership and Leadership • Students will understand and adhere to policy in accessing services and in demonstrating self-advocacy regarding their rights and responsibilities.

Individual & Group Counseling  Appointments Number of Appointments

Mission 

8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

7392 5943

6007

6429

7709

7445

•   Staff members provided 619 workshops, seminars, campus program support services, and outreach programs to 18,938 students, faculty and staff, and community members. • Staff members provided 7445 individual and group appointments to clients. • The Counseling Center is accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc. • The pre-doctoral internship is accredited by the American Psychological Association. • The Center provided training opportunities for doctoral level psychologists, social work interns, CSAL graduates, and peer

educators from numerous academic disciplines. • Staff members are committed to scholarship through publications in the areas of:  Attachment and relationship maintenance in long distance romantic relationships  Developing clinical expertise regarding persons with disabilities  Ethical practice with people who have disabilities  Models of social justice for interns with disabilities • The Center published and copyrighted The Learning Model for Academic and Career Success.

2011‐2012 Goals &  Priorities  • Develop methods of service delivery that allow for expedient access to multiple levels of care. • Promote student engagement and personal responsibility concerning mental health outcomes. • Increase use of innovation and technology in providing mental health resources.

ACES – Alcohol and Other Drugs Campus &  Education Services   

ACES is an outreach office of the Counseling and Career Development Center. ACES focuses on awareness and prevention, treatment, and recovery services. Our philosophy focuses on harm reduction building awareness to make healthy and safe choices around substance use. For most, raising awareness is sufficient to make changes in their life, for others treatment or recovery options may be necessary. ACES works closely with many offices and programs both on and off campus to provide quality services and information to the campus community. The ACES office works closely

Campus Initiative

with the Counseling Center to provide an appropriate continuum of care for students who are in need of services beyond developing awareness around healthy and safe choices. Several of our educational programs are provided jointly with the Department of Public Safety. We work closely with the Housing and Residence Life Office to provide sanctioned alcohol   awareness groups to those with a first violation of the University’s alcohol policy. We also attend the weekly Behavior Team meeting to pay attention to developing alcohol and drug issues on campus and provide consultation

  ACES Goals & Priorities:  • Begin to offer marijuana awareness groups similar to the weekly alcohol groups offered. • Re-administer the CORE survey. • Begin to use CORE survey data for educational programs and campaigns. • Continue to support and host 12Step meetings. • Begin to use peer-educators to assist in presentations.

A recent Center initiative is to incorporate a strengths-based approach in career counseling. Strengths focused counseling aids students in recognizing their potential, in taking ownership of

mental health services. 

their skills, and in achieving excellence in academic and career settings.

Academic Year

10 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Counseling and Career    Development Center  

Address: 204 STU

Website: gvsu.edu/counsel 

Interim Director: Amber Roberts, Ph.D.

Phone: 616‐331‐3266

Website: gvsu.edu/aces 

E‐Mail: gvcounsl@gvsu.edu

Department Highlights 2010‐2011  To enhance the healthy development of our diverse GVSU students through: • Consultation • Personal and career counseling • Education

Strategic Goals  • To promote student mental health and well-being via psychological counseling and group services, preventative education, and consultation. • To provide coordinated psychological care during campus crises and to aid individual students during acute mental health risk periods. • To offer services that are sensitive to diversity, knowledgeable about personal characteristics, and promote the success of all students. • To encourage staff development and selfassessment to ensure the improvement of services and continued innovative response to student needs. • To increase student awareness of rights and responsibilities in attaining

Department Overview  The Counseling and Career Development Center focuses on assisting students in developing the interpersonal and coping skills needed in today’s complex world. The staff members of the Center believe that it is important for students to feel empowered and develop a strong sense of self-efficacy while a student at GVSU. To assist with this, the Center offers psycho-educational

skill groups and individual and group therapy for those who may have personal and career concerns. The Center serves as a resource for faculty and staff regarding the mental health needs of students within the classroom and GVSU community. The Center also provides training opportunities for mental health and student affairs professionals.

Learning Outcomes  Self-awareness, Relationships, and Critical

Citizenship

Thinking • Students will learn the characteristics of healthy personal choices and will increase personal responsibility and coping across a domain of relational and mental health issues. • Students will learn self-care strategies and utilize support resources during times of acute stress.

• Students, faculty, and staff will increase their knowledge in responding to mental health concerns. Membership and Leadership • Students will understand and adhere to policy in accessing services and in demonstrating self-advocacy regarding their rights and responsibilities.

Individual & Group Counseling  Appointments Number of Appointments

Mission 

8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

7392 5943

6007

6429

7709

7445

•   Staff members provided 619 workshops, seminars, campus program support services, and outreach programs to 18,938 students, faculty and staff, and community members. • Staff members provided 7445 individual and group appointments to clients. • The Counseling Center is accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc. • The pre-doctoral internship is accredited by the American Psychological Association. • The Center provided training opportunities for doctoral level psychologists, social work interns, CSAL graduates, and peer

educators from numerous academic disciplines. • Staff members are committed to scholarship through publications in the areas of:  Attachment and relationship maintenance in long distance romantic relationships  Developing clinical expertise regarding persons with disabilities  Ethical practice with people who have disabilities  Models of social justice for interns with disabilities • The Center published and copyrighted The Learning Model for Academic and Career Success.

2011‐2012 Goals &  Priorities  • Develop methods of service delivery that allow for expedient access to multiple levels of care. • Promote student engagement and personal responsibility concerning mental health outcomes. • Increase use of innovation and technology in providing mental health resources.

ACES – Alcohol and Other Drugs Campus &  Education Services   

ACES is an outreach office of the Counseling and Career Development Center. ACES focuses on awareness and prevention, treatment, and recovery services. Our philosophy focuses on harm reduction building awareness to make healthy and safe choices around substance use. For most, raising awareness is sufficient to make changes in their life, for others treatment or recovery options may be necessary. ACES works closely with many offices and programs both on and off campus to provide quality services and information to the campus community. The ACES office works closely

Campus Initiative

with the Counseling Center to provide an appropriate continuum of care for students who are in need of services beyond developing awareness around healthy and safe choices. Several of our educational programs are provided jointly with the Department of Public Safety. We work closely with the Housing and Residence Life Office to provide sanctioned alcohol   awareness groups to those with a first violation of the University’s alcohol policy. We also attend the weekly Behavior Team meeting to pay attention to developing alcohol and drug issues on campus and provide consultation

  ACES Goals & Priorities:  • Begin to offer marijuana awareness groups similar to the weekly alcohol groups offered. • Re-administer the CORE survey. • Begin to use CORE survey data for educational programs and campaigns. • Continue to support and host 12Step meetings. • Begin to use peer-educators to assist in presentations.

A recent Center initiative is to incorporate a strengths-based approach in career counseling. Strengths focused counseling aids students in recognizing their potential, in taking ownership of

mental health services. 

their skills, and in achieving excellence in academic and career settings.

Academic Year

10 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Housing and Residence Life 

Address: 103 STU 

Website: gvsu.edu/housing 

Director: Andrew Beachnau, Ph.D

Phone: 616‐331‐2120

 

E‐Mail: gv_housing@gvsu.edu

Make Home GRAND! 

Mission  Collaborating to provide opportunities for student learning and success through inclusive residential communities and experiences.

 

Learning  Outcomes 

Avg. GPA By Class Standing: On‐ and  Off‐Campus Residents 2005‐2010

Department Overview  3.4 The Office of Housing and Residence Life houses approximately 6000 students between 2 campuses. Our staff is made up of over 20 full-time members, 13 graduate assistants, nearly 100 RA’s and dozens of student desk assistants all working together to deliver an unmatched residential experience. We provide our students with an opportunity to live

independently in a supportive environment. The design of our residential communities is intentional, promoting community, campus involvement and contributing to friendships that will last a lifetime. Our staff focuses on the development of our residents, helping them to become contributing members of a global society.

3.2 3

2.93

2.8 2.6 2.4

3.18 3.14

3.13

3.08

3.02

On-Campus

2.72

Off-Campus

2.62

2.2 2 Freshman Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Connected Learning: Providing out-of-class experiences that support, complement, and enhance the in-class learning that happens.

Strategic Goals 

Department Highlights 

Intentional Student Development through • Connect students with faculty outside the Effective Customer Service

Self-Awareness: Awareness

helping students learn from an

Academic & Personal Success- Students thrive in a supportive living environment with personal support and academic resources right on-hand! Companionship- Our residents meet new people, make more friends and create lifelong bonds through their on campus experience and the programs offered by our staff. Dining- Great food just about anywhere or anytime on campus further enhances their campus living.

of self as well as the need for interdependent community and the impact of personal behavior on community.

Out of Class Learning Opportunities classroom.

• Engage campus and community partners, interdisciplinary perspective, maximizing

that provide services to benefit our students, developing intentional collaborative opportunities for learning and engagement.

learning.

Connected Learning

Student Success

• Connect students with campus and

• Utilize Student Success Center on North Campus to serve first-year students through

Citizenship: Providing opportunities that encourage students to engage in what it means to be a citizen in a democracy. The students will acknowledge the importance of caring for the community around them.

academic advising, career counseling, and

 

residential student service learning

tutoring. • Utilize Blueprint for Student Success, to help students understand and participate in programs and campus services.

Civic Engagement • In tandem with campus (Community Service Learning Center) and community partners, develop more intentional opportunities, connected whenever possible with the curriculum.

12 

• Effectively connect with other departments

community resources for growth in connected learning, self-awareness, and citizenship.

Assessment and Planning • Utilize assessment and planning to develop proactive strategies for decisionmaking, continuous improvement, and student success. • Promote and model fiscal accountability • Continue developing sustainable practices using technology to communicate and disseminate information.

• Continue to implement multifaceted communication, marketing and sales plan to increase/maintain occupancy. The ultimate goal for Fall 2012, to be at 95% occupancy or above. • More fully utilize the tools and

Safety- Through our Community Police Office program, our residents are educated in areas of personal safety and protection. Sustainability- Our commitment to sustainability makes living on campus a rewarding opportunity to be environmental stewards. Campus Involvement- Building leadership skills by participating in activities and organizations on campus and within residential communities

• Utilize assessment tools, like MAPWorks or UniLOA, to shape best practices.

2011‐2012 Priorities 

On‐Going Program 

Campus Activity 

Traditions 

In Fall ’11 we opened the Student Success Center in North Living Center C, through collaboration with Student Academic Success Center and The Counseling and Career Development Center. Another impactful program we participate in is MAP-Works. Our staff strives for 100% participation from our first year students and strong participation from our returning residents.  

The presence of our department reaches far beyond the walls of our living centers and apartments. Through community councils, Residence Hall Association, National Residence Hall Honorary, Diversity organizations and countless programs offered by our Residential staff, our team impacts the campus climate in many ways.  

Paramount is the longstanding tradition of world-class housing accommodations! Our academic year kicks off with Move-In; thousands of students and families arrive at GVSU to experience campus living. Move-in is highly coordinated and incredibly rewarding. We look forward to it annually. Other traditions include Lead Strong RA recruitment, Drag Show and more.  

structures within MAP-Works to be able to help with the overall University goals of increasing retention and decreasing time to graduation. • Utilize assessment and planning to develop proactive strategies for decision-‐ making, continuous improvement, and student success. • Animate the Blueprint for Success with programs and services offered across the university to help students to achieve success. • Effectively connect with other departments that provide services to benefit our students, developing intentional collaborative opportunities for learning and engagement.

 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Housing and Residence Life 

Address: 103 STU 

Website: gvsu.edu/housing 

Director: Andrew Beachnau, Ph.D

Phone: 616‐331‐2120

 

E‐Mail: gv_housing@gvsu.edu

Make Home GRAND! 

Mission  Collaborating to provide opportunities for student learning and success through inclusive residential communities and experiences.

 

Learning  Outcomes 

Avg. GPA By Class Standing: On‐ and  Off‐Campus Residents 2005‐2010

Department Overview  3.4 The Office of Housing and Residence Life houses approximately 6000 students between 2 campuses. Our staff is made up of over 20 full-time members, 13 graduate assistants, nearly 100 RA’s and dozens of student desk assistants all working together to deliver an unmatched residential experience. We provide our students with an opportunity to live

independently in a supportive environment. The design of our residential communities is intentional, promoting community, campus involvement and contributing to friendships that will last a lifetime. Our staff focuses on the development of our residents, helping them to become contributing members of a global society.

3.2 3

2.93

2.8 2.6 2.4

3.18 3.14

3.13

3.08

3.02

On-Campus

2.72

Off-Campus

2.62

2.2 2 Freshman Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Connected Learning: Providing out-of-class experiences that support, complement, and enhance the in-class learning that happens.

Strategic Goals 

Department Highlights 

Intentional Student Development through • Connect students with faculty outside the Effective Customer Service

Self-Awareness: Awareness

helping students learn from an

Academic & Personal Success- Students thrive in a supportive living environment with personal support and academic resources right on-hand! Companionship- Our residents meet new people, make more friends and create lifelong bonds through their on campus experience and the programs offered by our staff. Dining- Great food just about anywhere or anytime on campus further enhances their campus living.

of self as well as the need for interdependent community and the impact of personal behavior on community.

Out of Class Learning Opportunities classroom.

• Engage campus and community partners, interdisciplinary perspective, maximizing

that provide services to benefit our students, developing intentional collaborative opportunities for learning and engagement.

learning.

Connected Learning

Student Success

• Connect students with campus and

• Utilize Student Success Center on North Campus to serve first-year students through

Citizenship: Providing opportunities that encourage students to engage in what it means to be a citizen in a democracy. The students will acknowledge the importance of caring for the community around them.

academic advising, career counseling, and

 

residential student service learning

tutoring. • Utilize Blueprint for Student Success, to help students understand and participate in programs and campus services.

Civic Engagement • In tandem with campus (Community Service Learning Center) and community partners, develop more intentional opportunities, connected whenever possible with the curriculum.

12 

• Effectively connect with other departments

community resources for growth in connected learning, self-awareness, and citizenship.

Assessment and Planning • Utilize assessment and planning to develop proactive strategies for decisionmaking, continuous improvement, and student success. • Promote and model fiscal accountability • Continue developing sustainable practices using technology to communicate and disseminate information.

• Continue to implement multifaceted communication, marketing and sales plan to increase/maintain occupancy. The ultimate goal for Fall 2012, to be at 95% occupancy or above. • More fully utilize the tools and

Safety- Through our Community Police Office program, our residents are educated in areas of personal safety and protection. Sustainability- Our commitment to sustainability makes living on campus a rewarding opportunity to be environmental stewards. Campus Involvement- Building leadership skills by participating in activities and organizations on campus and within residential communities

• Utilize assessment tools, like MAPWorks or UniLOA, to shape best practices.

2011‐2012 Priorities 

On‐Going Program 

Campus Activity 

Traditions 

In Fall ’11 we opened the Student Success Center in North Living Center C, through collaboration with Student Academic Success Center and The Counseling and Career Development Center. Another impactful program we participate in is MAP-Works. Our staff strives for 100% participation from our first year students and strong participation from our returning residents.  

The presence of our department reaches far beyond the walls of our living centers and apartments. Through community councils, Residence Hall Association, National Residence Hall Honorary, Diversity organizations and countless programs offered by our Residential staff, our team impacts the campus climate in many ways.  

Paramount is the longstanding tradition of world-class housing accommodations! Our academic year kicks off with Move-In; thousands of students and families arrive at GVSU to experience campus living. Move-in is highly coordinated and incredibly rewarding. We look forward to it annually. Other traditions include Lead Strong RA recruitment, Drag Show and more.  

structures within MAP-Works to be able to help with the overall University goals of increasing retention and decreasing time to graduation. • Utilize assessment and planning to develop proactive strategies for decision-‐ making, continuous improvement, and student success. • Animate the Blueprint for Success with programs and services offered across the university to help students to achieve success. • Effectively connect with other departments that provide services to benefit our students, developing intentional collaborative opportunities for learning and engagement.

 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


LGBT Resource Center  

Address: 1161 Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/LGBTRC 

Director: Colette Seguin Beighley

Phone: 616‐331‐2530

Twitter: @gvsuLGBTcenter 

E‐Mail: lgbtcenter@gvsu.edu

Facebook: Grand Valley State University LGBT Resource Center 

Star Ranking: 5 Star Maximum Mission  The LGBT Resource Center's mission is to educate, support and empower students to lead authentic lives, to challenge gender and sexuality stereotypes, and to work for social justice.

Department Overview  The LGBT Resource Center provides a visible presence on campus that serves to enrich the connection among LGBTQ students, faculty, staff as well as the greater GVSU community. The center supports the personal growth and educational achievement of lesbian, gay,

bisexual, transgender, questioning and intersex students and their allies. The LGBT Resource Center is committed to fostering a safe, equitable and inclusive experience for all students.

Building Community, Empowering the Movement Vision  The LGBT Resource Center strives to create an inclusive and just environment where the many expressions of gender and sexuality are celebrated within the complex identities of all students. We will support and challenge LGBT students on their developmental journey as well as create a space for all students to confront and overcome personal bias. Our students will be dynamic leaders in the social justice community who demonstrate solidarity with other marginalized communities by working together to challenge intersecting systems of oppression.

14 

This fall, the LGBT Resource Center begins work on our third grant from Arcus Foundation: “Building Community, Empowering the Movement.” This $150,000 grant allows our center to continue to facilitate “Change U: Training for Social Justice” for the next two years as well as add an additional advanced level each year. In November 2011, we will host the premiere of “A People’s History of the LGBTQ Community in Grand Rapids” --a project of the Grand Rapids Institute for Information Democracy.

Lavender Graduation  Lavender Graduation recognizes the accomplishments of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer graduates and their allies by providing an occasion to celebrate their GVSU career with family and friends. At this annual April celebration, the LGBT Resource Center acknowledges our students’ achievements and contributions to the university. 

The center, along with the GVSU Kutsche Office of Local History, has co-sponsored this film. The result of over 70 videotaped oral histories of LGBTQ community members – ages 18-93, this film and its accompanying archives will provide a rich resource for future research on the community. Additionally, these monies provide an opportunity for our center to continue our work responding to anti-gay activity in our community.

OnGoing LGBT Conference  The OnGoing LGBT Conference is offered throughout the academic year featuring local and national speakers. This monthly event is open to the entire campus and examines LGBT issues as they intersect with six different issues: race, gender, sexuality, spirituality, leadership and culture. Additionally, resources are available for each program to support faculty incorporating our conferences into their curricula. 

4.5 4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0

2011‐2012 Priorities   Create an inclusive campus environment for LGBT students, faculty and staff GVSU

U of M

K College

CMU

GRCC

GVSU Ranks 4.5 out of 5 stars As Gay‐Friendly  Grand Valley State University has been named one of the top gay-friendly universities in the nation by the 2011 LGBT-Friendly Campus Climate Index. The Campus Climate Index ranks nearly 300 public colleges and universities based on policies, programs and practices related to inclusion and friendliness. Colleges are ranked on a scale of one to five stars, based on answers the schools provide on a voluntary survey submitted to Campus Pride.

GVSU Excelled in the Following Areas for 2011: 

“Out” of the Dark  On October 12, 2010, the LGBT Resource Center hosted “OUT of the Dark” -- a candlelight memorial to remember the numerous LGBT youth suicides that took place that fall. Over 400 people attended the vigil and participated in the “Speak Up Against Bias” campaign pledging to address every day bias. 

 Increase visibility and mainstream inequalities faced by the LGBT communities  Support students in their identity development  Build community by connecting students to LGBT organizations on and off campus  Empower and educate students to work for equality and justice

LGBT Support & Institutional Commitment LGBT Academic Life LGBT Student Life LGBT Campus Safety LGBT Recruitment & Retention Efforts

 Work to improve the lives and legal equality of LGBT people

 

 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


LGBT Resource Center  

Address: 1161 Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/LGBTRC 

Director: Colette Seguin Beighley

Phone: 616‐331‐2530

Twitter: @gvsuLGBTcenter 

E‐Mail: lgbtcenter@gvsu.edu

Facebook: Grand Valley State University LGBT Resource Center 

Star Ranking: 5 Star Maximum Mission  The LGBT Resource Center's mission is to educate, support and empower students to lead authentic lives, to challenge gender and sexuality stereotypes, and to work for social justice.

Department Overview  The LGBT Resource Center provides a visible presence on campus that serves to enrich the connection among LGBTQ students, faculty, staff as well as the greater GVSU community. The center supports the personal growth and educational achievement of lesbian, gay,

bisexual, transgender, questioning and intersex students and their allies. The LGBT Resource Center is committed to fostering a safe, equitable and inclusive experience for all students.

Building Community, Empowering the Movement Vision  The LGBT Resource Center strives to create an inclusive and just environment where the many expressions of gender and sexuality are celebrated within the complex identities of all students. We will support and challenge LGBT students on their developmental journey as well as create a space for all students to confront and overcome personal bias. Our students will be dynamic leaders in the social justice community who demonstrate solidarity with other marginalized communities by working together to challenge intersecting systems of oppression.

14 

This fall, the LGBT Resource Center begins work on our third grant from Arcus Foundation: “Building Community, Empowering the Movement.” This $150,000 grant allows our center to continue to facilitate “Change U: Training for Social Justice” for the next two years as well as add an additional advanced level each year. In November 2011, we will host the premiere of “A People’s History of the LGBTQ Community in Grand Rapids” --a project of the Grand Rapids Institute for Information Democracy.

Lavender Graduation  Lavender Graduation recognizes the accomplishments of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer graduates and their allies by providing an occasion to celebrate their GVSU career with family and friends. At this annual April celebration, the LGBT Resource Center acknowledges our students’ achievements and contributions to the university. 

The center, along with the GVSU Kutsche Office of Local History, has co-sponsored this film. The result of over 70 videotaped oral histories of LGBTQ community members – ages 18-93, this film and its accompanying archives will provide a rich resource for future research on the community. Additionally, these monies provide an opportunity for our center to continue our work responding to anti-gay activity in our community.

OnGoing LGBT Conference  The OnGoing LGBT Conference is offered throughout the academic year featuring local and national speakers. This monthly event is open to the entire campus and examines LGBT issues as they intersect with six different issues: race, gender, sexuality, spirituality, leadership and culture. Additionally, resources are available for each program to support faculty incorporating our conferences into their curricula. 

4.5 4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0

2011‐2012 Priorities   Create an inclusive campus environment for LGBT students, faculty and staff GVSU

U of M

K College

CMU

GRCC

GVSU Ranks 4.5 out of 5 stars As Gay‐Friendly  Grand Valley State University has been named one of the top gay-friendly universities in the nation by the 2011 LGBT-Friendly Campus Climate Index. The Campus Climate Index ranks nearly 300 public colleges and universities based on policies, programs and practices related to inclusion and friendliness. Colleges are ranked on a scale of one to five stars, based on answers the schools provide on a voluntary survey submitted to Campus Pride.

GVSU Excelled in the Following Areas for 2011: 

“Out” of the Dark  On October 12, 2010, the LGBT Resource Center hosted “OUT of the Dark” -- a candlelight memorial to remember the numerous LGBT youth suicides that took place that fall. Over 400 people attended the vigil and participated in the “Speak Up Against Bias” campaign pledging to address every day bias. 

 Increase visibility and mainstream inequalities faced by the LGBT communities  Support students in their identity development  Build community by connecting students to LGBT organizations on and off campus  Empower and educate students to work for equality and justice

LGBT Support & Institutional Commitment LGBT Academic Life LGBT Student Life LGBT Campus Safety LGBT Recruitment & Retention Efforts

 Work to improve the lives and legal equality of LGBT people

 

 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Office of Multicultural Affairs  

Address: 1240 Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/oma 

Phone: 616‐331‐2177

Facebook: Office of Multicultural E‐Mail: oma@gvsu.edu Affairs at GVSU 

Each Student, a Different Perspective 

Mission  To foster a climate of inclusiveness that will provide students with opportunities for intercultural awareness and appreciation. 

Strategic Goals  Goal 1: Support the University’s commitment to increase the presence of faculty, staff and students from diverse and underrepresented groups. Goal 2: Implement programs to increase retention, academic excellence and graduation of students from diverse and underrepresented groups. Goal 3: Implement diversity and cultural awareness training, education, workshops and programs. Goal 4: Strengthen and develop collaborative partnerships with internal and external communities.

relationships with high schools and communities through the pre-college planning and preparation programs, Wade H. McCree and GEAR UP/College Day Program. For the past five years, the GEAR UP program has been working with a cohort of over 500 students who will be entering their senior year in high school in fall 2011. This summer, these students will be visiting our campus and receiving admissions and financial aid presentations as well as experiencing a college classroom session. Steady progress in the matriculation of students of color in the Wade McCree program to GVSU has occurred in the past three years. This positive trend is due largely to the work and collaboration among Grand Valley’s Admissions, Financial Aid and Multicultural Affairs offices. Additionally, the following components: parental involvement, counselor engagement, mandated student participation in meetings,

university life. 

16 

ACT workshops, GVSU’s campus visits and summer camps have been incorporated into the program. Intentional efforts have been made in the area of recruitment and retention of the Multicultural Cohort Programs students. Measurable learning outcomes are integrated into the structure of the programs and students are required to submit records of participation. Some noteworthy students’ achievements in 2010-11 include: 439 hours of community service volunteering with 43 on- and off-campus organizations; four outstanding students received financial support from the OMA to participate in spring/summer study abroad programs and 59 students received recognition awards in a variety of categories. Another important highlight is the newly created Don Williams Multicultural Business Education Scholarship as a gift from a Multicultural Cohort alumnus.

Current Co‐hort Participants by Race Other Native American Asian 0

Goal 5: Promote inclusion, equity and intercultural learning in all aspects of

Current Multicultural Co‐hort  Participants ‐ Total: 149

Department Highlights   The office continues to cultivate meaningful

20

40

60

4

Native American 0

Multi‐ racial 2

12

4

0

23

10

1

23

16

1

Asian

Black

Hispanic

2007‐2008 Co‐hort

5

15

2008‐2009 Co‐hort

6

2009‐2010 Co‐hort

4

2010‐2011 Co‐hort

5

Director: Connie M. Dang

80 White

Other

1

0

2

1

1

1

0

1

4

7

0

27

56

2007‐2008

26

2008‐2009 2009‐2010

40

2010‐2011

Department Overview

Learning Outcomes 

By collaborating with campus and community partners, the Office of Multicultural Affairs will create an educational environment that cultivates the rich contributions of all cultures and where students can achieve academic, social and cultural success.

Foundations and Skills for Lifelong Learning Civic Engagement Integrative Learning Critical Thinking Intercultural Knowledge and Competence

Campus Activity 

On‐Going Programs

Traditions 

• Professionals of Color Lecture Series • Diversity Brownbag Series • Intercultural Student Reception • Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration • Asian Pacific Islander American Heritage Celebration • Black History Month Celebration • Cesar Chavez Celebration • Native American History

• GEAR UP/College Day Program • Wade H. McCree, Jr. Incentive Program • King-Chavez-Parks Future Faculty Program • King-Chavez-Parks Visiting Professor Program • Multicultural Cohort Programs • OMA Ambassadors Program 

Advocate for a campus climate that respects and appreciates the history, culture and traditions of different ethnic groups. Stimulate and encourage opportunities for intentional intercultural dialogue and engagement among university members. Assist with efforts to promote access and equity in higher education through recruitment and retention of a diverse student body. Promote academic, social, personal, cultural, leadership and professional growth of students from traditionally underrepresented groups. 

 

2011‐2012 Goals &  Priorities  Goal 1: Support the University’s commitment to increase the presence of faculty, staff and students from diverse and underrepresented groups. Goal 2: Implement programs to increase retention, academic excellence and graduation of students from diverse and underrepresented groups. Goal 3: Implement diversity and cultural awareness training, education, workshops and programs. Goal 4: Strengthen and develop collaborative partnerships with internal and external communities. Goal 5: Promote inclusion, equity and intercultural learning in all aspects of university life. 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Office of Multicultural Affairs  

Address: 1240 Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/oma 

Phone: 616‐331‐2177

Facebook: Office of Multicultural E‐Mail: oma@gvsu.edu Affairs at GVSU 

Each Student, a Different Perspective 

Mission  To foster a climate of inclusiveness that will provide students with opportunities for intercultural awareness and appreciation. 

Strategic Goals  Goal 1: Support the University’s commitment to increase the presence of faculty, staff and students from diverse and underrepresented groups. Goal 2: Implement programs to increase retention, academic excellence and graduation of students from diverse and underrepresented groups. Goal 3: Implement diversity and cultural awareness training, education, workshops and programs. Goal 4: Strengthen and develop collaborative partnerships with internal and external communities.

relationships with high schools and communities through the pre-college planning and preparation programs, Wade H. McCree and GEAR UP/College Day Program. For the past five years, the GEAR UP program has been working with a cohort of over 500 students who will be entering their senior year in high school in fall 2011. This summer, these students will be visiting our campus and receiving admissions and financial aid presentations as well as experiencing a college classroom session. Steady progress in the matriculation of students of color in the Wade McCree program to GVSU has occurred in the past three years. This positive trend is due largely to the work and collaboration among Grand Valley’s Admissions, Financial Aid and Multicultural Affairs offices. Additionally, the following components: parental involvement, counselor engagement, mandated student participation in meetings,

university life. 

16 

ACT workshops, GVSU’s campus visits and summer camps have been incorporated into the program. Intentional efforts have been made in the area of recruitment and retention of the Multicultural Cohort Programs students. Measurable learning outcomes are integrated into the structure of the programs and students are required to submit records of participation. Some noteworthy students’ achievements in 2010-11 include: 439 hours of community service volunteering with 43 on- and off-campus organizations; four outstanding students received financial support from the OMA to participate in spring/summer study abroad programs and 59 students received recognition awards in a variety of categories. Another important highlight is the newly created Don Williams Multicultural Business Education Scholarship as a gift from a Multicultural Cohort alumnus.

Current Co‐hort Participants by Race Other Native American Asian 0

Goal 5: Promote inclusion, equity and intercultural learning in all aspects of

Current Multicultural Co‐hort  Participants ‐ Total: 149

Department Highlights   The office continues to cultivate meaningful

20

40

60

4

Native American 0

Multi‐ racial 2

12

4

0

23

10

1

23

16

1

Asian

Black

Hispanic

2007‐2008 Co‐hort

5

15

2008‐2009 Co‐hort

6

2009‐2010 Co‐hort

4

2010‐2011 Co‐hort

5

Director: Connie M. Dang

80 White

Other

1

0

2

1

1

1

0

1

4

7

0

27

56

2007‐2008

26

2008‐2009 2009‐2010

40

2010‐2011

Department Overview

Learning Outcomes 

By collaborating with campus and community partners, the Office of Multicultural Affairs will create an educational environment that cultivates the rich contributions of all cultures and where students can achieve academic, social and cultural success.

Foundations and Skills for Lifelong Learning Civic Engagement Integrative Learning Critical Thinking Intercultural Knowledge and Competence

Campus Activity 

On‐Going Programs

Traditions 

• Professionals of Color Lecture Series • Diversity Brownbag Series • Intercultural Student Reception • Hispanic Heritage Month Celebration • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration • Asian Pacific Islander American Heritage Celebration • Black History Month Celebration • Cesar Chavez Celebration • Native American History

• GEAR UP/College Day Program • Wade H. McCree, Jr. Incentive Program • King-Chavez-Parks Future Faculty Program • King-Chavez-Parks Visiting Professor Program • Multicultural Cohort Programs • OMA Ambassadors Program 

Advocate for a campus climate that respects and appreciates the history, culture and traditions of different ethnic groups. Stimulate and encourage opportunities for intentional intercultural dialogue and engagement among university members. Assist with efforts to promote access and equity in higher education through recruitment and retention of a diverse student body. Promote academic, social, personal, cultural, leadership and professional growth of students from traditionally underrepresented groups. 

 

2011‐2012 Goals &  Priorities  Goal 1: Support the University’s commitment to increase the presence of faculty, staff and students from diverse and underrepresented groups. Goal 2: Implement programs to increase retention, academic excellence and graduation of students from diverse and underrepresented groups. Goal 3: Implement diversity and cultural awareness training, education, workshops and programs. Goal 4: Strengthen and develop collaborative partnerships with internal and external communities. Goal 5: Promote inclusion, equity and intercultural learning in all aspects of university life. 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Office of Student Life:   Community Service Learning Center 

 

Address: 1110B Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/service 

Asst. Director: Valerie Jones

Phone: 616‐331‐2345

Twitter: @GV_Lead_Serv 

Coordinator: Jeff Mutch

Facebook: Grand Valley Leadership and Service 

E‐Mail: service@gvsu.edu

Creating Active Citizens 

Mission  Our mission is to prepare GVSU students to become citizens of a global society and challenge them to be committed to a life of community service as active citizens. 

Strategic Goals  • Continue to enhance student engagement and high impact experiences through partnerships with faculty, other departments, and the external community • Further clarify the CSLC’s role in the university’s strategic plan and identify role in High Impact Practices through the High Impact Task Force • Create and implement a support plan (facility, staffing, and financial resources) • Improve overall assessment and reporting practices, particularly assessment of LEAP outcomes for programs • Further develop faculty engagement in service learning and the role of CSLC Faculty Liaison • Continue tracking and reporting community service data to support MCC and Provost reporting requirements

18 

Extra‐curricular Service Learning &  Community Service

Department Overview  The CSLC serves as a clearinghouse for volunteering, community service, and servicelearning by: • Connecting students to opportunities to serve the community through centercoordinated opportunities (i.e. days of service) and matching students’ interests to community-identified needs. • Supporting faculty/staff in community service and service-learning activities through one-on-one consulting, regularly disseminating service-learning information and updates, and coordinating professional

development opportunities in conjunction with the Faculty Teaching and Learning Center. Assisting local nonprofit organizations through disbursing service opportunities to the GVSU community.

Additionally, the CSLC supports over 40 service and advocacy registered student organizations, as well as provides guidance to any student organization planning service and philanthropy activities. We track service data for the university in conjunction with the Provost’s Office for state and national reporting.

Learning Outcomes  Based on LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes, the CSLC mainly focuses on civic knowledge and responsibility. Participants of our direct service programs are exposed to education about the issue/cause and community and engage in reflective activities to discover how the experience impacts them personally and to draw connections and express realizations. The CSLC promotes transformational experiences which help students develop on an active citizen

continuum (defined by BreakAway®) from member of society not concerned with personal role in societal problems, to volunteer, consciousness citizen, to active citizen where the community becomes a priority in values and life choices. Other LEAP Essential learning outcomes used include foundations and skills for lifelong learning, critical thinking, intercultural knowledge and competence, and integrative learning.

Money Raised ‐ Reported to the CSLC  $200,000.00

$156,703.25 

 $150,000.00 $98,512.00 

 $100,000.00  $50,000.00

$26,977.61 

 $‐ 2008‐2009

80000

62,767.82

Hours Reported to CSLC

60000 40000 20000

22148.5 10460

0 2008‐2009 2009‐2010 2010‐ 2011

Department Highlights  • CSLC received dedicated space to open in gathering of faculty/staff across campus Winter 2006, however, GVSU has a long history interested or currently involved in service of serving our community learning. Updates from the CSLC are sent • Bi-weekly electronic newsletter disseminated to electronically on a bi-monthly basis and ad students hoc meetings are called as necessary • Faculty and staff recognition for community • Work collaboratively with the Heart of West service and service-learning (local and state Michigan United Way Volunteer Center level) • Michigan Campus Compact Community • AmeriCorps Michigan Service Scholars program Service/Service-Learning Director representative • Dedicated fund to assist with coordination of • Student leadership opportunities including faculty professional development for serviceCSLC Ambassador, Service & Leadership learning Intern (for academic credit or experience), site • Service-Learning Web Network (resources on a variety of service learning topics for faculty) leader for Make a Difference Day, and more. • Service-Learning Network– an informal

On‐Going Program

Traditions 

Nonprofit Volunteer & Internship Fair each semester, First Year Service Experience, Overnight Service Experience, Make a Difference Day, College Positive Volunteer Training, Service and Advocacy Week, Community Outreach Week, and Service Saturdays (Hosted by Alternative Breaks). 

Make a Difference Day- a national day of service, held the 4th Saturday in October. More than 300 students serve over 20 local nonprofit organizations throughout the Greater Grand Rapids community.

2011‐2012 Priorities • Continue delivery and assessment of quality volunteer and service opportunities • Implement an awareness campaign about the services of the Community Service Learning Center • Intentionally connect with Johnson Center for Philanthropy staff and initiatives • Continue to participate in discussions with the other area volunteer and service Directors during the transition from Volunteer Solutions to HandsOn Connect, a county-wide volunteer database of the Heart of West Michigan United Way Volunteer Center • Clarify the Community Service Learning Center’s role in supporting and strengthen the community service partnerships with living centers/campus apartments • Reach more than 300 students per semester through classroom presentations about Leadership and Service opportunities (Student Life- OSL Objective for DSS Strategic Plan) 

Community Outreach Week- co-sponsored by Alumni Relations, a week of various community service projects hosted by students and alumni locally and across the country held annually in March 

2009‐2010 2010‐ 2011

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Office of Student Life:   Community Service Learning Center 

 

Address: 1110B Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/service 

Asst. Director: Valerie Jones

Phone: 616‐331‐2345

Twitter: @GV_Lead_Serv 

Coordinator: Jeff Mutch

Facebook: Grand Valley Leadership and Service 

E‐Mail: service@gvsu.edu

Creating Active Citizens 

Mission  Our mission is to prepare GVSU students to become citizens of a global society and challenge them to be committed to a life of community service as active citizens. 

Strategic Goals  • Continue to enhance student engagement and high impact experiences through partnerships with faculty, other departments, and the external community • Further clarify the CSLC’s role in the university’s strategic plan and identify role in High Impact Practices through the High Impact Task Force • Create and implement a support plan (facility, staffing, and financial resources) • Improve overall assessment and reporting practices, particularly assessment of LEAP outcomes for programs • Further develop faculty engagement in service learning and the role of CSLC Faculty Liaison • Continue tracking and reporting community service data to support MCC and Provost reporting requirements

18 

Extra‐curricular Service Learning &  Community Service

Department Overview  The CSLC serves as a clearinghouse for volunteering, community service, and servicelearning by: • Connecting students to opportunities to serve the community through centercoordinated opportunities (i.e. days of service) and matching students’ interests to community-identified needs. • Supporting faculty/staff in community service and service-learning activities through one-on-one consulting, regularly disseminating service-learning information and updates, and coordinating professional

development opportunities in conjunction with the Faculty Teaching and Learning Center. Assisting local nonprofit organizations through disbursing service opportunities to the GVSU community.

Additionally, the CSLC supports over 40 service and advocacy registered student organizations, as well as provides guidance to any student organization planning service and philanthropy activities. We track service data for the university in conjunction with the Provost’s Office for state and national reporting.

Learning Outcomes  Based on LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes, the CSLC mainly focuses on civic knowledge and responsibility. Participants of our direct service programs are exposed to education about the issue/cause and community and engage in reflective activities to discover how the experience impacts them personally and to draw connections and express realizations. The CSLC promotes transformational experiences which help students develop on an active citizen

continuum (defined by BreakAway®) from member of society not concerned with personal role in societal problems, to volunteer, consciousness citizen, to active citizen where the community becomes a priority in values and life choices. Other LEAP Essential learning outcomes used include foundations and skills for lifelong learning, critical thinking, intercultural knowledge and competence, and integrative learning.

Money Raised ‐ Reported to the CSLC  $200,000.00

$156,703.25 

 $150,000.00 $98,512.00 

 $100,000.00  $50,000.00

$26,977.61 

 $‐ 2008‐2009

80000

62,767.82

Hours Reported to CSLC

60000 40000 20000

22148.5 10460

0 2008‐2009 2009‐2010 2010‐ 2011

Department Highlights  • CSLC received dedicated space to open in gathering of faculty/staff across campus Winter 2006, however, GVSU has a long history interested or currently involved in service of serving our community learning. Updates from the CSLC are sent • Bi-weekly electronic newsletter disseminated to electronically on a bi-monthly basis and ad students hoc meetings are called as necessary • Faculty and staff recognition for community • Work collaboratively with the Heart of West service and service-learning (local and state Michigan United Way Volunteer Center level) • Michigan Campus Compact Community • AmeriCorps Michigan Service Scholars program Service/Service-Learning Director representative • Dedicated fund to assist with coordination of • Student leadership opportunities including faculty professional development for serviceCSLC Ambassador, Service & Leadership learning Intern (for academic credit or experience), site • Service-Learning Web Network (resources on a variety of service learning topics for faculty) leader for Make a Difference Day, and more. • Service-Learning Network– an informal

On‐Going Program

Traditions 

Nonprofit Volunteer & Internship Fair each semester, First Year Service Experience, Overnight Service Experience, Make a Difference Day, College Positive Volunteer Training, Service and Advocacy Week, Community Outreach Week, and Service Saturdays (Hosted by Alternative Breaks). 

Make a Difference Day- a national day of service, held the 4th Saturday in October. More than 300 students serve over 20 local nonprofit organizations throughout the Greater Grand Rapids community.

2011‐2012 Priorities • Continue delivery and assessment of quality volunteer and service opportunities • Implement an awareness campaign about the services of the Community Service Learning Center • Intentionally connect with Johnson Center for Philanthropy staff and initiatives • Continue to participate in discussions with the other area volunteer and service Directors during the transition from Volunteer Solutions to HandsOn Connect, a county-wide volunteer database of the Heart of West Michigan United Way Volunteer Center • Clarify the Community Service Learning Center’s role in supporting and strengthen the community service partnerships with living centers/campus apartments • Reach more than 300 students per semester through classroom presentations about Leadership and Service opportunities (Student Life- OSL Objective for DSS Strategic Plan) 

Community Outreach Week- co-sponsored by Alumni Relations, a week of various community service projects hosted by students and alumni locally and across the country held annually in March 

2009‐2010 2010‐ 2011

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Office of Student Life : Laker Leadership Programs 

Address: 1110 Kirkhof  Center

Website: gvsu.edu/leadership 

Asst. Director: Valerie Jones

Encouraging Growth as Lifelong Leaders 

Phone: 616‐331‐2345

Website: gvsu.edu/iamgv 

Twitter: @GV_Lead_Serv

E‐Mail: leadership@gvsu.edu

E‐Mail: iamgv@gvsu.edu  

Facebook: Grand Valley Leadership  and Service 

Mission  The mission of the Laker Leadership Programs to provide GVSU students with training, education, and experiences which encourage growth as lifelong leaders of integrity and social change within their lives, professions, and communities. The Office of Student Life, in collaboration with several other areas of the university, provides students the opportunity to learn and apply new leadership techniques in a social and engaging environment. 

Strategic Goals  • Partner with Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies to fully launch Leadership University Initiative • Identify LLP role in High Impact practices through the High Impact Task Force • Develop a proposal for student leadership retreat for week following winter semester exams • Improve overall assessment and reporting practices, particularly assessment of LEAP outcomes for programs • Co-teach academic course in Strengths-Based Leadership with Brooks College. Develop curriculum proposal for academic leadership course 

20 

Winter 2011: Consider themselves  leaders on campus or in their community

Department Overview  The two main components of the LLP are leadership development experiences and leadership recognition. Our curriculum of leadership development experiences include specified learning objectives delivered through trainings, workshop/seminars, and conferences. We also offer other leadership development opportunities that focus on learning from the personal leadership experience of GVSU alumni and local community leaders as well as opportunities that afford students the

Over 68% of GVSU students consider  themselves leaders

with other leaders on campus. Leadership Recognition efforts include the “I am Grand Valley” campaign which offers students, faculty, and staff the opportunities to recognize students who exhibit leadership qualities in and out of the classroom as well as Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society. Additionally, we serve as a connection to leadership opportunities across campus including Leadership University.

Learning Outcomes  Based on LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes, the LLP focuses on the following: • Foundations and skills for lifelong learning (i.e. students engage in individual and small group reflection activities to process learning) • Critical thinking (i.e. students are exposed to the process of critical thinking and ethical

leadership, then engage in problem-solving through case studies in FYLE) • Intercultural knowledge and competence (i.e. students are exposed specifically through FYLE Diversity & Inclusion Seminar) • Civic responsibility (Community Leader Seminar)

2011‐2012 Priorities

2%

opportunity to create meaningful connections

30%

30%

Yes

• Continue delivery and

Sometimes

assessment of quality extra– and co-curricular programs • Strengthen our collaborative partnerships for specific programs and for overall engagement of students in the LLP. In particular, Housing and Resident Life (engagement of

No

38%

Other

Department Highlights  • The Social Change Model of Leadership Development serves as a framework for the LLP, focusing on strengthening individual, group, and societal values. Concepts from this framework include consciousness of self, congruence, commitment, collaboration, common purpose, controversy with civility, and citizenship. • The LLP are noted as engagement opportunities in the Four Year Blueprint for Student Success and several of the LLP programs are LIB 100 and US 102 approved.

Our opportunities engage students ranging

from first-year to graduate students, both traditional and non-traditional students, emerging to experienced leaders, and students with formal and informal leadership roles on campus and in the community. • Students can participate in one or all of our programs during their time at GVSU, and are welcome to participate in each of the receptions and Leadership Summit annually, as these experiences vary in topic each time.

Winter 2011 Survey: Importantance of your  personal development of leadership skills 

On‐Going Program

opportunities

Leadership Summit: Est. in

95% of students responded their personal leadership  development to be important. 

include the First Year Leadership Experience (5-week personal

1997, this student coordinated

leadership development), Intermediate Leaders Institute (1/2

state-wide premiere leadership

day workshop on group dynamics), Sustainable Student Leader

conference is held annually in

Workshop, and 3-week seminar series including Community

February

Leader, Strengths-Based Leadership, Inclusion and Diversity (I

dynamic

and II), and ATHENA Leadership.

speaker, more than 30 breakout

Very Important

Important

Somewhat Important 5%

18%

41%

36%

Not Very Important

Curriculum

based

  leadership

Traditions  development

Other leadership

and

a

keynote

Objective for DSS Strategic Plan)

development opportunities include the Venderbush Leadership

sessions,

Reception and Student Leader Networking Reception, and

study competition sponsored by

Campus Leadership Week which includes the “I am Grand

Omicron Delta Kappa National

Valley” Reception to honor nominators and nominees.

Leadership Honor Society, and

 

more.

a

student engagement including Brooks College and Intercultural Competence Experience Certificate program. • Continue to participate in dialogue of how StrengthsFinder is utilized on campus • By 2012, reach more than 300 students per semester through classroom presentations about Leadership and Service opportunities. (Student Life- OSL

includes

leadership

residents, community council members, and Resident Assistants), Women’s Center for the ATHENA Leadership Seminar, Student Organization Center (registered student organizations and Councils), etc. • Strengthen our connection to academic departments for

leadership

case

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Office of Student Life : Laker Leadership Programs 

Address: 1110 Kirkhof  Center

Website: gvsu.edu/leadership 

Asst. Director: Valerie Jones

Encouraging Growth as Lifelong Leaders 

Phone: 616‐331‐2345

Website: gvsu.edu/iamgv 

Twitter: @GV_Lead_Serv

E‐Mail: leadership@gvsu.edu

E‐Mail: iamgv@gvsu.edu  

Facebook: Grand Valley Leadership  and Service 

Mission  The mission of the Laker Leadership Programs to provide GVSU students with training, education, and experiences which encourage growth as lifelong leaders of integrity and social change within their lives, professions, and communities. The Office of Student Life, in collaboration with several other areas of the university, provides students the opportunity to learn and apply new leadership techniques in a social and engaging environment. 

Strategic Goals  • Partner with Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies to fully launch Leadership University Initiative • Identify LLP role in High Impact practices through the High Impact Task Force • Develop a proposal for student leadership retreat for week following winter semester exams • Improve overall assessment and reporting practices, particularly assessment of LEAP outcomes for programs • Co-teach academic course in Strengths-Based Leadership with Brooks College. Develop curriculum proposal for academic leadership course 

20 

Winter 2011: Consider themselves  leaders on campus or in their community

Department Overview  The two main components of the LLP are leadership development experiences and leadership recognition. Our curriculum of leadership development experiences include specified learning objectives delivered through trainings, workshop/seminars, and conferences. We also offer other leadership development opportunities that focus on learning from the personal leadership experience of GVSU alumni and local community leaders as well as opportunities that afford students the

Over 68% of GVSU students consider  themselves leaders

with other leaders on campus. Leadership Recognition efforts include the “I am Grand Valley” campaign which offers students, faculty, and staff the opportunities to recognize students who exhibit leadership qualities in and out of the classroom as well as Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society. Additionally, we serve as a connection to leadership opportunities across campus including Leadership University.

Learning Outcomes  Based on LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes, the LLP focuses on the following: • Foundations and skills for lifelong learning (i.e. students engage in individual and small group reflection activities to process learning) • Critical thinking (i.e. students are exposed to the process of critical thinking and ethical

leadership, then engage in problem-solving through case studies in FYLE) • Intercultural knowledge and competence (i.e. students are exposed specifically through FYLE Diversity & Inclusion Seminar) • Civic responsibility (Community Leader Seminar)

2011‐2012 Priorities

2%

opportunity to create meaningful connections

30%

30%

Yes

• Continue delivery and

Sometimes

assessment of quality extra– and co-curricular programs • Strengthen our collaborative partnerships for specific programs and for overall engagement of students in the LLP. In particular, Housing and Resident Life (engagement of

No

38%

Other

Department Highlights  • The Social Change Model of Leadership Development serves as a framework for the LLP, focusing on strengthening individual, group, and societal values. Concepts from this framework include consciousness of self, congruence, commitment, collaboration, common purpose, controversy with civility, and citizenship. • The LLP are noted as engagement opportunities in the Four Year Blueprint for Student Success and several of the LLP programs are LIB 100 and US 102 approved.

Our opportunities engage students ranging

from first-year to graduate students, both traditional and non-traditional students, emerging to experienced leaders, and students with formal and informal leadership roles on campus and in the community. • Students can participate in one or all of our programs during their time at GVSU, and are welcome to participate in each of the receptions and Leadership Summit annually, as these experiences vary in topic each time.

Winter 2011 Survey: Importantance of your  personal development of leadership skills 

On‐Going Program

opportunities

Leadership Summit: Est. in

95% of students responded their personal leadership  development to be important. 

include the First Year Leadership Experience (5-week personal

1997, this student coordinated

leadership development), Intermediate Leaders Institute (1/2

state-wide premiere leadership

day workshop on group dynamics), Sustainable Student Leader

conference is held annually in

Workshop, and 3-week seminar series including Community

February

Leader, Strengths-Based Leadership, Inclusion and Diversity (I

dynamic

and II), and ATHENA Leadership.

speaker, more than 30 breakout

Very Important

Important

Somewhat Important 5%

18%

41%

36%

Not Very Important

Curriculum

based

  leadership

Traditions  development

Other leadership

and

a

keynote

Objective for DSS Strategic Plan)

development opportunities include the Venderbush Leadership

sessions,

Reception and Student Leader Networking Reception, and

study competition sponsored by

Campus Leadership Week which includes the “I am Grand

Omicron Delta Kappa National

Valley” Reception to honor nominators and nominees.

Leadership Honor Society, and

 

more.

a

student engagement including Brooks College and Intercultural Competence Experience Certificate program. • Continue to participate in dialogue of how StrengthsFinder is utilized on campus • By 2012, reach more than 300 students per semester through classroom presentations about Leadership and Service opportunities. (Student Life- OSL

includes

leadership

residents, community council members, and Resident Assistants), Women’s Center for the ATHENA Leadership Seminar, Student Organization Center (registered student organizations and Councils), etc. • Strengthen our connection to academic departments for

leadership

case

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Office of Student Life:   Student Organization Services  

Address: 110 Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/studentlife 

Asst. Director: Aaron Haight

Phone: 616‐331‐2345

Twitter: @GVSOC 

Asst. Director: Tom Coy

E‐Mail: rso@gvsu.edu

Director: Michelle Burke

Maximize Your College Experience 

Number of Members by Year

Department Overview  Mission  Our Mission at Student Life is to enhance student development through involvement in diverse experiences. 

Strategic Goals  • Create an Interfaith Advisory Council to help support the needs of students and faith-based student organizations. • Foster and recognize students’ scholarly achievements and intellectual growth.

The Office of Student Life provides staff support and facilities for more than 350 Registered Student Organizations (RSOs), comprised of 8,000+ student members and 250+ faculty/staff advisors. Student organization involvement is an important way for students to interact with faculty outside of the classroom, and RSO activities help students connect their in-class learning to out-of-class professional, leadership and service experiences. RSOs register through the Stuey online system, which gives RSOs access to campus space reservations, office supplies and work space, leadership training, and staff assistance with event planning and organizational issues.

 

MAX It Out – Fall

Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes • Provide training and knowledge for students • Student Organizations will be able to (primarily student organizations) on a variety of identify resources provided by the OSL. topics. Fraternities • Offer facilitating experiences to faculty, staff, graduate assistants, and students.

Number of Advisors 85 12 16 35 3 8 5 21 7 40 50

22 

10

20

5842

2011‐2012 Priorities 

3674 796 2007

2008

2009

2010

• Increase awareness of resources and services for student organizations. • Increase the use of online media and social networking. • Utilize the data collected for meaningful assessment.

 

• • • •

Over 350 Registered Student Organizations (over a 100% increase in last 10 years) 108% growth of fraternity and sorority community in last 4 years 4 National Champion Club Sports Over 8,000 members of student organizations and over 250 faculty/staff advisors

40

50

Organizations start each year promoting their organizations to over 3800 first year students at

Campus Activity 

On‐Going Program 

Campus Life Night. Other

Student Organizations are

The Student Organization Center (SOC), located on the lower

annual traditions include

a great way for students to

level of the Kirkhof Center (0008), is an area in which

participation in

become an active part of

registered student organizations (RSO) are encouraged to use

Homecoming, Leader

the campus community.

to conduct business, share ideas and information, and to utilize

Summit, Make a Difference

Whether integrating in

each other for collaboration opportunities. The SOC is

Day, and Relay for Life.

class learning through an

equipped with conveniences such as storage areas, mailboxes

Organizations conclude the

Academic and Professional

(packages), phones, computers, a lounge area, conference

year at the annual

organization or relaxing

facilities, and televisions. It is staffed by students from the

Recognition Awards.

with friends at a Special

Office of Student Life who have a strong programming history.

Interest Organization

Though designed to aid with professional dealings of

meeting, student

organizations, the SOC is an area that attracts all students to

organizations provide

interact in a manner that promotes cooperation, collaboration,

support, learning, and a

and learning outside of the classroom. 

students.

30

Registered Student

 

sense of belonging for

13 0

7033

Traditions 

Workshops on Demand

Academic & Professional Cultural Faith‐Based Fraternity/Sorority Graduate Student Honor Societies Media & Entertainment Performing Arts Professional Fraternities Special Interest Sports & Rec Student Government

8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

Department Highlights 

Learning Outcomes 

• Develop a needs assessment and proposal for improvement of facilities including but not limited to performance space, fraternity/sorority housing, and recreational space.

Grand Valley RSOs provide countless hours of programming each year for student engagement, including community service, educational events, film screenings, guest lectures, sports events (for participants and spectators), and social/entertainment activities. Much of this programming is supported by the Student Life Fund, a $1.1 million University fund allocated by the Student Senate and administered through Student Life. The fund is distributed to RSOs through Student Organization Councils representing each classification of RSO. The allocation process is run completely by students under the guidance of Student Life staff.

60

70

80

 

90

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Office of Student Life:   Student Organization Services  

Address: 110 Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/studentlife 

Asst. Director: Aaron Haight

Phone: 616‐331‐2345

Twitter: @GVSOC 

Asst. Director: Tom Coy

E‐Mail: rso@gvsu.edu

Director: Michelle Burke

Maximize Your College Experience 

Number of Members by Year

Department Overview  Mission  Our Mission at Student Life is to enhance student development through involvement in diverse experiences. 

Strategic Goals  • Create an Interfaith Advisory Council to help support the needs of students and faith-based student organizations. • Foster and recognize students’ scholarly achievements and intellectual growth.

The Office of Student Life provides staff support and facilities for more than 350 Registered Student Organizations (RSOs), comprised of 8,000+ student members and 250+ faculty/staff advisors. Student organization involvement is an important way for students to interact with faculty outside of the classroom, and RSO activities help students connect their in-class learning to out-of-class professional, leadership and service experiences. RSOs register through the Stuey online system, which gives RSOs access to campus space reservations, office supplies and work space, leadership training, and staff assistance with event planning and organizational issues.

 

MAX It Out – Fall

Learning Outcomes Learning Outcomes • Provide training and knowledge for students • Student Organizations will be able to (primarily student organizations) on a variety of identify resources provided by the OSL. topics. Fraternities • Offer facilitating experiences to faculty, staff, graduate assistants, and students.

Number of Advisors 85 12 16 35 3 8 5 21 7 40 50

22 

10

20

5842

2011‐2012 Priorities 

3674 796 2007

2008

2009

2010

• Increase awareness of resources and services for student organizations. • Increase the use of online media and social networking. • Utilize the data collected for meaningful assessment.

 

• • • •

Over 350 Registered Student Organizations (over a 100% increase in last 10 years) 108% growth of fraternity and sorority community in last 4 years 4 National Champion Club Sports Over 8,000 members of student organizations and over 250 faculty/staff advisors

40

50

Organizations start each year promoting their organizations to over 3800 first year students at

Campus Activity 

On‐Going Program 

Campus Life Night. Other

Student Organizations are

The Student Organization Center (SOC), located on the lower

annual traditions include

a great way for students to

level of the Kirkhof Center (0008), is an area in which

participation in

become an active part of

registered student organizations (RSO) are encouraged to use

Homecoming, Leader

the campus community.

to conduct business, share ideas and information, and to utilize

Summit, Make a Difference

Whether integrating in

each other for collaboration opportunities. The SOC is

Day, and Relay for Life.

class learning through an

equipped with conveniences such as storage areas, mailboxes

Organizations conclude the

Academic and Professional

(packages), phones, computers, a lounge area, conference

year at the annual

organization or relaxing

facilities, and televisions. It is staffed by students from the

Recognition Awards.

with friends at a Special

Office of Student Life who have a strong programming history.

Interest Organization

Though designed to aid with professional dealings of

meeting, student

organizations, the SOC is an area that attracts all students to

organizations provide

interact in a manner that promotes cooperation, collaboration,

support, learning, and a

and learning outside of the classroom. 

students.

30

Registered Student

 

sense of belonging for

13 0

7033

Traditions 

Workshops on Demand

Academic & Professional Cultural Faith‐Based Fraternity/Sorority Graduate Student Honor Societies Media & Entertainment Performing Arts Professional Fraternities Special Interest Sports & Rec Student Government

8000 7000 6000 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

Department Highlights 

Learning Outcomes 

• Develop a needs assessment and proposal for improvement of facilities including but not limited to performance space, fraternity/sorority housing, and recreational space.

Grand Valley RSOs provide countless hours of programming each year for student engagement, including community service, educational events, film screenings, guest lectures, sports events (for participants and spectators), and social/entertainment activities. Much of this programming is supported by the Student Life Fund, a $1.1 million University fund allocated by the Student Senate and administered through Student Life. The fund is distributed to RSOs through Student Organization Councils representing each classification of RSO. The allocation process is run completely by students under the guidance of Student Life staff.

60

70

80

 

90

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Women’s Center 

Address: 1201 Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/women_cen  Director: Marlene Kowalski‐Braun

Phone: 616‐331‐2748

Twitter: @GVSUWomensCtr 

E‐Mail: womenctr@gvsu.edu

 

Mission  Our mission is to create meaningful learning about women and gender and to advocate for gender justice through the education, engagement, and empowerment of women students and the greater GVSU community.

 

Strategic Goals  Each year, we establish goals based on the following priorities:

Department Overview   We serve students, faculty, staff and the

practice and connect students with the larger community with a primary goal of partnering community. We acknowledge that oppression with students in their lifelong learning. In our and inequities exist in society and strive to make work, we embrace the unique differences among opportunities and resources genuinely available people and recognize the complexities of and accessible to all. Through advocacy and multiple and intersecting identities. Through activism, we empower others and engage in programs and services, we engage in high impact intentional actions designed to improve the lives of people, communities and societies. practices that bridge research, theory and

Grant Success! (Secured over $283,000)  Department of Justice, Violence Against

living/learning center to enhance mentoring

Women Grant - $265,129 (3 years)

opportunities for students in STEM (science,

• Connecting with faculty and academic units to enrich student learning • Maximizing campus partnerships • Enhancing student development efforts within the context of a liberal education

This grant strengthens GVSU’s anti-violence

technology and engineering) fields.

• Improving internal effectiveness • Promoting inclusion, equity and intercultural learning with an emphasis on intersectionality

process by preparing them to run for office.

The work of the Women’s Center is an outward

Anti‐Violence Programming 

demonstration of our values. In all aspects – our daily administrative work, our programming, our advocacy and activism – we strive to make these values visible. We value: diversity, equality, collaboration, activism, advocacy, mentoring, students and celebration. 

24 

education and prevention around sexual assault, stalking, and dating/domestic violence.

Meemic Foundation, Girls in Sports Grant $1,800 This grant was awarded in partnership with

Kellogg Foundation, Ready to Run Grant -

Laker Athletics, Movement Science, and

$12,000

Grand Rapids Public Schools to engage

This grant provides non-partisan training to

middle school girls in athletics on a college

engage women more fully in the political

campus. Sustainable Community Development

American Association of University Women,

Initiative, Food Pantry Grant - $1,000

Campus Action Grant - $4,257

This grant supports student access to fresh

This grant was awarded in partnership with

produce and education about local and

Women in Science and Engineering (WISE)

sustainable foods.

Annually, the Women’s Center, in collaboration with student organizations and campus and community partners, hosts several events designed to educate about and prevent sexual violence and intimate partner violence. This year, programs included: • Silent Witness program (An event to remember the women of Michigan who have died as a result of domestic violence) • Take Back the Night (A march intended as a protest and direct action against rape and other forms of sexual violence) • Clothesline Project (A visual display of shirts with graphic messages and illustrations that have been designed by women survivors of violence or by someone who loves a woman who has been killed) • ReACT! (A peer education theatre troupe designed to facilitate scenarios and dialogue around bystander intervention to end sexual violence) 

22%

22%

8%

First Year Student

29%

Sophomore Junior

19%

Senior Grad Student

Department Highlights: New Initiatives  South Africa The Women’s Center and Women & Gender Studies have joined efforts to provide a 6 week international study abroad that pairs education and service in South Africa. Our collaborative partner in Cape Town, South Africa is the Student Health and Wellness Centres Organization (SHAWCO). This 6 credit program is open to all majors and the first group of students will travel to Cape Town in the summer of 2012.

Women’s Leadership House The Women’s Leadership House is a residential living/learning opportunity. The program will provide leadership development, programming that specifically matches student interests and needs, and provides opportunities for close interaction with Women & Gender Studies faculty, Women’s Center staff, Academic Community Housing staff and TRIOTA Student Organization members. The Women’s Leadership House is located in VanSteeland Living Center, Allendale Campus.

Women’s Leadership Programming  The Women’s Center uses various programs and models for teaching and practicing feminist leadership. These programs connect students with campus and community opportunities designed to prepare college women for leadership in higher education and beyond. • The Athena® Connections Program and Seminar are designed to provide leadership development and networking opportunities for college women to link with outstanding women leaders in the community. • The Ambassador Program builds a connection to students who want to further the mission of the Women’s Center as well as their own leadership. It is based on a Feminist Leadership for Social Change curriculum with the goal of empowering women leaders through activism and community engagement!

2010‐2011 Points of  Pride  • We sponsored 81 programs, cosponsored 20, and served over 10,000 students • We launched ReACT!, a theatre for dialogue, anti-violence peereducation performance group • We awarded over $11,000 in scholarships to 12 non-traditional students • The Women’s Center endowment reached the $50,000 mark! • The Women’s Community Collaborative (WCC) won a SILVER NASPA Excellence Award • We created a campus violence prevention team (CVPT) to unite campus and community partners around anti-violence efforts • We served over 300 through the Student Food Pantry and launched a voucher program for students to access fresh produce through the Farmer’s Market • After ten years of producing The Vagina Monologues, we reached $100,000 in contributions to agencies that work on behalf of women and girls 

• The Women’s Community Collaborative is an undergraduate internship program designed to provide upper level students with supervised work experience in community agencies that serve women and children. 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Women’s Center 

Address: 1201 Kirkhof Center

Website: gvsu.edu/women_cen  Director: Marlene Kowalski‐Braun

Phone: 616‐331‐2748

Twitter: @GVSUWomensCtr 

E‐Mail: womenctr@gvsu.edu

 

Mission  Our mission is to create meaningful learning about women and gender and to advocate for gender justice through the education, engagement, and empowerment of women students and the greater GVSU community.

 

Strategic Goals  Each year, we establish goals based on the following priorities:

Department Overview   We serve students, faculty, staff and the

practice and connect students with the larger community with a primary goal of partnering community. We acknowledge that oppression with students in their lifelong learning. In our and inequities exist in society and strive to make work, we embrace the unique differences among opportunities and resources genuinely available people and recognize the complexities of and accessible to all. Through advocacy and multiple and intersecting identities. Through activism, we empower others and engage in programs and services, we engage in high impact intentional actions designed to improve the lives of people, communities and societies. practices that bridge research, theory and

Grant Success! (Secured over $283,000)  Department of Justice, Violence Against

living/learning center to enhance mentoring

Women Grant - $265,129 (3 years)

opportunities for students in STEM (science,

• Connecting with faculty and academic units to enrich student learning • Maximizing campus partnerships • Enhancing student development efforts within the context of a liberal education

This grant strengthens GVSU’s anti-violence

technology and engineering) fields.

• Improving internal effectiveness • Promoting inclusion, equity and intercultural learning with an emphasis on intersectionality

process by preparing them to run for office.

The work of the Women’s Center is an outward

Anti‐Violence Programming 

demonstration of our values. In all aspects – our daily administrative work, our programming, our advocacy and activism – we strive to make these values visible. We value: diversity, equality, collaboration, activism, advocacy, mentoring, students and celebration. 

24 

education and prevention around sexual assault, stalking, and dating/domestic violence.

Meemic Foundation, Girls in Sports Grant $1,800 This grant was awarded in partnership with

Kellogg Foundation, Ready to Run Grant -

Laker Athletics, Movement Science, and

$12,000

Grand Rapids Public Schools to engage

This grant provides non-partisan training to

middle school girls in athletics on a college

engage women more fully in the political

campus. Sustainable Community Development

American Association of University Women,

Initiative, Food Pantry Grant - $1,000

Campus Action Grant - $4,257

This grant supports student access to fresh

This grant was awarded in partnership with

produce and education about local and

Women in Science and Engineering (WISE)

sustainable foods.

Annually, the Women’s Center, in collaboration with student organizations and campus and community partners, hosts several events designed to educate about and prevent sexual violence and intimate partner violence. This year, programs included: • Silent Witness program (An event to remember the women of Michigan who have died as a result of domestic violence) • Take Back the Night (A march intended as a protest and direct action against rape and other forms of sexual violence) • Clothesline Project (A visual display of shirts with graphic messages and illustrations that have been designed by women survivors of violence or by someone who loves a woman who has been killed) • ReACT! (A peer education theatre troupe designed to facilitate scenarios and dialogue around bystander intervention to end sexual violence) 

22%

22%

8%

First Year Student

29%

Sophomore Junior

19%

Senior Grad Student

Department Highlights: New Initiatives  South Africa The Women’s Center and Women & Gender Studies have joined efforts to provide a 6 week international study abroad that pairs education and service in South Africa. Our collaborative partner in Cape Town, South Africa is the Student Health and Wellness Centres Organization (SHAWCO). This 6 credit program is open to all majors and the first group of students will travel to Cape Town in the summer of 2012.

Women’s Leadership House The Women’s Leadership House is a residential living/learning opportunity. The program will provide leadership development, programming that specifically matches student interests and needs, and provides opportunities for close interaction with Women & Gender Studies faculty, Women’s Center staff, Academic Community Housing staff and TRIOTA Student Organization members. The Women’s Leadership House is located in VanSteeland Living Center, Allendale Campus.

Women’s Leadership Programming  The Women’s Center uses various programs and models for teaching and practicing feminist leadership. These programs connect students with campus and community opportunities designed to prepare college women for leadership in higher education and beyond. • The Athena® Connections Program and Seminar are designed to provide leadership development and networking opportunities for college women to link with outstanding women leaders in the community. • The Ambassador Program builds a connection to students who want to further the mission of the Women’s Center as well as their own leadership. It is based on a Feminist Leadership for Social Change curriculum with the goal of empowering women leaders through activism and community engagement!

2010‐2011 Points of  Pride  • We sponsored 81 programs, cosponsored 20, and served over 10,000 students • We launched ReACT!, a theatre for dialogue, anti-violence peereducation performance group • We awarded over $11,000 in scholarships to 12 non-traditional students • The Women’s Center endowment reached the $50,000 mark! • The Women’s Community Collaborative (WCC) won a SILVER NASPA Excellence Award • We created a campus violence prevention team (CVPT) to unite campus and community partners around anti-violence efforts • We served over 300 through the Student Food Pantry and launched a voucher program for students to access fresh produce through the Farmer’s Market • After ten years of producing The Vagina Monologues, we reached $100,000 in contributions to agencies that work on behalf of women and girls 

• The Women’s Community Collaborative is an undergraduate internship program designed to provide upper level students with supervised work experience in community agencies that serve women and children. 

Division of Student Services – Grand Valley State University 


Grand Valley State University Division of Student Services Highlights 2010-2011