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January 2014

Pets In The City Magazine


Happy LOVE Month! Share the love with animals in Utah and support Pets in the City Magazine. We have listed below several ways you can participate with the magazine.

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• Adopt a new animal family member. • Tell our advertisers you saw their ad in PICM. Their sponsorship makes it possible for us to bring this magazine to you FREE each month. • Participate on our FB page! We may select your name for dinner at The Dodo or Porcupine Grill. • Send in your happy ending rescue stories to be published in our reader submission section, “Saving Lives in the City.” • Pay tribute to your animals that have passed away, in our (no charge) “Saying Goodbye” section. • Send us a photo of your companion animals. We love seeing your pictures! • Email us your comments or suggestions to info@petsinthecitymagazine.com.

Pets In The City Magazine

Letter From The Staff


• • • February Calendar of Events • • • Camp Bow Wow, Canines & Cupids Adoption Event on Valentine’s Day! Food, Drinks, & Fun! Feb. 14th from 3-6pm

Caws For Paws Utah Valentine’s Benefit - At the Alpine Art on 430 E. South Temple in SLC Pet friendly event - Saturday, Feb. 8th at 6pm

February 25th is World Spay & Neuter Day! Camp Bow Wow is having an event to spread awareness & raise money for local shelters - 4-6pm Smooches for Pooches - Fund Raiser for Rescue Rover Dog Adoptions - Bodacious in South Town Mall - Feb. 8th from 6-8pm

The Yappy Hour to benefit FOA/Furburbia An Evening of Wine & Dog Paring - Must be 21 years of age - McMillan Fine Art Photography Gallery - 1678 W. Redstone Center Drive, Park City, Utah 84098 Call 435-575-1270 to purchase tickets Feb 8th from 6:30-9:30pm

Paws For Life Adoption Event At the Heber City Petco Saturday, February 8th from 11-3pm

Paws For Life Adoption Event At the Wasatch Common Apartments in Heber - Pet Friendly - Saturday, Feb. 22nd from 11-3pm

Send in your events for March & April now! Please email info@petsinthecitymagazine.com PUBLISHER PICM Publishing, LLC EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Genevieve Campbell MANAGING EDITOR Deborah Myers

Pets In The City Magazine

COPY EDITORS Chanté McCoy Jennafer Martin Tina Brunetti Mumford WEBMASTER / SOCIAL MEDIA Jennafer Martin STAFF WRITERS Chanté McCoy Jennafer Martin Mona Mistric CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lynn McCarron, DVM Laura McLain, DVM Tonya Landon RonaLeigh Wheelwright Bobbie Pyron

January 2014

GUEST WRITERS Alyssa Hughes, DVM Tonya Monard

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STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Chris Dickinson

CIRCULATION Shane Myers City Weekly Smith Grocery Store Racks BOOKSMARTS ACCOUNTING Jenny Groberg Lindsay Kirby GRAPHIC DESIGNER Michelle Bellinger All illustrations created by Michelle Bellinger. Copyrighted 2014.

SALES & ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Beverly Egleston Deborah Myers CONTACT US: EMAIL: debbiepetsinthecitymagazine@gmail.com PHONE: Debbie 801.702.1171

www.petsinthecitymagazine.com PICM Disclaimer: All reader submissions and photos are voluntarily submitted without expectation of compensation. All opinions of the authors in this Magazine are those of the writer or contributor and are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher. The publisher has not confirmed the accuracy of information contained in the articles. PICM reserves the right to edit, alter, or modify the submitted article to the extent in which we deem necessary.

DON’T FORGET TO FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK & TWITTER!

Cover photo by Chris Dickinson

TABLE of CONTENTS

3 LETTER FROM THE STAFF 4 CALENDAR OF EVENTS 6 MY DEPLOYMENT WITH URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE - Laura McLain, DVM 8 PET PEEVES - 4 Reasons Why Communities Should Have Dog Parks - Chanté McCoy 10 PETS FOR YOUR HEALTH: STRONGER IMMUNITY 10 WAYS ANIMALS CONTRIBUTE TO THE LIVES OF PEOPLE 12 EXPERT ADVICE February: National Pet Dental Health Month - Alyssa Hughes, DVM 14 BEAGLE: THE MERRY MELODIOUS HOUND - Chanté McCoy 10 WAYS ANIMALS MAKE OUR LIVES LOVELY 15 MADAME TABU’S PET HOROSCOPE 16 SINGLE AND SEEKING LOVE - Rescue Me 18 THE ADVANTAGES OF A NO KILL SHELTER - Mona Mistric 20 COATS FOR FUNCTION AND STYLE - Chanté McCoy 24 FLYING FREE: MAKE YOUR HOME BIRD-SAFE - RonaLeigh Wheelwright 25 ASK STETSON Q & A - Tonya Landon 26 SAYING GOODBYE 28 FAMILY FUN - Book Reviews - January Caption Contest Winner! - Astrology That Brings Out The Animal In You Crossword 30 YOUR PETS IN THE CITY PHOTOS

A RESCUE PLEA Pets In The City Magazine is dedicated to and encourages rescuing companion animals of all types. There are thousands of animals in Utah and across our nation needing a forever home. If you are interested in rescuing a companion animal, there are over 100 animal rescues in Utah. A good resource is petfinder.com, a nationwide database for companion animals of all types. A rescued animal can be rewarding and lead to a forever grateful love.

Last Month’s Issue

Pets In The City Magazine © 2012 is an independent, free monthly magazine published by PICM Publishing. For information regarding Pets in the City Magazine, visit www.petsinthecitymagazine.com Any and all articles in Pets in the City Magazine are submitted for reading enjoyment only. Please consult a professional and make wise personal decisions regarding health and safety issues of pets and family.


Pets In The City Magazine

January 2014

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My

Deployment With Urban Search Rescue Laura McLain, DVM

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For about six years, I’ve worked with search dogs and handlers with FEMA Urban Search and Rescue (US&R). In 2012, I officially joined US&R Utah Task Force 1 as team veterinarian. The experience has been amazing, especially my first deployment.

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Most of my teammates are firefighters, since they already have training in rigging, extrication, and rescue. There are a few non-fire people: physicians, structural engineers, canine handlers, and me.

We were called up shortly after midnight on September 13, 2013. I dragged myself out of bed, got my uniform and equipment, and drove to the warehouse. I performed pre-deployment exams on the four dogs that were deploying, and filled out health certificates. We spent most of that day C convoying to Boulder in a long line of semis, trucks, and vans. All roads into r s d

A t r d f h

Pets In The City Magazine

wenty-eight US&R task forces exist across the country, each comprised of several hundred people and a dozen or so dogs. Unlike smaller search and rescue teams focused on finding people lost in the wilderness, urban search and rescue teams are larger with heavy-duty equipment to rescue people trapped in urban environments after large-scale disasters. The disasters to which US&R deploys include terrorist attacks (e.g., World Trade Center), hurricanes (e.g., Katrina), earthquakes, tornadoes, etc. Each task force is capable of deploying within four hours of a disaster, with all the equipment, supplies, and personnel necessary to be self-sufficient for 72 hours.

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January 2014

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Crates set up by Boulder Animal Control for temporary housing of evacuee pets.


Dr. Laura McLain and “Zeteo,” a search and rescue dog.

Some of the hundreds of pets who evacuated with their owners on Army helicopters.

Three of the four Utah team dogs who deployed to the floods: “BeBe,” a black Labrador mix, “Bandit,” an Australian Shepherd, and “Zeteo,” a chocolate Labrador.

people. Of course, there were many dogs and cats, but also a fair number of exotic pets: parrots, turtles, small mammals, geese, fish, and even a monkey. Overall, the pets were amazingly healthy and happy. I treated a few dogs with minor abrasions and lacerations from the flooding.

As team veterinarian, my primary goal is to keep the search dogs healthy, so they can do their job of finding trapped people. All of the Utah team dogs remained healthy for the entire deployment, but one of the Nebraska team dogs became ill, with profuse diarrhea and dehydration. The Nebraska task force does not have a veterinarian (less than half the task forces nationally have DVM’s), so I treated him. He was back to work the next day.

Our deployment lasted a week. I was sore, soaked, and mentally and physically exhausted, but it was a great experience. All the members of the task force are dedicated to saving lives, and it is an honor to work with them.

I also was called on to examine pets of evacuees. If you watched any television footage of the disaster, you probably saw long lines of evacuees coming off helicopters. Twenty Army Chinook and Blackhawk helicopters flew back and forth between the canyons and the airport, evacuating residents and their pets. Some helicopter loads had more animals than

Dr. Laura McLain is a veterinarian with Holladay Veterinary Hospital. Her professional interests include internal medicine, critical care, soft tissue surgery, and pain management. In addition to dogs and cats, she also treats rabbits, ferrets, guinea pigs, and rodents. She and her family have two dogs -- a German Shepherd mix named Leyla and a Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Pippin -- and a grey tabby named Clyde.

Pets In The City Magazine

Colorado were closed, so we crossed into the state through a highway patrol roadblock. We finally got to the Boulder Airport around 6 p.m., where we set up our base of operations. The US&R task force from Nebraska was also deployed, and they set up their base adjacent to ours.

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PET PEEVES 4 REASONS WHY COMMUNITIES SHOULD HAVE DOG PARKS Chanté McCoy Dog parks offer multiple benefits to people and communities, let alone dogs. Considering that 46 million American households have dogs (compared to 38 million with children), the demand for dog parks is growing. Municipalities should take heed of the need and create positive change for their cities. Dogs are now vital to our communities. People often view them as their “furry children,” investing time and money. Pet-oriented businesses are flourishing. Research also shows that dogs improve the health of their owners: their presence and interaction lower people’s blood pressure, reduce stress and depression, encourage people to exercise more, strengthen

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January 2014

Pets In The City Magazine

SALT LAKE DOG PARKS Herman Frank’s Dog Park 700 East 1300 South Parley’s Way Dog Park 2740 South 2700 East Millcreek Canyon 3800 South Wasatch Blvd. Lindsey Gardens Dog Park 7th Ave and “N” Street Memory Grove 375 North Canyon Rd. Cottonwood Dog Park 350 North Redwood Rd.

their sense of purpose, and increase resistance to disease. Responding to this need, cities are incorporating more dog parks, with “paw parks” becoming the fastest growing segment of city parks.

Dog parks offer an easy way for people – often tired after a day at work – to let their dogs romp and get vital exercise. Dog parks are particularly important for seniors and disabled owners who need an accessible place to exercise their dogs; walking their dogs on leash is not a viable option.

Why should Utah communities follow their lead?

4. ENCOURAGING RESPONSIBLE DOG OWNERSHIP

1. BUILDING COMMUNITY

Dog parks bring together dog lovers, trainers, and pet professionals. This gathering allows people to exchange information and resources. Experienced owners can help others with dog training and other issues, so dogs are better canine citizens.

Parks connect people with others in their community. With our busy schedules, many of us have little opportunity to interact with neighbors. It’s easy to live side-by-side and not know anything about one another, unless we’re compelled to be drawn out of our insular shells. Dogs and dog parks bring people together in a pleasant environment, creating friendships and establishing stronger ties to the community. 2. SOCIALIZING DOGS Dogs, like humans, are highly sociable beings. Dog parks allow canines to come together and interact at will. Leashes actually cause dogs to become territorial. Parks, on the other hand, provide an open space, free of restraints, to romp freely with their own species. Dogs need to hone their social skills too, learning to read social cues, such as backing off when play gets too rough. Dogs, accustomed to playing with animals and people other than their owners, are better socialized and react less aggressively toward strangers (yet another benefit to communities). 3. EXERCISING DOGS The second most common reason for people taking a dog to the shelter is “behavioral problems.” Bored dogs, with pent-up energy, will act out. They’ll bark incessantly, tear up furniture, or dig up the yard. Exercised, socialized dogs are healthier, happier, and less aggressive. They’re also less inclined to be destructive.

With increasingly strict leash laws, providing a safe and sanctioned place for dogs to run freely removes excuses for people to violate those ordinances and walk their dogs without leashes to “get in a little romp,” “let Max stretch his legs,” and “give Freya some freedom.” Research correlates higher levels of compliance with animal ordinances when communities accommodate dogs and owners in public open space.

**** Obviously, there are many factors to consider when establishing a park, including location and funding. Rules and enforcement must also top the list to accommodate community concerns about traffic, noise, and smell, and to ensure the park is a safe and enjoyable experience for all. Utahns are already speaking loud and clear on the need for space for their dogs to exercise and frolic freely. Doggie day cares are cropping up like dandelions, and small business owners are offering to take dogs for walks or hikes to accommodate this need. If you think a dog park is a good idea for your community, speak up at your local county or city council meetings. Get a petition going. Join with likeminded dog-loving citizens to develop a strategy to bring a dog park to your area.


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Pets In The City Magazine

January 2014

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PETS FOR YOUR HEALTH: STRONGER IMMUNITY Pets are good for your well-being, including your immunity. For example, multiple studies have shown that pets reduce stress and depression. By reducing stress and depression, pets bolster our immune systems, keeping us healthier. Growing up with pets also strengthens our immunity, lessening our risk for allergies and asthma. It used to be thought that having pets increased our chances of developing allergies. According to a growing number of studies, the opposite is true. Allergies are hypersensitive disorders, recognizing normally harmless substances as threats. Certain white blood cells called mast cells and basophils are activated, resulting in an inflammatory response which can range from uncomfortable (such as red eyes, itchiness, runny nose, eczema, and hives) to dangerous (anaphylaxis). By being around cats, dogs, or even farm animals while young, our immune systems are exposed early to potential allergens and strengthened. In one study, infants living in a home with dogs were less likely to develop

pet allergies: 19% versus 33%. The babies also had higher levels of some immune system chemicals, and they were less likely to have eczema, a common skin allergy condition. An Irish proverb says, “A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor’s book.” Add in a playful pup or a cuddly kitten, and the formula is complete.

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January 2014

Pets In The City Magazine

10 Ways Animals Contribute to the Lives of People 1.

Therapy animals help children and adults with special needs.

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Therapy animals help pediatric patients recover in hospitals.

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Pet Therapy animals help seniors in hospitals, rehabilitation, and convalescent and assisted care facilities.

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Courtroom dogs help calm children when they testify in court.

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Service dogs help to comfort children who are victims of abuse with their emotional interviews. “Children will talk to the dogs.”

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Therapy dogs are now helping our soldiers with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

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War dogs are saving our soldiers by sniffing out land mines and bombs.

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Dogs help our police force and fire departments in the criminal justice system.

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Avalanche search and rescue dogs save lives.

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Dogs help search for missing persons and children.

Chris Dickinson Photography


Pets In The City Magazine

January 2014

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EXPERT ADVICE

February: National Pet Dental Health Month Alyssa Hughes, DVM

Rocky, a two-year-old Labrador Retriever, was brought to his veterinarian due to his bad breath. Three months earlier, Rocky’s owner was skipping stones on a pond, and Rocky tried to catch one of the stones in his mouth. His veterinarian found that Rocky had a fractured tooth and a tooth root abscess. Under anesthesia, the veterinarian surgically extracted the tooth. A few days after surgery, Rocky’s owner noticed that his bad breath was gone, and he had a renewed interest in his rawhide chews. Rocky is just one of many pets who suffer from dental disease, often without their owners suspecting a thing!

Bad breath, while unpleasant when snuggling up with your favorite canine or feline, is not the most worrisome consequence of untreated dental disease. Periodontitis can cause pain, tooth loss, and bone loss within the mouth and even the nasal cavity. It can even lead to release of bacteria into the blood stream, which can infect the kidneys, liver, and heart. So how can you make sure your pet has a healthy mouth? Be aware of the signs of dental disease, do what you can at home to prevent dental disease, and seek regular veterinary dental care.

Here are some signs that your pet may have a dental problem: • Bad breath • Chewing only on one side of the mouth or difficulty chewing • Broken or discolored teeth • Excessive drooling • Pawing at or rubbing the muzzle/mouth • Loss of interest in favorite chew toys What can you do at home to help prevent dental disease?

Pets In The City Magazine

• Check your pet’s mouth once a month for bad breath, red gums, or tartar. • Brush your pet’s teeth once daily (any less doesn’t provide much of a benefit) using pet toothpaste. Never use human toothpaste, as fluoride can be toxic. • Feed your pet a prescription dental diet (most of these products feature a very large kibble that must be bitten Eighty-five percent of dogs and cats over four years old have some form of and chewed). It is a common misconception that feeding dental disease. If you’ve ever had a toothache, you know how painful it can dry kibble will prevent dental disease. However, many be and how it can affect your overall well-being. However, our pets can’t tell dogs and cats swallow their kibble whole, without even us when their mouths are bothering them, so regular veterinary dental care chewing it. Moreover, simply eating crunchy food isn’t a is vital to their health. Dental disease is progressive, and early dental disease such as inflammation of the gums (gingivitis), if untreated, will eventually substitute for tooth brushing and professional dental progress to periodontitis or destruction of the other tooth structures care. and surrounding bone. The good news is that gingivitis is reversible with • Use appropriate dental chew products (products should be treatment. However, periodontitis and bone loss is not. soft enough that you can indent them with your fingernail), such as treated rawhide chew strips and There are many reasons that dogs and cats develop dental disease. These Greenies. With any chew product, supervise your pet include genetics, tooth crowding (more common in small breed dogs and at all times during use to avoid your pet from biting off short-nosed breeds, like Bulldogs and Persian cats), and tooth fractures from and swallowing large chunks that could cause intestinal chewing rocks or bones. While some pets are more prone to dental disease obstruction. than others, most every pet will eventually develop dental disease, if not • There are many dental products on the market. Some are given regular dental care. A mere two days after a tooth brushing, bacteria effective, and others are not. Look for the Veterinary Oral and other substances deposited on the teeth will form a sticky film called Health Council seal or ask your veterinarian for advice. plaque which – if not removed – will harden to tartar and eventually cause gingivitis and set the stage for further disease.

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January 2014

Most importantly, have your pet’s dental health evaluated by your veterinarian at least once a year. February is National Pet Dental Health Month, and it’s a great time to remember the importance of your pet’s dental health. Ask your veterinarian what special information or promotions may be available. Your pet will be glad you did!

Before

After

Dr. Alyssa Hughes is a 2008 graduate of Cornell University and just recently moved here from Vermont. She is an Associate Veterinarian at University Veterinary Hospital & Diagnostic Center.


Pets In The City Magazine

January 2014

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BEAGLE: THE MERRY, MELODIOUS HOUND Chanté McCoy

The modern, more recognizable Beagle was established around the 1830s. English hunters bred Beagles to scent track rabbits, hare, pheasants, and other small animals, an activity that became known as “beagling.” Beagle packs, often consisting of up to 40 dogs, would run closely together. The hunters followed the Beagles’ white tipped “flags” (tail tips) waving through the underbrush, and their distinctive baying bark reverberated throughout the forest.

One of America’s all-time favorite breeds, Beagles have consistently ranked in the top-ten most popular dogs (out of 155 breeds) for over 30 years. The reasons are many. Its size (generally under 15” at the withers and under 30 pounds), hardiness, gentle disposition, and highly sociable nature make it an ideal family dog, good with children as well as other dogs. Its nose also ensures its continued popularity as a hunting and working dog. This hound has one of the best developed senses of smell of any dog. The Beagle is routinely recruited for detecting drugs, explosives, people during search and rescues, and even termites. The “Beagle” dates back to the Middle Ages. Edward II, Henry VII, and Elizabeth I had some variation of this breed, possibly named after the French begueule (meaning “open throat”) in reference to their musical baying, or the French beigh, Old English begele, or Celtic beag, all meaning “small.”

Breeding standards for today’s classic Beagle were established in the 1880s. The tricolor markings (white with large black areas and light brown patches) are the most recognizable, but two-color varieties are common. Two-colors have a white base, with either tan, lemon (light tan), red, or liver markings. Ticking or mottling also occurs, such as with bluetick Beagles. Beagles have broad heads and square-cut muzzles topped with black gumdrop noses. Their hazel or brown eyes are large, and their ears are long and soft with rounded tips. They have broad chests

that taper to a narrow abdomen. Their short tails are slightly curved and tipped in white. Their short-haired coats are easy to care for, requiring only a weekly brushing to maintain their sleek appearance and reduce shedding. Beagles typically live 12 to 15 years. As with all breeds, they are prone to certain health issues. Beagles are susceptible to epilepsy, spinal disc diseases, heart disease, mast cell tumors, and eye conditions, including glaucoma, corneal dystrophy, “cherry eye,” and retinal atrophy. With their floppy ears, moisture tends to get trapped and lead to ear infections too. These singing hounds are playful, with moderate exercise needs. They’re too friendly to be guard dogs, but curious and noisy enough to be great watch dogs. They are intelligent and easy to train, except for an independent tendency to run off if a scent beckons. If you can forgive their obsession with smells and periodic baying, you can’t go wrong with a Beagle for a great family dog.

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January 2014

Pets In The City Magazine

Animals Make Our Lives Lovely

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Chris Dickinson Photography

Our companion animals provide us with unconditional love. They make us happy when we are down. Animals clown around and make us laugh. (Youtube video proof of this)

Dogs protect our homes. Cats keep us warm. Dogs give happy tail wags and licks. Kitties purr and lick. Dogs and cats hug us around our necks. Birds get visibly excited as they chirp and sing. They all snuggle up next to us as we relax from a long day.


Madame Tabu’s

PET HOROSCOPE February 2014

Aquarius (Jan 20 – Feb 18) If you’re worried about the romantic pressure of a date, use your sociable nature to set up a group date for a casual Valentine’s Day.

Pisces (Feb 19 – Mar 20) Use your pawsitively fantastic matchmaking skills to help your pack mates find love this month.

Aries (March 21 – April 19) Don’t let your fiery impatience get in the way of romance this month. As a popular human song says, “you can’t hurry love.”

Taurus (Apr 20 – May 20) Share a good meal with your romantic partner on Valentine’s Day—a plate of spaghetti á la “Lady and the Tramp” will work!

Gemini (May 21 – Jun 21) Turn your inquisitive nature towards your sweetheart this month to get to know even more about his or her likes/dislikes.

Cancer (Jun 22 – July 22) Your loyalty in love is one of your best traits—consider renewing your commitment to your mate for a romantic Valentine’s Day.

Leo (July 23 – Aug 22)

Virgo (Aug 23 – Sept 22) Finding love isn’t always an organized affair—let down your fur this month to help you find a mate.

Libra (Sept 23 - Oct 22) You can get tongue-tied when Mercury turns retrograde on February 6—remember to think before you bark.

Scorpio (Oct 23 – Nov 21) If you and your Valentine have a spat, remember the making up is the fun part of fighting!

Pets In The City Magazine

Enjoy the Full Moon energy on Valentine’s Day to share your passion with your romantic partner.

Sagittarius (Nov 22 – Dec 21)

Capricorn (Dec 22 – Jan 19) In search of a Valentine this month? Use that dry sense of humor to charm interested mates.

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Madam Tabu’s horoscopes are translated through the human pet psychic Jennafer Martin, www.PetInsightsbyJennafer.com.

January 2014

If your search for a Valentine doesn’t happen as quickly as you’d like, don’t get impatient. Keep your optimistic outlook & keep trying!


SINGLE and seeking love mia

Age: 6 years old Breed: Nebelung (Long Hair Gray Kitty) Likes: Being around people who will scratch me behind her ears. Dislikes: Would prefer to be the only child or have enough space to observe other pets from a comfortable distance. About Me: I am a sweet and loving cat, whose only goal in life is to test out the comfort of everyone’s lap. I would make an excellent companion as I am very easy going and even easier to please. Do you have a window that I can look out? Then I am happy! If you are interested in learning more about me, please call Best Friends Pet Adoption Center at 801-574-2440.

walt

Pets In The City Magazine

Age: 1 year old Breed: Black Labrador mix Likes: Carrying things in my mouth and being with people and other dogs. Dislikes: The weight scale, no really it is really scary. I weigh 48 pounds. Plus I am afraid of the cats here. About Me: I am a young neutered male that is very willing to please. I have a medium to high energy level. I know how to sit and lay down, and I want to learn more. I am sweet and love people and food. Please contact Second Chance for Homeless Pets for more information 801-590-8999.

SIMON

Age: 2 years old Breed: Black & white domestic medium hair Likes: Warm sun and people’s laps Dislikes: Chaos About Me: I am a handsome black & white male cat. I am almost blind, but I can find my food and my litter. I can even jump up and down from high places. I am neutered and fully vaccinated. I am a perfect for a calm family with no more than 1 other pet. Call Ginny at 435-640-4752.

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January 2014

misty

Age: 5 years old Breed: Blue Heeler/Border Collie mix Likes: People and food Dislikes: Sharing my toys or treats with other dogs. About Me: I am a sweet girl that has a medium energy level. I am a spayed female that weighs 38 pounds. I really like being with people. Please contact Second Chance for Homeless Pets for more information 801-590-8999.

jesse

Age: 1 year old Breed: Border Collie mix Likes: Playing ball, running, playing fetch, running, and did we mention playing and running? Dislikes: Not having enough exercise and toys or friends to play with About Me: I am a friendly girl who loves everyone I meet. Come see me at Furburbia or call 435-649-5441 for more information.

GRETA

(Photo by dornbuschphotography.com) Age: 3 years young Breed: Declawed female domestic short hair Tabby Likes: People Dislikes: Other cats and dogs About Me: I am a lovely gray and white declawed female tabby. I have the cutest brown around my nose. My eyes are hypnotic and will hypnotize you into adopting me. I have a friendly and outgoing personality. I am spayed and declawed, so I make the perfect companion for cold winter nights. Call Ginny at 435-640-4752.

KENYA

(Photo by dornbuschphotography.com) Age: 2-3 years old Breed: Shepherd mix Likes: People Dislikes: Some men About Me: I am perfect for you. I have lovely brown eyes and a gorgeous coat with shades of brown. I am sweet and very friendly. I am afraid of some men and will try to hide because I have not always been treated nice by men. I am great with other dogs as long as they are not aggressive. I am spayed and current on vaccinations. Call Ginny at 435-640-4752.

Ziggy

Age: 3 years old Breed: Domestic Short Hair Likes: Lounging, sunbathing, and cat lovers Dislikes: Cloudy days and dog lovers About Me: I am very laid back and would be a very cool addition to any family. I’m easy going and loving. Come see me at Furburbia or call 435-6495441 for more information.


Are you looking for the perfect companion? If so, we have just the match for you! These animals are single and looking for a loving forever future in your home. They can offer you companionship, laughter, and a lifetime of love.

naya

Age: 5 years old Breed: Dilute, Domestic Short Hair Likes: Warm places and other cats Dislikes: Cold days, beds with no fluff About Me: I am gentle and sweet and like other cats, so I can easily fit right in to your group! I’d love to curl up in your house. Come see me at Furburbia or call 435-649-5441 for more information.

benji

Age: 10 years old Breed: Jack Russel Terrier mix Likes: EVERYTHING- he loves cats and dogs and has been around children! Dislikes: Haven’t seen any yet About Me: I am the perfect family dog and a package deal to whoever gets to take me home. I am already housebroken and know all my basic commands. I am calm and mellow in a home and very content snoozing next to your feet until it is time to go outside and play; then you will find that I am a ball of energy and fun! I am a really sweet boy and promise you won’t be disappointed if you take me home! If you are interested in meeting me, contact Best Friends Pet Adoption Center at 801-574-2440.

Age: Adult Breed: Domestic Long Hair Likes: Being around other cats Dislikes: Posing for cameras About Me: I like to play and explore. I’m curious and always want to know what’s going on. I’ve been waiting for a new family for months. Please make me the next addition to your home. Call the North Utah Valley Animal Shelter today at 801-785-3442.

Age: 3 months old Breed: Domestic Short Hair Likes: People, food, laps, toys, my sister’s tail Dislikes: Dogs and having my nails trimmed About Me: My sister and I were found in a managed feral colony with very severe eye infections. We were placed in a foster home and given oral antibiotics and eye drops. Our eyes cleared up and now we are sweet, loving, playful little babies. Please contact Loa Collins at Black Dog Walk for more information 801-710-4984.

roscoe

Age: Adult Breed: Black and Tan Coonhound Likes: Following my nose wherever it takes me Dislikes: Being bored About Me: I am a handsome fella that just wants a home of my own where I can be doted on with lots of walks, games, and, of course, love and attention. If you are interested in adopting me, please contact the Best Friends - Utah Pet Adoption Center at 801-574-2440.

SPUNKY

Age: 3 years old Breed: Black and White Domestic Short Hair Likes: Interacting with other cats, and affection from people Dislikes: Unknown About Me: I truly live up to my name and have lots of energy and fun-loving enthusiasm for life. I love to run around and see what everyone is doing and to see exactly what I can do to help. I am one great, outgoing cat! If you are interested in adopting me, please contact the Best Friends - Utah Pet Adoption Center at 801-574-2440.

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Age: Around 3 years old Breed: Labrador Retriever mix Likes: Going for runs Dislikes: Being a couch potato About Me: I’m very energetic and I love to play! I know “sit”and “shake” and love learning new tricks. If you’re looking for an exciting new family member, give the North Utah Valley Animal Shelter a call at 801-785-3442.

LUNA

January 2014

PHINEAS

Age: 6-10 years old Breed: Setter mix Likes: Being around others Dislikes: What’s not to love?! About Me: I’m pretty easy going. I can be playful but relax and snuggle too. I like kids! I am very gentle and would be compatible with most households. Come adopt me today at the North Utah Valley Animal Shelter! 801-785-3442

Pets In The City Magazine

GABRIEL

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The Advantages of a

“NO KILL”Shelter

To the best of our knowledge, only THREE shelters in Utah are now No Kill: Salt Lake County Animal Services, South Salt Lake Animal Services and Heber City Shelter.

Mona Mistric

Let’s define the word “shelter” (noun) 1. A dwelling place or home considered as a refuge from the elements: basic needs are food, clothing, and shelter. 2. A building serving as a temporary refuge or residence for homeless persons, abandoned animals, etc.

Let’s ask ourselves: How can a place of shelter or “refuge” also be a place where you go to be killed? According to the No Kill Advocacy Center, approximately 4 million cats and dogs are euthanized in animal shelters every year. The people who work at these shelters are horrified by the ugly reality they face day in and day out of having to kill the animals they were trying to save.

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When I think of an animal shelter, my mind pictures a clean, pleasant environment with staff and volunteers petting, hugging, and grooming cats and dogs, while providing them with nutritional food, fresh water, soft blankets, regular exercise, and veterinary care. Their primary role is saving the animals from abuse or death and locating new homes.

As responsible caretakers, they would scan the animals for a microchip and post pictures of lost and found animals on public forums, giving their human companions a place to look for lost loved ones and time to find them. They would implement a spay/neuter program in-house or through their relationships with private foundations to reduce the number of animals entering the shelter. They would encourage and educate guardians on the animals’ basic needs and how to work through behavioral issues, which would also reduce the number of animals being brought to the shelter. They would collaborate with other nonprofit organizations (big and small) willing to save more lives by providing assistance with rescue, foster care, social skills, and the adoption process. In other words, I envision a modern, progressive animal shelter that works efficiently to ensure the safety and well-being of the animals.

Continued on page 22...


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COATS FOR FUNCTION AND STYLE Chanté McCoy If you’re like me, you can never have enough coats. I’m no clothes horse, but one needs a variety to cover most occasions. Evidently, this seems true for dogs. Diva and Dash could have so many coats as to require their own closet.

STYLING COATS If looking to clothe your canine fashionista, coats of lightweight fabrics and sweaters run the gamut of cute. You can dress your pet to accessorize your look, to match a collar, or to reflect the season. Styling coats and sweaters meet a variety of tastes and budgets. How about a tartan plaid vest, a faux leopard trim coat, or a “Born to Ride” leather jacket (www.baxterboo.com)? Or, consider the Alpaca Poncho (www.inthecompanyofdogs.com): hand knitted and “detailed by artisans in Peruvian mountain villages using ancestral techniques of spinning and dyeing.”

Pets In The City Magazine

Since styling coats are designed to declare one’s fashion sense, they are meant primarily for indoors or moderate weather. These coats and sweaters pull on and stay on, often for days, until needing a wash or a new look.

WET AND COLD WEATHER COATS When talking about walking, especially in inclement weather, coats become more a necessity than a fashion statement, especially for our shorthaired canine companions. For cool weather, fleece is all that is needed. Coats with Velcro wraps or pullovers with elasticized waists to keep in warmth are cozy.

January 2014

For wet or windy weather, seek out waterproof lightweight nylon that is breathable. Fleece linings add extra warmth.

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Quilted and “blanket” coats are also a possibility, creating air pockets to trap your dog’s body heat. I even found a blanket coat at BaxterBoo with removable leg pieces to convert it into a snowsuit.

For easy fitting, Velcro closures around the neck and waist are the quickest for an adjustable, comfy fit. If well designed, a coat should accommodate a leash, either through an opening or via its own metal ring. Extra features might be a removable liner, reflective piping for extra visibility, handy zip pocket for keys and waste bags, or reversible sides for two looks.

COOLING COATS Yep, there’s such a thing as a coat for hot weather. Ruffwear (www.ruffwear.com) offers one called the Swamp Cooler. You soak the coat in cold water, and – via evaporative cooling – the coat exchanges body heat with the water’s chill. For our scorching Utah summers, this certainly seems a good idea.

PRESSURE COATS Some coats are designed to quell anxiety. The Rein Coat (www.thereincoat.com) and Thundershirt and Thundercoat (www. thundershirt.com) are snug fitting coats designed to apply constant, gentle pressure to calm dogs during storms, travel, and fireworks, or for separation anxiety. The Rein Coat also incorporates a harness to replicate the nurturing pick-up of a puppy by its mother. According to manufacturers, The Rein Coat “is designed to lightly touch your pet at the nape of the neck—just like a mommy dog or cat— triggering the production of oxytocin to be released by the brain, which then reduces the fear and anxiety in your pet.” (The coats are indeed available for cats too.)

manufacturers that specialize in breed-specific coats. For example, Foggy Mountain Dog Coats (www.dogcoat.com) provides a variety of functional and styling coats for deep-barreled, thin-waisted dogs and their short-legged, longbodied comrades.

SIZING Sizes vary by manufacturer, so get out the measuring tape. For back length (example: 23” – 25”), measure from the base of the neck to the base of the tail. For girth, measure your dog’s chest behind the front legs at the widest part. If the measurements are at the upper end of the sizing range, it is safest to go up to the next size. Hopefully, the measurement guide includes a weight range too for extra guidance. If possible, take your dog to pet stores and outdoor recreation outfitters and try on coats before investing. If ordering online, read the ratings and comments. Often, other buyers’ observations will help you decide if this coat will meet your requirements, or how to determine your dog’s size. With measurements in hand and some assurance of quality from previous buyers’ feedback, you can buy with confidence (but double-check their return policy!). And don’t forget to set aside closet space to accommodate your dog’s wardrobe.

How to measure your dog

BREED-SPECIFIC COATS For dogs with unique body shapes, such as Dachshunds and Whippets, you can find

Length

Neck

Chest


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The Advantages of a “NO KILL” Shelter By Mona Mistric Continued... Many people are under the impression that a “No Kill” shelter will cost too much. Let’s see if that’s true.

1. There will be more volunteers. They want to save animal life, not take

care of an animal and then find out it will be killed. Some volunteers would be willing to implement the educational programs too.

2. Veterinarians will be more inclined to offer reduced prices and/or donate services when they feel the shelters are like them--saving animal life.

3. Forming public-private partnerships to provide animals with the

best possible care saves taxpayer money, that not only reduces expenses associated with caring for an animal, but transfers expenses from taxpayers to private philanthropy.

4. Nonprofit organizations that specialize in adoptions desire to see every

animal in a happy home. Shelters can charge the cost of an adoption to those groups, thereby bringing in needed revenues and defraying administration costs.

5. Collaboration between large and small non-profits will help them fulfill their lifesaving mission; therefore, they will be eager to spread awareness about their cause and raise more funds.

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6. Through collaboration and partnerships, the amount of time an animal

spends at the shelter will be reduced, freeing up space to save more animals.

7. The shelter funds can now be used to preserve animals’ lives, allowing

staff that was busy killing animals and disposing of the bodies to spend more time taking care of animals. Let’s join together to make our animal shelters a place of “refuge” where basic needs are met and no animal goes there to die. If you are interested in promoting a “No Kill” shelter through the legislative process, visit www.nokilladvocacycenter.org, which will provide you with ongoing guidance and assistance.


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Flying Free: Make Your Home Bird-Safe RonaLeigh Wheelwright Birds love to fly and explore! If you want to allow your feathered friends to fly around in your home, take a few precautions ahead of time to make sure your environment is safe for them.

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Close doors and windows. Keep your bird safe by keeping them inside your home. If domesticated birds fly out of open doors and windows, they can be difficult, if not impossible, to retrieve. So, before you open the door to your bird’s cage, make sure the doors and windows to the outside of your home are closed.

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Power off. Birds are unaware of what damage appliances in your home can do to them if they land on or fly into them unsuspectingly. Turn off ceiling fans to avoid a fatal crash, and turn off appliances such as stove burners, space heaters, griddles, or ovens to avoid burns.

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Cover up. Cover up things around the house that your feathered friend could crash into or land on/in that could cause injury. Close toilet covers, remove mop buckets, or close off access to a room with an uncovered aquarium to keep your bird from falling in and possibly drowning. Leave curtains or blinds closed on windows, so your pet doesn’t accidentally collide with them.

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Secure landing surfaces. Be mindful that birds can land on surfaces that were not designed to support the force of their landings, like curtains, fragile plants, collectibles, vases, and your favorite artwork. Take a look around your home: if there are less stable items that may not fare well during your bird’s flight or landing, you may want to secure them until you find out how adept your bird is at landing.

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Avoid toxin exposure. Move or close off access to plants that may be harmful to birds (for a comprehensive list of toxic plants, visit RoniesLoveOfBirds.com). And don’t allow birds into rooms where there have been hardwood floor treatments or carpets/furniture coated with treatments that are toxic to birds (the most common being aerosolized Teflon [PTFE] products, such as Scotchguard). To find out more about household cleaners that could be toxic to birds, read my article in the November 2013 issue of Pets in the City Magazine. Taking the time to prepare your environment will allow your pet bird to explore safely. To keep your home clean during your bird’s free flights, be sure to train your bird ahead of time to make droppings only on her cage. For training and other tips, visit Ronie’s For the Love of Birds store in Sandy.


n o s t e t S

Q. I AM ADOPTING A NEW DOG FROM A LOCAL ANIMAL SHELTER AND AM WONDERING HOW TO INTRODUCE HER TO OUR TWO EXISTING DOGS? – GREG A. Proper introduction is very important when introducing a new pet

to existing pets. First impressions can be lasting. One of the reasons why animals are returned to shelters or animal rescue groups is because of faulty first introductions. It is important to remember that change is not easy on humans or animals. There is no reason to rush any introductions. Take your time to make a positive first impression. GET TO KNOW YOU. Spend at least 30 to 60 minutes with your new dog before taking it home. This will help the dog feel comfortable with you and will help the dog bond with you. During this time, ask the dog to do simple obedience commands such as sit and down. Get to know which type of treats or toys the dog prefers. EXERCISE. Keep in mind that a lot of dogs that are rescued have been kept in dog runs or other cages for different lengths of time. Your new dog may have some excess energy to burn off. Take your dog for a walk around your neighborhood for at least 30 minutes before introducing her to your resident dogs.

Tonya Landon

GROUND RULES. All dogs need rules and boundaries to be happy. House rules start and are enforced as soon as the new dog walks in the door. PICK UP. Before introducing the new dog to your resident dogs, pick up all chewies, toys, and food. You can introduce them slowly after the dogs have calmed down and you know that none of the dogs will guard them or become too protective. INTRODUCTION. Introducing your new dog to your resident dogs should be done on neutral territory. Introducing your new dog to your resident dogs in your home can cause your resident dogs to be territorial or defensive towards the newcomer. Neutral territory is a place which none of the dogs can claim as territory, such as across the street or at a park. You don’t want to overwhelm the new dog, so introduce only one dog at a time. Once the dogs have said a short hello to each other, take a walk around the neighborhood with all the dogs for at least 10 minutes to burn off steam before taking them home.

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S AY I N G

GOODBYE

Over the Rainbow Bridge

My son, Garrett, his fiancé, Kelsey, my unborn grandson, Sage, and five dogs were traveling to the Animal Care Center in Bountiful, Utah on January 19, 2013. During their journey, they hit black ice and went over a bridge, which tragically took all of their lives. During the past year, my family and I did many things in their memory. One of the many things we did included donating a tree at the Festival of Trees, which my daughter, Cassie, wanted to do. Therefore, we collected donations and voted on a name for the tree. Garrett and Kel were avid animal lovers, so my family and I agreed that the name of

the tree should be “Over The Rainbow Bridge”. The Legend of the Rainbow Bridge is a story by William N. Britton. The story tells of a place where our beloved furry friends go after they passed away, and, after their owners pass on, everyone is reunited again under the Rainbow Bridge. I received this book from a friend at the time of my family’s passing, including a message saying that the book was placed under their Christmas tree in memory of my loved ones. Our tree was based on this tale. Our festival tree was decorated in rainbow colors with dogs all over it, as well as a few other animals. It had eight beautiful angel wings on it, which represented Garrett, Kel, Sage, Rambo, Rogue, Odin, Lyla, and Akayah, our angels. Many ornaments were hand made with love by my daughter, Kelly, including the skirt, which was decorated with a rainbow and a silhouette of the kids and their dogs. In addition, there were dogs on a train that went around the tree, and the track was done in rainbow colors, too.

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The tree was auctioned at the festival for $1,225.00, and the proceeds went to Primary Children’s Hospital in Garrett, Kel, Sage, and the dogs’ names. The buyer of the tree, Northrup Grumman, offered the tree to its six hundred employees at the end of the holiday during a raffle event. The tree was won by one of the supervisors, who donated it back to me. I placed it in the memorial room of my home in memory of the kids and the dogs. I like to believe that Garrett, Kel, and Sage were sent to the Rainbow Bridge to take care of all the animals that go there. I imagine them lovingly greeting and caring for each animal until they meet with their earthly caregivers once again. This tribute was written by Tonya Monard in loving memory of Garrett Boweter-Barker, Kelsey Halterman, Sage Cannon Boweter, and their five dogs: Rogue, Odin, Rambo, Akayah, and Lyla. One year ago, their lives were tragically taken. They now play over the Rainbow Bridge.


Lollie

A Little Bird with a Big Spirit

In 2012, I responded to a notice on Facebook about a 10-year-old Bourke’s parakeet needing a home. When I picked up this spunky bird, who had no name at the time, I noticed some of her talons were missing, her beak was overgrown, and her feathers were a dull pink. A trip to the vet revealed she was dehydrated and had two different kind of infections. We spent her first 8 weeks in my home trying to get her well with meds, probiotics and love, and soon her feathers had a bright sheen and her energy returned. I wanted to give her a name that reflected her sweet disposition and had a tie-in to Australia, where her breed is common. So when a friend suggested “Lollie”—Australian slang for “sweet”— and Lollie she became. Lollie spent the last two years of her life in my little flock until she passed from liver failure and old age in 2014. I miss her, but I’m so glad I had the chance to get to know and love this sweet, feisty little survivor! - Jennafer Martin

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y l m Fa i Fu n BOOK REVIEWS! How Dogs Love Us: A Neuroscientist and His Adopted Dog Decode the Canine Brain, by Gregory Berns Dog Songs, by Mary Oliver

Pets In The City Magazine

Ever wondered what your dog is really thinking? So did neuroscientist Berns after his family adopted a shy, skinny terrier mix. Attacking the question in true scientific form, he decided to use an MRI machine to help him find the answers. Bern’s research offers surprising results on how dogs empathize with us, love us, and share one of the most remarkable bonds in the animal kingdom.

Ring Out The Old, Ring In The New!

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John Dilley!

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T 12

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H O R 16 S E

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L A O D 11 A U L D L A N G S Y U

C H I N E S E

I A 13 14 L U N I S O L A R N N T I U M M A P R I N G L

E R O M A N T I 10 M A R C H 2 5 N E 7

J A N U A R Y

This gorgeous book, from the author of the New York Times bestselling Unlikely Friendships, is filled with gorgeous, breathtaking photographs of love between different animal species. The 43 true stories cover “parental” love, playful love, and friendship love. Whether between a Dalmatian and baby goat or a fox and a hound, these stories are beautifully told and photographed with insight and compassion.

January Caption Contest Winner:

W I N T 2 E F 3 J A N U A R I U S T 4 H O G M A N A Y

January Crossword Answers

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Since February is the month of love, and poetry the language of love, what better way to enjoy both with a collection of poetry celebrating the dog-human bond. Mary Oliver is one of the most beloved poets alive today and an observer of extraordinary vision. Her collection of poems about the dogs in her life will surely make a wonderful Valentine gift for any dog or poetry lover.

Unlikely Loves, by Jennifer Holland


y l m Fa i Fu n Can you match the attributes to the Chinese Zodiac animal?

1 2

Self-assured, thoughtful responses, love deeply, and share strength with loved ones. Elegant, wise, gentle, shy, and compassionate. Honest, full of energy, stubborn, loyal, strong, protective, and lucky. Early riser, proud, alert, deep thinker, and good speaker. 5 Brave, powerful, loyal, intelligent, competent, and stubborn. Popular, cheerful, quick witted, and shy. Lucky, happy, independent, affectionate, bright, ambitious, and trustworthy. Wise, focused, and trusting of their own judgment. Loyal, intelligent, eager to please. Quick, funny, nosey, clever, witty, and successful. Cheerful, kind, and generous with loved ones. Intelligent, sincere, brave, popular, and kind.

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4

6 7

8

9 10

In the Chinese zodiac, based on a 12-year mathematical cycle, every year is associated with an animal. Each animal is further identified by one of the five elements: Earth, Metal, Fire, Water, and Wood: Dog Dog

Dragon Dragon

Horse Horse

Monkey Monkey

Dog Dog

Pig Pig

Rabbit Rabbit

Rat Rat

Rooster Rooster

Snake Snake

Dragon Dragon

Ram Ram

Ox Ox

Pig Pig

Water Rooster Rooster

Water

Wood

Horse Horse

Horse Horse

Monkey Monkey

Rabbit Rabbit

Ram Ram

Monkey Monkey

Ox Ox

Tiger Tiger

WoodRat Rat

Dragon Dragon

Pig Pig

Rabbit Rabbit Dog Dog

Ram Ram Dragon Dragon

Horse Horse

Monkey Monkey

Rat Rat

Rooster Rooster

Snake Snake

Tiger Tiger

Rabbit Rabbit

Ram Ram

Ox Ox

Snake Snake

Tiger Tiger Pig Pig

Water

Wood

Earth Earth Fire Water

Wood Fire

Dog Dog

Metal

Dog Dog

Dragon Dragon

Horse Horse

Earth

Earth

Metal

Dragon Dragon

Horse Horse

Rat Rooster Rat Monkey Monkey Rooster

Snake Snake

Tiger Tiger

Earth

Wood

Ox Ox

Pig Dog Dog Pig

Fire

Water

Wood Metal Water

Ox Ox Earth

Rabbit Ram Rabbit Horse Dragon Dragon Horse Ram Earth

Rat Rat Dog Dog

Dragon Dragon

Pig Pig

Earth

Fire

Rat Rat

Rooster Rooster

Rabbit Rabbit

Rooster Rooster

Dog Dog Monkey Monkey

Rat Rat

Pig Pig

Snake Snake Dragon Dragon

Ram Ram

Fire

Fire

Rooster Rooster

Dog DogSnake Snake

Metal

Dragon Dragon Tiger Tiger

Horse Horse

Wood

Monkey Monkey

Tiger Tiger Rabbit Ram Rabbit Ram Horse Monkey Horse Monkey

Rooster Rooster

Snake Snake

Ox Ox Ram Ram

Pig Pig

Rat Rat Tiger Tiger

Rooster Rooster

Water

Pig Pig

Rabbit Rabbit

Rat Rat

Rooster Rooster

Snake Snake

Dog Dog

Dragon Dragon

Metal

Ram Ram

Tiger Tiger Rabbit Rabbit

Ram Ram

Dog Dog

Dragon Dragon Tiger Tiger

Water

Wood

Snake Snake

Tiger Tiger

Horse Horse

Monkey Monkey Ox Ox

Water

Wood

Earth

Fire

Ox Ox

How the Animals Were Assigned to the Zodiac Metal

Earth

Fire

Metal

Snake Snake

Rabbit Rabbit

Pig Pig

According to a folk tale, the Lord Buddha summoned all the animals to assign each of them a year in the 12-year cycle. Cat heard the news and told his friend, Rat. The two decided to go together. However, the next morning, Rat failed to wake Cat who, being fond of a good nap, slept through the event and did not get a year. This is why there is no Year of the Cat and why cats hate rats.

Rat, Monkey however, arrived early. Knowing he was small and nervous he’d be Monkey unable to compete with the larger animals, he begged Ox to let him ride on his head. Ox obliged. Rat was sneaky though, leaping off Ox’s head and running ahead of Ox. This is why the Year of the Rat is the Rabbit Ram Rabbit Ram first year in the cycle, and the Year of the Ox is second. Horse Horse

Earth

Metal

Ox Ox

Pig Pig Fire

Rooster Rooster

Snake Snake

Rat Rat

Ram Ram

Tiger Tiger

Rooster Rooster

Snake Snake

Tiger Tiger

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Rat Rat

Rabbit Rabbit Metal

January 2014

Water

Wood

Ox Ox

Horse Horse

Ox Ox

Metal

Rat Rat

Metal

Water

Earth

Monkey Monkey Fire

Fire

Pig Pig

Wood

Persons born a given year reputedly have the attributes and personality traits of that year’s associated animal, A person’s zodiac can be used for match-making, similar to how astrology is used in the West. For example, Rats and Dragons make good matches, like Aries and Libras make suitable companions.

Water Metal

Wood Fire

Monkey Monkey

Individual years are also linked with the elements. For example, someone born in 1987 would be a Fire Rabbit. 2014 will be the Year of the Wood Horse.

Pets In The City Magazine

Ox Ox

Dog Dog


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YOU

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KISSY E OU MR OCK

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Pets in the City Magazine February 2014 Issue