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Tolerate 3 At this point we start distance work, slowly decreasing if we are getting the proper signals. Each dog is released from any barrier and is on leash. Rotate who is out and who is in. One dog in the photo (see page 24, bottom left) looks to me for the next steps and trusts me. The Cairn is inching away but we are at a certain distance so I am just standing. If this happens, walk backwards, call the dog or use a positive interrupter, reward and then reset. The photo (top right) depicts an example of a female Havanese and a female Cairn terrier, where we have taken a step forward. This, however, is not okay with the dogs at this point, so we remove the social pressure, toss a handful of rewards to the Havanese, and the exercise ends. Always end on success. Let the

A neutral dog has been added as a go-between to remove social pressure and bring a sense of calm to the process

We have taken a step forward but this is not okay with the dogs at this point, so we remove the social pressure and end the exercise

Photo: Diane Garrod

Stage Four: Be Prepared - Checklist,Tools of Tolerance • Use of barriers and markers. • Use of distance. • Use of duration. • Watching for positive changes in emotional responses (CERs) to each other. • Proofing progress. • Going from barriers to leash, to long line. • Practicing approaches, walk aways, walk-bys - all highly rewarding. • Work on manners, come aways, whistle recalls. • Off-leash work starts - decrease duration (whenever you add new contexts, decrease duration and increase distance). • Neutral dog addition (if one is available). Start on-leash work, and move to a long line when the dogs are ready. The goal is incremental duration of up to 10 minutes of peaceful compliance, then 20, 30 and 60 minutes. The dogs are still supervised together. This is a tolerate advanced stage. At this stage you may want to go back and forth between stages three and four depending on the dogs’ comfort levels and the context of where they are in your environment. Duration is key. Keep togetherness rewarding and successful. Use dramatic arm movements as a positive cue, move between the dogs, rewarding what they are doing right, and mark and reward that. Always end on a high note. Use the checklist of tolerance tools to develop a format where you work both dogs on leash, do static distance sits and downs, parallel walks at an acceptable distance, distance approach/retreat and slowly decrease distance, and slowly increase duration of exercises. Here, you can be creative.

Photo: Diane Garrod

decreasing signals. By now everything should be flowing smoothly and the dogs are willingly and eagerly giving distance decreasing signals whenever they see each other. They are tolerating each other. It is as simple as that at this stage. Go back and forth in the stages as needed. The goal is to move incrementally closer and start to, under supervision, provide closer proximity where the dogs are together successfully for one to five minutes.You are working toward 10 minutes of peaceful tolerance with supervision, but do not assume anything at this stage.

COVER STORY

dogs go to separate areas to relax and process the information they have received. These sessions last only about five minutes, followed by a processing period and then five minutes more. In addition, a series of impulse control skill work, working one dog at a time in the household, should begin. If you have a neutral dog, as in the photo of the two Cairn terriers (second from top), add him now as a go-between. This removes social pressure while the neutral dog teaches the other dogs and brings a sense of calm to the process. One stage four case I consulted on involved a 4-year-old pit bull mix who started habitually aggressing toward the 4-year-old herding mix in the household with unclear and globalizing triggers. It started with resource guarding but the guardian said it happened out of nowhere, with unidentifiable and unpredictable triggers. One injury that was caused by the pit bull mix to the herding mix required veterinary attention. In this case, muzzles were initially required on both dogs. In this case video example, Fence Between (Donaldson, 2014), the dogs are working through the fighting in stage four, and in this video, First few trials of our session today (Donaldson, 2014), we can see some nice progress with the same two dogs in stage four. There is an eagerness to see each other, and some good distance decreasing signals. Stage Five “Accept” = to agree or consent without adverse reaction or to live peacefully. BARKS from the Guild/May 2017

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BARKS from the Guild May 2017  

The bi-monthly trade publication from the Pet Professional Guild covering all things animal behavior and training, canine, feline, equine, p...

BARKS from the Guild May 2017  

The bi-monthly trade publication from the Pet Professional Guild covering all things animal behavior and training, canine, feline, equine, p...