Issuu on Google+


Page |1

All materials and information in this manual are owned and copyrighted by Austin Pets Alive d/b/a American Pets Alive, with the exception of "Reforming Animal Control In Your Community Through Effective Political Advocacy," which is owned by and included with permission of the No Kill Advocacy Center and author Ryan Clinton. Reproduction or distribution of any and all materials in this manual without the express written permission of Austin Pets Alive and/or American Pets Alive is strictly prohibited. None of the information contained herein is intended to be considered legal advice; prior to making any decisions regarding liability, consult the advice of an attorney. None of the information contained herein is intended to be considered medical advice; prior to making any decisions regarding medical care or treatment of animals, consult the advice of a veterinarian. Your acceptance and/or use of any material in this manual constitutes acceptance of these conditions of its use, and waives any and all liability you have now or might have against Austin Pets Alive d/b/a American Pets Alive in the future.


Page |2

Table of Contents How We Got No Kill Started in Austin Manual ....................................................................................... 19 Brief History of Animal Welfare in Austin ............................................................................................ 19 1997-2001: No Kill Millennium Era ............................................................................................... 19 2001-2006: Post No Kill Millennium .............................................................................................. 19 2006-2008: Beginning of No Kill Movement through FixAustin ....................................................... 19 2008-2011: Austin Pets Alive takes off ............................................................................................ 19 What Inspired Change ....................................................................................................................... 20 FixAustin.org Rallies the Community ............................................................................................... 21 What Were the Arguments Against No Kill in Austin? .......................................................................... 23 Key Information Needed to Start ........................................................................................................ 25 Key Decisions to be Made .................................................................................................................. 26 How is No Kill going to happen? .................................................................................................... 26 First Public Steps ................................................................................................................................ 27 Town Hall Meeting ......................................................................................................................... 27 Committees/Teams ........................................................................................................................ 27 Austin Pets Alive! Committee Participation Agreement ..................................................................... 28 2008 Starting Location Committee ..................................................................................................... 28 2008 Starting Public Relations Committee .......................................................................................... 29 2008 Starting Fundraising Committee ................................................................................................ 30 2008 Starting HR Committee ............................................................................................................. 32 2008 Starting Finance Committee: ..................................................................................................... 33 2008 Starting Legal Committee.......................................................................................................... 33 2008 Starting Marketing Committee .................................................................................................. 34 2008 Starting Branding Committee .................................................................................................... 36 2008 Starting Website Committee ...................................................................................................... 37 2008 Starting Operations Committee ................................................................................................. 38 2008 Starting Medical Committee: ..................................................................................................... 41 2008 Starting Rescue Committee ....................................................................................................... 41 2008 Starting Dog Adoption Committee ............................................................................................. 41 2008 Starting Dog Behavior Committee ............................................................................................. 43 2008 Starting Cat Adoption Committee .............................................................................................. 44 2008 Starting Cat Behavior Committee .............................................................................................. 45


Page |3 2008 Starting Positive Alternatives To Shelter Surrender (PASS) Committee .......................................... 46 2008 Starting Foster Coordination Committee .................................................................................... 46 2008 Starting Volunteer Coordination Committee .............................................................................. 47 First Letter out to Austinites using verticalresponse.com:...................................................................... 48 The Ultimate Implementation Plan ......................................................................................................... 50 Revise Mission of Animal Services ................................................................................................... 50 Always be Transparent ................................................................................................................... 50 Recommendations II- Restrict Unnecessary Euthanasia ........................................................................ 50 Killing While Cages Are Empty Moratorium ..................................................................................... 50 Institute Euthanasia Checklist.......................................................................................................... 50 Recommendations III- Increase Live Outcomes.................................................................................... 50 Increase Citizensâ€&#x; Accessibility to Shelter Pets .................................................................................. 50 Increase Returns to Owners ............................................................................................................ 50 Increase Adoptions ......................................................................................................................... 51 Increase Transfers to Rescue Groups and other Shelters ................................................................... 51 Recommendations IV- Increase Medical And Behavioral Care.............................................................. 51 Medically Treat Every Animal As If It Will Live .................................................................................. 51 Behavior Program .......................................................................................................................... 52 Recommendations V- Empower the Community .................................................................................. 52 Large Scale Volunteer Program at City Shelter ................................................................................. 52 Donation Programs ........................................................................................................................ 52 A Robust Foster Program ................................................................................................................ 52 Recommendations VI- Limit Intake ..................................................................................................... 52 Counseling at Intake to provide alternatives to shelter surrender (PASS- Positive Alternatives to Shelter Surrender) ..................................................................................................................................... 52 Provide Sterilization Services for Owned Cats and dogs ................................................................... 52 Community Hospital ....................................................................................................................... 52 Stray Cat Trap-Neuter-Return Program ........................................................................................... 52 Political Advocacy ................................................................................................................................. 53 Arm Yourself ..................................................................................................................................... 57 Prepare for Battle .............................................................................................................................. 60 Fight Smart ....................................................................................................................................... 62 Be Political ........................................................................................................................................ 65 Anticipate the Opposition .................................................................................................................. 66


Page |4 Become the Status Quo ..................................................................................................................... 69 Never Give Up .................................................................................................................................. 70 Additional Resources ......................................................................................................................... 71 Technology ........................................................................................................................................... 73 Google Apps ..................................................................................................................................... 73 Yahoo Groups ................................................................................................................................... 73 Online Database ............................................................................................................................... 73 Website ............................................................................................................................................. 73 Animal Management System .............................................................................................................. 73 Austin Pets Alive! Development Committee ............................................................................................ 74 Development committee teams .......................................................................................................... 74 How to set up an online giving account .............................................................................................. 74 How to fund raise for specific animals through a Chip-in .................................................................... 74 Donation request letter ...................................................................................................................... 76 Co-sponsorship agreement ................................................................................................................ 77 Sample event sponsorship request ..................................................................................................... 79 Event report form .............................................................................................................................. 80 Donor thank you letter/tax receipt ...................................................................................................... 81 Donor recognition plan ...................................................................................................................... 82 Commonly requested information for grants ....................................................................................... 83 Sample event flyers ........................................................................................................................... 86 Marketing & PR ..................................................................................................................................... 87 Department Structure ........................................................................................................................ 87 PR team: ........................................................................................................................................ 87 Branding team: .............................................................................................................................. 87 Campaigns team:........................................................................................................................... 87 Brand ................................................................................................................................................ 87 Dog and Cat Marketing ..................................................................................................................... 88 Messaging......................................................................................................................................... 88 PR ..................................................................................................................................................... 89 Facebook and Twitter ............................................................................................................................ 92 Facebook .......................................................................................................................................... 92 Twitter............................................................................................................................................... 93 Rescuing Dogs & Cats at Risk for Unnecessary Euthanasia Handbook ..................................................... 96


Page |5 No other option for a live outcome from the shelter ............................................................................ 96 Identifying “At Risk” dogs and cats: .................................................................................................... 96 First Steps ......................................................................................................................................... 97 Identifying your Resources and Capabilities ..................................................................................... 97 Working with the shelter where you will be saving lives ................................................................... 97 Forming your Rescue Team: We formed two teams, one for dogs, and one for cats .......................... 97 Aspects of a Successful Rescue Team .................................................................................................. 98 Obstacles We Encountered in the Beginning ....................................................................................... 99 Typical Day for the Rescue Team ........................................................................................................ 99 Dog Evaluations ............................................................................................................................. 99 Cat Evaluations ............................................................................................................................ 100 Adoptability Considerations .......................................................................................................... 100 Key Lines of Communication between Rescue & Shelter .................................................................... 101 Key Lines of Communication between the Rescue Team, public, volunteers for your group and volunteers and staff at the shelter ..................................................................................................................... 101 Ongoing Obstacles the Rescue Team Faces ...................................................................................... 101 Priorities of the Rescue team ............................................................................................................ 102 Sustainability ................................................................................................................................... 102 Sample Dog Rescue Procedures ....................................................................................................... 104 At Home – Checklist: .................................................................................................................... 105 APA @ TLAC Rescue Protocol & Explanation: ................................................................................. 105 Pleading Foster for a dog.............................................................................................................. 106 Medical Schedule Update: ............................................................................................................ 107 Sample Transport Email: ............................................................................................................... 107 Sample Cat Rescue Manager Manual ............................................................................................... 108 Cat Rescue Job Description: .......................................................................................................... 108 Team Members ............................................................................................................................ 109 Transportation Guidelines for cats ................................................................................................. 110 Sample Hold Sheet .......................................................................................................................... 111 Sample Dog Evaluator Daily Recap email: ........................................................................................ 111 Sample Cat Evaluator Daily Recap email: ......................................................................................... 113 Positive Alternative to Shelter Surrender (P.A.S.S.) Program .................................................................. 115 General Description......................................................................................................................... 115 Austin Pets Alive!‟s P.A.S.S in-shelter numbers over the last year ....................................................... 115


Page |6 Critical Steps to putting a PASS program in place .............................................................................. 116 Good Working Relationship With Shelter Staff & Volunteers: .......................................................... 116 Hotline and Email Program: .......................................................................................................... 116 Volunteers to man the hotline and be at the shelter: ...................................................................... 117 Who are the key players in PASS and what their duties are ............................................................... 117 Hotline Volunteers........................................................................................................................ 117 Shelter Volunteers ........................................................................................................................ 117 Network & Resources.................................................................................................................... 117 Why you need volunteers with people skills (aka there are no happy calls and emails on PASS!!) ........ 117 Most successful aspects of the PASS program .................................................................................... 118 Re-homing pets through ads: ........................................................................................................ 118 Check out the rescues and sanctuaries you contact thoroughly!...................................................... 118 Beware Of The Crazy Facebook People! ........................................................................................ 118 Temporary Boarding For Emergencies: .......................................................................................... 118 Keeping Pets Out Of The Shelter By Offering Food And Medical Assistance: ................................... 118 Keeping Pets Out Of The Shelter By Offering Training Resources .................................................... 118 Obstacles to overcome .................................................................................................................... 118 People who want a quick fix.......................................................................................................... 118 No Resources For People In Emergency Situations ......................................................................... 119 Found Dogs and Cats ................................................................................................................... 119 Obstacles on the hotline and at the shelter ....................................................................................... 119 Feral cats are killing my birds, in my garden, terrorizing my house cats, etc. ................................... 119 I‟m moving (tomorrow) and can‟t take my dog/cat or I‟m moving and can‟t pay my pet deposit ....... 119 My cat is peeing on me (and my clothes, bed, floor, etc.) ............................................................... 120 My Toddlers pull my Chihuahua‟s ears and he‟s biting them! ......................................................... 120 Training the PASS volunteers ............................................................................................................ 120 Keeping good volunteers .............................................................................................................. 120 Canned responses for volunteers .................................................................................................. 120 Canned responses for dogs .......................................................................................................... 121 Ad sources ...................................................................................................................................... 121 PASS protocols ................................................................................................................................ 123 Emails & phone ............................................................................................................................ 123 Know your resources .................................................................................................................... 123 Re-homing someone‟s animal with ads and postings ..................................................................... 124


Page |7 Dog and cat returns and people re-homing animals ...................................................................... 124 What to do if you have to miss your shift ....................................................................................... 125 Volunteer Recruitment and Management: ............................................................................................ 126 Recruit ............................................................................................................................................ 126 Educate ........................................................................................................................................... 126 Inspire ............................................................................................................................................ 127 Ten Critical Steps to Getting your Volunteer Program off The Ground ................................................ 128 Decide what you need volunteers to do!........................................................................................ 128 Determine when and where you can hold an orientation. .............................................................. 128 Web-based Recruiting .................................................................................................................. 128 Volunteer Applications & Sign In ................................................................................................... 129 Orientation Discussion Points & Handout ...................................................................................... 133 Volunteer Choice Sheet ................................................................................................................ 139 Have them sign a release ............................................................................................................. 141 Set up a Database ........................................................................................................................ 143 Getting Your New Volunteers Involved .......................................................................................... 144 Develop a communication system for volunteers. ........................................................................... 144 FAQs: ............................................................................................................................................. 144 Who are the key players and what are their jobs within the program? ............................................ 144 What aspects of this program have been the most successful? How did they occur? ........................ 147 What were the obstacles to success that need to be surmounted and how did you do it? ................. 147 How did you decide priorities and what are they? .......................................................................... 147 Code of Conduct .......................................................................................................................... 152 Age Guidelines ............................................................................................................................ 153 The Adopt Line Team: Virtual Front Line of APA ................................................................................... 155 About the Adopt Line Team.............................................................................................................. 155 How adopt line was born .............................................................................................................. 155 Who emails or calls the adopt line? .............................................................................................. 155 Our Growth ................................................................................................................................. 156 Why this team is critical ................................................................................................................ 157 Adopt line team structure ............................................................................................................. 157 Building Your Team ...................................................................................................................... 157 Getting Started ................................................................................................................................ 158 Setting up the Gmail inbox ........................................................................................................... 158


Page |8 Gmail - Widespread use ............................................................................................................... 159 Gmail - Ease of use with companion products ............................................................................... 159 Gmail - Threading ........................................................................................................................ 160 Gmail - Canned responses ........................................................................................................... 161 Gmail – Signature ........................................................................................................................ 163 Setting up Google Voice ............................................................................................................... 165 Setting up Google Documents ...................................................................................................... 167 Ready to Answer Emails/Vmails ........................................................................................................ 169 Prepare Your Workstation - Computer with multi-tab browser ........................................................ 169 Adopt Line 4 Most Common Email Inquiries .................................................................................. 169 Answering the Top 4 Inquiries Step by Step ................................................................................... 170 Other Emails ................................................................................................................................ 178 Adopt Line Voice Mails ................................................................................................................. 179 Funny Stories: ................................................................................................................................. 179 Wrap Up – Benefits of a Strong Adopt Line Team .............................................................................. 179 General: ......................................................................................................................................... 181 Defending our fees....................................................................................................................... 181 Townlake Trail Dogs - Weekend 'take a dog for a jog' program ...................................................... 181 Trail Site directions: ...................................................................................................................... 181 Positive Feedback ......................................................................................................................... 181 Lost Pet ........................................................................................................................................ 182 How to get to APA HQ:................................................................................................................. 182 Wants to Adopt a Pet as a Gift ...................................................................................................... 182 Dogs ............................................................................................................................................... 183 Overview of the Dog Adoption Process .......................................................................................... 183 Dog Fee....................................................................................................................................... 183 Dog at one of our Adoption Sites .................................................................................................. 184 Adopter requesting a Dog be at a specific site the following day: ................................................... 184 Foster Dogs Email ........................................................................................................................ 184 Foster Dog Phone Call -(call into adopt – email to foster parent ): .................................................. 185 Dog has been Adopted ................................................................................................................. 185 Out-of-Town Adopters - Dogs ....................................................................................................... 185 Wanting to Adopt Two Pups at once (two adults is fine, multiple cats is great...this is only an issue with puppies)....................................................................................................................................... 185


Page |9 Overview of the Cat Adoption Process .............................................................................................. 186 Foster Cats Email (2 parts): ........................................................................................................... 186 Fost Cat Phone Call -(call into adopt line, email sent to foster): ...................................................... 186 Cat at Cattery .............................................................................................................................. 187 Cat has been Adopted .................................................................................................................. 187 Cat Fee ........................................................................................................................................ 187 Multiple Kitten Fee ....................................................................................................................... 187 Out-of-Town Adopters - Cats ........................................................................................................ 188 Info Request for FELV+ Cats ......................................................................................................... 188 FIV FAQs ..................................................................................................................................... 188 Medical Program ................................................................................................................................ 190 Organizational Chart ....................................................................................................................... 190 Standard Questions to Determine Health Status ............................................................................... 191 All animal guardians (foster, caretakers) should be asked: ............................................................. 191 If anything is abnormal, ask the following: .................................................................................... 191 Vaccine Protocol .............................................................................................................................. 191 Protocol for incoming animals from shelter (TLAC) ............................................................................ 191 Protocol for wellness visits ................................................................................................................ 192 Protocol for illness visits ................................................................................................................... 192 Doctor communication..................................................................................................................... 193 Common Medical Issues Facing Shelter Animals ............................................................................... 193 Upper Respiratory Infection treatment protocol for cats under the care of APA! .................................. 194 Treatment .................................................................................................................................... 194 Nebulizing your foster animal ....................................................................................................... 195 Prognosis: .................................................................................................................................... 196 Baby Kittens: A Special Situation ................................................................................................... 197 Adult Cats .................................................................................................................................... 198 How do we Know it is Herpes?...................................................................................................... 198 Canine Kennel Cough Information for Foster Homes ........................................................................ 199 Keys to preventing the spread of infection ..................................................................................... 199 A few things to consider when fostering an animal with kennel cough ............................................ 199 Canine Distemper Virus ................................................................................................................... 199 Distemper Control Protocol ........................................................................................................... 200 Pneumonia in Dogs ......................................................................................................................... 201


P a g e | 10 The most common causes or types of pneumonia: ......................................................................... 201 Symptoms of pneumonia .............................................................................................................. 201 Physical Therapy........................................................................................................................... 201 Home Care .................................................................................................................................. 201 Prevention of URI in dogs (specifically the deadly Distemper) ............................................................. 202 Malpractice as it applies to vaccine decision making: ..................................................................... 202 Ideal Shelter Vaccination Protocol ................................................................................................. 202 Animals coming into the shelter “over the counter�: ...................................................................... 203 Animals picked up by Animal Control in the field: .......................................................................... 203 Standard Diarrhea Protocol:............................................................................................................. 203 Severe diarrhea in Shelter Cat and Kittens .................................................................................... 204 Chronic Diarrhea Protocol ............................................................................................................ 204 Hairloss Treatment Protocol ............................................................................................................. 205 Dogs............................................................................................................................................ 205 Cats............................................................................................................................................. 205 Demodectic Mange in Dogs ............................................................................................................. 206 Contributing factors...................................................................................................................... 206 Causes/Transmission .................................................................................................................... 206 Clinical signs ................................................................................................................................ 206 Diagnosis ..................................................................................................................................... 206 Treatment .................................................................................................................................... 206 Sarcoptic Mange in Dogs ................................................................................................................. 207 Contributing factors...................................................................................................................... 207 Causes/Transmission .................................................................................................................... 207 Clinic signs .................................................................................................................................. 207 Diagnosis ..................................................................................................................................... 207 Treatment .................................................................................................................................... 207 2011 APA Cat Ringworm Protocols ................................................................................................... 207 Itraconazole Treatment ................................................................................................................. 207 Lym-Sulfur Treatment ................................................................................................................... 208 RW Ward Protocols ....................................................................................................................... 208 RW Recovery/Exposure Ward ........................................................................................................ 208 Treatment in Foster Care .............................................................................................................. 209 Heartworm Protocol (revised April 17, 2011) .................................................................................... 209


P a g e | 11 FIV Positive Quarantine and Testing protocol for cats under the care of APA! ..................................... 210 FeLV (Feline Leukemia Virus) ............................................................................................................ 210 Who Gets It and How the Disease is Spread .................................................................................. 210 How is FeLV Diagnosed? .............................................................................................................. 210 Vaccinating .................................................................................................................................. 210 Symptoms .................................................................................................................................... 210 Fostering/Owning a FeLV+ Cat .................................................................................................... 211 Spay/Neuter Documents: ................................................................................................................. 212 Post-Operative Care Instructions for your foster pet ....................................................................... 212 Fading Kitten Syndrome ................................................................................................................... 213 Symptoms: ................................................................................................................................... 213 Treatment: ................................................................................................................................... 213 Prognosis: .................................................................................................................................... 214 Force feeding the cat that wonâ€&#x;t eat before it goes into liver failure ................................................... 215 Supplies needed:.......................................................................................................................... 215 Force feeding instructions: ............................................................................................................ 215 Miscellaneous Hospital Forms: ......................................................................................................... 216 Illness Form for Check Ups ........................................................................................................... 216 Treatment Sheet ........................................................................................................................... 217 Cattery check off list ..................................................................................................................... 218 Dog Adoptions Three Ways: Saving Lives Through Innovation ............................................................... 220 Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 220 Getting Started ................................................................................................................................ 220 Building a Relationship Your Local Open Intake Shelter. ................................................................ 220 Selecting Dogs for Your Program .................................................................................................. 220 Necessary Materials and Staff to Complete Your First Adoption ...................................................... 221 Training Your Staff and Adoptions Volunteers ................................................................................ 222 The Adoption Process....................................................................................................................... 223 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 223 Adoption Fees .............................................................................................................................. 224 Application Protocols .................................................................................................................... 224 Counselor Role............................................................................................................................. 224 Screening Applications and Red Flags ........................................................................................... 225 Denying an Application ................................................................................................................ 226


P a g e | 12 After Approval: The Contract and Basic Take Home Packet ............................................................ 226 Additions to the Contract .............................................................................................................. 227 Special Circumstances: Heartworm Positive Dogs .......................................................................... 228 Handling Returns ......................................................................................................................... 228 Overview: Three Types of Adoption Programs ................................................................................... 229 Overview ..................................................................................................................................... 229 In Shelter Adoptions ........................................................................................................................ 229 Goals and Purpose ....................................................................................................................... 229 Logistics of Working Within the Shelter System: APA @ TLAC ......................................................... 229 Benefits of an In-Shelter Program ................................................................................................. 230 Daily In Shelter Schedule .............................................................................................................. 230 Individualized Customer Service .................................................................................................... 230 In Shelter Adoptions ..................................................................................................................... 231 Off-Site Adoptions of Shelter Dogs ................................................................................................ 231 Off-Site Adoptions ........................................................................................................................... 231 Benefits of Off-Site Adoptions ....................................................................................................... 231 Off-Site Logistics: Selecting and Approaching a Partner ................................................................ 231 Prior to Opening Sites .................................................................................................................. 232 Supplies Needed .......................................................................................................................... 232 Pre-Site Checklist ......................................................................................................................... 233 Daily Off-Site Schedule................................................................................................................. 234 Site Logistics ................................................................................................................................ 234 Sanitation and Set Up................................................................................................................... 234 Managing the Site ........................................................................................................................ 235 On-Site Adoptions ........................................................................................................................... 235 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 235 Behaviorally Challenged Dogs ...................................................................................................... 235 More Dogs, Only Two Counselors ................................................................................................. 236 On Site Schedule.......................................................................................................................... 236 Emergency Situations ....................................................................................................................... 236 Foul Weather ............................................................................................................................... 236 Stolen Dog ................................................................................................................................... 236 Stolen Donations Jar .................................................................................................................... 236 Loose or Escaped Dog .................................................................................................................. 237


P a g e | 13 Sick Dog ...................................................................................................................................... 237 Dog Fight..................................................................................................................................... 238 Bites Happen: How to Deal with Them .......................................................................................... 238 Adoptions Materials Included in Your Electronic Files ........................................................................ 239 Dog Foster Program ............................................................................................................................ 241 Getting Started ................................................................................................................................ 241 Foster Application & Release ............................................................................................................ 241 Initial Fosters ................................................................................................................................... 242 Communication ............................................................................................................................... 242 Tracking foster dogs ........................................................................................................................ 244 Resource Materials .......................................................................................................................... 244 External Protocols ............................................................................................................................ 244 Medical Care................................................................................................................................... 244 Medical Protocol........................................................................................................................... 245 Medical protocol by age: .............................................................................................................. 245 Ongoing support ............................................................................................................................. 246 Foster Dog Adoptions ...................................................................................................................... 246 Dog Foster Team Organization ........................................................................................................ 246 Dog Foster Manager (DFM)........................................................................................................... 246 Dog Foster Placement Team ......................................................................................................... 247 New Dog Foster Parent Team (and Foster Application Screeners) ................................................... 247 Dog Foster Mentor Team .............................................................................................................. 247 Dog Foster Adoption Team ........................................................................................................... 247 Dog Foster Recruiting Coordinator ................................................................................................ 248 Other Necessary Support for Foster Team: .................................................................................... 248 Sample Foster Flow ......................................................................................................................... 249 Workshop Attachments .................................................................................................................... 250 Dog Foster Team .......................................................................................................................... 250 New Dog Foster (Parent) Program ................................................................................................. 250 Placement Team........................................................................................................................... 250 Mentor Team ............................................................................................................................... 251 Adoption Team ............................................................................................................................ 251 Dog Behavior Program Handbook ....................................................................................................... 252 Louie .............................................................................................................................................. 252


P a g e | 14 Implementing a Plan........................................................................................................................ 253 Coding dogs & using color collars ................................................................................................. 253 Programs for Dogs & Volunteers ................................................................................................... 254 Training Volunteers, Staff & Dogs .................................................................................................. 254 Dog Walking 101 ......................................................................................................................... 256 Louie‟s Fresh Start Condos – APA rescued a lot of “behavior” dogs before having the condos. ......... 259 Plan for the Long stay/behavior dogs ............................................................................................ 259 Reporting an Incident ...................................................................................................................... 259 Behavior Dog Transition to Foster Protocol........................................................................................ 260 Adoption Protocol for Behavior Dogs ................................................................................................ 260 Small Dog Bite History Addendum ................................................................................................ 261 Behavior Assistance Sent Home With Every Adopter .......................................................................... 262 Tips For A Smooth Transition ........................................................................................................ 262 Teach Your Dog How To Be Alone & To Love His/Her Crate! .......................................................... 263 Introducing a New Dog to your Current Dog ................................................................................. 265 Introduction to Cats ...................................................................................................................... 267 I am having a problem with my new dog! What do I do!? ............................................................. 268 Affordable Dog Training in Austin: ................................................................................................ 269 Important Information About Returns ............................................................................................ 270 Parvo Program .................................................................................................................................... 271 What is parvo? ................................................................................................................................ 271 About the Austin Pets Alive parvo ward............................................................................................. 271 How we got started ...................................................................................................................... 272 Our numbers throughout the years ............................................................................................... 272 Cost breakdown ........................................................................................................................... 274 Why we know you can be successful ............................................................................................. 276 Preparing to open a parvo ward ....................................................................................................... 277 Required items for a parvo ward ................................................................................................... 277 Where and how to purchase medical supplies ............................................................................... 280 Saving your first parvo puppy ........................................................................................................... 280 Pre-Treatment .............................................................................................................................. 280 Treatment .................................................................................................................................... 281 Post-Treatment ............................................................................................................................. 284 General Parvo ward best practices ................................................................................................ 286


P a g e | 15 Expanding your Parvo program ........................................................................................................ 288 Building and training a team of volunteers .................................................................................... 289 Building a dedicated parvo ward ................................................................................................... 289 Advanced treatment methods ....................................................................................................... 290 Learning from mistakes and overcoming roadblocks ......................................................................... 292 Chesterâ€&#x;s story ............................................................................................................................. 292 Tina and Pepperâ€&#x;s story ................................................................................................................ 292 IV pumps woes ............................................................................................................................. 293 Forms & Documents used by Austin Pets Alive................................................................................... 293 Patient in-take form...................................................................................................................... 293 Daily patient medical form ............................................................................................................ 293 IV pump log ................................................................................................................................. 293 Inventory sheet............................................................................................................................. 293 Volunteer Schedule Sheet ............................................................................................................. 293 Post Parvo Hand-out..................................................................................................................... 294 Cat Adoptions Four Ways! ................................................................................................................... 295 Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 295 Getting Started ................................................................................................................................ 295 Building a Relationship Your Local Open Intake Shelter. ................................................................ 295 Selecting Cats for Your Program ................................................................................................... 295 Necessary Materials and Staff to Complete Your First Adoption ...................................................... 296 Set Your Adoption Fee Structure and Basic Rules ........................................................................... 296 Adoption Materials ....................................................................................................................... 296 At Least One Trained Adoption Counselor ..................................................................................... 296 Basic Animal Care Items Required for Any Type of Adoption Site .................................................... 297 Record Keeping and Banking ........................................................................................................ 297 Training Your Staff and Adoptions Volunteers ................................................................................... 297 Overview ..................................................................................................................................... 297 Training: Staff Adoption Counselors .............................................................................................. 297 Training: Volunteer Adoption Counselors ...................................................................................... 298 The Adoption Process....................................................................................................................... 298 Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 298 Adoption Fees .............................................................................................................................. 298 Application Protocols .................................................................................................................... 298


P a g e | 16 Counselor Role............................................................................................................................. 299 Screening Applications and Red Flags ........................................................................................... 299 Denying an Application ................................................................................................................ 300 After Approval: The Contract and Basic Take Home Packet ............................................................ 301 Additions to the Contract .............................................................................................................. 301 Special Circumstances: Pre-Adopts, Cats Requiring Surgery or with Chronic Health Issues............... 301 Overview: Four Types of Adoption Programs ..................................................................................... 302 Overview ..................................................................................................................................... 302 In Shelter Adoptions ..................................................................................................................... 303 Off-Site Adoption Events of Shelter Cats ........................................................................................ 304 Off-Site Adoption Catteries for Shelter Cats................................................................................... 305 Off-Site Adoptions........................................................................................................................ 305 Site Checklist ............................................................................................................................... 307 Managing the Site ........................................................................................................................ 308 On-Site Adoptions ........................................................................................................................ 308 Emergency Situations ....................................................................................................................... 309 Stolen Cat .................................................................................................................................... 309 Stolen Donations Jar .................................................................................................................... 309 Loose or Escaped Cat ................................................................................................................... 309 Sick Cat ....................................................................................................................................... 310 Bites Happen: How to Deal with Them .......................................................................................... 311 Adoptions Materials Included in Your Electronic Files ........................................................................ 311 Cat Foster Manager Manual ................................................................................................................ 312 Cat Foster Program Organization Chart ........................................................................................... 312 Cat Foster Manager Job Description:............................................................................................. 312 Team members ............................................................................................................................... 313 Foster Screener Lead .................................................................................................................... 313 Foster Screeners ........................................................................................................................... 313 Foster Mentor Lead ...................................................................................................................... 313 Foster Mentors ............................................................................................................................. 313 Overdue Foster Lead .................................................................................................................... 314 Foster Followup Volunteers ........................................................................................................... 314 Behavior Team Leader .................................................................................................................. 314 Behavior Fosters ........................................................................................................................... 314


P a g e | 17 Behavior Volunteers ..................................................................................................................... 314 Duties ............................................................................................................................................. 314 Finding Fosters ............................................................................................................................. 314 New fosters.................................................................................................................................. 314 Foster Recruitment ....................................................................................................................... 315 Getting the cat out of the shelter and into the foster home............................................................. 315 When the foster cat first gets to the foster home ............................................................................ 316 Moving fosters into the adoption center......................................................................................... 316 Dealing with foster parents going on vacation/out of town............................................................. 316 Dealing with foster parents that get overwhelmed/request their foster cat be moved....................... 317 Barn Cat program ............................................................................................................................... 318 Beginning a Barn Cat program......................................................................................................... 318 Identifying candidates for barn placement both within your program and prior to intake .................... 319 Appropriate Barn Placement Candidates ....................................................................................... 319 Inappropriate candidates for barn placement ................................................................................ 320 Identifying placement locations ........................................................................................................ 321 Safe Relocation Procedures ........................................................................................................... 321 Staffing needs ................................................................................................................................. 321 Future plans for barn cat program.................................................................................................... 322 Bottle Baby Team ................................................................................................................................ 323 Care of Orphaned Kittens under 6 weeks ......................................................................................... 323 Orphaned Kittens ......................................................................................................................... 323 Body Warmth ............................................................................................................................... 323 Isolation is the best policy ............................................................................................................. 324 Development Milestones............................................................................................................... 324 Weight Gain ................................................................................................................................ 324 Feeding ....................................................................................................................................... 325 Stimulation for urination and defecation ....................................................................................... 328 Weaning ...................................................................................................................................... 329 Cleaning ...................................................................................................................................... 329 Parasite Control ........................................................................................................................... 330 Medical Guide ................................................................................................................................. 330 Medical Issues - Warning Signs to Watch For ................................................................................. 330 Isolation....................................................................................................................................... 331


P a g e | 18 Common Illnesses in Cats ............................................................................................................. 331 The Scoop on Poop....................................................................................................................... 333 Overview of Hydration.................................................................................................................. 334 Medication Schedule .................................................................................................................... 335 Notes........................................................................................................................................... 335 Bottle Baby Daily Care Sheet ............................................................................................................ 338 Medications..................................................................................................................................... 339 Handling Returns ................................................................................................................................ 341 About APA‟s Return Policy ................................................................................................................ 341 From our website under “Adoption FAQs”: .................................................................................... 341 Return Rate .................................................................................................................................. 341 Our Returns Process ..................................................................................................................... 341 Sample Dog Return Email: ............................................................................................................ 342 Sample Cat Return Email: ............................................................................................................. 344 Austin Pets Alive Owner Surrender Form .......................................................................................... 346


P a g e | 19

How We Got No Kill Started in Austin Manual Brief History of Animal Welfare in Austin 1997-2001: No Kill Millennium Era Austin Pets Alive formed to address lack of life saving in Austin. Actions were to draft No Kill Millennium plan that specified what each major group in Austin, including the City, would need to do to reach No Kill. Major accomplishments were to start volunteer program at Town Lake Animal Center (TLAC), double City Animal Center Budget, decrease euthanasia from 85% to 50%. Two major spay/neuter organizations were formed, Animal Trustees of Austin and EmanciPET.

2001-2006: Post No Kill Millennium Austin Pets Alive decreased activity when goal of No Kill was not met by 2001. Spay/Neuter continued in full force (>20,000 surgeries per year at low cost or free). TLAC stayed at 50% euthanasia rate. Live Outcomes stayed at about 10,000 per year.

2006-2008: Beginning of No Kill Movement through FixAustin FixAustin.org was created and became active in politics and the media with No Kill message. City planned new shelter for exact same performance measures (50% euthanasia, ~10,000 live outcomes every year).

2008-2011: Austin Pets Alive takes off Austin Pets Alive was rebirthed and grew exponentially to address gaps in life-saving.


P a g e | 20

TLAC Year to Year Live Intake/Euthanasia 30,000 27,163 25,000

24,807

23,960

25,489

24,663

24,357

20,000

15,000

Live Intake

14,304

14,055

12,887

12,466

Euthanized

12,343 10,916

10,000

5,000

0 FY 02/03

FY 03/04

FY 04/05

FY 05/06

FY 06/07

FY 07/08

Live Outcomes Year to Year 6,000

4,354 4,000

4,353

4,054 3,115 2,875

3,225 2,977

4,129 3,260

2,804 2,549

4,327

4,435 3,862

3,388 3,147

3,092

Adoption Return to Owner

2,531

Rescue/Transfer

2,000

0 FY 02/03

FY 03/04

FY 04/05

FY 05/06

FY 06/07

FY 07/08


P a g e | 21

What Inspired Change        

Nathan Winograd‟s success in other cities. Ryan Clinton‟s bullhorn approach to demanding change. A group of committed citizens brought Nathan Winograd to Austin and personally asked all animal welfare leaders to attend. o This led to Ellen Jefferson‟s interest in the topic. Ellen and Ryan both tried to get other already established groups to engage in large scale life-saving to no avail. Continued “squeaky wheel” effects from FixAustin caused the issue to stay front and center. Ellen eventually chose to get on board because it was the right thing to do even though it was rife with politics and had potential for fallout with other animal welfare entities. She then engaged Austin Pets Alive. Austin Pets Alive was able to be the neutral “doer” while FixAustin continued to protest that nothing was changing at the city. A continuum was created from left to right of No Kill Activists, neutral life-saving Doers, and No Kill Opponents. o The Activists and Opponents fought while the Doers made a difference and gained the citizen support. o It was not designed this way but couldn‟t have worked better to be effective.

FixAustin.org Rallies the Community Here are some of FixAustin‟s first couple of email blasts to community, friends, and potential stakeholders follow on the next few pages. ---------- Forwarded message ---------From: Ryan Clinton Date: Sun, Nov 19, 2006 at 7:21 PM Subject: Five Minutes to Help Save Shelter Pets Dear Friends, As many of you know, I'm on a mission to convince City Hall to adopt proven, cost-effective "no-kill" methods to reduce the horrific number of lost and homeless pets killed each year by Austin's municipal pound. Last year alone, our pound killed well over fourteen thousand animals. The widespread, officially sanctioned killing of those animals is not inevitable. It is not the result of "too many animals" and "not enough homes"--- a well-travelled myth. Rather, it is the result of bureaucratic inertia and the failure to effectively adopt methods that have proven wildly successful in other cities to reduce or even end the killing of healthy, adoptable pets. With a "kill rate" of more than 55%, Austin lags far behind cities like San Francisco, CA, and Ithaca, NY, who no longer kill healthy, adoptable pets at their municipal shelters. Clearly, it is time for a change in Austin. One way we might dramatically improve conditions for our shelter animals is to locate our new animal shelter--- which was recently approved by Austin voters--- in an attractive, appropriate, accessible, and convenient location. Sending our animals far from the City's center--- out on 601 East Airport Blvd. where the current shelter management intends to build it--- would be a grave mistake that could cost hundreds of thousands of lives over the shelter's lifespan. That's why I wrote a column published Saturday in the Austin American Statesman demanding that the City find a better location for the new shelter . A better location might be in the Mueller Redevelopment area, or perhaps at the abandoned Room Store site across from Leif Johnson Ford. But regardless, we couldn't possibly do worse than 601 East Airport--- which is remote and difficult to find. So today, I'm asking you to please take just 5 minutes of your time to help effect positive change for our shelter pets by e-mailing the city council right now--- you can do so in just one e-mail by clicking on this link--- to tell them two things. First, tell them that Austin should adopt proven, cost-effective "no-kill" methods to reduce or end the killing of adoptable pets at our pound. Second, tell them that a better, more attractive location for our new animal shelter is needed to reduce the number of animals killed each year; 601 East Airport is a just-plain-awful choice. If you would like to learn more about these issues, please visit fixaustin.org. Please also pass this e-mail along to any of your


P a g e | 22 friends or colleagues who might be interested. Thank you, in advance, for writing the City Council today. Best regards, Ryan Links in this e-mail: http://www.fixaustin.org http://www.statesman.com/opinion/content/editorial/stories/11/18/18clinton_edit.html http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/council/groupemail.htm

Press Release from FixAustin.org CONTACT: Ryan Clinton February 7, 2007

Austin animal-welfare groups urge policy changes at City pound Groups say ASPCA effort may help, but pound‟s failed strategies must change AUSTIN, TX - Tomorrow morning at City Hall, Austin Mayor Will Wynn and the national President of the ASPCA will announce an effort to reduce the number of lost and homeless pets killed each year at the City‟s pound. In 2005 alone, the number of animals killed at Austin‟s pound reached over 14,000, with a whopping 56% of pets leaving the shelter in body bags. According to the ASPCA‟s website, the new initiative includes donations of $100,000 in each of the next three years for efforts to reduce Austin‟s pet population. But animal advocacy groups in town argue that while the additional funding may be helpful, lost and homeless pets will continue to be killed at alarming rates so long as the pound‟s policies remain the same. Lorri Michel, President of the Central Texas Animal Alliance, has led a grass-roots effort to change the policies at the City‟s pound. She urges cautious optimism regarding the City‟s partnership with the ASPCA. “The pound does not need more money,” Michel said. “It has a budget of over four million dollars.” She continued, “It‟s the pound‟s policies that need to change. And as long as the City replicates its failed policies of the past, animals will continue to die.” Ryan Clinton, founder of the animal-welfare group Fix Austin, agrees with Michel‟s


P a g e | 23 outlook. According to Clinton, “The non-profit groups linked to the City‟s new effort do fantastic work and deserve great credit for saving the lives of countless pets. But the City pound itself has a record of sending most animals to their graves.” Clinton added, “First and foremost, we must change the pound‟s policies.” Michel and Clinton both point to successes in cities that have adopted what is often called the “no kill” method developed by shelter expert Nathan Winograd. Cities like San Francisco, CA, and Ithaca, NY, no longer kill healthy, adoptable pets at their municipal animal shelters. “If we want to stop killing our pets,” Michel added, “then we should replicate the policies of the cities that have done so. Repeating our own failures, even with more money, will not solve the problem.” Michel also pointed out that while the City pound‟s budget has more than doubled in the last six years, from almost two million in 2000 to over four million this year, the number of animals taken in at the shelter and the number of animals killed at the shelter have remained virtually constant. “That‟s a complete and total failure,” said Michel.

What Were the Arguments Against No Kill in Austin? Costs too much • •

Most traditional No Kill shelters spend between $500-$1000 per animal to save a life. How do you get around that? • Volunteers increase workforce without paid staff. Sheltering is at least 75% staff expense. With enough volunteers, lives can be saved for very little money. • Foster homes increase cage capacity. They provide food and love to their foster pets and keep them out of the shelter where staff would have to clean, medicate, and socialize. • Start fundraising to get the funds in place for the things that volunteers and fosters can‟t provide, like medical care.

Not responsible thing to do • •

If you don‟t have the money, you shouldn‟t start the process. The logic here is that a responsible project would be completely funded before starting. The deaths of these animals are a crisis and it is an urgent situation that needs to be addressed now. No one responds to natural disasters (think Katrina) or other major crises with funds in place. The responsible thing is to help now to save the lives before it is too late and scramble to get the other pieces together like housing, funding for medical, and adoptions. It becomes irresponsible if the outlets for humane care and rehoming are being put into place very closely behind the life saving efforts.

Spay/Neuter is only answer •

The only way to combat the problem is to spay/neuter as many animals as possible since there is no way to “adopt them all out”. • According to the AVMA: • Austin MSA human population: ~1,600,000 • Austin MSA pet population: ~1,000,000 • Unaltered pet population in Austin: ~350,000


P a g e | 24 • • • • •

Outdoor dog population: 100,000 Outdoor/feral cat population: 250,000 How do you get these animals in for spay/neuter if they are cared for so little? Must Spay/Neuter 93% of all breeding animals in a community in ONE breeding cycle to get to zero population growth (and in theory No Kill) >100,000 animals had been spayed/neutered in Austin through low cost and free programs prior to 2008. Yet there was no meaningful difference in intake. Not enough to see difference?

Not enough homes • •

No Kill has never been successful before because there are not enough good homes out there. You can‟t “adopt yourself out of euthanasia”. Animals are better off dead if can‟t find an ideal home • According to American Veterinary Medical Association: • ~1,000,000 owned animals in Austin MSA • 17-20% come from shelters and rescues • 30% come from breeders and pet shops • 20% are acquired as strays • 30% unknown • ~150,000 pets are put into new homes annually • Austin area shelters take in ~35,000 • >50% are killed because “not enough homes” • We only need to convince a fraction of the 150,000 homes that become available each year to adopt rather than buy. • It is morally reprehensible to assume that death is better than a chance at life. Instead of judging and preventing people from owning pets, help them provide for the pet medically with low cost wellness and illness options and teach them about the importance of pets being a part of the family.

People are the problem. • •

Things will never change until there is a cultural shift towards animal welfare APA became the agent of change and then the cultural shift did occur. There is no one else out there that will create that cultural shift. If you do the work, promote your good work, and keep doing more, the cultural shift will occur. You can‟t wait for it to happen.

Not enough cages at the shelter. •

No one wants to build more because we can‟t get them out alive as it is. • Solutions: Use existing cages better • Increase S/N timeliness at shelter to increase output and increase cage turnover • At day 3, get all eligible animals altered so they are ready • Could house 72,000 animals if all left after 3 days • Emergency S/N on chosen animals so owner leaves with them that day • Get all babies out the day they come in and into foster to increase cage capacity

These animals are not adoptable •

No one wants to adopt the dogs and cats that are currently being euthanized because of their breed, medical issues, or behavioral issues. • Who was being euthanized in 2008? • 50/50 dogs/cats • 8% too young (unweaned or get sick right away at shelter) • Solution: Increase Adoption/Rescue by Type: Age • Currently 4300 babies are killed because too young to do s/n • 85% of adopters want babies • Need to be sent to foster or adopter immediately upon intake • 23% sick • ~5000 killed due to illness • Most illness is from shelter


P a g e | 25 TLAC had veterinary staff handling basics and work ups but not treating animals as if they would live past their three days • Need: More advanced veterinary care onsite • Ongoing veterinary care to rescuers/adopters until illness/injury is resolved • Better disease control- intake vaccines and solid cleaning protocols • Faster turn-around time would help decrease disease transmission 36% behavior • Currently kill 8600 for behavior • No strategies were in place to address this • Need on-site training, foster homes, and ongoing training as part of adoption package 19% vicious • We have found this to be utterly untrue after getting to No Kill. • True viciousness should result in euthanasia and is more accurately quantified at about 2% of intake in Austin •

You are divisive, you should instead work with other groups to develop 10 year plan • •

The only way No Kill can happen responsibly is through collaboration and ensuring that all stakeholders are at the table, no matter how long it takes. Collaboration was not possible due to different philosophies about No Kill and wasted a lot of time. If we had spent more time working and less time talking, we would have made faster progress. The people who morally agree will come on board. The community will instantly be on board. The only people fighting you will be the other animal welfare advocates. We found that extending an invitation, being neutral on any inter-organizational battles, and just getting the work done was the most productive thing we could do. If you have to convince a group to get involved, then they are not ready to join you.

Starting a new group will take away funding from other animal welfare nonprofits who are already struggling to make ends meet and do good work. • •

We found the exact opposite happened. Everyone got credit, whether they deserved it or not, for No Kill and all major groups saw an increase in donations year after year from 2008 to 2011. Increasing awareness increases community participation and support.

Key Information Needed to Start Who could do more in the community to address shelter euthanasia? •

We talked to all community stakeholders (Directors of large animal welfare organizations, vocal community advocates, large pet related businesses (training facilities, vets), volunteers of the shelter), told them the problem and asked if they could do more. • All the large established organizations and businesses said no, they were doing all they could do • One small fringe adoption group said they would do more but refused to spay/neuter or medically care for the animals in their program. We did not think that would be a good partner for us. We also asked the No Kill nonprofit shelter in town as well as the City shelter directors if volunteers from this new group could just work at their two shelters to process adoptions faster, care for more animals, etc so they could increase their capacity to life save. • They said no

Statistics •

We looked at key statistics year to year and determined that live outcomes were the same every year, regardless of intake numbers. This meant that the shelter staff was only capable of “producing” a certain number of live outcomes each year. The TLAC director had not asked for increases in funding for more staff, which led us to believe that the situation would not change from the inside. Euthanasia followed intake numbers perfectly. In a year with more intake, there was more euthanasia. If there were fewer animals taken in, fewer euthanasias occurred. There was no change based on policies or staff production for the 7 years prior to APA starting.


P a g e | 26 •

Ultimately, the most important piece of statistical data that we needed was the true euthanasia numbers based on age, reason for euthanasia, species, and breed. We used this data to create all of our programs. Every other piece of data would solely be used to educate others (ie number of homes in Austin that acquire pets each year). • It took us months to get the actual euthanasia list before an animal was euthanized. Shelters don‟t want to share the fact that they will be euthanizing a specific animal due to fear of public scrutiny. You need that information to produce measurable results (one animal off the list is one that definitely didn‟t die that day – gives you quantity, timeframe, and percentage change instantly).

Why were animals dying in Austin? • •

Again, you need to get the most specific info you can on animals euthanized- species, age, breed, reason for euthanasia. This tells you where the gaps are in your community. You don‟t need to know anything else if you are building a program to fill the gaps.

What are we missing? •

We defined what the community was missing and what gaps we thought were killing animals at the shelter. We used only pieces that were tangible and fixable to create our successful programs. Focus on what you can change or create, not what you can‟t. • In Austin, we were missing: • Medical care for shelter animals so that most owners don‟t have to take on big vet bills • This included waging war at a policy level to get sound practices in place like proper intake vaccinations • Parvo ward and/or teaching fosters/owners to treat at home • Teaching fosters to treat URI and diarrhea that comes from shelter stay • Program to address unweaned kittens (~1200 a year died immediately upon entry into shelter) • Marketing and ways to get the easy to place animals in front of those who might adopt • Online, multiple offsite venues, and better marketing at the shelter • Foster program to house animals outside the shelter rather than taking up cage space at the shelter • Speedy adoption processing so animals that were already chosen by an adopter don‟t take up cage space waiting to get spay/neutered (sometimes for weeks) while incoming animals die due to “no cage space” • Behavioral enrichment for large dogs while staying at the shelter so that they do not deteriorate.

What exactly needs to happen? •

We developed our plan after realizing that we were not going to be able to fill any of the gaps above at the City shelter. If the City would have allowed us to help them, we would have done it and it would have cost us far less. • Our plan started with the vision of a building to house all the animals that the City could not save.

Key Decisions to be Made How is No Kill going to happen? 1. Create a political coup d‟etat of shelter director, replace with director who can make necessary changes at shelter to get to No Kill • Timeline: we estimated at least 3 years before then director retired 2. Work with other animal welfare agencies to create a plan to get to No Kill (No Kill Millennium used this choice and it didn‟t work) • Timeline: there was talk of needing a 10 year plan


P a g e | 27 3. Do it ourselves from scratch • Timeline: started immediately, hoped for one year to No Kill

Your message: We chose for our platform to be “Making Austin No Kill as Fast as Humanly Possible” Your approach: 1. Work at the shelter implementing the gap filling programs (this is the best method but for us, was not possible due to shut out by city staff). 2. Create a new shelter to pull animals out of the City shelter and fill the gaps there

What is your entity? 1. We chose to use Austin Pets Alive because it was an existing 501c3, already bought into the mission, was somewhat dormant so there would not be a lot of upheaval in existing programs, no staff, only 10 volunteers. 2. You can create your own 501c3 but that takes time.

What do you need to get into place to be successful with your plan? 1. We developed a roster of committees (also called Teams at APA) along with objectives, timelines, and results identified.

First Public Steps Town Hall Meeting    

We invited everyone who might be interested We kept it apolitical, no talk of discontent with people or the city. Created shared vision of what working together would be like. Discussed statistics (without judgement) on euthanasia and our plans to fix them.

Committees/Teams (see original action items from first meeting attached) 

                  

It is important to note that many of our initial ideas did not pan out (like getting a building in 3 months- it took 2 years!). You have to be flexible and nimble enough to see your plan through any reality glasses that are thrown your way. If you only can see how it will fail, you need to find a new leader. You HAVE to keep seeing how it will succeed, no matter the obstacle. Location PR Fundraising HR Finance Legal Marketing/Branding Website Operations Medical Adoption Cat & Dog Behavior Cat & Dog Hotline Reception Rescue Foster Coordination Volunteer Coordination


P a g e | 28

Austin Pets Alive! Committee Participation Agreement Welcome to Austin Pets Alive! committees! We are excited you want to help by contributing your time and talents to our committees and pool of resources. We look forward to working with you. It is extremely important to the animals of Austin that as members of APA! committees that we are responsible for our actions, duties, and commitments. Because our committees can only succeed with the help of reliable members who can work together in cohesive and solution-oriented teams, please read through the following agreement before we proceed. By signing this document, you are agreeing to the following terms:

Committee Participation: I understand that it is vital that the committees work hard and fast towards our goals. I understand that it will likely take at least 2 hours each week to accomplish the duties I have taken on. I also understand that in addition to those 2 hours, there may be a need to meet with my committee weekly to preserve communication. Lastly, I understand that if I cannot follow through on a commitment, I will provide notice to my Committee Chair, or APA! President (if I serve as Committee chair) so the work can be reassigned if necessary. If I do not follow through with my commitments for 3 out of 4 consecutive weeks with or without notice, then my committee has the ability to replace me if necessary.

Positive Energy Guarantee: I am aware that every committee member only wants the best for animals in Austin. I will assume the best in other members and will work towards resolving conflicts in constructive ways. I fully understand that this needs to be a positive place of communication and that points of view will vary. I will keep my comments constructive. I will not let a disagreement (new or old) hold back the work or communication of the committee. If I cannot stay committed to the terms above, I understand that I may need to be replaced with someone that can preserve the unity of the group.

Single-Minded Focus: I understand that in order to achieve the aggressive timeline and goals that we have set, we as a group cannot afford for me to get sidetracked by the work of another committee unless I am expressly asked by that committee and my committees can afford for me to do so. I understand that if I am unable to comply with this scope of work, I will be replaced to ensure that the overall work continues unfettered.

Again THANK YOU! This document is only needed to ensure that we get the most work accomplished that we can.

_____________________________________________________________________ Committee Participant (printed) Signature

2008 Starting Location Committeecharged with finding a building that met the following criteria

Date


P a g e | 29     

Centrally located, within 10 miles of Town Lake Animal Shelter Short term lease because banking on overtaking TLAC when City operations moved to East Austin At least 5,000 sq feet Zoned for retail pet or kennel Less than $3,000 per month

Flier that Location Committee made for potential donors of space:

What do we need from you? • Facility use for 1 year

• Ability to alter premises to accommodate our work • Advertising from that facility to fundraise for permanent facility We will provide you with the following: • Liability insurance coverage that specifically covers the property owner(s)

• Neighborhood Association buy in and support • Advertising on all marketing materials for your business • No risk/no hassle arrangement Who are we? Austin Pets Alive! is compiled of experts in many fields including veterinarians, founders/directors of other successful nonprofit organizations, a state representative, lawyers, marketing directors, fundraising professionals, and of course concerned citizens.

What are we doing? We are building the Austin Pets Alive! Resource Center to fill the need for a safety net for Austin‟s pets. We hope to take on the 13,000 animals that our city shelter is killing each year and give them the chances they deserve.

Why not just work with the existing shelters to increase their capacity? That is actually what we have been doing for the last 10 years. We believe that it will be another 10 years before our existing shelters are able to gear up to handle the number of animals that Austin has to care for- even with volunteer help. In 10 years, over 130,000 animals will die. We don‟t think waiting is a viable alternative (literally!).

Does Austin really need another animal facility? Yes!!!! The shelters that are in place are overfull and cannot expand. They have been in operation for 50+ years while Austin has grown exponentially. Over 13,000 animals died last year because they were not given the chance to find a home. Our facility will match people with animals, help owners find and keep their pets, and will provide solutions to the reasons that pets are “surrendered” to shelters in the first place.

Why do we think we can make Austin a No Kill City when so many others have tried and failed? Our volunteers have direct and vast experience in this field. We know inside and out the animal systems that are already in place in Austin and more importantly why they are not working. It is this background and knowledge that will make our project successful. It is very simple because we already know what to do.

2008 Starting Public Relations Committee Goal: Make in person contact with individual people in Austin that have the power to help us politically, financially, strategically, and publicly.


P a g e | 30 To do and suggested timelines: 1. Make list of people that might be important and interested - suggested timeline – today. a. City Council Members (existing and potential) b. Heads of organizations (animal or other). c. Prominent Citizens (Ray Benson, news anchors, celebrities, CEOs of businesses, etc…) d. Who else? 2. Develop (with help of marketing committee) pitch (why these people should talk with you?). Suggested timeline 1 week. a. Concentrate on the positive of what we are doing- fervor is contagious! b. What is the simplest thing that person can do for us? i. Spread the word ii. Come to us with animal issues iii. Recommend others that might want to know about us c. Make it easy to digest- only 7 minutes long d. Creation of General Pitch can be delegated to one person on committee 3. Divide list amongst committee members a. Take pitch to each person i. Suggested timeline is 3-4 weeks. 4. Work with Location Committee to meet in person with property owners to ask for donated use of land. a. Suggested timeline: as comes up. b. Delegate person today 5. Work with Marketing Committee to meet with media as needed. a. Delegate person today.

Key Points in Process:  

The work done on this committee is not meant to be all inclusive but should help to get us started. o We can add people to meet as we go and we get a comfort level with networking. People want to be involved in something like this so even if our message isn‟t perfect, give them the chance to be involved in the beginning.

2008 Starting Fundraising Committee Will need to work closely with Marketing Committee to communicate what materials are needed for each project. It would be best to give needs about 2 weeks before you need them. 

Advice from Fundraising Professional: People want to help us do this. We need to create opportunities to allow them to do it. So your job is informing people of what we are doing, the impact that it is going to make, and what we need from them (and if necessary, how we found them).

In order of Priority: 1. Create Menu of Giving: Suggested timeline 1 week. a. Pick 5 items of varying value that are needed for us to open facility (in addition to money). i. Suggestions: 1. Cagebanks= $5,000 each for 10 cages a. For onsite housing. i. Keeps pets comfortable during their stay with us. 1. number of cages determines number of animals we can house 2. Dog Runs= $2000 each a. For onsite housing i. Gives high energy dogs or litters room to exercise while they stay with us. 3. Crates for moving animals to adoption sites $100 each a. We will need 10-15 crates per vehicle per offsite location. 4. Vaccinations= $900/ 100 animals a. Enables us to keep animals healthy while in our care or out for adoptions 5. Spay/Neuter funds= $50/animal


P a g e | 31 a. Enables us to move animals fast through the system so they are ready to get adopted b. Partnership with EmanciPET who will get them altered the when we need it (no wait). c. We hope to process at least 100 animals per week that would normally go to TLAC. 6. Transport Vans= need 1 used vehicle for each PetsMart/PetCo a. $5,000-$10,000 each b. We can only go to as many offsite locations as we have vehicles 7. Computer System and Software= a. Need Computers and software to track animals through our system 8. 2 Washer/Dryers- must work! a. We need to keep our animals happy with a clean blanket or towel. b. These need to be constantly operating to keep up with laundry 9. Fridge/dishwasher- Must work! 10. Microwave- must work~! 11. Incubators for babies: $450 per incubator. a. Will allow us to care for babies that are too young to adopt out b. Need at least 10 12. Desks/chairs for reception and offices- can be used 13. Chairs for lobby- folding or straight 14. Construction to change whatever building we get to closer to what we need 2. Start with what we have to reach people that are already interested in animal welfare in Austin. a. Use our database through APA! handbill (~700 people) b. Talk with FixAustin about joint mailing to their database (~700 people) c. Ellen is working on getting email list of volunteers that are currently volunteering at TLAC. d. Emailing: suggested timeline 1-2 weeks i. Needs: 1. Get post card flyer from Marketing Committee but in email format so that it can be viewed on the text page (not a link in an email). 2. Keep all email addresses in software that can track names, email addresses, and donations (in conjunction with paper mailing database). 3. Work with Website Committee and APA! donationsto ensure that we can accept donations online (preferably through Network for Good). 4. Suggested timeline: 2 weeks. e. Paper mailing: suggested timeline 3 weeks i. Needs: 1. Get post card size flyer from Marketing Committee. 2. Software to keep names, addresses, emails, dollar amounts donated. 3. Ability to print postcards or letters/envelope/SASE 4. Talk with APA! Treasurer about funds needed to pay for postage of mailing 5. Create account with Post Office to use nonprofit mass mailing rate. 6. Mail it out! f. Website: suggested timeline 1-2 weeks i. Needs: 1. Work with website committee to make sure that donation page is ready to go as soon as email mailing goes out. 2. Menu of giving as well as call for towels, paper, dog and cat beds/toys, collars/leashes, unopened dog/cat food. 3. Small Group Hosting: Enable entire group of committees to host parties at their homes or at pet friendly venues to fundraise and raise awareness. a. Suggested timeline: 3-4 weeks b. Send email to all the Committee members asking for help in locating places that might be willing to donate food, space, and a drink or so for small group gatherings (8-10 people). c. Ask owners of suggested venues to get involved in this way. d. Create standard evite that anyone can use to get a group of friends together.


P a g e | 32 e. Create suggested donation standard request that any member can use: ask each participant to donate what they would have expected to pay for food/drinks or more if they like. f. Create suggested speech that any member can use to explain why people were invited (should be 3-4 minutes long). g. Push members to get involved in this easy fun way. 4. Tours as soon as facility is open: suggested timeline: ? a. Ask all members for names of people that might be interested in seeing our facility. i. Invite that member and suggested person to tour facility. 1. It will likely not be in a great state but we hope that getting people there will help them to see what we need. 2. Use Menu of giving to explain what our needs are. 5. Events: a. Hardest and most labor intensive and costly. b. Ok to plan but should be last priority (after we have completed all of the above).

Key Points to Process: ď ą

No o o o o

one is an expert on this. The most important thing is that we get started. Donâ€&#x;t get hung up on details. We can improve as we go. Most important thing is that we start generating funds asap.  Even if only 10% of people give, we will be able to start. Remember all donations are tax deductible!

2008 Starting HR Committee Goals: To develop guidelines for HR within the Resource Center. To do and suggested timeline: 4 weeks for all. 1. Develop simple packet of information that should be given to each new employee: a. Operations committees will fill in training manuals and specific information about the specific position b. We need from you the paperwork that is needed to be legal and proactive regarding employees c. If there are items that need specific internal information about company that is not related to the job, please send questions to Ellen. 2. What do we need to offer employees? a. Benefits: i. If we are starting out bootstrapping, what legal minimum requirements do we have? 1. paid time off 2. health insurance 3. overtime b. Salary structure: i. What is the criteria for determining if an employee should be: 1. Salary, contractor or hourly c. Breaks: What are the requirements for breaks d. Disclosures: i. What do we need to require in the hiring process: 1. reception- ability to hear, speak well, hold phone in hand and type for long periods of time 2. animal care- ability to lift at least 50 lbs, work long periods of time standing up, handle animals (no immunocompromised individuals) 3. off site adoptions- ability to stand outside for long hours, ability to safely drive and move animals from place to place 4. in general- handling animals may end up with bites/scratches 3. What do we need to do to make sure that we are hiring/evaluating/firing people legally? a. Create outline of:


P a g e | 33 i. General hiring process for success ii. General job description (key general factors needed) iii. General evaluation process 1. General wage/position increase process iv. General firing process 4. Other suggestions that will set us up for success?

Key Points in Process: The HR committee is not here to do the specifics but is here to help people with no HR background (or maybe no experience in any size company) create a working environment that is legal, professional, and allows employees to excel. Please let Ellen know today who is doing what and when she can expect to see finished products.

2008 Starting Finance Committee: Develop organization around finances. 1. What software do we use? 2. Cash or Accrual Basis? 3. How do we budget for something we have never done before that we hope will grow exponentially each year? 4. Who is responsible for bookkeeping? 5. How does bookkeeper get receipts? 6. How are deposits handled, especially if doing off site adoptions and events? 7. What are the checks and balances for bookkeeping to prevent embezzlement? 8. Who approves expenditures, how do people get approval? 9. What policies need to be in place to ensure proper paper trail and to show responsibility to funders? 10. What reports are created and when and for who? 11. Who is doing taxes? Do we need an audit? 12. Need to check on IRS filings to ensure that organization is in compliance with all rules.

2008 Starting Legal Committee Ideally legal committee will find out the answers to these questions, research options, and present recommendations for insurance on what to get within 4 weeks. -

Waivers: suggested timeline: 2 weeks Recommendations should be easily understood and should require only a phone call to implement. Once recommendations are made, the treasurer will help the president implement. Please communicate with President on 3/22 if any changes need to be made to suggested timeline.

What kind of insurance and or waivers do we need: -

-

-

-

to have a facility that houses animals o facility insurance in case of injuries onsite by the public o facility insurance in case of fire o animals that are in contact with the public  zoonotic disease  possible injuries to have employees o workers compensation package recommendation o any HR policies that we have to have legally?  If yes, can you give us sample or make the policy? to have volunteers o only a waiver?  Can you draft an adequate waiver? for our Board of Directors (we are currently researching companies for Directors Insurance) o Do we need more than Directors‟ Insurance or do we need that at all if we have general liability? To do offsite adoptions


P a g e | 34

-

o Vehicles- auto insurance for different drivers? o Employees, animals, volunteers offsite liabilities and special insurance needs To do any adoptions o In case of bite after adoption- any special liability issues?  Waiver- can you write a simple one?

What other legal issues do we need to be concerned about? -

We have a 501c3 We have bylaws

How can we structure a donation of use of a building? If we are lucky enough to find one, what kind of contract do we need? o Short term lease with no rent but instead will offer tax deduction o It would be great to have a template ready to show that we are organized and know legally what we can offer people. Location Committee will determine zoning, permitting, etc…. (and work with Lorri Michel). We can combine this committee with location committee after liability and insurance needs are met. -

2008 Starting Marketing Committee  

Who is our audience and does our message change to each? Donorso We have a better solution than is currently available  We are the leader in this area o We are mixing sound business practices with humane care  It works, is efficient, and you can see results fast o Less expensive than current life threatening strategy o We need help to be successful o We are proven in animal welfare o Successful relationships with key stakeholders (city, ahs, Emancipet, ATA, Mission Orange). Volunteers- pet lovers o No stress of attaching to animals that get might get euthanized o If you work here you will definitely make a difference o We are organized and value volunteers o It is fun! Pet owners o We provide solutions o We are focused on customer service  We listen, we care about the animal and the owner, and we will back up our ideas with action Government Officials o We can help shield officials from public dismay by providing palatable solution o We are a voice of reason o We are professional and well organized Potential pet owners o We are the best place to shop  Most knowledgeable “sales” staff  Money back guarantee  Save a life but no guilt in looking because animals will not die  Add-ons to value  30 days health insurance  free training  Accoutrements from stores


P a g e | 35 Every marketing piece should be:    

Consistent with brand and message Require prompt attention/action from marketee Able to tell people where to go to give that attention or make that action Should be very easy for the person to comply

Our Overall Image:  

 

We are professionals The problem is out of control and growing (number of animals, money needed, impact on culture and environment) o Unnecessarily inhumane We are trusted in the community Our solution works

To do and suggested timeline: 1. Create flyer to use as mailing to database describing what we are doing and what we need. Geared towards volunteers and donors. Give to Ellen to give to Fundraising committee after quick review. Timeline: 1 week. 2. Create poster to hang at TLAC and AHS to inform owners surrendering animals or people with strays that we exist and would like to talk with them for FREE. 3. Create simple sign and donation box to be used at all offsite adoptions. Also, small cards with website on them for people to access animals and give donations online. 4. Create signage for offsite adoptions that is consistent with our brand/message. 5. Newspaper ad if we can get it donated: ??? 6. Research and find media persons who are interested in animals. Identify them within 2 weeks. 7. Create press release to announce the beginning of the center. Timeline 4 weeks. 8. Create different human interest story every 2 weeks and hound animal oriented media people to run it. Timeline: start within 2 weeks of 3/22. A newstory is 4x more likely to attract attention than advertising. 9. Become identified by the media as the expert on animal issues. Whenever something pops up in a news story, we should go to media with commentary on it within 72 hours, how it affects Austin and what the inside scoop is. Gives us free advertising. a. Call main number and ask for tv assignment desk b. Call before 3:30 unless urgent or will miss that day‟s news c. 10:45 am is best time d. Link to all TV stories that we are involved from our website e. Define who will be in charge of identifying opportunities and making sure our spokesperson can act? Please delegate today. 10. Signage for new building. Timeline 4-6 weeks. Give best 2-3 choices to Ellen to take to board for review and vote. 11. Decide who our “Spokesperson” is for media stories. a. They should be engaging and enthusiastic. b. Suggest someone on PR committee with backup on either PR or marketing committee c. Decide today and let Ellen know. 12. Design business cards for committee chairs and board members within 6 weeks. Send to Ellen for review and printing. 13. Create posters to hang around town to attract volunteers and donors. Bring best 2-3 designs to Ellen. Timeline 4 weeks. 14. The media loves surveys. We should start some surveys that we can track results of and have at our fingertips. Such as: Do you believe Austin needs an alternate shelter to deal with the number of homeless pets? Or Do you believe that Austin is saving as many dogs and cats as it should? Maybe on our website? Through the handbill? Timeline – 2-4 weeks to begin.


P a g e | 36

2008 Starting Branding Committee How do we want Austin to quantify our efforts in 5 years? 

“Austin Pets Alive! is the group that ended the killing of dogs and cats.”

Problem Statements:    

demand for pets is not currently being reached by shelter market animals are euthanized because of outdated ineffective systems myth about too many animals and not enough homes many animals are surrendered because their owners cannot find solutions to the problems they are having soon enough in the bond breaking process

Key competitors for new pets:   

Pet land Backyard breeders Accidental litters by friends, neighbors, and acquaintances

Key competitors for pet information: 

Shelters, vet clinics, web, friend

What is our key differentiator?     

Responsible, humane source of animals We provide resources to the public for new pets and pets already in homes We bring pets to you and match you with the best fit Efficient and innovative ways to handle animals in a shelter system We respect the right to own pets and do not insist on “one size fits all” pet ownership standards

What are key unique points about us?     

Happy endings Match.com of pets (we match the right people up with the right pets) Efficient, smart, productive systems Life focused Community collaboration- grassroots

Key visual points: Innovative Edgy  Simple  Happy  Respectable To do: Please bring 2-3 versions of each of the below to Ellen who will bring to board for vote. Suggested timeline: 2 weeks. 1. What is our market vision? 2. What is our mission statement? 3. What is our positioning statement? 4. What is our elevator pitch? 5. What is our boilerplate? 6. What is our company story? 7. What is our message architecture? 8. What is our tagline? 9. What is our logo? 10. What is the name of our building?  


P a g e | 37 

Buzz words: safe, safety net, resources,

Key Points in Process: 

Start with what we have. We will likely go through many reiterations over the next year or two. Important to get something suggestive on paper to begin marketing even if not 100% happy with it.

2008 Starting Website Committee The Vision: In order of priority: End Result of each future section of website: 

     

    

People know us very well o Who we are o What we are doing o Why we are doing it o How we are different than others in the country/Austin People are moved to get involved o Donate- Donate For Good o Volunteer o Adopt o Use us for resources (hotline, onsite) instead of TLAC Visitors can watch our progress and see changes daily in statistics, pets in need, and success stories o All news stories that involve us are easily linked to from our site Visitors can access any animal we have in the program by clicking on their picture o Links to bio and/or foster/shelter email and outcome Visitors have access to our resources and other resources in town o Visitors can rate those resources Visitors can learn information that they can also get on the hotline  Pet owners can read about problems/concerns about their pets with searchable database of information Potential pet owners looking for the right pet can learn about breeds and responsibilities with searchable database Interactive:  Ask the vet  Ask the trainer  Ask the shelter Website becomes “No Brainer” to pass on link to others verbally or via email. o People mention us and think of us to seek first for anything about pets! People/groups can learn how they can do what we are doing in their own community with website tutorials and webinars Pet owners can connect and chat on topics that interest them Pet owners can schedule Meet Ups through the site Pet owners can post their own pets pics and bios

Overall Setup (steps to think about at each stage):      

Every visitor is one click away from all the information from the main page We lead the list in search engines People enjoy the process because it is so easy Easy to remember site name People have a fun experience while on there o Natural place to go to “kill time” daily Attracts Ads to generate income

Suggestion: Start small, don‟t worry too much about the graphics as we will have to add in more or change things as the branding/marketing teams get moving. Get the idea up, we can tweak as we go.


P a g e | 38 Questions: 1. Do we have the right team to start this? If not, does anyone have any ideas on who to get (what talent are we missing)? As we grow it, we might want to think of companies we want to approach to get the complete picture off the ground. 2. Is our current domain provider the right one? 3. Are we standard compliant so any volunteer in the future can help? 4. If we follow the priority list, what is the estimated timeline for completion of each item (given our resources (very limited money, volunteers, free software that is available)? 5. Who is responsible for what? How will you obtain the content (and who will get it)? How will you add new content? When will we remove outdated content? Who will edit content before it goes live? Who will review changes? (major content changes need to be approved by the board). 6. Can we make the first change fairly rapidly as people start talking about APA! more? 7. What do you need from the board to get this going? What will you need next? 8. When is your next meeting?

Key Points in Process:    

  

Give Ellen answers to questions above as best as you can before 3/22 is finished. Priority is to get something up fast that describes what we are doing (use presentation for now). Then we will amend that as we go. Once you have decided on content for anything, please send to Ellen for review. Turn around will be less than 24 hours for feeback and approval. Ellen will send you Branding/Marketing details as soon as they are available and then layout and message will have to be changed to reflect uniformity. Then please submit the best 2-3 layouts you have created. Once a layout is decided upon, and as new pages are ready to be added, please submit new pages to Ellen for review. Any decision that requires money, needs to be brought to Ellen who can then bring it the board depending on the dollar amount. Thank YOU!

2008 Starting Operations Committee Research and Choose Shelter Software:     

talk with palmer about accounting=shelter software research pet point, chameleon, pet finder o http://www.petfinder.com/admin/shelter_software/index.cgi Winograd recommendations- www.nokillsolutions.org bring recommendations to Operations Committee Software needs to keep track of animal by: o age, o sex, o species, o alter status (and be able to tell us if it changes while the animal is in our care), o foster status o adoption information o microchip and rabies info o illness o We want to be able to use the shelter software to do financial modeling of our program. (ie we want to prove that moving them fast through the system is cheaper than sitting on them until they get chosen)- Talk with Palmer about her plans to show this

Research in-take volume (and call volume although we won‟t use that now) at TLAC to determine highest “staffing needs” or priority list for intake hours:


P a g e | 39 

Use information to figure out ways to catch each peak time or direct people to come back if we are not open/ready for intake

Create “In Person” intake process:     

Greeting Questionnaire to determine if need to enter center or can go to Mac or stay in home Protocol/script for answers to each question o Flow chart of decisions depending on answers Protocol to meet with behavior evaluator before intake and before owner leaves o Connect with behavior committees (dog and cat) User friendly intake form to glean as much info as possible from owner/finder o Esp important in cats o Behavior o Medical o Ability to skip sections if owner has no clue o Reliability marking of form so intaker can communicate with center staff if answers might be shady o Capture info on where they were found exactly to try to reunite with owner Photos and entering in system o What kind of photos do we need o Where do we link these photos to Fees or donations? o Can use national statistic (research) to post of how much an animal costs a shelter until it is adopted – set suggested fee to match. How do we keep animals stress free and separated during this process (assume little building in front of big building)? o How do we identify animals that need to be seen immediately by the medical team?  Mac has a good way to determine this. Stress relief for staff- focus on positive of saving this life!

Create flow and set up of animals to be efficient

decrease general health risks –

Create marketing plan for onsite adoptable animals o

o

generalities at first of layout of animals within vision of adopters  who is on eye level  do you mix dogs and puppies  do you mix cats and dogs  what do cages need to look like  what do animals need to look like  what is mix of animal colors, sizes, breeds  talk with Mac about his specific marketing plan specific promotions later

Create protocols and policies on cleanliness:  

daily, weekly, monthly chemicals needed/equipment needed/ventilation o indoors- each room (be general now – we will know more what we need after we reconvene) o cages o outdoors o vehicles o staff attire o bathing animals? zero tolerance policy

Protocols and Procedures for emotional stability: 

homeopathies?


P a g e | 40     

Lighting Noise Isolation from what?, how long? Scents Bedding/housing requirements

Protocols and Procedures for neonatal care      

Equipment Cleaning agents Staff sterility protocol Milk products Feeding schedules depending on age, weight, other criteria? When to spay/neuter adopt out Vaccination schedule

Protocols and Procedures for Hospital –       

List major diseases seen and treatment protocols Who needs to be isolated from whom? How long til they are safe to go back in general population? What is isolation/sterility protocol for staff? Nutritional needs Equipment needed When to spay/neuter/vaccinate according to health status?

Protocol for nutritional needs    

Cats and kittens Dogs and cats Feeding schedule as it relates to excretory schedule/cleanliness Water needs and set up Hospitalized and neonatal nutritional needs will be set up by those groups.

Animal Handling Protocol:      

Equipment needed Attire needed Proper handling for decrease stress to animal Proper handling for safety to staff and animal Connect with behavior committees to set up check lists for behavior monitoring and assessment before entering cages Videos/pictures needed to show proper restraint and or general handling

Create protocol for handling “found” animals:     

Use info from intake Contact with TLAC, petfinder asap Create instant flyer for posting in found neighborhood- generic Create craigslist posting- generic Way to identify when we can release this animal for workup and adoption

Create layout of facility- we will do this last after we get the other components back from each of us        

Assessment/intake reception isolation cats dogs neonatal bootcamp adoption


P a g e | 41

2008 Starting Medical Committee: 1. Research options for spay/neuter and rabies vaccinations (only activities that require a veterinarian). a. Low cost clinics b. Regular vet clinics c. Create a space (APA bought an airstream) and have a vet come there to perform weekly spay/neuter, rabies, other surgeries 2. Create medical team that handles and performs vaccinations and routine treatments for URI, fleas, skin problems like demodex and ear mites, diarrhea, fading kittens, parvo a. Needs vet oversight to order meds, set policies, etc. b. Needs people with some medical experience to properly calculate dosages, administer subq fluids, etc… c. Ideally have teams in all four quadrants of city that have “stashes” of noncontrolled medications so fosters can access meds as needed quickly. d. Need basic treatment protocols written out so that everyone follows the same treatment plans. 3. Research and put into place a medical record system that is virtual so it can be accessed by many people all over the city. 4. Create medical record protocols and templates. 5. Create medical information handouts for fosters and adopters 6. Set guidelines on medical issues that APA can handle, what to do if larger medical issue arises, and when to euthanize. 7. Reach out to area vet clinics for support on post adoption free exams, donation jar setups, and pro bono services. 8. Research and communicate all laws as they pertain to practicing on shelter animals (ie only licensed veterinarians can have access to controlled drugs or use anesthesia, administer rabies vaccines).

2008 Starting Rescue Committee • • • •

How will you choose which animals to save? Who has final decision? Get contract with city to pull animals as approved rescue partner How will you communicate with Shelter? What reports and rules do they have? Develop Team Positions

2008 Starting Dog Adoption Committee Goal: To document all policies and procedures for off site and on site dog adoptions. This could be thought of as the “how to” for adoption program managers.

To do and suggested timeline: 1 month to complete 1. Document major key factors of success in adoptions (ie mix of 3 big dogs, 2 medium dogs, 5 puppies). a. Would these be the same for off site and on site? 2. Document procedures for off site adoptions= Training Manaul; a. What supplies are always needed? b. What are the hours? c. What does the set up look like (diagram ok)? d. What is the selection process for animals? e. How many staff persons are there? i. What is each person‟s job description 1. where do they set up and stand, 2. what do they do all day, 3. how do they take breaks, 4. how do they interact with the public (greeting and giving information),


P a g e | 42 5. how exactly do they care for the animals, a. how do they pick them up and carry them b. how do they walk them on a leash c. what is the procedure if a dog „freaks out” d. what do they provide – food and water? 6. how do they do adoption transactions, a. what paperwork do they use b. what goes home with new owner 7. what do they do with supplies that are donated 8. what do they do donations . f.

3.

4. 5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

10. 11. 12. 13.

14. 15. 16.

How many volunteers are there (ie how many do we need there)? i. What is their job description (same as above). a. Provide training manual as if an employee Document the same for on site adoptions: a. Is it the same? i. If so, how do you make it the same in a stationary facility? ii. If not, what exactly is different? What is the expected budget of each location? (not onsite) What are fixed costs to program regardless of number of locations? (offsite program only) What other needs are there to expand to each new location? a. Vehicle b. More staff to assess, transport, counsel? c. Crates, tents, more? What contracts do we need to set up with locations? If have sample, please provide. What adoption criteria are used to determine eligibility? What do we need to do to get everything documented in the Center‟s database? a. Any specific software? b. If we do this, how would employees document money and animal transactions? (ie when they get back vs via laptop on site?) c. What information do we need to get from new owner‟s to allow for followup? What is expected timeline of individual animals based on size, age, and breed? a. From arrival to adoption. What is expected return rate across the board? What will be process for sick animals provided we have onsite medical facility at the Center? a. What will be process if an animal gets sick at the off site adoption location? If an animal is „fostered‟ by a person and is not housed at our facility, what do we need to do to ensure an organized approach to off site adoptions? a. Computer generated location match with foster home? b. Waiver and contract? c. Will that foster need to do anything to the animal before showing up on day 1? What? d. How will you or your staff determine eligibility of temperament and health status prior to first day? (can work with behavior committee on that)? What items do we need to get to make sure that branding/messaging is consistent with APA!? a. Will need to work with marketing committee Need to work with marketing committee to allow for donations onsite as well as cards to send home to direct people to website (they will create, you just work into training how they will be used) What is process for donations at offsites? a. Recommendation: small sign that says- “If you do not receive receipt for donation, you are entitled to free gift”. That encourages staff/volunteers to give receipts for donations and no money ends up pocketed. i. We will need to get receipt book for each site that has carbon copies.

Key Points in Process:  

It is critical that these are finished before we open. Think in your mind what someone would need to know if you died.


P a g e | 43 

Give finished manual to Ellen for review at before at end of 4 week timeline.

2008 Starting Dog Behavior Committee Suggested Timeline: see each category All outcomes need to be approved by Ellen for finalization

1. Download ASPCA Meet Your Match Program details (or get from Mac). 1. Create specific “check off list” for volunteers and staff to use to assess behavior in dogs at the Center (suggested timeline 4 weeks)  This should be written so that it is easy to digest (no more than one page), complete (covers all major points), and anyone can do it without supervision (idiot proof). 2. Create simple staff training program for MYM in dogs. This will be used by managers to train staff and volunteers. (suggested timeline 4 weeks) 3. Create protocol so that MYM assessment can be done BEFORE animal enters Center or is accepted into offsite adoption program (essentially at “check in”). (suggested timeline 2 weeks)  While still with owner  Not inside the shelter due to stress of other animals  Do we need a tent or small outbuilding in front of main building where assessments can take place?  While we are growing what will we tell people that want to “drop off” their pet with us at all hours?  Either make it so any staff person can do assessment or try to use times of the week when dogs have to be dropped off so that they can be assessed correctly. 4. Aggression: (suggested timeline 4 weeks)  Does MYM address this?  If yes, then use their guidelines for determining if an animal is too aggressive to keep in the program or not  If no, then we will have to create our own guidelines that any staff person can use at “check in”. o Talk with Mac. o These must be 100% because they will be used to turn away dogs from the program which means they only have 2 options:  Go to training to stay in home  Possible euthanasia 5. Training Program: (suggested timeline 6 weeks)  Out of control dogs in Center:  Idea: 3 day bootcamp. o Create program that requires each “out of control” dog to go through basic training that lasts at least 6 hours per day.  Need protocol so that volunteers can do 1 hour shifts per dog without changing methodology and confusing dogs.  End result should result in a dog that can walk on a leash, sit and lay down on command, stay when you walk away, and preferably not jump. o Idea: Create “certification” program like car BMW dealers use for used cars. If an animal goes through bootcamp with us then they will receive our certification that will make them more attractive to potential adopters. 6. Training Program for owners: (suggested timeline 6 weeks)  Dogs that have distressed owners  Create program that is easy for owner to do o Very few class sessions  One might do for most cases o Offered onsite often  Possibly „emergency basis‟?  Use outside facilities to get them in the door asap?  Daily programs onsite?


P a g e | 44 o o

 Needs to be “no brainer” for people to do it Free or low cost  Pros and cons to both Goal is to work with owner to keep pet  If that is not possible, then goal is to keep pet in that home until another is found  Hopefully by then the dog will be better trained

2008 Starting Cat Adoption Committee Goals: To develop policies and procedures for onsite and offsite adoption of cats.

To do and suggested timelines: 1. Create manual for Meet Your Match adoption policies. a. Free on ASPCA website 2. Create map of kennels to produce the highest number of “sales” a. What is the right mix of colors, ages, hair length per cage bank b. How do adult cats get the exposure they need (separate room from kittens or kittens strategically placed so cats are more attractive?) 3. Create policy and procedure for staff/volunteers to touch animals and interact with them: a. No yelling b. No scruffing unless absolutely necessary c. Proper way to carry a cat or kitten d. Ways to calm cats down e. What to do if cat „freaks out‟ f. How to control the spread of disease between cats in shelter or at adoption sites. 4. Create Packet of information that will go home with each cat. a. Medical information b. History c. FAQs d. Housing information e. Policy of returns 5. Create map of how staff/volunteers will interact with potential adopters a. Create employee script for greeting them b. Quiz for Meet your Match off of ASPCA website c. Process for allowing meet and greet between person/cat. i. Cleanliness to ensure no spread of disease from cat before or after that that person touches d. Create employee script for discussing adoption e. Create information sheet to capture i. Name, ii. Address and email iii. Phone number 6. Pricing structure: a. Adult cats: free i. Create Script for eliciting donation b. Kittens less than 8 months old: i. Research other groups to determine “going rate” 7. Draft adoption contract that specifies (work with Ellen on this): a. Feeding routinely b. Human interaction c. Medical care d. Housing fundamentals 8. For offsite adoptions: a. How are cats/kittens selected


P a g e | 45 b. How are they transported c. How are they set up on site i. Caging, bedding, litter, water, food d. How do you limit disease spread e. How do you let people interact with them i. May require finding inside space at each location where potential adopters can sit with them. ii. Alternatively, could buy fully enclosed tents that people could go into with cat. f. What kind of staff do we need to transport and handle adoptions? i. Will need separate job description for staff and volunteers who do off site adoptions g. Might be good to shadow Mac and see how we can apply his principles to cats i. Mix of cats/kittens and colors to bring

Key Points: We just need to provide something for day 1. We can tweak as we go but let‟s start with what we think is the best way to do it. Feel free to ask Ellen for any help/guidance.

2008 Starting Cat Behavior Committee All outcomes need to be reviewed before finalized

1. Download ASPCA Meet Your Match Program from their website (I think this is free). 1. Create specific “check off list” for volunteers and staff to use to assess behavior in cats at the Center (suggested timeline 4 weeks)  This should be written so that it is easy to digest (no more than one page), complete (covers all major points), and anyone can do it without supervision and without getting hurt (idiot proof). 2. Create simple staff training program for MYM in cats. This will be used by managers to train staff and volunteers. (suggested timeline 4 weeks) 3. Create protocol so that MYM assessment can be done BEFORE animal enters Center or is accepted into offsite adoption program (essentially at “check in”). (suggested timeline 4 weeks)  Purpose is to do assessment before the stress level is so high that test is unreliable (then you have to wait 2 weeks to get reliable results in cats)  While still with owner  Not inside the shelter due to stress of other animals  Do we need a tent or small outbuilding in front of main building where assessments can take place?  While we are growing what will we tell people that want to “drop off” their pet with us at all hours?  Either make it so any staff person can do assessment or try to use times of the week when cats have to be dropped off so that they can be assessed correctly.

What do we do with aggressive cats? (suggested timeline 6 weeks) 

If come in in live traps: o Create protocol to tell if they are strays that are friendly or truly feral (without getting anyone hurt).  Create handling procedures for staff for these animals that stay in our care until they find a home/colony. If are brought in by owner: o Create protocol to determine if cat will calm down once it is comfy (may need to just ask owner).  Create handling procedures for staff for these animals that stay in our care until they calm down.  If not, what do we do with it? o Determine Rabies status of any aggressive cat before allowing general Center handling.


P a g e | 46 Create general handling procedures for all cats and kittens documented, posted, and written in all training manuals. (suggested timeline 6 weeks) Create general assessment procedures for staff to be able to read cat “warning signs”. (suggested timeline 6 weeks)     

Cats in traps Aggressive cats brought in by owners Cats that become aggressive while in our care Cats that are on offsite adoption sites Cats that are in Center

2008 Starting Positive Alternatives To Shelter Surrender (PASS) Committee First priority: Develop At Shelter System Where volunteers are stationed at shelter to intervene when people come by to drop off an animal. Using policies created below, volunteers give surrenderers options other than leaving the pet at the shelter.

Tasks: 1. Procure HSUS "Pets for Life". Karen Medicus and I are working on getting this from the Humane Society. a. If that doesn‟t work, we will have to try to find another free resource or a different program. i. Needs research on alternatives b. Would prefer if this info was set up as a Wiki that can be updated by committee members as they run across questions. 2. Set up Google Grand Central Station Number. We are on the waiting list. 3. Need to create list of resources: a. Full list on www.austinspetdirectory.com b. Need list with contact info for specific groups to get VIP care for high risk animals i. Follow up system to make sure resource has been used and animal is doing well (ie do they need more help). 4. After it is all collected, then we will process it for consistency with the other messages that are out there from the other committees so we are not contradicting each other. 5. Need to create training protocols that we can use to start getting volunteers involved that tell them exactly how to answer the phone (script), how to talk to clients (tone), what questions to ask, when to refer, how to find the info they need, how to document calls/emails, etc... a. A very basic job description 6. Need to create web link from www.austinpetsalive.org with information and contact info. 7. Need to create advertisement for the service that we can share with ATA, AHS, TLAC, Epet, and any other group. 8. Call for volunteers to “man” the hotline.We want a hotline that will eventually be "manned" 24/7 and will be a host of information to help people handle their pets. It will be used for education, problem solving, counseling, and giving resources. a. Start small- one hour per day? b. Email only? c. Other ideas?

2008 Starting Foster Coordination Committee Goal: To create training manual for foster coordinator to follow once “hired” so they don‟t have to create any protocols/procedures. Suggested timeline: 6 weeks All protocols need to be reviewed before finalization.


P a g e | 47 1. 2. 3. 4.

Research successful shelters that have foster programs. Create criteria for animals that need to be fostered (work with Ellen and use other organizations as template) Create protocol for Center staff to communicate with Foster Coordinator when fostering is needed. Create protocol for FC to communicate with potential foster homes a. Eligibility? b. Training? c. How do we attract foster homes? 5. Create protocol for sending an animal home with a foster a. What supplies do they get sent home with? b. What do we ask them to pay for or what do we pay for? c. How do we keep track of animals in foster? d. How do we ensure good care? i. Weekly exams by doctor? ii. Weekly phone calls? e. Do we allow them to adopt a foster out without coming back to the Center? i. If yes, how do we ensure s/n, vaccines, etc…? 1. How do we get new owner data? 2. Do we charge a fee? ii. If no, how do we get the animals back? 1. What is the communication process to ensure timely return?

2008 Starting Volunteer Coordination Committee Goal: To create a manual for training the VC so that nothing needs to be “made up” after they get hired Suggested timeline 6 weeks All protocols need to be reviewed by Ellen before finalization 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

8.

Research successful volunteer programs and use as template for our program Work closely with shelter operations committee to determine best use of volunteer time Research protocols for training of volunteers to decrease liability and improve compliance Create job descriptions for each job that a volunteer can sign up to do – start with needs that we have now like foster coordinator, rescue coordinator, volunteer coordinator, offsite adoptions helpers, hotline helpers. a. Create training protocol and procedure for volunteers to follow before they can be “on their own” b. How do volunteers get promoted to alone status? i. What are levels of promotion? 1. what do they have access to as they get promoted? c. How do volunteers get “fired”? d. Do we require donation to volunteer Create protocol for VC to keep database of volunteers and keep track of time, training, and some system for scoring Create protocol for VC to communicate with volunteers a. Group training meetings? b. Regular Meetings c. Phone calls d. Emails Work with legal committee to get waiver for volunteers and determine if there are any other legal needs. a. If driving b. If handling animals c. If volunteering onsite or offsite Create levels of volunteerism to promote excitement, dedication, and sense of responsibility. a. Research other shelters that are successful with volunteers


P a g e | 48

First Letter out to Austinites using verticalresponse.com: From:

Austin Pets Alive! President, Ellen Jefferson, DVM

To:

{EMAIL_ADDRESS}

Subject: Join Dr. Jefferson in creating a No Kill City

Click to view this email in a browser

Dear Austin,

How is it possible that a city like Austin is still killing over 50% of the animals in it's shelters? It is unbelievable but true: dogs and cats just like yours and mine are still dying in Austin. Just today I read about a young husky mix with a wonderful temperament and good behavior, who will likely get euthanized because he won't be given the opportunity to get adopted. I am tired of being heartbroken every day for these animals wishing I could do something more for them. Aren't you? For those of you that don't know me, I founded EmanciPET Spay/Neuter Clinic in 1999 because I believed that spay/neuter was the only answer to the problem of too many pets being euthanized in our animal shelters. I still believe that spay/neuter is an integral piece if the No Kill recipe. EmanciPET is doing a great job getting over 80,000 animals fixed in and around Austin. However, I no longer believe that it is the only piece needed to create a No Kill city. One reason is that there are now statistics that show that there are many more homes available for a new pet each year than the number of animals we kill in animal shelters. Spay/neuter is still a cornerstone but there is more that needs to be done. As I have gotten to know the shelter system better over the years, I have come to realize that a community like Austin could have a shelter that does better in terms of life saving. Does that mean that I think Town Lake Animal Center is bad? No, I actually think that the fact that the city funded shelter is charged with animal control rather than animal welfare makes it impossible for our city to think in terms of "no kill". Austin is lucky enough to have a Humane Society that saves about 2500 animals a year. While this is definitely admirable, we need more animals saved. I recently joined Austin Pets Alive! as President because I don't want to wait for our city government to change the mission of TLAC. I don't want to wait the years it will take to build a new city shelter that might be able to save more animals. I am not the only one that doesn't want to wait- the 13,000+ pets killed each year don't want to wait either. I believe Austin Pets Alive! is the organization that can make this happen. Austin Pets Alive!'s mission is to promote and provide the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals in Austin. APA! has been creating smaller safety nets for pets for 10 years. With that mission in mind and the massive amount of work that needs to occur to get Austin to No Kill, I am asking you to help Austin Pets Alive! create a facility that can temporarily shelter all the animals that need our care so they don't have to go to TLAC. Help


P a g e | 49 us create the facility that will implement life saving programs. The Austin Pets Alive! Resource Center will focus on prevention, retention, and adoption with innovative, efficient, and most importantly life-focused procedures. Please join me in solving this problem NOW. We can do it. Our organization is run solely by dedicated volunteers. The amount of time and energy our dedicated volunteers are spending on this project is astounding. We need more people to help. If we all pitch in, I have no doubt that Austin, over every other place in America, can become No Kill in a very short period of time. I am bringing to the table the background and expertise to implement the operations. I need you to help APA! by donating for a building, volunteering to help implement these life saving programs NOW, and spreading the word so that all of Austin knows about our plans. There is hope for these pets, we just have to unite and make it happen. Let's stop the daily killing of 30+ animals at our shelters. Sincerely, Ellen Jefferson, DVM Austin Pets Alive! President www.austinpetsalive.org PS With as little as a $50 donation, we can save one animal today and find it a new home using our PASS program (read below). With a bigger donation, we can continue to grow our fund to move into a facility where we can actually shelter animals and not rely solely on foster homes.


P a g e | 50

The Ultimate Implementation Plan A Tool for Effectively Communicating How No Kill Can Be Implemented by City Government

Recommendation I- Define Mission Revise Mission of Animal Services Include as the key indicator in next FY Business Plan, a live outcome goal of 90%.

Always be Transparent •

Performance measures including number of animals taken in/euthanized/RTO/Adopt/Transfer by breed, species, age, and reason for euthanasia are reported monthly to Animal Advisory Commission and City Council. (in addition to any Asilomar data shelter chooses to report) Citizens that surrender their animal are required to sign an owner surrender form that includes an acknowledgement that the animal may be euthanized and staff will add the number of animals euthanized the previous year to the form.

Recommendations II- Restrict Unnecessary Euthanasia Killing While Cages Are Empty Moratorium Impose an immediate and permanent moratorium on the killing of any animal (except for terminal medical reasons or aggression validated by a behaviorist) when there are empty cages and kennels.

Institute Euthanasia Checklist • • • • • •

Call source to give last opportunity to save Check rescue partners Ensure animal has had opportunities to be found by owner Plea to foster Fair chance- every animal has opportunity to be seen by adopters Veterinary or Behaviorist signature that pet is untreatable

Recommendations III- Increase Live Outcomes Increase Citizens‟ Accessibility to Shelter Pets • •

The shelter should be open during the peak shopping times, until at least 7pm Mon-Sun. Revamp website- All animals are visible online within 1 hour of arrival at shelter. o The site will enable first time visitors and longtime friends of the Animal Center to connect immediately with the resources, including adoption/fostering resources, lost/found help and options to volunteer/donate. Easily marketable and memorable URLs will be available.

Increase Returns to Owners • • •

Following footsteps of Washoe County Animal Services, ACO will return 10% of in the field strays to owners while still in the field using foot searching techniques. In shelter Lost and Found program staff and volunteers will institute sign/flyer hanging campaigns, customer services and craigslist to reunite pets with owners. Volunteers will be needed. Elimination of the night drop boxes in the shelter allows for contact info and history on every pet to be acquired before surrender.


P a g e | 51 Increase Adoptions •

Audit Adoption Policies: o Ensure that the adoption policies follow Open Adoption Guidelines promote education and antidiscrimination while simultaneously ensuring safety of adopted pets o Adopters should be treated like gold and even late arrivals are accommodated. o Customer Service needs to be excellent o Pricing needs to be consistent with perceived desirability o Make harder to place animals more desirable by offering medical and behavioral care short term after adoption Hold Regular Adoption Events at Shelter o Special pricing and promotions for holidays, local events, or just weekends to invite the public in to the shelter Hold Regularly Scheduled Off-Site Adoptions o Bring the animals into the community on a regular basis o Allows people to avoid the shelter if they desire o Shelter pets go to adopters rather than adopters having one venue to choose from

Increase Transfers to Rescue Groups and other Shelters Help Rescue Groups take more animals by offering incentives ($ for medical or behavioral care) for animals that are less desirable (predefined as pit bull over 3 months, sick animals, behaviorally challenged dogs, bottle babies) and ensuring that animals are kept healthy while in the shelter. Offering free spay/neuter and testing would further incentivize groups to take more animals.

Recommendations IV- Increase Medical And Behavioral Care Medically Treat Every Animal As If It Will Live •

Enforce Intake Vaccine Policy o All animals over 4 weeks of age are vaccinated without exception (even if sick or fractious) before entering main kennel area or being exposed to other animals. Fund Make-Ready Capacity o Increase veterinary capacity to spay/neuter, vaccinate, test, minimally treat at least 90% of the animals entering the City shelter Audit Make Ready Efficiency o Ensure that animals are ready to go (spayed/neutered) immediately before or after chosen by “adopter interest” to limit use of cage space at shelter. Increased turnover= increased lives saved. Ensure that all animals are available for “adoption interest” immediately upon entry into shelter regardless of condition. Additional Veterinary Capacity for Injured/Ill Shelter Animals o Provide additional capacity for treating injured/ill animals that are candidates for rehoming. o Continue to treat known issues for adopters until resolved to decrease burden on citizens while still yielding live outcomes o Provide care for fostered pets on out-patient basis o Provide isolated wards for caring for specific types of diseases such as Parvo, Ringworm, and Upper Respiratory Disease. o Provide nursery ward for unweaned kittens while searching for foster.


P a g e | 52 Behavior Program Fund a behaviorist position to create programs that assist sheltered animals that have behavior issues and to create programs that reduce shelter intake.

Recommendations V- Empower the Community Large Scale Volunteer Program at City Shelter Volunteers are used in every aspect of city -shelter work- barely distinguishable from staff especially in marketing, in shelter customer service, adoption processing, and animal care

Donation Programs • • • •

Allow the public to be part of the solution by asking for and providing receptacles for donations both tangible and monetary. Online, onsite, and via mail Fund programs that directly save lives. Thank the community and show them how they helped.

A Robust Foster Program At any one time, over 50% of animals should be in foster. Building a foster network is key to increasing “cage” capacity and decreasing costs associated with animal care.

Recommendations VI- Limit Intake Counseling at Intake to provide alternatives to shelter surrender (PASS- Positive Alternatives to Shelter Surrender) Trained staff provide additional owner relinquishment counseling at all open hours of shelter and information regarding pet retention and alternative re-homing options. Staff is there during all open hours.

Provide Sterilization Services for Owned Cats and dogs Provide funding for free sterilization of owned cats and dogs. Target to people who make contact with the city shelter needing to relinquish, asking for help, or being cited.

Community Hospital Provides very basic medical and surgical care for owned animals who are in immediate danger of relinquishment to the shelter. CH is not advertised but is only used when animals are presented for possible surrender and these people are referred through the shelter Intake Staff (PASS) after trying other veterinary alternatives first. Low fees are charged as able to recoup costs.

Stray Cat Trap-Neuter-Return Program Return stray cats back in to the community from where they came, after spaying or neutering them. The City works with community stakeholders to develop related procedures and protocols to address this item and prevent unnecessary euthanasia of wild and semi-wild cats.


P a g e | 53

Political Advocacy


P a g e | 54


P a g e | 55


P a g e | 56


P a g e | 57

Arm Yourself


P a g e | 58


P a g e | 59


P a g e | 60

Prepare for Battle


P a g e | 61


P a g e | 62

Fight Smart


P a g e | 63


P a g e | 64


P a g e | 65

Be Political


P a g e | 66

Anticipate the Opposition


P a g e | 67


P a g e | 68


P a g e | 69

Become the Status Quo


P a g e | 70

Never Give Up


P a g e | 71

Additional Resources


P a g e | 72


P a g e | 73

Technology Google Apps You need a 501c3 to get a free Google Apps account (up to 3,000 email inbox addresses). Otherwise, it costs $5/month/email inbox address. Apply here: http://www.google.com/nonprofits/   

  

Email Groups: Create distribution lists (ie foster@austinpetsalive.org) Calendars: Create multiple calendars for different teams and schedules. Assign different access levels to users of calendars. Can embed calendars in your website, which we use for our adoption events: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/events/dog-adoption-events/ Docs: Great way to store all of your documentation online. Can also create forms. Voice: Acts like distribution list for phone calls, so a team can answer calls. When someone leaves voice mail, you‟ll get an email with text of voice mail and a button to listen to voice mail. Adwords: Allows you to use google advertising to increase traffic to your website

Yahoo Groups Because google groups are limited, we use yahoo groups for the main foster and volunteers groups. If you have a gmail account, you can only send out 500 emails per day. If you have a google app email account, you can only send out 2,000 emails per day. Each member of a google group counts as one email. So if you have a group with 600 members, someone with a regular gmail account wouldn‟t be able to send an email to that group.

Online Database We use zoho, because we grandfathered into a free account, but they are no longer free and we‟re getting bad support, so we don‟t recommend it. You‟ll probably want a way to separately collect and manage volunteer data and foster data. Other ideas:   

Google doc/form (limited functionality with data you collect) Wufoo Online volunteer management system

Website Highly recommend finding volunteer who knows Wordpress content management system.

Animal Management System We use Petpoint, but it has lots of problems and bad support. They offer web services so you can pull animal data to display how you want it or with easy frame on your website. If you‟d like the (php ) code we used on our site to display the pets as you‟d like, contact us at webmaster@austinpetsalive.org.


P a g e | 74

Austin Pets Alive! Development Committee Development committee teams Utilize volunteers and their amazing energy to be successful! It is easy to focus your energies on events, but leave those to volunteers and focus more on large donor and corporate relationships. Grants: Team researches and writes both corporate and foundation grants requests. Research can be done through corporate websites and with the Foundation Center – www.fconline.foundationcenter.org - (free access usually at local or university library). Grants under $20,000 can be exclusively written by a volunteer and any above $20,000 are written by a team with the development coordinator. All grants are proofed and submitted by development coordinator. Team meets monthly to go over any issues, discuss tactics, and celebrate successes! PET Squad (events): This team is in charge of setting up and manning booths as third party events, about half are trained counselors incase the event allows animals, and some also help plan events. I oversee a spreadsheet that shows all third-party event opportunities and there they can sign up for which ones they want to help plan/cover the day of. I require at least two people per event, with extra required if animals will be there. Team meets monthly to go over any issues, discuss changes/upcoming events and celebrate successes. Donor Recognition: Team does thank you calls, thank you letters and postcards, and helps with large donor recognition. A select few members also help with the data entry in the donor database system. Those who can do the data entry are kept to a minimum to protect the database from misuse as well as protect strict proper data entry. Most team members work remotely, but a weekly “thank you” party is held to finish up letters.

How to set up an online giving account Having an easy, accessible donate button on your website is key in your fund raising efforts. There are many options, but Razoo is easy and has a low charge rate (2.9% of each donation) and is the one I strongly suggest for young organizations. Go to Razoo.com to set up your organization page. Razoo is very user friendly so setting up will be easy! Click on the “edit” tab to add positive photos, a description of your organization‟s mission and vision, a nice thank you video, and donation amounts attached to what the amount has the power to do. Now you can encourage individuals to set up personal fund raising pages through your organization page and set up separate pages for each program at your organization. Razoo also makes sharing your donation page very easy. You just click on the “share” tab in your dashboard and it will give you easy access to the QR code, donation button, donation widget. All coding is provided pre-made! They send you the check or do the direct deposit on the 10th of every month. They also provide a really nice spreadsheet where you can see all your donor information – just click on “donations” and you can run all your necessary reports.

How to fund raise for specific animals through a Chip-in Chip-in is a good way to make money quickly, and therefore useful for medical cases you need extra funding for.


P a g e | 75 Go to www.chipin.com and sign up an account. You will need a paypal account for where the donations will be received as well (paypal takes 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction in processing fees) and you can set that up at www.paypal.com. Chipins are very easy to set up and the basics you need are name of fund raiser, amount needed, date fund raiser ends, and your paypal account email. While this is easy to set up and might suffice, you should also add a captivating story about why you are fundraising and include positive photos of the animal(s) directly affected by the funding.


P a g e | 76

Donation request letter Date

Company Name Company contact Company Address

Dear Company Contact Name,

Greetings from Austin Pets Alive! Please accept this letter as our expressed interest in developing a potential opportunity to partner with your company. We are hoping you might have an interest in setting up a relationship for supplies donations to our cause and we would welcome the chance to talk with you to explore various options that would be mutually beneficial to us both.

Since June 2008, Austin Pets Alive! has rescued over 9,500 dogs and cats from the brink of euthanasia, provided temporary and emergency foster homes, medical aid, and training assistance for owners who might otherwise have given up their pets. This is only possible because of thoughtful contributions from people like you.

** insert information about specific request***

Thank you in advance for considering our request for help. Your support would mean that Austin would be one step closer to creating a city that does not kill its cats and dogs.

Sincerely,

Jenna Riedi Development Coordinator 512.436.3841 jenna.riedi@austinpetsalive.org


P a g e | 77

Co-sponsorship agreement

The purpose of this agreement is to serve as a framework for the development of an effective working relationship between Austin Pets Alive and [organization name]. This agreement serves to formalize the responsibilities of those parties entering into a co-sponsorship relationship. In order for the co-sponsorship concept to function effectively, it is important that both groups strive to keep the lines of communication open. The delegating of responsibilities in this agreement will prevent misunderstandings which could jeopardize program quality. Use of the Austin Pets

Alive logo or name is prohibited unless preapproved in writing and signed by the assigned Austin Pets Alive representative. Groups Involved Organization Name __Austin Pets Alive!________________________________________________________ Contact Person(s) ___Jenna Riedi_____________________________________________________________ Email _jenna.riedi@austinpetsalive.org________________ Phone ___________________________________ Organization Name _________________________________________________________________________ Contact Person(s) __________________________________________________________________________ Email __ ______________________________________ Phone _____________________________________ Event Information Event Title ________________________________________________________________________________ Date ________________ Time ___________________ Location ____________________________________ Expenses Please indicate below who is responsible for what costs, or what the terms of the financial agreement are. Amount

Paid By

Performer/Speaker/Entertainment Fee

________________________________________________

Travel Expenses

________________________________________________

Publicity

________________________________________________

Hospitality

________________________________________________

Lodging

________________________________________________

Event Services

________________________________________________

Other Costs

________________________________________________

Unless expressly agreed to by Austin Pets Alive! and set forth above, Austin Pets Alive! will not be responsible for costs associated with the event. If one group is contributing a flat fee to the event, indicate who and what amount: _________________________________________________________________________________________


P a g e | 78

Describe how any profits will be distributed: _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ Under no circumstances will Austin Pets Alive! be responsible for any losses.

Delegation of Responsibilities Negotiation with agency/performers and contracts

_______________________________

Permits

_______________________________

Facility/equipment reservations

_______________________________

Fundraising requests

_______________________________

Hospitality/lodging/travel arrangements

_______________________________

Publicity Press release

_______________________________

Social media

_______________________________

Website _______________________________ Print

_______________________________

Other

_______________________________

Ticket sales

_______________________________

Day of event set up

_______________________________

Return of equipment

_______________________________

Other: _________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

_______________________________

Agreed to by:

__________________________________Austin Pets Alive!_________________________________________ Signature Organization Date

_________________________________________________________________________________________


P a g e | 79

Sample event sponsorship request June 7, 2011

Dreyer‟s Grand Ice Cream Foundation 5929 College Avenue Oakland, CA 94618

Dear Sir or Madam,

Greetings from Austin Pets Alive! Please accept this letter as our expressed interest in developing a potential opportunity to partner with your company. We are hoping you might have an interest in making a contribution to our cause for an upcoming event and we would welcome the chance to talk with you to explore various options that would be mutually beneficial to us both. Since June 2008, Austin Pets Alive! has rescued over 8,000 dogs and cats from the brink of euthanasia, provided temporary and emergency foster homes, medical aid, and training assistance for owners who might otherwise have given up their pets. This is only possible because of thoughtful contributions from people like you. We are currently planning a summer adoption event on July 23 and 24 where we will do adoption fee specials to promote adoptions of the cats and dogs in our program. We are writing to request a $1,000 sponsorship of the event so that we can recover some of the loss through the adoption fee specials. In return for your donation, your business will be included in the following publicity for the event:  Blog post - APA has about 1,300 daily visitors to our website  Facebook post - APA has 12,000 facebook followers  Video - A video will be posted to facebook and twitter the day before the event  Flyer Thank you in advance for considering our request for help. Your support would mean that Central Texas would be one step closer to creating a city that does not kill its cats and dogs. Sincerely,

Jenna Riedi Development Coordinator 512.436.3841 jenna.riedi@austinpetsalive.org


P a g e | 80

Event report form Austin Pets Alive Event Report

Your Name: ______________________________________________________________ Name of Event: __________________________________________________________ Date of Event: ____________________________________________________________ Bag Number (circle one):

1

2

3

Brochures that need to be replaced: ___________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Binder pages that need to be refilled: __________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Donations in donation box: yes / no

Please attach the binder pages that were filled out, including any notes and all donations, and place in an envelope on my desk.

Thank you so much!!


P a g e | 81

Donor thank you letter/tax receipt Date

Donor Name Donor Address

Greetings Donor Name, On behalf of Austin Pets Alive!, I would like to thank you for your generous donation of $Amount. Your contribution makes it possible for us to eliminate the needless killing of companion animals in Austin. Since June 2008, Austin Pets Alive! has rescued over 9,500 dogs and cats from the brink of euthanasia, provided temporary and emergency foster homes, medical aid, and training assistance for owners who might otherwise have given up their pets. This is only possible because of thoughtful contributions from people like you. We have moved into our Austin Pets Alive! Animal Resource Center and are using innovative, life-focused programs to attain No-Kill Success and relieve some of the burden on the city shelter by deflecting animals from TLAC to APA!. We look to save even more animals than before with this new Center. The Resource Center also serves as the first resort rather than the last resort for pet owners in order to proactively affect the pet/pet owner relationships before it is too late. We want to help people help others and themselves with pet problems. No goods or services of any value were or will be transferred to you in connection with this donation. Please keep this written acknowledgment of your donation for your tax records. Once again thank you for your generous donation! Sincerely,

Jenna Riedi Development Coordinator 512.436.3841 jenna.riedi@austinpetsalive.org

*** Donâ€&#x;t forget to check with your employer to see if they will match your donation. Itâ€&#x;s a quick and easy way to double your impact! ***


P a g e | 82

Donor recognition plan Austin Pets Alive! Donor Recognition Plan

$1 - $9.99

$10 $49.99

$50 $149.99

$150 $499.99

$500 $999.99

$1000 and up

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X Email Thank you Post card thank you (mailed within one week) Thank you letter and receipt on stationary (mailed within one week)

X

Phone call thank you (made within one month) Personalized note on APA stationary from Dr. Jefferson (mailed within 1 month) Letter with number and pictures of animals saved ($100/animal) sent within 6 months) Invitation for 2 to the gala/large event (invited 6 weeks before the event)

X

X

** Honor/Memory: the person making the donation receives a thank you; the person donation was made in honor of receives the picture frame magnet and photo of animal that was sponsored ** Building/Adoption Site Sponsorships: thank you letter right away, a 3 month and a one year letter with number and pictures of animals saved through their specific sponsorship ** End of the year: send certificates of appreciation to businesses that donated/supported $1000 or more


P a g e | 83

Commonly requested information for grants History Austin Pets Alive! (APA) is a 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to making Austin, Texas, a no-kill city. A no-kill city does not kill healthy and treatable pets. The industry standard defines no-kill as saving at least 90% of the pets who enter the government run shelter system (the other 10% are usually too sick/injured/aggressive to be saved and are humanely euthanized.) APA came into being in 1997 when it successfully advocated for a city council resolution to stop the large-scale killing of homeless animals (19,000 that year alone) in the city‟s only municipal animal shelter, Town Lake Animal Center by the year 2001. Although the city failed to fulfill the entire no-kill pledge, the organization successfully coaxed the City of Austin to double its budget for animal care, create a volunteer program at Town Lake Animal Center where there had never been one before, and saw that shelter‟s euthanasia rate drop from 85% to 50% of intake.

Over the next seven years following that success, the small group of volunteers making up Austin Pets Alive! targeted their activities to lobbying the city on behalf of homeless pets and supporting local public access to low-cost spay/neuter surgery.

In June 2008, Austin Pets Alive! transformed its role in the welfare of Austin‟s homeless animals and grew dramatically under dynamic new president, Ellen Jefferson, DVM. Recognizing that even substantial city-wide progress in spay/neuter efforts still left over 10,000 cats and dogs killed (still 50% of intake after seven years) in the city shelter each year, the organization re-focused on ensuring that all healthy or treatable pets make it out of the shelter alive. Through an arrangement negotiated with city shelter officials, Austin Pets Alive!‟s work now revolves around saving only those cats and dogs left behind by all other rescue groups, shelters, and Town Lake Animal Center visitors; those who are scheduled for euthanasia the next day. It develops resources to foster, treat and adopt them out, proving that the reasons cited for euthanasia could be overcome. Public awareness and community programs that help people keep their pets out of the shelter complement this work.

In March 2010, Austin Pets Alive! played a lead role in prompting a new city no-kill resolution. The organization‟s 700+ active dedicated volunteers now work to make the resolution a reality by 2012, a much more achievable goal than in in 1997 before there were so many substantial animal welfare programs in the community. APA fills the gaps in the community by identifying the problems that leave dogs and cats euthanized at the shelter and creating innovative programs to overcome those specific problems. Programs to save two entire classes of shelter animals, parvo-positive dogs and unweaned kittens, have been especially successful, with survival rates well above national averages.

Austin Pets Alive! has saved over 8700 pets from certain death in just under three years, and finds a home for each through 12 daily adoption sites spread throughout the city. As a result of its work, the city‟s euthanasia rate fell by 20% in 2008 alone, was only 21% in 2009-10 and has been less than 11% since December 2010. Mission To promote and provide the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals.


P a g e | 84 Vision An Austin where the city shelter is used as a safety net for lost pets in search of their owners and where abandoned pets find new homes. Town Lake Animal center will no longer be a place where animals who could have seen a bright future are euthanized. Beyond that, APA hopes to see shelters all across the US embrace the No Kill philosophy, using Austin as a shining example. Current Budget Latest 990 Tax Document APA!‟s core programs Rescue – APA takes the animals directly from the euthanasia lists of Central Texas shelters, such as Town Lake Animal Center, Williamson County Humane Society and Bastrop County Humane Society, and puts as many as possible in foster homes until they can be adopted. There are currently over 500 foster homes working to save over 3,000 animals in the last year alone. Off-Site Adoption - Having at least 12 daily adoption locations for both cats and dogs throughout the community is the key to high adoption rates. This program is the largest in the country. Other Programs Include:

● No-Kill Handbill – APA!‟s daily e-mail newsletter which includes articles about lost and found pets, animals in need, news and information about APA!. ● PASS (Positive Alternatives to Shelter Surrender) – Since October 2008, PASS has been a pilot project, working to provide rehoming, medical, and behavioral resources to owners considering surrendering their pets to Town Lake Animals Center. PASS helped 821 people in 2009 find their own solutions to their pet problems, thereby preventing shelter intake. ● Behavior and Enrichment ○ Healthy Dogs, Healthy People Program – APA takes dogs that have been at Town Lake Animal Center for over one month to APA‟s Lady Bird Lake trail adoption site in an effort to give them more opportunities for placement. These dogs join the APA dogs for much needed exposure and exercise on the Lady Bird Lake running trail where they can be “checked out” for a good run with joggers. ○ Fresh Start Program - Dogs in need of some behavioral guidance are put into the Fresh Start Program. Approximately 2000 dogs a year are killed at Town Lake Animal Center for fixable behavior issues. The majority of these are highly adoptable, non-aggressive dogs who need minimal to moderate behavior support to address basic obedience and socialization issues. ○ Dog Walking and Cat Socializing - each dog in the APA program living at the facility is walked by a volunteer at least twice a day as a means of exercise and socialization with people. The cat team has a similar program ensuring that each cat receives one-on-one attention each day. ● Bottle Baby Program- APA has built a “station” for orphan babies who need milk supplemented so that resources can be combined rather than create the hundreds of trained foster homes that would be required but do not currently exist. The babies are housed at the central station until they are “weaned” and then sent to less intensive foster homes for proper socialization. ● Puppy ICU Program- APA has created a hospital ward that treats puppies for parvovirus, a disease that kills 90% of the puppies it infects without treatment. The Austin Pets Alive Puppy ICU ward has saved 85% of these puppies and is one of the only such programs in the US. ● Big Sisters/Big Brothers Program- APA‟s volunteers assign themselves to the dogs and cats and “spoil” them while they are in the program. This program enriches the quality of life for sheltered dogs and cats and makes them more adoptable as personalities emerge and are documented on the APA website. Austin Pets Alive! Board of Directors


P a g e | 85 State Representative Eddie Rodriguez (Board Chair) Eddie is the State Representative for District 51, serving East Austin and Southeast Travis County in the Texas Legislature since 2003. He has served on APA!‟s board since 2004. Eddie became involved in Austin animal welfare after rescuing several puppies from the street and seeing the need for pet-related resources in his neighborhood. He believes strongly in the mission of APA! and its ability to work with both private and public sectors to achieve its goals. Ellis Winstanley (Treasurer and Board Member) Ellis Winstanley, along with twin brother Austin, specializes in business turnarounds and startups, including Cain & Abel‟s Bar and Grill, beloved among University of Texas students, and Aztec Promotional Group. The twins started Company Six Productions in 2006 to produce and promote events. They formed Tradelogic Software Group in 2003 to create business management software. Ellis graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2003 with a degree in Spanish language and culture. His household has included three rescue animals, a Catahoula mix, a Siamese cat, and currently, Buddy, a Catahoula/Lab Mix adopted from Austin Pets Alive! in 2008. He joined Austin Pets Alive!‟s board in 2010 as treasurer. Stephanie Arena (Secretary and Board Member) Stephanie is the Marketing Director for the United States Tennis Association, Texas Chapter. She joined APA! in 2003 and became involved with feeding feral cat colonies, and assuming more responsibility until she joined the board. Her goal is to see Austin as a true “No-Kill” city due to APA!‟s innovative programs for retention of pets and life saving adoptions. While continuing with her work with feral cats, she shares her home with a number of domesticated kitties. Palmer Neuhaus (Board Member) Although she joined APA! in 2008, Palmer has been involved in animal welfare since volunteering at the Cedar Park SPCA while attending college at Southwestern University. As an employee of TLAC in the 1990‟s, Palmer was instrumental in abolishing the gas chamber and establishing the health and temperament program. She and her son Caleb are still working hard to make Austin safe for animals, including enriching APA!‟s foster program. Palmer is a Financial Advisor at Raymond James. Palmer is Council Person Randi Shade‟s appointee to the Animal Advisory Commission. Don Pitts (Board Member) Don brings more than 20 years of experience in the music industry, entertainment, community outreach, event planning, marketing and management. Currently the Program Manager for the City of Austin Music Division, his career has been devoted to all aspects of the music industry. Don was instrumental in creating and producing the successful project known as Austin GuitarTown, which raised over $640,000 for four local non-profits. With this event, he brought together hundreds of artist, sponsors, musicians, business, and civic leaders to raise awareness of the Austin music and art scenes. Pitts served several years on the Austin Music Foundation board as well as Austin Music Commission, Live Music Task Force, Create Austin Leadership Council. Tom Albright (Board Member) Tom is a board certified trial lawyer with more than 30 years of experience in commercial litigation. Tom holds both a Bachelor‟s degree and JD from UT. After a long tenure with a premier Austin law firm, including ten years at the helm, Tom is now a solo practitioner who is happy to devote his advocacy skills to APA!. Tom is the father of three grown sons and has lived in Austin for most of his life. He is also a long distance runner. Tom and his wife Cindy Meston, a UT clinical psychology professor, have fostered a variety of homeless pets for APA and are the proud parents of five cats and one Maltipoo.


P a g e | 86

Sample event flyers


P a g e | 87

Marketing & PR Department Structure PR team:  

Writes, sends out press releases Manages social media accounts (facebook and twitter)

Branding team:   

Makes all merchandise, collateral, materials, etc. Responsible for the overall look of adoption sites/building Often have to play the “bad guy” when well-intentioned volunteers make items that don‟t comply with our style guide

Campaigns team: 

Leads “campaigns” to spread messages and gather resources for different areas

Brand Well-intentioned volunteers and partners are going to do things to your logo that could hurt your brand. Have a published style guide to head off these problems, avoid hurt feelings, and ensure a consistent, professional look: http://f.cl.ly/items/0e3E1g3e0S0F3H2a2S1g/APAStyle_v001.pdf Set up online form for people to request items: http://volunteer.austinpetsalive.org/Branding.html First Marketing Pieces     

flyer - general introduction rack cards - cheaper than color flyers, sturdier business cards (an email address like gretchen.meyerapa@yahoo.com is not nearly as professional as gretchen.meyer@austinpetsalive.org. thank you cards and postcards We use http://vistaprint.com for many printing needs. Their prices are low, especially for low quantities. They have a reputation for sneaking hidden items on your order if you accidentally click on something and you‟ll see charges on your credit card later (like magazine subscriptions), so be careful. We‟ve never had a problem and their customer service has been good. Get on their mailing list for the best prices.


P a g e | 88

Dog and Cat Marketing This team started in the PR/Marketing Department, but was later moved into the Dog and Cat Programs, as the work is highly operational and the Manager of this team needs to be in close contact with the Adoption, Foster, and Rescue Managers. Create online form for fosters/volunteers to submit info about your pets (don‟t use Word doc): http://www.austinpetsalive.org/dog-profile and http://www.austinpetsalive.org/cat-profile For bios, check out Elizabeth Doyle‟s advice: http://www.bestfriends.org/archives/forums/032805adoptionads.html

Messaging Make and publish guidelines to let volunteers know where to go when they have a branding, messaging, or media question: http://volunteer.austinpetsalive.org/PR---Marketing---Guidelines.html Make and publish guidelines for your team to have consistent messaging and explain hot topics: http://volunteer.austinpetsalive.org/Communication-guidelines.html Use AVMA stats to find out approximate number of new pets acquired every year in your city to show that your community doesn‟t have an overpopulation problem: Total households * % who own dogs/cats * mean number of dogs/cats per household * % under 1 year old (if under 1 year old, they must have been acquired in last year). In the Greater Austin Area there are roughly 720,000 households, 44.6% of households have dogs, the mean number of dogs per household is 1.8, and 12.3% of the dogs are under 1 year old:

720,000 x 44.6% equals 321,120 dog owning households and 578,016 dogs. Of all dogs, 12.3% were under the age of 1 year (meaning they were acquired that year) or 71,095 dogs were acquired that year.

In the Greater Austin Area, 31.3% of households have cats, the mean number of cats per household is 2.4, and 13.7 are under 1 year old: 720,000 x 31.3% equals 223,920 cat owning households and 537,408 cats. Of all owned cats, 13.7% were under the age of 1 year or 73,625 cats were acquired that year.


P a g e | 89

PR Keep online spreadsheet of reporters‟ emails and notes. Keep track of your interactions with each reporter. Salesforce.com may be a good way to keep track of everything and nonprofits can get it for free. ALWAYS put the addresses in the BCC line when sending out emails to reporters. There are different reporters/producers for the weekdays versus the weekends. Sometimes you will need to send the same item twice – once during the week and once on the weekend. Types of correspondence with media:   

Press release – Use for big news. Media alert – Use for your events. Send once during the week, to get on their calendar, then send again the morning of the event to remind. Morning show pitch – Send these one-by-one and personalized for each morning show.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Melissa Miller; melissa.miller@austinpetsalive.org; 512-658-1131

Austin Pets Alive! Aiding in Bastrop Animal Search And Rescue Efforts

Nonprofit organization also offering free medical care to pets affected by the devastating wildfires AUSTIN, TEXAS (September 10, 2011) - Austin Pets Alive! is working in tandem with the Bastrop Sheriff Department and Animal Control in a door-to-door search and rescue mission for those whose pets may be stuck in their still evacuated homes without food or water following the week's wildfires and evacuations. The organization has gathered a list of approximately 170 names and addresses with descriptions of the missing pets for which they're searching. Additionally, Austin Pets Alive! is offering free medical assistance to those whose pets have medical conditions caused by the fires. They have set up a mobile veterinary clinic, located across from the Bastrop Police Department at the dog park at 104 Grady Park Lane. The mobile clinic is currently being used as the command center and also has supplies and pet food available for those in need. "In these trying times, we feel that it is our duty to be here for the community and to help in whatever way we can," said Ellen Jefferson, executive director of Austin Pets Alive! "For those whose pets may have made it through the fire, we don't want to allow them to die inside their own homes from dehydration or starvation, so we are thankful for Bastrop Animal Control for allowing us to go behind evacuated lines and potentially help save lives." People displaced by the fires that need assistance with their pet and are looking for temporary foster home for their pets can contact faith.w@austinpetsalive.org. Those looking to help can visit www.austinpetsalive.org/donate-now. Volunteers are welcome at the Adoption and Resource Center at 2807 Manchaca Road or at the command center in Bastrop at 104 Grady Park Lane. Throughout the week, Austin Pets Alive! has taken in 258 animals from local shelters to help free up room for the flood of animals coming in due to the fires. As these were animals that were already strays and property of the shelter prior to the fires hitting, APA! is adopting these animals out, and hosting half-priced adoption fees today. About Austin Pets Alive!


P a g e | 90 Austin Pets Alive! is a non-profit organization of volunteers dedicated to promoting and providing the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals. The organization's purpose is twofold: to provide the services needed to save the lives of the thousands of pets killed every year at city shelters and to prevent them from getting there in the first place. ###

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jenna Riedi, jenna.riedi@austinpetsalive.org, 608-213-6591

Austin Pets Alive! Kicks Off Summer with Hawaii 5-0 Adoption Event

Local non-profit offering adoption discounts and family-friendly festivities for the holiday weekend WHAT: To celebrate start of summer, APA! is hosting a special family-friendly party at their building with games and prizes, when the City's Town Lake Animal Center will be closed. The group will be offering discounted adoption fees of $50 for all adoptable pets, thanks to sponsor Protect America Cares. Visuals of potential adopters looking at cats and dogs and interviews with APA! staff are available. WHO: Austin Pets Alive! is a local non-profit organization of volunteers dedicated to promoting and providing the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals. The organization's purpose is two-fold: to provide the services needed to save the lives of the thousands of pets killed every year at city shelters and to prevent them from getting there in the first place. WHERE: The APA! Adoption and Resource Center at 2807 Manchaca Road and APA! adoption sites located throughout the city. All locations can be found at http://www.austinpetsalive.org/. WHEN:

Monday, May 30. All adoption locations will be open from 12 p.m to 6 p.m.

CONTACT:

Jenna Riedi, jenna.riedi@austinpetsalive.org, 608-213-6591


P a g e | 91 [Subject: In-Studio Interview Opportunity: Two Local Shelters Enter National ASPCA 100K Challenge ] Hi XXX, Wanted to see if you'd be interested in having a representative from Austin Pets Alive! and the Humane Society of Williamson County on for an in-studio interview next week (8/1-8/6) to talk about the ASPCA 100K Challenge and a huge, joint adoption event (with NO adoption fee) the two non-profits will be hosting next Saturday (8/6). Austin Pets Alive! and the Humane Society of Williamson County are among the 50 nationwide contestants competing for grants totaling $300,000 in a challenge hosted by the ASPCA, with the top prize being $100,000. The purpose of the competition is to push communities to increase the number of animals adopted from their shelter, and Austin Pets Alive! hopes to adopt out 2,000 cats and dogs within the three month period of the contest . Specifically, the APA! and HSWC representatives can speak to:

 A joint no-fee adoption event being held on August 6th  Austin's current success in becoming No-Kill, how APA! has been involved, and what it will take for the city to continue its success

 What APA! plans to do during the three month period to increase adoptions, and what the group will need from the community in order to do this

 How partnerships with shelters outside of Austin, like Bastrop County and Williamson County will play a role in the challenge

In addition to the in-studio interview, we'd love to invite you to our Adoption and Resource Center to film adopters and volunteers during a joint adoption event with the Humane Society of Williamson County. During the event, all animals at that location will have their adoption fee waived to kick off the start of the competition. And of course, we'd also be able to bring a furry creature or two to the segment. Please let me know if you have any questions or would like me to send over additional details. Thanks! Sarah


P a g e | 92

Facebook and Twitter Facebook   

Profile: Your individual account with your name – these are for people only and Facebook may take away your account if they‟ve found you‟ve set up a profile for an organization. Group: Forum for groups of people to communicate – might be good for different groups of volunteers. Groups can be open or closed. Page: Use this for your organization.

Steps to create Facebook page: 1. Visit https://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php 2. Choose “Company, Organization, or Institution” 3. Under Category, choose Nonprofit, then enter your organization‟s name Congratulations, you have a page! Now, customize it a bit for your organization: 1. Upload a logo or image, if you don‟t have a logo yet (It‟s ok if you want to get your page started if you‟re still working on your logo). 2. Invite some others from your org, or skip this for now. 3. Add your website url (if you have it) and info about your organization. To continue administering your page, use the “Edit Page” button on the page. You‟ll only see this button if you‟re an administrator on your page (which you will be by default if you‟re the one who created the page):

Get a custom url: Once 25 people have “liked” your page, you can get a custom url to make it easier for people to find your facebook page (ie, http://www.facebook.com/austinpetsalive): https://www.facebook.com/username/


P a g e | 93

Twitter 1. Create account at: http://www.twitter.com 2. Start following other organizations: a. Use Search bar to find other orgs b. Many organizations have their twitter link on their home page. Click this to go straight to someone‟s twitter page.

Then click the “Follow” button to follow them.

3. Start sending out news :

4. In addition to sending out your own news, re-send interesting news someone else has sent to your followers – called a “retweet”, or RT - using this format: RT @twittername This is the message that was interesting that you want to send.


P a g e | 94 Example: RT @austinpetsalive Rumor has it the live outcome rate at TLAC in August was 95%! By using the @ symbol, the twitter account that is referenced after the @ symbol will see that you referenced it. You can also simply click the “Retweet” link by the interesting news to Retweet something. Main page has 5 tabs:

1. Timeline: Shows everything “tweeted” by everyone you follow. After awhile, this may become an unmanageable list


P a g e | 95 2. Mentions: Shows everything that others have said about you, by using the @ symbol

3. Retweets: Shows everything you‟ve posted that others have retweeted. 4. Searches: Save searches, like of your organization name, for when people referenced your org but didn‟t use the @ symbol. 5. Lists: Eventually you are going to follow too many people/organizations and the “Timeline” view will be unmanageable. Use lists to categorize the people and organizations you‟re following. APA has the following lists: a. Partners b. Media c. Local animal welfare orgs d. No-kill orgs


P a g e | 96

Rescuing Dogs & Cats at Risk for Unnecessary Euthanasia Handbook Rescuing Dogs & Cats at Risk of Unnecessary Euthanasia

Trudy then

Trudy now

No other option for a live outcome from the shelter   

We only focus on those with no other options We defer to all other options if one arises. If someone else will save one we were working to save, we let them and focus on another.

Identifying “At Risk” dogs and cats: ○ ○ ○

Shelter has deemed unadoptable and has listed as “At Risk” of being euthanized Other Rescue Groups have declined saving them Owner reclaim options have been exhausted

Orphaned Kitten in APA! Nursery


P a g e | 97

First Steps Identifying your Resources and Capabilities Setting capacity number of animals and the criteria for those you can save How many foster homes do you have available and what types/ages are they willing to take? What types of medical and/or behavioral problems can you accommodate? How many animals are you capable of adopting out on a monthly basis?

Golden Rule: Intake numbers need to match adoption numbers closely so you don‟t get ahead of yourself. As your adoption program grows, so will your ability to save more animals

Working with the shelter where you will be saving lives 

Meet with the shelter you will be working with and address the following questions: o How can you identify dogs and cats “at risk” on a daily basis? o Do they have a report they can provide to you? When is it available and how long do you have to make a decision? o What information will be provided?  Medical? Behavioral? Owner Surrender Notes?  How will you receive a copy of the records?  Do they vaccinate for Distemper and Parvo on intake?  Do they test for Feline Leukemia? o Will they allow your Rescue Team access to these animals for evaluations? o If you identify one you can save, how long will you have to coordinate getting it out of the shelter and finding foster? How will you notify them of ones you are working on saving? o Will/can any basic or additional medical work up be provided before the animal leaves the shelter? o How will you receive the shelter‟s medical and behavioral records for the ones you are pulling? o How can you assure the ones you are working to save are safe from being euthanized while you figure out placement?

Forming your Rescue Team: We formed two teams, one for dogs, and one for cats Manager(s)/Program Director(s): a. b.

Has the tough job of deciding who you can and cannot save. Must be level headed, practical and focused on the big picture and sustainability so you do not get ahead of your resources. Must adhere to the “Golden Rule”, capacity number and criteria


P a g e | 98

c. d. e. f.

g.

i. Needs to clearly understand that your intake numbers need to match adoption numbers closely so you don‟t get ahead of yourself. The choices of those you do pull need to be adopted quickly so you can save more ii. Needs to constantly be aware of output/adoptions to make sure that intakes says consistent with animals being placed Must have an understanding of “adoptability” of the animals in order to prioritize who is saved in what order. The quicker they are adopted, the quicker that spot can be used to save another Must maintain constant communication with the other programs to be aware of their challenges and abilities to expand and how this effects the lives you are trying to save Trains and creates protocols for volunteers and oversees that the relationship between the rescue team and the shelter is a positive one, even in difficult times Needs to be able to review the shelter‟s notes on each animal for consideration to be “pulled”, and also look for alternate opportunities to save lives you cannot take into your program. I.e. could the owner be called to possibly reclaim/ could the adopter that changed their mind be called and helped to adopt? The Rescue Program ability to save lives will be constantly changing, the manager needs to be able to adapt to the constant changes so no opportunity to save a life that meets the programs criteria is missed

Evaluators: h. i.

j.

k.

l.

Hands on at the shelter, looking and evaluating the animals at risk of being euthanized Report their findings back to the group so the Manager can make decisions, share information with the Foster Team, and the Evaluator going the next day so they knows what is going on with the ones “on hold” In the beginning as you are saving the easier to adopt animals, the handling knowledge level here can be fairly basic. As you move on to save animals with some “issues” the level of handling knowledge will need to be greater, but hopefully your Evaluators will continue to learn and their ability increase at the same time The Evaluators have the very tough job of meeting the animals “at risk” and realizing that they cannot all be saved. They will have to try and remain focused on the fact that you are saving who you can today, and hope that the number you can save increases and if wasn‟t for them doing this tough job that day, no one would be getting out Need to understand and respect the decisions the Manager makes realizing that the decision are being made based on many factors i.e. foster homes available, animals currently available for adoption, current animals in the program with challenges, money available to provide medical treatment, training etc.

Additional Support a. b. c.

Photographers/Videographers Marketing - Posting at risk animals on social media i.e. Craig‟s List, Facebook Administrative - Assisting with paperwork/data entry

Aspects of a Successful Rescue Team 1.

2. 3.

Following the “Golden Rule”: Not getting in “over our heads”: Being able to make the tough decisions for the welfare and sustainability of the program a. Recommend that intake numbers are similar to adoption numbers for said period b. Consider time and expense for individual cases. The faster they are adoption ready, another animal can be saved c. Staying focused on the big picture Stay positive! Focus on those we can save and work toward increasing that number Dedicated Volunteers a. Maintain good communication and support of one another b. Creativity, how can we save more even if we cannot take them into our program at this time i.Posting at risk dogs and cats on Craig‟s List ii.Calling previous owners iii.Talking to the public while at the shelter about animals at risk


P a g e | 99 iv.Asking the shelter to reconsider an animal that they may have deemed unadoptable when it came in due to fear, but is now well adjusted v.Identifying animals that other Rescue Groups may be interested in if contacted (i.e. particular breed or ability) and asking the shelter to reach out to that rescue group, or doing so ourselves

Obstacles We Encountered in the Beginning ● ● ● ● ● ●

It took us some time to get a “true” list from our shelter. At first they gave us a list of animals they were providing to the other rescue groups and not the real list from which they would choose who was euthanized next. Working with shelter management that does not always embrace the change Staying positive and professional while working with those that do not agree with No Kill Started with just two people going on daily basis to review “the list” Limited number of foster homes and no overnight location Learning to deal with our emotions that although we wanted to save them all, we had limitations and were not capable of doing so, yet

New Arrivals at APA!

Typical Day for the Rescue Team ● ●

“At Risk” list is received from the shelter by email Evaluator(s) at the shelter from 5-7pm looking at all those at risk: our shelter‟s daily list wasn‟t ready until 5pm, and then they closed at 7pm so we had two hours to evaluate and make our decisions

Dog Evaluations ○Approach, how do they do being approached in the kennel ○Can they be easily leashed and walked to a play yard ○Did they react to other dogs while walking to the play yard? ○Can they be easily handled, can they be comfortably restrained? ○Do they know any commands ○Any health concerns seen or noted by shelter or previous owner? ○Any behavioral concerns seen or noted by shelter or previous owner? ○Take a picture so it can be shared with the adoption team or the alternative placement team that would be handling Craig‟s List and Face book


P a g e | 100 Cat Evaluations ○Do they welcome petting? ○Can all four of their paws be lifted slightly off the kennel floor? ○Any health concerns seen or noted by shelter or previous owner? ○Any behavioral concerns seen or noted by shelter or previous owner? ○Take a picture so it can be shared with the adoption team or the alternative placement team that would be handling Craig‟s List and Facebook

Evaluator discusses the results of their evaluations with their Manager

Adoptability Considerations *This will change as your resources grow You will very likely have more choices of animals in need of rescue each day than you have the space available to save. You will have to prioritize or rank them to figure out who your first choices should be based on how quickly you think you can find them a home and save another in its place. In addition to the criteria above, you will want to consider who you already have in your program in order to keep a variety of different breeds, colors, etc. available for adoption Identify types you can most easily adopt out Temperaments most easily adopted  Can the average person handle them?  Are they safe for a child to handle?  Are they good with other dogs and cats?  Are they doing well in the stressful shelter environment?  What resources do you have for medical and behavioral issue? How much money and time will it take to place one with medical and/or behavioral concerns? Are there others “At Risk” that you could place in less time and with use of less resources?  Dogs  Puppies and young dogs  Small breeds under 25 pounds  Not in need of serious training  Large Breeds without major behavior concerns  Unique breeds, colors  Good with other animals  No concerns for children handling  Do we think they could handle placement in an “X pen” at a store for the day?  Health  Concerns noted by previous owner or shelter staff  Cats  Kittens & young cats  Health  Color  Ease of handling  No litter box issues  Concerns noted by previous owner or shelter staff Evaluator notifies the shelter of which ones we want to “hold” while we look for foster or set up to have them transported to our building by completing a “Hold Sheet”. They turn one copy of the Hold Sheet in to the shelter before leaving and keep a copy to help them complete their Daily Recap email. See Sample pg. 20 Evaluator sends out a Daily Recap email to the entire Rescue Team when they get home each day with the information about those they placed holds on and the notes from their evaluation including: See Samples pgs. 21-23  

● ●

“Check APA” Hold: the ones we are trying to get out, we might be checking foster availability, available space at our shelter, asking our vet to review any medical concern


P a g e | 101 ● ● ● ●

Check APA/Alt” Hold: ones we are currently unable to take into our program but we have placed a hold on them while we try “alternative” rescue Calling owner Posting on Craig‟s List and Facebook “Released”: Animals we had previously placed a hold on but now have determined we are not able to find alternative placement and/or are unable to take into our program

Manager reviews Daily Recap and sends emails to: ■ Foster Team - to find fosters for those who have been held that need to go to foster include notes on those they are seeking fosters for ■ Transport Team - to arrange transport for those going straight to our shelter instead of foster ■ Medical Director - medical notes for cases not already approved to pull ● Evaluator that is going to the shelter the next day can read the Daily Recap to see if there are any “on hold” that need to be looked at by a second person before we make a decision. For examples of protocols and task descriptions provided to each rescue team, please see the attached “Cat Rescue Program Manual” and the “Dog Rescue Protocols”

Key Lines of Communication between Rescue & Shelter ●

Rescue Manager and Shelter Staff ■ Provide to them in writing their contacts for your group ○Who is authorized to “place and animal on hold for your group” ○Who is authorized to confirm that your group will take an animal ○Who is authorized to pick up and animal for you ○Who do they contact and how if they have questions Rescue Evaluators and Shelter Staff: ○ Who should your team notify if they see a concern about an animal they would like to report? (i.e. medical or behavioral)

Key Lines of Communication between the Rescue Team, public, volunteers for your group and volunteers and staff at the shelter 

Requests to save certain animals start coming in from all directions. Whoever is asking will keep asking different members of your team and group trying to get the answer they are wanting. For this reason, these requests need to all be directed to the Rescue Manager and the decision of the manger supported. We often found that if someone is pushing hard for you to save an animal, they are often talking to and pushing multiple people and groups at the same time and often will find a live outcome for the animal without you. Since you are trying hard to save many animals without someone fighting for them it is often best to let the person fighting, keep fighting and looking for placement other than with your group so if they find a way to save the animal, you can save another. If the animal someone is asking for help on is not appropriate for your program at this time due to medical and/or behavioral issues, perhaps they can adopt it, address its issues and then work with our group for placement if it is appropriate for your program. We never made guarantees on this though because it is hard to tell if you will have room in the future or if the “issue” will be totally resolved.

Ongoing Obstacles the Rescue Team Faces ●

Paying close attention to our capabilities ■ Numbers in foster ■ Number getting adopted ■ Cost of medical and behavioral problems and the time it takes to get them adopted Dealing with the team‟s sad emotions about those we cannot save


P a g e | 102 ● ●

Figuring out how to work at the shelter with the support or lack of support that is provided As you grow, more foster homes and an overnight facility will be needed ■ More Rescue evaluators will need to be recruited ■ More jobs will need to be created on the Rescue Team ○ We added Rescue Assistants to help with paperwork and email reporting of shelter evaluations ○ Recruited people to help save the animals we could not take into our program directly from the shelter (we called this “Alternative Rescue”) ● Recruited people to do Craig‟s List and Facebook postings for animals we were working on saving ● Recruited people to help call owners that had surrendered their pets and see if they might reclaim them now that they were at risk of being euthanized

Priorities of the Rescue team ●

● ●

Saving the most lives you can within your means(Golden Rule) ○ Closely adhering to the number of animals you can save. This number should be decided before you start saving lives but should be re-evaluated on a regular basis. You may want to set a number and then for each animal adopted out, another can be saved. ○ This direct correlation will also help motivate the adoption team for each one they place, another is saved. It also helps the rescue team and your other volunteers understand at what point you will able to save another and focus on the most adoptable ones for quick placement. Maintaining a professional, respectful relationship with the shelter is critical. The Rescue Team has the most contact with the shelter they must maintain good relations with the shelter and their staff while conflict and controversy were dealt with by others. Supporting one another on your team. Although it is very rewarding when a life is saved, it is very sad that you cannot do the same for all of them at this time.

Sustainability The most difficult challenge we had was following our “Golden Rule” and adhering to our preset capacity numbers, capabilities and criterias for lives we could save, We were not going to let ourselves get ahead of our capabilities and threaten our sustainability. Since our success was determined by the number of lives we were able to save, we had to make sure we were sustainable, and we did. When we started rescuing in 2008, the city shelter had about a 40% euthanasia rate. We were new, our resources had limitations and unfortunately, there were many dogs and cats we had to leave behind . In a relatively short amount of time, we hit some exciting milestones in part because we did not get ahead of ourselves. 1. Within the first 6 months, we realized we had the foster homes and adoption capabilities to place all puppies under 4 months. When we reached this point, we no longer evaluated puppies under for months for “if” we could save them but instead, we were evaluating them to determine when we save them , what do they need. 2. Over the next year, we had the resources and adoption success to do the same for adult dogs under 25 lbs, bottle baby puppies and large adult dogs without serious behavioral/training issues 3. Less than a year after that, we have been able to save all “At Risk” kittens and bottle baby kittens, and adult cats without serious behavioral concerns. 4. Two and a half years after we started, our shelter reached a 90% save rate, and we were saving all animals at risk without serious behavioral issues and as many as we can in need of behavioral/training support Since reaching 90% we have continued to develop programs that support the foster, training and adoption of the dogs and cats still “At Risk” so we can continue to save more lives and continue to lower the shelter‟s euthanasia rate.

For Support Contact:


P a g e | 103 Cat Rescue:

Lindsay Oâ€&#x;Gan Lindsay.ogan@austinpetsalive.org

Dog Rescue: Palmer Neuhaus Palmer.neuhaus@austinpetsalive.org


P a g e | 104

Sample Dog Rescue Procedures AT TLAC – Checklist:

Davenport Building Pre Eval

Ask for "No Holds Dog" w/ notes report Ask for "Check APA" report (this includes APA & APA Alt lists) Check to see if dogs previously held are on APA report; if not ask staff if they have customer interest; if they do, pls make note Read notes prior to evaling dogs

TLAC Dog Stray Kennels Prioritize evaling puppies & small dogs & those that APA has not seen Eval dogs based on adoptability & behavior Considerations/Eval Criteria: All dogs should get Dog/Dog Evals to eval reactive behavior:

Put on apron & take keys

1. Walk dog by other kennels to see reaction

Ask for RO/Screening/VS escort first if needed

2. Walk other dogs while dog is in kennel 3. While dog is in dog run, see reaction to greeting adoption dog

Davenport Building Post Eval

Call Holly to confirm any dogs APA is pulling Fill out APA Hold & APA Alt Hold Sheets Include:

Bully breeds should get 2 fulls days of this eval w/ 2 different ppl Stranger evals: Always have a new person eval the dog on day 2, without the dog seeing you first

A-number, weight, vacc date, notes, Black Dogs are generally harder to adopt Let know date (2 days post current day) Pit Bulls are generally harder to adopt Extend or release any dogs on check APA list Extremely anxious/hyper dogs do not do well at adoption sites Print "No Holds" Dog report & compare to Dogs that are sick will take a lot of extra resources & foster care current notes to make sure no dogs were added Dogs with prior dog aggression are usually not adoption candidates Take Pictures of Dogs for APA or CL, if needed Return vest & key If any paperwork needs to be faxed:

Get weights on any dogs that APA is taking and need surgery

9-1-866-760-9101

APA Contact Information: Palmer: 512-555-1234 / email@austinpetalive.org Kim: 512-555-1234 / email@austinpetalive.org Foster pleas: dog-foster-pleas@austinpetsalive.org Rescue team: rescuedog@austinpetsalive.org Ellen: (for Parvo pick up or seriously injured animals who need immediate assistance): 512-555-1234 Holly: (for dogs ready for site) 512-555-1234 / email@austinpetsalive.org


P a g e | 105 Ann: (for foster related questions) 512-555-1234 / email@austinpetsalive.org

At Home – Checklist:     

Confirm dogs going to site with Holly Send transport email Send dog foster plea email Fill out SX Google doc (if necessary) Write up recap to rescue group

APA @ TLAC Rescue Protocol & Explanation: Step 1: Request Reports from TLAC  

Ask TLAC rep for “No Holds Dog” report & “Check APA” report with and w/o notes Compare this to recap email from night before

Step 2: Evaluating Dogs Prioritize dogs that are new to “No Holds” report that APA has not seen. 

 

Dog/Dog o Please indicate whether greeted in friendly relaxed manner or ignored o Please indicate whether it got opportunity to greet adoption dog while loose in back exercise run (if it did not get this opportunity and dog/dog is in question (i.e. “ignored), we may want to make sure we get opportunity on day 2 eval) o Eval dogs‟ reaction to dogs while in their pen, outside of their pen, in the dog run when approaching adoption dog Stranger evals o If you have already evaled a dog and someone else is available to do the “day 2”, let them eval without you to get their thoughts without the dog having someone there it has already met (unless of course it is a “day 2” on a scared little one and we have not yet seen it “turn the corner” If this is the case, a “stranger eval” would not be done until it is easily handled by the first person evaluating it Always hold a dog that is under 25lbs & puppies under 4 mths old Sick Dogs o If a dog is sick and you feel like you can‟t get an accurate read on him/her, please consider adoptability and breed before holding. APA would rather take a chance on a more adoptable dog that we can‟t get a good read on (unique purebreds, small dogs, etc.) vs. a dog that could be a long-term place (i.e. larger pitbulls, Rottweilers, etc.). “Flight Risk” o Any dogs that are generally scared and wary to be handled are considered a flight risk for site and we would need to consider foster. Please check for this and indicate your thoughts.

Step 3: Holding Dogs Holding Dog under “Check APA” 

Please get the following info and indicate this on the hold list document: o Get weight if not already altered o If already altered, check if it is also chipped o Get date vaccinated o Check and see if currently on meds at TLAC, if so, what? o Plan - foster or site? o If foster does not come through, could this dog go to site? Holding Dog under “APA/Alt”  

Reason If calling owner, deadline given


P a g e | 106  If CL posting, deadline given  If alt method fails, would we be interested in pulling? Decision to Pull a dog 

 

Call/text Holly (512)555-XXXX, if: o There is a dog that can go to site and is already altered o There is a dog that can go to site but needs surgery and we have surgery the next day If Holly has the space to take the dog, she will let you know which site transport needs to deliver the dog to after it goes by the building – see: TRANSPORT below for instructions If decide to pull a dog(s) next day, have paperwork printed and fax. Write Pre-fax on top page to indicate dog hasn‟t been pulled yet.

Step 4: After you leave the shelter    

Text Transport Co-Coordinators to let them know whether there‟s transport needed the next day or not -- see: TRANSPORT below for instructions If dog needs foster, you can send the foster plea out via email (see below for detail) – see: PLEADING FOSTER below for instructions Enter dog info into medical schedule for wellness/surgery – see: MEDICAL SCHEDULE below for instructions Send out daily recap email to rescue team – see: DAILY RECAP EMAIL below

Pleading Foster for a dog   

Get ok from Rescue Lead Take picture Email picture and the following information to dog-foster-pleas@austinpetsalive.org o Kennel #, A#, breed, age, approx. weight, reason for foster, approximate length of foster o Please make sure to be clear about any medical and/or behavioral problems noted o Kennel # and animal ID# (A#). o Does the dog have a name? o How long and why the dog needs foster? o Type of foster needed (on a scale from "clueless" to "could write the book" - see below) o Anything special including bite history or concern re: flight risk o How soon the animal needs to be picked up (ideally, as well as what our "real" deadline is)? o What medical has already been done at TLAC (e.g., vaccinations) so we know what needs to be done or checked at the building. Any noted illnesses, aggression, fear level, etc. o Do we need to contact you before sending the foster to TLAC?


P a g e | 107 Medical Schedule Update:  Surgery dates typically Mon, Thur, Fri (transport & surgery info needs to be entered the night before)  Google docs (SX Clinic)  Scroll to applicable date and click; complete info.  Most TLAC dogs will need HW Test, Strong & Chip and we need to enter weight Dog Spay

Total Surgery

Foster Name

Phone #

Name

Elsa

555-1238

Hazel

emily

555-1234

rudy

Erin

555-5678

Heidi

TLAC

rat terrier

Cookie

ID#

RV

DHPP

KC

HWTest

Stron

Chip

Other

Wt.

Ket/Ac e

x

needs frontline

11

0.44

NO SX, NASAL D/C

35

1.40

12

0.48

16

0.64

x A570680

X

X

Sample Transport Email: Send to Transport Coordinators: To: email@austinpetsalive.org Cc: rescuedog@austinpetsalive.org, <medtechs@austinpetsalive.org>, From where to where and times (check SX bldg times)

TLAC to bldg at 11:30

Kennel #

Kennel 131

A#, “Name”

A570680, Cookie

Desc (age, sex, breed, color)

2-yr female rat terrier, tri-color

Weight

16 lbs

Procedures to be done

spay

(all pups 6 mths & under are dewormed and don‟t get h/w test)

chip h/w test


P a g e | 108

Sample Cat Rescue Manager Manual

Cat Rescue Manager

Rescue Team Trainer

Rescue Team Members

Craiglist Writers

Transporters

Cat Rescue Job Description: Oversee the cat rescue team and make decisions on what cats we can or cannot pull from area shelters or from the public. Job Duties:   

Each day review the euthanasia list at area shelter(s) to see what cats are at risk for being euthanized. Check owner surrender notes, shelter behavior notes, and medical notes. Each day review the rescue team‟s behavior and medical notes for cats at risk. Make decisions on who the cat program should save if space and who they can‟t save, communicate these decisions with the rescue team and the area shelter in a respectful and empathetic way. Rescue team often gets attached to the animals they are evaluating and will sometimes have an emotional reaction when you can‟t pull an animal they want you to. Communicate with cat foster manager about which cats need foster.


P a g e | 109        

Communitcate with Adoption Center Manager about which cats can go directly into the adoption center. This is rare as most cats need quarantine first. Communicate and coordinate pick up and transportation of animals from area shelters if needed. Often fosters will transport themselves but if doing a large pull sometimes transporting all at once in a single vehicle is most efficient. Manage the rescue team personnel including hiring, conflict resolution, termination, and recruitment. Communicate with cat foster manager about space in the program for new cats, what types of cats there is more space or less space for (i.e. medical or behavior special needs, are there enough fosters currently?) Recruit and manage transport volunteers to pick up cats from area shelters and transport to vet appointments or to foster homes. Forward cats needing Craigslist posting to Craigslist volunteers Forward behavior problem cats to behavior team leader (in cat foster program org chart) Work to find ways to get cats out of the shelter without the use of APA‟s limited resources.

Team Members Rescue Team Trainer -

Performs rescue orientations at local animal shelter for interested cat rescue volunteers Creates and maintains cat rescue manuals and protocols with guidance from rescue manager Trains new rescue volunteers to eval cats and navigate the shelter system

Rescue Team Volunteers -

-

Goes to area shelter(s) on specified days of the week in the evenings after the euthanasia list has been made Requests a copy of the “At Risk for Euthanasia” cat list from shelter staff Evaluates all new cats on the list – checks for medical problems and evaluates behavior Takes pictures/videos of all new cats on the list Re-evaluates cats previously on the list, especially ones that a decision has not been made about Spends time working with behavior problem cats At the end of the night right before shelter closes get an updated at risk list, and make sure no new cats were added. Also, Get an “Empty Cage” count from shelter staff. At the end of the night, sends an update email to all rescue members and the rescue manager. This will include all information about each cat that is at risk, including whether or not the cat could be picked up, any good or bad behavior seen, any medical problems seen, etc. Update email will also include empty cage count. Pictures and videos sent in separate emails including the cats A# for easy lookup

Craigslist Writers -

-

Write Craiglist posts for cats that are at risk for euthanasia at the shelter. This should include whether the cat is available for adoption from the shelter only, or if APA is willing to accept the cat into the program if foster can be found. Must be 100% honest and follow Craigslist Posting guidelines.

Transporters Duties -

Receives emails for transportation needs and if able to transport, confirms ability Follow safe transport guidelines

Making Decisions The ability to save or not save a cat will change from day to day, month to month. In the winter months when intake is slow you might be able to save less-then-ideal cats, while in the summer months when intake is high you might have to only pull very fast placement cats. Currently, to maintain a 90% or higher live outcome rate at TLAC, the following protocol is utilized. However, if intake were to drastically increase or capacity at APA were to decrease, decision making guidelines might have to change.


P a g e | 110 These are the decision making steps: 1. Download at risk reports from TLAC, and print out the list that doesn‟t have notes on it (the short version that is easier to digest and about 1 page long) 2. Review owner surrender notes for each cat, shelter behavior notes, and medical notes if applicable. 3. If notes are confusing or missing, email TLAC for clarification. 4. Make short notes on your printed at risk list – simple things like “urinates in house” or “bit child” or “great behavior at shelter” or “broken leg”. This will make things more digestible then trying to work off of the long full notes list. 5. Open the rescue team‟s evaluation update email and make notes on your printed list. 6. Below is a list of “what ifs” and the life saving solutions 7. Once you have made your decisions, please respond to the update email and let the rescue team know your thoughts. I will try to be as kind and understanding as I can, while being firm in my decisions. Not that they don‟t change, but since they are life and death decisions, they shouldn‟t be wishy washy or unclear. 8. Forward cats you would like foster for to the Cat Foster Manager, including pics and videos, so they can plea. 9. Once foster is found, Cat Foster Manager will email TLAC to let them know the cat is being picked up, and once picked up the cat will be removed from the at-risk list.

Evaluations by Rescue Team Members Each cat should be evaluated for the following: -

-

-

Behavior: how does the cat react when you first walk up to cage? Open cage? Stick your hand in? Petting? Petting all over (including hind end and sides and stomach)? Picking up? Holding in your arms? Are there are any warning signals (ears back, pupils dilated, not blinking?)? If any aggression (swatting, growling, hissing, whipping head, biting), explain circumstances and what was going on before, during, and after aggression. o If behavior question or unsure if should pull due to behavior contact behavior team leader Medical: check for hairloss, snot or eye discharge, diarrhea in litterbox, wounds, skinny, dehydrated, etc. If any medical problems, rescue team should have medical history forwarded to rescue team manager. If a medical problem seen that the shelter doesn‟t know about, should be reported to shelter staff. o If medical question or unsure if should pull due to medical contact vet staff Risk Level: is this cat getting lots of attention from the public? Is it in a cage that the public can‟t visit? Is it getting treatment for illnesses or is the kitty getting sicker at the shelter? Is the type of cage it is in a cage that there are other empty ones, or is it in a part of the shelter that is very full? Are there a lot of staff members/volunteers invested in this cat that would help prevent euth? o Cats at higher risk should be considered for pull sooner than cats at lower risk.

Transportation Guidelines for cats Safe Transport: Please use the following guidelines for safe transport: -

-

-

-

Cats often have illness coming from shelters, including diseases that can be sneezed on each other. Keep them separated from each other using sheets/towels thrown over crates, pieces of cardboard between carriers, etc. Just so long as the cats can't sneeze through the holes in their crates and onto other cats. Cats can sneeze a long way, so just being far apart won't work. Stacking crates - never stack cardboard or soft sided carriers. Stacking plastic carriers is fine so long as they are bungeed together or somehow secure so they can't tip over and injure a kitty if you had to slam on your breaks No loose cats! They have to go inside a secure crate when carrying from the shelter to the vehicle, while inside the vehicle, and from vehicle into APA building. Never take a cat out of its crate unless you are in a building, even if they pooped on themselves or something. Never open a cage door unless inside a building, cats can bolt past you like lightening. Make sure your crates are secure and aren't loose or missing hardware that would allow a kitty to escape. You'd be shocked how often this happens and it usually doesn‟t end well. Keeping cats straight is vital. Please put the paperwork on top of the cats' carrier or write their name on the carrier if possible so cats don't get mixed up.


P a g e | 111

Sample Hold Sheet

APA Hold Report

Released

Today's Date

Kennel #

Animal ID

Description

Name

Weight/medical note

"Let know by date"

Description

Name

Hold reason

"Let know by date"

Contact Name: Phone or email

"Check APA" Hold Kennel #

Animal Id#

"Check APA/Alt" Hold Kennel #

Animal Id#

Sample Dog Evaluator Daily Recap email: Released: 242 (x2) A570838, A579007

Errors: 906, A579524, 3-wk rottie pup. Sharon said not supposed to be on APA. TLAC finding foster. 253, A579428, now on Y-call after I pointed it out to them. Don't know if this is error, but 2 dogs in 106 were added to dispo attn report after I got 1st report.

Watch For: 166 A579512 Black Lab in with a Pit. The Pit was on our list but not the Lab... declined on the Pit, but the Lab seems super sweet. APA HOLD


P a g e | 112 145 A579146 Black Basset mix 8mo F Steve 7/15: On dispo with notes. Has some hairloss. Super sweet. Great dog, super cute, very adoptable looking. Needs a more thorough eval but Please let me know before releasing. Kim 7/16: All greens from TLAC. I really like this little girl. No aggression seen towards people or dogs. Walked her by other kennels w/ no reaction, some interest in other dogs. Walked dog by her kennel - a little barking but more interest and not aggression. That was the only negative I saw and not a big deal. Would like to move her to kennel 25 Saturday.

152 A579308 Tan/White Basset 4yo S (kind of looks like mix with beagle) Steve 7/15: Sweet and mellow, HW+. Owner says is affectionate and anxious and not housetrained, tolerant of cats and quiet. Kim 7/16: All Greens from TLAC. Very mellow. (due to HW or being overweight?) No negatives seen, no aggression towards people or other dogs. Owner only had her 2 mths and gave her up due to HW. I'll call Banfield in White Rock Saturday to get more medical info. 226 A579041 Catahoula Mix 2yo N Steve 7/15: On dispo with notes. Kind of freaked out by dogs barking... trying to run... but notes say he is good with other dogs. Owner giving up because can't afford. All good notes except escape from door and eats other dogs food (uhhhh... yeah). Has a nice sit. I like him but he's a handful, and probably needs a pretty good owner. Should have been put on ALT. I'm going to CL, but OK to release. Kim 7/16: I didn't eval, but walked dog by his kennel--at first, no reaction, then as other dogs started barking around him, he started barking also but not aggressively. Steve said someone is interested in him.

SC-10, A579347, 9-wk F vizla pup, (faxed medical notes for Ellen) TLAC: non-weight bearing on left rear leg and has bloody diarrhea. significant swelling/distension on right side of body around/near ribcage. has coccidia, hooks from fecal test. TLAC doesn't know what is causing lameness. Kim 7/16: pup very friendly and social. Letting Ellen have chance to read medical notes prior to pleading foster. Will plead Saturday if OK w/ Ellen.

APA Alt (2 total): 219, A578344 - "Charlie", 6-yr blk lab. TLAC has spent lots of time contacting owner who RTO one dog, but not this one. TLAC offered them community service to work off fee, and they're resistant. Owner said dog escapes ... from apartment? This is a TLAC favorite, so I asked Sharon they request this dog go to adoption. Cross fingers!

192 A578995 Blue Pit 1yo Steve 7/15: I love this dog. Nice size, very very sweet... very nice reactions to a dog barking very aggressively at him, and just a very nice guy. No problems handling. Knows sit. I took video and am going to CL. There was a potential adopter who never got back in contact with TLAC... I called her and left a message as well. I know it's hard for us to take pits, but he seems like a great pet. I'm afraid if he's there too long he might get reactive, b ut he really seems to just want to be a nice dog. Please let Steve know before releasing. Kim 7/16: Not on APA, but didn't ask why. Hopefully has app. Will ck Saturday.

Seen and declined: (We evaluated and did not place a hold on them: they are still at risk of euthanasia) 105, A579200 111, A548060 132, A579382 165, A579108 166, A579511 180, A578601


P a g e | 113

Sample Cat Evaluator Daily Recap email: They were going to euth Cali, Ravage, Silverbolt and a 12yr old orange tabby either tonight or tomorrow. We were given 24hrs notice and I was forced to release them even though Cali and her siblings were not as bad as they were making out. Check APA: 04/16 KISMET, RO-18, A570388, 1+ year, female, black, domestic shorthair, divine momma, gentle, social, kittens thriving, FIV+ KISMETKITTEN1, RO-18, A570389, 6 wks, M, black and white tuxedo, dsh KISMETKITTEN2, RO-18, A570391, 6 wks, M, black and white tuxedo, dsh KISMETKITTEN3, RO-18, A570392, 6 wks, F, tortie, dsh LARISSA, RO-19, A570791, 1 yr, F. brn tabby FERAL mom LARISSAKITTEN1, RO-19, A570792, 2 wks, M, brn tabby and white, dsh LARISSAKITTEN2, RO-19, A570793, 2 wks, M, brn tabby and white, dsh LARISSAKITTEN3, RO-19, A570794, 2 wks, M, lynx point, siamese mix 4/15 JED (was URIAH), ISO2-01, A568786, 2 yr, N, blue and white, super-friendly and wonderful, FIV+ -http://austin.craigslist.org/pet/1692292501.html 4/17 GRACIELA, BLACK MOM CAT, RO-08, 4 newborn kittens, A570237, black, domestic shorthair, FERAL, aggressive (kittens are A570577, 578, 579, 580, born Friday, 04/09/10) Check APA/ALT: 04/14 WILBUR, ISO2-09, A570183, 1 yr, neutered male, black and white, domestic shorthair, total lovebug -Dorinda requested CL ad and promotion of this cat. Cilla there were no dates on this cat, so I didn't think I needed to a put a hold on him..... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uf3SJOsIHIc youtube video from 4/14 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uf3SJOsIHIc 4/16 LANCE, ISO2-10, A570440, nice older cat, Maine coon mix, blind, needs food given to him -- can't see it or find it -- going to promote on the www.blindcatrescue.com site on Thursday HAS TIL COB FRIDAY SB-51, JACQUES, A570390, 2 yrs, M, black, dsh, found at convention center 04/17 SB-52, JACKSON, A570461, 2 yr, M, black, domestic shorthair, big, loving tom cat SB-58, SHEBE, A570720, 8 yr, spayed female, Maine coon mix, brown tabby, gorgeous SB-07, MOJO, A569883, 2 yrs, M, black shorthair, shy (give fancifeast by hand in his pen) http://austin.craigslist.org/pet/1687837890.html http://austin.craigslist.org/pet/1685036535.html http://austin.craigslist.org/pet/1681826004.html SB-08, CHLOE, A569683, 4 yrs, female, brown tabby http://austin.craigslist.org/pet/1671253356.html SB-47, ZEPHYR, A568110, 2 yrs, spayed, blue tabby longhair, very friendly , returned for aggression when scared http://austin.craigslist.org/pet/1681847071.html SB-13, CLANCY, A570139, 12 yrs, N, black, domestic shorthair DISPO ATTN: TUX, SB-29 (came in with SB-17, COCO) TOO TOO, SB10 has cloudy eye, 7yr, M very sweet, shy SB56, 1yr, M black and white â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nice kitty! No Holds Report (didn't hold):


P a g e | 114 SB-02 SB-04,A570104 SB-16, A569982, white COCO, SB-17, Axxxxxx, 18 years old! please save him SB-20 SB-21 SB-22 SB-23, A569984, white and SB-26 SB-32 SB-36, new, "wrong photo" SB-37, A570339 SB-38, A570535, nice, friendly, skinny, wounded legs, black and white SB-41, new **SB-44, A569772, siamese seal point SB-49, A569849, blue and white, spayed female, older, skinny, adorable and friendly **SB-50, A569600, org tabby still trying SB-55, palmer declines by phone SB-59, big tom cat, being examined and treated, big abscess SB-60, revisit SB-65, missing 3 days at TLAC, found again, very ill with URI SB-66, A569670 SB-68


P a g e | 115

Positive Alternative to Shelter Surrender (P.A.S.S.) Program

General Description The Pass Program seeks out ways to help keep pets of the public out of the shelter by providing resources, education and sometimes by placing ads for people who are unable to do it for themselves.

Austin Pets Alive!â&#x20AC;&#x;s P.A.S.S in-shelter numbers over the last year The following shows how the in-shelter staff have succeeded in getting people to consider rehoming their pets via the methods outlined by P.A.S.S instead of turning them over to the local shelter:

Month

People that came to surrender at the Shelter

Number Surrendered

Percentage that were still surrendered

Percentage that were rehomed

November, 2010

75

56

74.67%

25.33%

December, 2010

77

56

72.73%

27.27%

January, 2011

43

30

69.77%

30.23%

February, 2011

55

41

74.55%

25.45%

March, 2011

112

89

79.46%

20.54%

April, 2011

80

65

81.25%

18.75%

May, 2011

76

65

85.53%

14.47%

June, 2011

107

96

89.72%

10.28%

July, 2011

75

64

85.33%

14.67%

August, 2011

95

80

84.21%

15.79%

September, 2011

17

15

88.24%

11.76%


P a g e | 116

P.A.S.S. in-shelter success Animals re-homed

Animals Surrendered

120 100 80 60 40 20 0

Critical Steps to putting a PASS program in place Good Working Relationship With Shelter Staff & Volunteers: The most critical first steps in setting up a Pass Program are establishing a good working relationship with the shelter, familiarizing yourself with their policies and procedures and then educating yourself on all the resources you intend to provide. From the shelter aspect it is important to set up some place separate from, but close to the surrender or intake office. You should be the first person people see when they come to surrender a pet. Ideally this should be before they get into the actual room where the pets are surrendered and away from the shelter staff who do intake because once inside that area it is too easy to bypass the person doing Pass and just get in the surrender line. If they have to actually speak to you before they can surrender they are more likely to give you their attention and to accept your help.

Hotline and Email Program: The second step is to set up and email and phone hotline and you can do this through Google mail and Google voice. All of the emails and voicemails will come into Google mail and can be handled from there. It is a good idea to put an outgoing message on the voicemail encouraging people to email and only leave a voicemail in the case of an immediate emergency like a sick animal, etc.

Google Voice http://www.google.com/voice/ When you setup google voice, you can get a phone number that will go straight to voice mail and email you and your team with the message left by the caller. It also attempts to transcribe the voice mail so you can read what the person left in their message, though sometimes it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x;t do a very good job. Luckily there is a link to play the message via audio right in the email. Here is an example of an email received from the Austin Pets Alive! P.A.S.S hotline:


P a g e | 117

Volunteers to man the hotline and be at the shelter: Pass Volunteers need to have more people skills than animal skills. Most of your interaction will be with people of all ages and personalities, some nice and some not so nice. Some who care about their pets and some who view them as nothing more than lawn ornaments. A Pass volunteer has to remain tactful, educational, and professional with each client. Not doing so can sometimes make things worse for the pets involved.

Who are the key players in PASS and what their duties are Both your hotline volunteers and your shelter volunteers need to have good people skills. They also need to be able to handle sad and sometimes aggravating situations in a professional manner.

Hotline Volunteers People who can commit 4 or more hours at a time, one or more days per week on a consistent basis to the hotline.

Shelter Volunteers People who commit to at least 3-4 hours at a time, one or more days per week at the shelter.

Network & Resources Some of your main key players will be your network. I found, created, and then maintained a relationship with good facebook rescue pages and reliable rescue people who help me daily. I did this by going to their pages and sites and responding to their needs. Once you create a network of respectable rescue people you have hit gold!

Why you need volunteers with people skills (aka there are no happy calls and emails on PASS!!) Every call and email a Pass volunteer gets, and ever person a Pass volunteer meets at the shelter either wants to surrender an animal, has a sick animal, knows of or has an abused animal, or has some sort of unhappy situation. Pass Volunteers must have a thick skin. You can be angry in your head but it cannot come out of your mouth. How you handle a Pass client can directly determine how that client handles the animal in need. Some of the things you may run into are:     

Abused animals Neglected animals Rude and uncaring owners Owners who threaten to shoot or do harm to their animals Owners who are either physically or mentally ill.

You must have volunteers who can handle all of these owners and their situations in a non-judgmental and professional manner.


P a g e | 118

Most successful aspects of the PASS program Re-homing pets through ads: We have had an enormous amount of success on the hotline and at the shelter in re-homing pets so they never have to enter the shelter system. On the hotline we ask that people send us pictures and behavior info on their pet so we can place ads and postings. Our ads go out on craigslist, facebook, to listserv‟s and to different rescues.

Check out the rescues and sanctuaries you contact thoroughly! Not all rescues and animal sanctuaries are created equal. If you have not visited these places yourself you need to contact people who have and make sure they are safe, well run facilities. Don‟t operate on the “I heard they were wonderful” recommendations. I recently sent a dog to someone who came highly recommended to me by a rescuer I have great respect for and who had known this lady for years. Later I found out my friend had only known her through phone conversations and facebook posts and this woman was actually overwhelmed and nearly to hoarder status. The dog was removed luckily, but it taught me a valuable lesson.

Beware Of The Crazy Facebook People! If you are going to place ads on facebook be prepared to baby-sit them. I have people from all over replying to my ads, trying to transport my dogs to Canada and out of state. These people will talk amongst themselves and be arranging transports before I even have time to screen them. This is true with rescue facebook posts as well and people will be calling the shelter from out of state and out of the country to adopt, inundating the shelter with calls that are not welcomed and can adversely affect your working relationship with them. You also have to beware of hoarders and abusers on the rescue sites. Everyone wants to trust people simply because they are posting on a rescue page and you can‟t do that. I still ask for references and I will want to “friend” them and check out their page before even talking to them about a dog. You can tell a lot about a person from their facebook page!

Temporary Boarding For Emergencies: We have had further success with finding temporary boarding for pets of people in hospice, people in domestic violence situations, and more that have kept pets out of the shelter and in some instances kept them from being euthanized.

Keeping Pets Out Of The Shelter By Offering Food And Medical Assistance: Additionally we have been able to save pets from the shelter by offering people free dog or cat food, free litter, kennels or crates, and low cost medical treatment through our community hospital.

Keeping Pets Out Of The Shelter By Offering Training Resources Another great avenue for keeping pets out of the shelter has been a program called The Schrodi Fund that people here can apply for and if they are approved it gives them free training for their pets. This has kept a lot of behavior cases out of the shelter. We also have a list of training facilities in our area that are low cost and specialize in aggression cases.

Obstacles to overcome People who want a quick fix For us, most of our obstacles came from people who simply wanted a quick fix and expected us to take their pet. This is still an obstacle so it has to be overcome daily by making people believe there is indeed a solution and that they can be a part of it. Getting people on your side and the side of the animal is key. By the time people call our hotline or show up in the shelter parking lot they are pretty much committed to giving up the pet and getting them to rethink


P a g e | 119 that concept is a practiced skill. We have found that the more respect we give the person, the more the person will give the animal. If you make someone defensive or angry it is always the pet that suffers.

No Resources For People In Emergency Situations We solved a lot of our resource issues when we were able to secure temporary boarding for people, when we created our community hospital, and when we were able to offer people free food and litter.

Found Dogs and Cats It seemed almost hopeless for the found dogs and cats that come into the shelter on a daily basis until we started taking pics of them before people surrendered and quickly put up a lost & found ad on craigslist. This started bringing people to the shelter to find and reclaim their pets.

Obstacles on the hotline and at the shelter Feral cats are killing my birds, in my garden, terrorizing my house cats, etc. Alley Cat Allies is the best resource ever for educating people about feral cats. They have printer friendly pages you can take to the shelter with you to hand out to people and they completely dispel all the myths about feral cat and address all the problems mentioned above.

Online resrouces Cat resources:   

http://www.alleycat.org http://www.alleycat.org/Page.aspx?pid=924 http://www.alleycat.org/Page.aspx?pid=434

I‟m moving (tomorrow) and can‟t take my dog/cat or I‟m moving and can‟t pay my pet deposit If a person calls the hotline or brings their cat or dog to the shelter saying they are moving tomorrow and can‟t take their pet I usually try and see if there isn‟t a friend, family member, etc, who can keep the pet a few days to give me time to re-home thru ads and postings. This is usually easier on the hotline than at the shelter because by the time people get to the shelter they are resigned and committed to giving up that animal right then. They have already begun to divorce themselves emotionally from the situation and to ask them to take the animal back with them will make it necessary to re-commit. If the surrender is due to a pet deposit that can‟t be paid I ask the person if they have spoken to their landlord about paying the deposit out. I also ask if they would like me to call their landlord and advocate for them and see if I can get him or her to agree to that. I might also suggest they ask each of their friends and family to donate $20 each to their pet deposit. If they can come up with at least $100 of it the landlord will usually agree to let them pay the rest out. In the case of a little dog named Bevo who showed up at the shelter I set up a chip-in account on a facebook rescue page I use and raised the owner‟s $300 pet deposit in exactly 25 minutes.


P a g e | 120 My cat is peeing on me (and my clothes, bed, floor, etc.) We have a cat behaviorist I consult with on these types of problems but I finally started saving her responses so I wouldn‟t have to bother her and then copying and pasting the parts that applied to each person‟s situation into replies. There is a wealth of information out there on cats that pee outside the litter box, from checking them for a URI, to changing the type of litter, type of litter box, to certain household changes that can cause cats to divert such as divorce, bringing in a new pet, etc.

My Toddlers pull my Chihuahua‟s ears and he‟s biting them! Dogs 101…sometimes people just need educated on dog breeds (and on kids) and I have heard this excuse more than once for needing to re-homing a dog.

Training the PASS volunteers I have found that the best avenue for training the hotline volunteers is to let them into the email and phone lines and have them read our responses for 2-3 days before attempting their first shift. Along with this I send them the canned responses I wrote to help with different Pass situations. Training the shelter volunteers involves having someone shadow me at the shelter for a week to let them get a feel of what it‟s like to be there on a daily basis, how to deal with different situations, etc. Because there is a process a person has to go through to get approved to sit at the shelter I want to make sure the person really wants to commit before moving forward.

Keeping good volunteers Pass is a tough place to volunteer. Because of the nature of the calls and emails coming in the Pass volunteers need to stay connected and have a place to vent and let off some steam so they don‟t burn out. Have a Pass Party for your volunteers! Once a month or so get your group together, meet for drinks or dinner and just hang out… Use this time to get closer as a volunteer group, to chill out and to vent about the situations you have come across that month with people who will understand and can relate.

Canned responses for volunteers Canned responses for cats Unfortunately we cannot take cats from the public because when we do that means one less endangered cat we can take from the shelter. Finding a home is best if done going through your own network of friends, coworkers, neighborhood, and every resource you can think of to get the word out. Send out an email blast to literally everyone in your address book and then ask them to forward it and share. Beg for help! Contact rescues! Here is a list of Austin rescues for cats: http://www.jugglingcats.com/rescue/austin_cat_rescue.htm and http://www.streetcatrescue.com/ The second option is to go through advertising in the public. I am sending you links on how to advertise. It can be done, but will take persistence and strategic ways of advertising (great pictures, persistence, posters, everything you can think of). Most importantly, NEVER advertise for free. Ask for $15 to $20, even if written to a shelter or charity. It will keep the cat hoarders and abusers away.

Get creative! Got a sad or desperate situation? Use it in your title! Make your ad stand out! Cats are hard because there are so many of them so the more creative you are the better chance you give your cat. Example: THIS KOOL KITTY NEEDS A NEW LITTER BOX! Or in keeping with desperate situations: “MY OWNER HAS TO TRAVEL BUT WON‟T BUY ME A


P a g e | 121 TICKET! HELP A KITTY OUT!!!” Inside the ad put cute pics and the behavior info on your cat, including whether or not it has been spayed/neutered and up to date on vaccines. Take 5 minutes each morning and write a brand new ad and delete the old one. Change your title and the body of your ad around so you won‟t be kicked off as spam.

Canned responses for dogs Unfortunately we cannot take dogs from the public because when we do that means one less endangered dog we can take from the shelter.

Finding a home is best if done going through your own network of friends, coworkers, neighborhood, and every resource you can think of to get the word out. Send out an email blast to literally everyone in your address book and then ask them to forward it and share. Beg for help! You can also contact breed specific rescue. Here is a long list for the Austin Area: http://austinrescue.com/

The second option is to go through advertising in the public. I am sending you links on how to advertise and giving you information on how to advertise SAFELY and in addition to these links you can also do a Google search for breed specific rescues and email or call them. It can be done, but will take persistence and strategic ways of advertising (great pictures, persistence, posters, everything you can think of). Most importantly, NEVER advertise for free. If you use Craigslist or Petfinder ask for a $35-$40 re-homing fee, even if written to a shelter or charity. It will keep the people looking for dogs/cats to abuse away (dog fighters look for FREE dogs to use as “bait” dogs and others look for FREE dogs to sell to medical research labs) Also, require a vet reference and let them know you will check it. Call the vet and tell them you are about to re-home your dog with this person and ask if they are a responsible pet owner. Do not feel bad about doing this!! Vets are used to getting these calls and it‟s important to keep your dog safe. I word ads like this: “There is a $35 re-homing fee for this dog that can be written to any charity you support and I will mail it there. I also require a vet reference and I will check it.”

Get creative! Do you have a sad story? A tough situation? Use it in the title of your ad! Now is the time to swallow your pride in the name of your pet! Getting a divorce and neither of you can keep the dog? “DIVORCE DOG SEEKS NEW TIL‟ DEATH DUE US PART COUPLE!! ” Think up something new each morning and take 5 minutes to do a new ad and delete your old one to keep it fresh! In the body of your ad tell the good and the bad about your dog and don‟t forget to tell whether he/she is spayed/neutered and up to date on vaccines. Change your words around each day in your ad or craigslist will not accept it and kick you off as spam.

Ad sources Craigs list. To post: https://post.craigslist.org/aus/C/pet/none/x


P a g e | 122

Pawsitively Texas: http://pawsitivelytexas.com/resources-for-pet-owners/pet-transport-directory/ Pet Finder: http://www.petfinder.com/classifieds/classifieds.html Facebook, Dogs: http://www.facebook.com/PawsTexas?ref=mf Google.com: “Texas Cat Rescue”


P a g e | 123 Google this and then go like their page and post with pics “Texas Cat Rescue Facebook” & “Texas Dog Rescue Facebook”

How to advertise or rehome Best Friends: http://www.bestfriends.org/nomorehomelesspets/pdf/HowtoFindHomes.pd No Kill or Low Kill Shelters: http://rocco2.com/pawsshelter/ http://www.austinhumanesociety.org/

PASS protocols Emails & phone When answering Pass emails please read the email carefully before deciding whether or not it is appropriate to use a canned response. Most emails will require a little more attention or at least some personalization. Be sure to address the person by name at the start of the email and end by signing your name. Try and say something positive to the person about whatever their circumstance is. An example might be: “Hi Joe, Thank you for taking in this little dog (cat) and trying to find it a home!” and after that if you need to add the canned response as least it will appear more personal in nature. If you make people feel good in some way (even if the situation isn‟t all that great) there is a better chance they will do the right thing by the animal. If a person needs to correspond with a Pass Volunteer more than once for the same animal it would be nice to keep the consistency of having the same person interact with them each time. If you sign off with your name the next person coming in to answer emails will be able to tell who to alert that they have an email waiting to be answered. For instance, if you see an email in Pass that I have been corresponding to you can email me and let me know that “Joe” is replying back to me and needs more help so I can go there and answer him. Be sure and click on the star after you have replied to an email or called a person back so someone else doesn‟t come along and think that email or phone call still needs attention. Please be sure to read the emails carefully. Is the person really asking for behavioral help? Is the person just frustrated with something about the animal and maybe just needs some support? Would some low cost medical maybe keep the animal in the home? Is their cat soiling in the house? If so send them some tips on how to stop that. Have they taken the cat to the vet to make sure it isn‟t a medical issue? Do they seem to be concerned that the cat or dog is staying out in the cold? If so, we may not be able to take the animal but besides the canned response we can also give them some tips on what to use for simple cat and dog houses, filled with straw and set up off the ground and away from the wind, that will give the animal some comfort until a better solution can be found. Try to read between the lines, ask questions…see if you can help. A canned response will suffice for some, but most will need a little more attention. Please fill out the Contact Form for each email and phone call. This is how we get our stats and our stats are how we get grants. No Grants =No Pass Program!

Know your resources 1. Try and keep up with the protocols of the places we use for resources. For instance, Austin Humane Society will not take stray animals. If it‟s an owner surrender the person can make an appointment. There is usually always a 2-3 week waiting list and the animal will have to pass a behavioral evaluation. They also require a small donation to surrender an animal. 2. Animal Trustees does not see sick animals. They do wellness days, spay and neuter and deeply discounted HW Treatment. They do have someone for emergency surgeries (also deeply discounted!!) but that vet isn‟t


P a g e | 124 always there so people need to call and set an appointment or drop by. Animal Trustees usually will not answer their phone. Tell people to leave a msg. and someone will call them back. 3. Look through the resources we use and if you aren‟t sure what to tell people about them check out their websites to learn more about them. 4. Feel free to seek out new resources and information! We are always looking for new ways to help the public! Before using them, though, please send them to me so I can check them outor verify them.

Re-homing someone‟s animal with ads and postings Usually it is best to try and get a person to do their own ads and Facebook postings to re-home their dog or cat but if they aren‟t resourceful or computer savvy and you decide to help them some protocols need to be followed. 1. Get good pics. Put the dog or cat on Craigslist brand new every morning. Let the owner know what kind of rehoming fee you will charge. I never charge less than a $40 re-homing fee for a dog and I say it can be donated to that person‟s charity of choice. I also require a vet reference. When a vet reference is given the person needs to call that vet, tell them they are about to re-home their animal with this person and ask if they are a responsible pet owner. Let the owner know they will need to get those things from anyone asking to take the dog. Get permission and use the owner‟s contact info in the ad or Facebook posting so you can direct inquiries straight to them. I would use an email address rather than a phone number. For cats the fee should be at least $15, using the same directions as above. Also, check your junk folder regularly and remind the pet owner to check theirs. CL ads go there a lot and even if you use the owner‟s contact info you both will get responses to your ad. 2. We are looking for adopters and not fosters. If someone offers to foster any dog you put on CL or Facebook they cannot be affiliated with APA in any way. Sometimes our own fosters want to help and offer to foster animals placed on ad sites. We cannot do this because when a foster for APA fosters a Pass dog then APA assumes responsibility for that dog. Even if that foster hasn‟t fostered for a year….if they are an approved foster for our APA adoption program we cannot use them as a foster for Pass. 3. Keep in contact with the owner so you will know when you can delete your ads and postings. 4. If you place an animal on Facebook please don‟t forget to monitor the postings. I do not charge the rehoming fees on facebook but I would still try and get a vet reference and get it checked. Facebook is where you will have to keep an eye on things. Some people, especially on rescue sites, try to take dogs just to keep them alive. I would be careful and get a really good feel for any site you post on before listing an animal there and then you will still have to go back and keep track of comments and questions. There will be many. If you have any questions about Facebook please don‟t hesitate to ask me. I have a lot of experience with the rescue sites there. Just because someone is posting on a rescue site doesn‟t mean they are okay or a good candidate for that animal. Some are backyard breeders and others are collectors. If someone is interested in a dog or cat you put on Facebook ask questions. Is the dog going to be kept inside or stuck out in a pen? Are you going to adopt the dog or just take it to save its life and then give it to someone? You cannot be too careful! 5. We never put dogs or cats on craigslist that have not been spayed or neutered, and neither should the public. If you are going to do an ad for someone this is the first thing you need to find out. If they need low cost spay/neuter then they can go to Animal Trustees of Austin or Emancipet before ads are placed. If you are suggesting they do their own ads please let them know it is in the animal‟s best interest not to re-home them prior to this being done. Their animal could end up with a back-yard breeder or worse.

Dog and cat returns and people re-homing animals 1. We always take our animals back so if someone adopted their dog or cat from us and needs to return please forward the email to the appropriate department/person if it‟s a dog or cat. If they are returning due to behavior issues also cc the dog or cat behavior teams so that they may be able to instruct the person on how to deal and curb whatever behavior they are having problems with.


P a g e | 125 2. If someone wants to re-home their dog or cat and mentions they adopted or rescued it then always find out where they adopted or rescued from before sending re-homing info. Like us, most rescues want their animals back and not re-homed some other way. Austin Humane Society takes their animals back and so do most others so they always need to check with the organization where they got the animal before re-homing another way.

What to do if you have to miss your shift 1. We have a calendar in our Pass email program. Please go into the calendar on Sunday nights and enter the days and times you will be on duty for the next week. We have to keep consistency in the email and phone system as well as being at TLAC. Please only answer emails or take calls on your shift. If you have some extra time and want to help during other times please email the person on duty and ask if they want some help. 2. If you are going to be on vacation, are sick, or have any other reason you cannot do your shift please let the Volunteer Coordinators. If you cannot commit to the emails on a consistent basis we may not be able to keep you as a volunteer. This is an overwhelming program and during certain times of the year we are so busy we simply cannot survive without dependable volunteers. You are SO important!!!


P a g e | 126

Volunteer Recruitment and Management: Key Takeaways: Recruit, Educate, Act, and Inspire!!

Recruit When building your Volunteer Program don‟t reinvent the wheel! Learn from the best practices of other animal rescue organizations.

Volunteer Management for Animal Care Organizations is a book in the Humane Society‟s Shelter Management Series by Betsy McFarland. It outlines all of the basic aspects of a volunteer program from startup to how to motivate, screen, and retain volunteers. It includes sample documents. The book also includes a long list of additional resources to explore.

● ● ● ● ●

Customize your recruiting to suit your needs. For instance if you are looking for volunteers to do dogwalking, try posting flyers in a local gym or near a popular trail site. Utilize social media such as Facebook to advertise you current volunteer opportunities with any requirements. APA‟s current volunteer opportunities are listed on the APA website Use your current volunteer base and ask them to spread the word. Post information about your rescue in local veterinary offices.

Educate Be able to clearly and consistently articulate your mission as well as your organizational and volunteer needs at all times. APA‟s Mission, “we promote and provide the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals,” is prominently displayed on our website where you can also find our current needs, projects, and results. The mission, needs, projects, and results are also communicated to all volunteers at an initial volunteer orientation. A simplified version of the mission statement, “Helping People Help Pets” appears on t-shirts, business cards, flyers, and other items which help volunteers to learn and internalize the mission and goals of the organization. The first and best place to educate volunteers about your mission and programs, however, is through a successful volunteer orientation.


P a g e | 127

Inspire “People don‟t always remember what you did or what you said but they will always remember how you made them feel.” Cultivate a positive, inspirational relationship with the local media and your community and the volunteers will come. In this story the taxi driver represents you, and each volunteer in the organization. The elderly woman represents each animal you treat with compassion, love and dignity. Even the smallest actions can make a difference in a person or an animal‟s life.

Happy & Linus are just 2 of the over 8,000 lives APA! has saved since 2008!! Austin Pets Alive! is 99% volunteer driven & 100% donation driven!!

Local news stations and businesses can help make or break you. Don‟t be known as the taxi driver who drove by the elderly woman!


P a g e | 128

Ten Critical Steps to Getting your Volunteer Program off The Ground Decide what you need volunteers to do! Create specific volunteer positions and write job descriptions for each position that include specific duties.

Determine when and where you can hold an orientation. In the beginning, homes can work well for small groups. As your program grows you may need larger spaces. Try reaching out to local community centers, libraries, schools, universities or businesses that have conference rooms and ask them to donate space. An ideal space will be climate controlled, with adequate seating and have AV equipment available. Sufficient parking is also helpful.

Web-based Recruiting Use free resources for recruiting and communicating with volunteers and the public like Facebook, Twitter, Craig‟s List, Yahoo Groups, and Google Groups. Build an amazing website!! Recruit talented, enthusiastic PR/Web designers from local colleges and businesses

Think Big and Act Small! Initially, small gatherings work best because you‟re able to “connect” more easily and make a significant impact. Some of our most successful orientations have been at people‟s homes, sitting around


P a g e | 129 the kitchen table. Now our orientations have outgrown small spaces. We average 60-100 people in attendance at each orientation and host them every 3 weeks!

Volunteer Applications & Sign In Make sure people sign in and provide their email address and phone numbers. Have them complete a Volunteer Application if they haven‟t already done so. APA! uses an online application system, however when you are getting started a hardcopy will do just fine.

Volunteer Application and Agreement and Release

To sign up to foster pets in your home please fill out our foster application. Austin Pets Alive! (“APA!”) is a private, nonprofit animal welfare organization whose mission is to promote and provide the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals in Austin. Please complete the entire application. For problems with this form please email volunteer@austinpetsalive.org. Thank You! First Name: Last name: Preferred Email: Alternate Email: Street Address: City: State: Zip Code: Year of Birth: Cell Phone*:


P a g e | 130 Home Phone: Work Phone: TwitterID: Emergency Contact Name & Relationship: Emergency Contact Phone: How did you hear about us? Why are you interested in volunteering with APA!? Reason for volunteering?

Do you volunteer with other animal welfare organizations? Check any that apply. o o o o

Austin Humane Society Emancipet Town Lake Animal Center Other (list in comments section)

What prior experience do you have with animals? Check all that apply. o o o o o o o o

None Experience with my own pets Worked in a veterinarianâ&#x20AC;&#x;s office Worked/volunteered in a shelter Animal behaviorist/training Worked/volunteered at a zoo Volunteered with a rescue group Other

If you are volunteering to be a photographer, select your photography level below. o o o o

Beginner with consumer camera Beginner with DSLR Enthusiast with DSLR Professional

Please describe any other skills, training or experience you have that could benefit Austin Pets Alive! (e.g. computer programming, office skills, fundraising experience, etc.)


P a g e | 131

Spanish Proficiency: o None o Poor o Fair o Good o Fluent Your Website or Blog where you can link to APA! URL: Link Name: Time You can Give: o A few hours a day o A few hours a week o A few hours a month o Special events or projects only Excluding Traffic violations, have you ever been convicted of any criminal offenses? If yes, please explain. o Yes o No

Volunteer Agreement In consideration of this opportunity to volunteer for Austin Pets Alive! (â&#x20AC;&#x153;APA!â&#x20AC;?), I agree to the following terms and conditions: 1. I will abide by the mission, rules, regulations, policies and programs of APA! While I am a volunteer. 2. I agree to be supervised by an APA! manager or designee and will work as a team member with all volunteers. 3. I will treat all animals, other volunteers, and the general public with dignity and respect. 4. If I will be sheltering or providing foster care or boarding for any of the APA! animals in my home, I consent to an APA! representative visiting my home from time to time to observe the animals and their living quarters. 5. I have accurately and truthfully completed this Volunteer Application and Agreement. Agreement Signature:

Volunteer Release and Waiver


P a g e | 132 I understand and agree that as a volunteer for Austin Pets Alive! (herein after referred to as â&#x20AC;&#x153;APA!â&#x20AC;?), I assume all risks of loss or injury, including death to myself or damage to my property while on the property of APA! and elsewhere, while participating in the volunteer program. I understand and agree that all services performed by me will be performed on a strictly voluntary basis, and that I will receive no remuneration, pay or compensation of any kind.

I understand and agree that I will not be an employee of APA! and will not receive any benefits normally available to employees of APA!. I understand and agree that APA! shall incur no liability of any nature as result of my volunteering for APA!

I understand that in handling animals and performing other volunteer tasks there is a risk of injury, including physical harm or death, and that all services performed by me will be done at my own risk. I understand APA! strongly recommends that I keep current my tetanus immunization. I further understand that APA! recommends that any dogs and cats that I live with should be immunized by my veterinarian, if not already done so.

Therefore, on behalf of myself, my heirs and personal representatives, I hereby release, discharge and indemnify and hold harmless APA! and its assigns, successors, agents, staff, officers, board of directors, and all claims, causes of action or demands of any nature of cause whatsoever, including costs and legal fees arising out of, or relating to, my volunteering with APA!, including, but not limited to, animal bites, disease, accidents, property damage, or injuries.

Release Signature:

o

Please check here if APA does NOT have permission to use photographs of you on our website, blog, or other marketing materials.

The following questions are for transport volunteers only. If you will not be transporting for APA!, your application is complete. Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x;s License: DL Expiration: Auto Insurance: Insurance Expiration:

Supervisor and Volunteer Coordinator Section Orientation Attended: o Yes o No


P a g e | 133 Driver‟s License Proof Received: o Yes o No Auto Insurance Proof Received: o Yes o No

Orientation Discussion Points & Handout Discuss the general aspects of the organization (history, goals, mission, policies, and procedures) and then introduce the specific job descriptions.

Austin Pets Alive! www.austinpetsalive.org

Volunteer Orientation

About APA! and our Mission Austin Pets Alive! (APA!) is a non-profit organization run almost exclusively by volunteers dedicated to helping make Austin a No-Kill City for homeless pets. Town Lake Animal Center (TLAC), Austin‟s city shelter, currently kills approximately 26% of the animals that enter into it, with over 6,000 animals‟ lives lost in the last fiscal year. There


P a g e | 134 are about 74,000 homes each year that become available to a new pet in Austin alone, more homes than needed to prevent unnecessary killing in our shelters. Making Austin a No-Kill City for homeless pets is achievable, and our City Council took the first big step in March of 2010 by unanimously passing a no-kill plan. The plan is multi-faceted and may take two or more years to fully implement, so we are asking our community to help us save the lives of innocent victims still being lost – the lives of our homeless pets. It is critical for Austinites to know that our city has not yet achieved a no-kill status, and can only do so with hard work and commitment.

Why We Love APA!

● ● ● ●

APA! is a well-respected and fast-growing, volunteer-driven rescue organization that focuses on saving the lives of homeless pets. We only take animals from the TLAC death list meaning we are their last chance. In June 2008, when we first started pulling dogs from TLAC, the kill rate at TLAC was about 50%. Since then, we have saved over 5000 cats and dogs, and the kill rate is now about half of what it was two years ago. Our President, Dr. Ellen Jefferson, DVM, has devoted her life to helping animals in need. In 1999, she created another non-profit, Emancipet, that is a free/low-cost spay/neuter/wellness clinic in hopes of reducing the homeless pet population. Volunteering with APA! is easy and flexible. You can choose to work directly with the animals or behind the scenes. We‟ll take as little or as much time as you can give, in one function or across several departments.

Volunteers are required to: submit an on-line application attend an orientation session join an APA! Yahoo! Group sign a Release and Waiver of Liability form sign a Volunteer Agreement be supervised at all times by a parent or guardian if under the age of 16 attend additional training sessions as required by APA! possess a valid Texas driver‟s license, if driving an APA! vehicle for animal transport treat animals in our care with kindness and concern for their welfare represent themselves and APA! in a professional manner and treat clients with respect Please refer to our online handbook at http://austinpetsalive.wiki.zoho.com/handbook.html for more information.

How We Save Homeless Pets

Rescue volunteers go to TLAC every day, get the list of cats and dogs at risk of dying, evaluate the animals we feel we can save, and have them taken off the list.

Foster volunteers foster rescued cats and dogs in their homes.

Transport volunteers are sent pleas via email to transport selected dogs and cats from TLAC to our facility for medical workup, and then transport to adoption site.


P a g e | 135

Adoption volunteers take shifts at sites to talk with the public about APA! and our dogs and cats, to walk our dogs and teach them good manners, and to assist counselors as needed.

Cattery volunteers help take care of and get our cats and kittens adopted at our cat adoption sites.

Adoption follow-up team members call adopters to check on how well their new pet is doing and whether they have any questions or concerns.

Dog and Cat Marketing volunteers write biographies and blogs of our animals for our website and Craigslist postings.

Development (Fundraising) and Events volunteers solicit sponsors and donations and coordinate fundraising events.

Marketing volunteers create a variety of promotional materials for the overall advertisement of APA!.

Outreach/PR volunteers help generate public awareness of APA! and seek out PR opportunities.

Volunteer Coordination volunteers help recruit new volunteers, enter and maintain database information, and assist departments with their volunteer needs.

Lost and Found volunteers help reunite lost pets with their owners through a variety of means.

PASS (Positive Alternatives to Shelter Surrender) volunteers help people help their pets to find new homes or to stay in their current home by addressing medical, behavioral, or other challenges.

Communications and Technology

APA! communicates with volunteers as a whole via Yahoo! Groups.

To volunteer with APA!, you must join the APA Volunteer Yahoo Group or if fostering only, then the APA Foster Yahoo! Group. The Volunteer Yahoo Group is the primary means for teamleaders to post volunteer opportunities and events, communicate important information that affects APA! volunteers, and schedule shifts.

We also offer an APA General Yahoo Group that is recommended, but optional to join. The purpose of the General Yahoo Group is to give all of our members an opportunity to discuss issues regarding APA!


P a g e | 136 Within a week of attending an orientation, you will be sent an email invitation to join the Yahoo Groups. Please be sure to check your spam folder if you don‟t see the email invitations. If you have technical issues or questions regarding joining the Yahoo Groups, please contact Tessa Copeland at tessa.copeland@austinpetsalive.org. After joining the groups, go to Files and review the Netiquette.

APA! information is located on our APA! wiki at http://volunteer.austinpetsalive.org/.

Become a Fan of APA! on Facebook

Austin Pets Alive! has a fan page on Facebook now! Though it is not required, we would love for you to add us onto your profile. It‟s a great way to stay updated on recent news, as well as to spread the word.

Just simply do a search for “Austin Pets Alive!” and click the “Become a Fan” button on the top of our page. It will then be added to the bottom of your information page on your profile under the section called “Pages.”

If there is a note posted that you want to share, you can add it to your profile or send it in a message. When you click on the note, there will be a small box in the top right corner that says “Share.” When you click this, a box will come up prompting you to post it to your profile. If you would prefer to send it in a message instead, that option will show in the bottom left corner of this box. If you post the note to your profile, any one of your friends that looks at your profile can view the note and APA!‟s mission will spread!

If you have any questions about adding our fan page or how to post a note to your profile, feel free to contact Tessa Copeland at tessa.copeland@austinpetsalive.org.

What Happens Next

After the general orientation and teamleader presentations, meet with the teamleader(s) with whom you‟re interested in volunteering to get more details and ask questions. Complete your choice sheet and hand it in to one of the volunteer coordination team members. 3. If interested in volunteering at dog adoption sites, stay after the orientation to receive further details and training.

4. If you are interested in fostering, please complete an on-line application at: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/foster-application Stay after the orientation to receive more training and information if you are interested in fostering a cat or working in the cat foster program.


P a g e | 137 5. You will be sent invitation emails to join the APA! Volunteer and General Yahoo! Groups. Be sure to check your Spam/Junk folder and set your computer to accept emails from APA!. If you have not received your invitation within three days, please contact tessa.copeland@austinpetsalive.org.

6. The volunteer coordination team will forward your contact information to the departments you expressed interest in on the choice sheet. You should be contacted by the departments within a week or two, but if you are not, please email our Volunteer Matchmakers. (contact info below)

7. Start Volunteering and Saving Lives!

Summary of Current Volunteer Opportunities

Cat Program

Bottle Baby Trailer – Assist in a variety of aspects of staffing and maintaining a 24-hour facility for feeding underage kittens (and, occasionally, puppies). Cat Adoption – Supervise or participate in adoption events, review and approve adoption applications, report weekly adoptions on yahoo groups, email adoption information, turn in adoption paperwork, and research and secure adoption sites that allow cats to stay at an adoption location 24/7 and be available for adoption during business hours. Cat Behavior – Work with cats who need extra support in the area of behavior to help make them more adoptable Cat Foster Coordination – Recruit, screen, mentor/train new foster homes. Cat Marketing – Create write-ups about individual cats, take photos, develop related materials to market APA! cats in both print and electronic media, and use a variety of web resources such as social networking sites. Cat Rescue – Evaluate cats on the TLAC at-risk list for possible rescue by APA!. Cat Transport – Transport cats in your own vehicle between TLAC, our facility, adoption site, or foster home. Foster a Cat – Foster cats and kittens awaiting adoption. Dog Program Adoption – Walk dogs, visit with members of the public about APA!, answer general questions, help with sanitation, and provide other assistance at dog adoption sites. Dog Behavior – This area includes:

Healthy Dogs, Healthy People Program – Assist at Lady Bird Lake trail site where people can take our higher energy dogs for walks or runs; work with B&E and Fresh Start dogs attending for socialization and training!

Behavior and Enrichment (B&E) – Receive training in dog handling and behavior before taking our higher need dogs on field trips to work on socialization, basic training, and FUN!


P a g e | 138 Fresh Start – Work with the 8-10 highest need dogs in APA!‟s program under direction of our trainer and have the opportunity to take them through Canine Good Citizen Class!

Dog Exercise Program – Walk dogs at the APA! Headquarters building mornings and/or evenings, before and after the dogs spend their day at adoption sites.

Dog Foster Coordination – Recruit, screen, mentor, and/or train new fosters. Dog Marketing – Create write-ups about individual dogs, take photos, develop related materials to market APA! dogs in both print and electronic media, and use a variety of web resource such as social networking sites. Dog Rescue – Evaluate dogs on the TLAC euthanasia list for possible rescue by APA! Dog Transport – Transport dogs in your own vehicle between TLAC, our facility, and adoption sites. Mid-day and evening shifts available. Foster a Dog – Provide foster home to dogs and puppies until they are ready to enter adoption program. Other Opportunities, including Combined Cat and Dog Services Pet Adoption Facilitator – Listen and respond via email or text to potential and recent adopters‟ messages left on adoption voicemail. Communication (Marketing, PR, Outreach) – Work with designers, writers, photographers, team leaders, and printers/suppliers to produce promotional materials. Publish monthly newsletter; provide public speakers; develop media contacts. Develop and implement APA!‟s educational and community awareness initiatives Development/Fundraising/Events – Assist with fundraising initiatives aimed at individuals and businesses, including seeking business sponsorships or working on special fund or supply drives, write/send notes of appreciation to donors and supporters. Help plan and staff events sponsored by APA!; coordinate or staff APA‟s participation in events sponsored by other organizations. Finance/HR – various positions that include TLAC reporting, deposits reconciliation, record keeping, and dog adoption file transmission. Lost and Found – Help reunite lost pets with their owners through a variety of online resources and other means. P.A.S.S. (Positive Alternatives to Shelter Surrender) – Help people help their pets to find new homes or to stay in their current home by addressing medical, behavioral, or other challenges. Post-adoption Follow-up – Call or email recent adopters to determine the success of the adoption and identify issues with which the adopter needs assistance; refer problem to adoption manager or appropriate resource; collect photos and success stories. Volunteer Coordination – Recruit and orient volunteers, publicize volunteer job opportunities and match volunteers to jobs, respond to emails from current and potential volunteers and groups, plan volunteer appreciation activities, and keep track of volunteers in our database. Volunteer Medical Team – assist med techs with scheduling appointments, clinic registration and discharge, medical records, cleaning, recovery, inventory, and laundry.


P a g e | 139

Volunteer Choice Sheet Now that your volunteers have an idea of the opportunities available have them complete a â&#x20AC;&#x153;choice sheetâ&#x20AC;?. Try to encourage them to limit their initial selections to prevent them from being overwhelmed at first.

.

Volunteer Choice Sheet Name: Email Address: Phone Number:


P a g e | 140

Cat Program: o Adopt Line o Bottle Baby Nursery o Cat Adoptions o Cat Marketing o Cat Rescue o Cat Transport o Foster a Cat o Post Adoption Follow-up o Ringworm Ward Community Assistance Programs: o No Kill Handbill o PASS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Positive Alternatives to Shelter Surrender Data: o Data entry Development: o Donor Appreciation o Events/Pet Squad o Grant Writing Dog Program: o Adopt Line o AM & PM Dog Walking o Big Brother/Big Sister o Dog Adoption Sites o Dog Behavior o Dog Foster Coordinator o Dog Marketing o Dog Rescue o Dog Transport o Foster a Dog o Post Adoption Follow-up Finance & Facilities: o

Greeter

Medical: o

Medical


P a g e | 141 PR/Marketing: o o o

Brand Marketing Marketing Campaigns PR

Have them sign a release Included below is a sample release form frequently used by our dog walking program.

Austin Pets Alive! Short-Term Volunteer Agreement and Release Austin Pets Alive! ("APA!") is a private, nonprofit animal welfare organization whose mission is to promote and provide the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals in Austin.

Please provide the following information and then read and sign the Agreement and the Release below.

__________________________________ Name

___________________________________ E-mail address

Volunteer Agreement

_________________________ Date(s) of Service

__________________________ Telephone Number


P a g e | 142 In consideration of this opportunity to volunteer for Austin Pets Alive! ("APA!"), I agree to the following terms and conditions:

1. I will abide by the mission, rules, regulations, policies and programs of APA! while I am a volunteer. 2. I agree to be supervised by an APA! Manager or designee and will work as a team member with all volunteers. 3. I will treat all animals, other volunteers, and the general public with dignity and respect. 4. I have accurately and truthfully completed this Volunteer Agreement and Release. ___________________________________ Signature

________________ Date

__________________________________________ Print Name

Volunteer Release and Waiver

I understand and agree that as a volunteer for Austin Pets Alive! (herein after referred to as "APA!"), I assume all risks of loss or injury, including death to myself or damage to my property while on the property of APA! and elsewhere, while participating in the volunteer program.

I understand and agree that all services performed by me will be performed on a strictly voluntary basis, and that I will receive no remuneration, pay or compensation of any kind.

I understand and agree that I will not be an employee of APA! and will not receive any benefits normally available to employees of APA!. I understand and agree that APA! shall incur no liability of any nature as result of my volunteering for APA!.

I understand that in handling animals and performing other volunteer tasks there is a risk of injury, including physical harm or death, and that all services performed by me will be done at my own risk. I understand APA! strongly recommends that I keep current my tetanus immunization. I further understand that APA!


P a g e | 143 recommends that any dogs and cats that I live with should be immunized by my veterinarian if they have not already been immunized.

Therefore, on behalf of myself, my heirs and personal representatives, I hereby release, discharge and indemnify and hold harmless APA! and its assigns, successors, agents, staff, officers, board of directors, employees, contractors and representatives from any and all claims, causes of action or demands of any nature of cause whatsoever, including costs and legal fees arising out of, or relating to, my volunteering with APA!, including, but not limited to, animal bites, disease, accidents, property damage, or injuries.

___________________________________ Signature

________________ Date

___________________________________ Print Name

For short-term volunteers under 18 years of age, this Agreement and Release must contain the signature of the Volunteerâ&#x20AC;&#x;s parent or legal guardian:

___________________________________

________________

Signature of Parent or Legal Guardian

Date

___________________________________ Print Name

Set up a Database If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x;t already have an online application system set up a database to keep track of your volunteers and their areas of interest.


P a g e | 144 Getting Your New Volunteers Involved Once the information is gathered pass it on to your team leaders. Have team leaders contact new volunteers within a week to get them engaged immediately. Follow up with team leaders to make sure theyâ&#x20AC;&#x;re following through and contacting new volunteers.

Develop a communication system for volunteers. Yahoo or Google groups are simple efficient ways of communicating with your volunteer database.

FAQs: Who are the key players and what are their jobs within the program? At first, there was just Volunteer Coordinator. As the team grew, we added Orientation Manager and Database Administrators, and then Volunteer Recognition and Matchmakers. We now have a team of ten people and we want to double the size of the team by the year end.

Volunteer Director The Volunteer Director is responsible for the first impression new volunteers have of Austin Pets Alive (APA!) This position requires a dynamic and enthusiastic personality who is highly organized and who can manage other volunteers online and in person.


P a g e | 145 The Volunteer Director is responsible for the recruitment, orienting, and management of APA‟s volunteers, maintains volunteer records and assists Team Leaders with coordinating their volunteer needs. Responsibilities: 

Recruits and develops a team administrator for each management facet of volunteering to include the online database and materials, mentoring program, facilitating team leader/new volunteer access, orientations and handbooks, recording volunteer hours, recruiting new volunteers, volunteer appreciation, etc....

Organizes and conducts the orientation and general training of volunteers making sure all aspects of the training are in accordance with the organization‟s mission and philosophy. Updates training materials and programs as needed and alerts volunteers to relevant volunteer opportunities.

Creates and updates job descriptions in conjunction with other Team Leaders.

Develops and implements strategies to recruit volunteers. Responds to inquiries regarding the volunteer program.

Matches volunteers to appropriate jobs seeking to fulfill the needs of the organization as well as the individual. Regularly surveys staff to reassess needs for volunteer assistance and updates job assignments as needed. Inspires volunteers to accept new jobs quickly.

Utilizes computer to update and maintain volunteer information.

Acts as moderator for APA‟s Yahoo Groups and confirms volunteers have joined as needed.

Qualifications and Requirements: 

Enthusiastic personality to inspire volunteers

Demonstrated knowledge of supervisor techniques for volunteers, motivation and decision-making techniques. Skill in teaching and mediating disputes and solving problems.

Skill in developing training materials. Ability to organize and conduct training sessions.

Strong verbal and written communication skills.

Strong organizational skills with attention to detail.

Must have computer and phone access.

Orientation Administrator The Orientation Manager is responsible for planning all elements of a volunteer orientation program and conducting the program on a regular basis to keep pace with the volume of volunteer applicants and the needs of other APA! team leaders for new volunteers. Responsibilities 

Develops, maintains, and implements a detailed orientation procedure that documents all responsibilities related to orientation before, during, and after the program


P a g e | 146 

Develops and delivers an oral presentation that provides an overall view of APA!‟s mission and organization and outlines opportunities for volunteer involvement  Develops a written orientation handout that complements the presentation and provides a source of contact information for new volunteers  Ensures that all written materials and correspondence related to orientation is current and accurate  Ensures all tasks delegated to other VC team members are covered during the orientation program  Ensures that host facility is left in its original condition Qualifications and Requirements 

Enthusiastic personality to inspire volunteers; good public speaking skills

Skilled in developing written materials; strong organizational skills with attention to detail.

Must have ability to compose and send well-written emails

Must be able to collaborate with other team members in a positive and effective manner

Must be capable of following through in meeting team leaders‟ volunteer needs

Attend Volunteer Coordination meetings approximately every three weeks

Time required – approximately 10-12 hours/week

Database Administrator Volunteer Recognition Creates and implements method of recognition for volunteers. Arranges volunteer get-togethers and parties. Ensures that volunteers understand the value of their work and that APA! appreciates their efforts. This person is essentially the 'Cheerleader" of volunteers. Assists in other volunteer coordination team duties as needed.

Group and Event specialist Responds to community, youth and corporate requests for groups who want to volunteer as a team for a service day or project. Coordinates groups with the Events/Development team to direct and organize group and youth volunteers. Assists in responding to general volunteers emails questions and essentially directs email traffic to the appropriate departments and assists with new volunteer orientations

Matchmaker Liaison The Matchmaker Liaison helps match new and current volunteers with APA! volunteer opportunities ensuring that APA! team leaders‟ volunteer needs are met.

Responsibilities

Coordinate with team leaders to ascertain their volunteer needs

Send weekly Volunteer Spotlight highlighting APA‟s most urgent volunteer needs

Attend orientations to speak with new volunteers and team leaders about volunteer opportunities


P a g e | 147 ●

Email all orientation attendees a welcome letter approximately one week after orientation to ensure they were contacted by a team leader, joined the APA Volunteer Yahoo group, and help them find the right volunteer role if needed

Correspond with any volunteers that reply and share feedback with team leaders as needed

Send a survey email to volunteers who unsubscribe from the Yahoo Group asking why they dropped off, report info to volunteer coordination team to discuss any appropriate resolutions, and notate in database

Help team leaders access database to retrieve information about volunteers interested in their departments

Qualifications and Requirements 

Must have computer and internet access

Must have ability to compose and send well-written emails

Must be able to collaborate with other team members in a positive and effective manner

Must be capable of following through in meeting team leaders‟ volunteer needs

Attend Volunteer Coordination meetings approximately every three weeks

Attend orientations approximately every three weeks to meet and establish rapport to engage new volunteers

Time required – approximately 8-10 hours/week

What aspects of this program have been the most successful? How did they occur? We have recruited and retained a large number of volunteers who are passionate about saving lives. We provide structure, professionalism, and organization while maintaining flexibility. Ninety-nine percent of our organization consists of volunteers who do everything from building and maintaining the website, walking dogs and socializing cats, PR and marketing, photography, foster, rescue, transport, construction, painting, data entry, phone and on-line response to adopters.

What were the obstacles to success that need to be surmounted and how did you do it? Retaining volunteers is a constant challenge. Team leaders and directors must have a can-do attitude. They need to have high expectations for their volunteers and communicate with them frequently and clearly. Managing difficult volunteers in an appropriate and effective manner can be difficult. Volunteers expect organization and NEED to be inspired and motivated constantly. Volunteers should be an asset, not a liability to the organization. On occasion it will be necessary to ask a volunteer to leave the organization but this must be done in a diplomatic and consistent manner in order to minimize community backlash and not tarnish the public perception of the organization. Developing an effective communication process and keeping volunteers engaged and organized is a constant challenge. It can be difficult to hold volunteers accountable since they are unpaid. Volunteers who fail to meet their commitments, however, can cause serious disruptions. Volunteer recognition programs, team parties, team contests, and multiple levels of communication (email, Facebook, twitter) can build a volunteer culture that promotes consistent involvement.

How did you decide priorities and what are they? Communication and Prioritization are the keys to success.


P a g e | 148 ACT: There is a delicate balance between “keeping your house clean” and “jumping in without a net.”

Automate as much as you can from the beginning and make sure your key players are all on the same page. Funnel everything through one source or email address: vc@austinpetsalive.org. Meet weekly with your leadership team!

Automated Responses Auto-reply to Volunteer Application Thank you for your interest in volunteering with Austin Pets Alive! We have received your application and look forward to meeting you. Please follow the link below to sign up for one of the upcoming volunteer orientation sessions. http://creator.zoho.com/austinpetsalive/forms/#Form:Orientation_Signup

Feel free to select whichever session is most convenient for you. The orientation program will last approximately two hours and provide information about APA!‟s goals, programs, and the progress toward making Austin a no-kill city for homeless pets. It will also give you the opportunity to learn about volunteer opportunities in further detail and select the area(s) in which you would like to work. You will need to attend an orientation session before you may begin volunteering for APA! . If the list of sessions does not currently contain an option that works for your schedule, please save this email or bookmark the link above so that you may return to the list later. We add new sessions regularly. The sessions are held (location, directions, parking info). New volunteers are requested to make a $20 donation as part of joining the APA! team. These donations are an important part of enabling APA! to save more lives. Exceptions will be made for individuals for whom this donation would present a financial hardship. Those who make the donation will receive a complimentary APA! t-shirt. Thanks again for choosing Austin Pets Alive! Debra Nesbitt and Ariana Gum Orientation Co-Managers

Auto-reply to registration for Orientation This is to confirm that you have successfully signed up for the Austin Pets Alive! volunteer orientation session on (date) at (time). You will receive a reminder several days before the session with information about location and parking. We look forward to meeting you then! APA! Volunteer Coordination Team

Reminder to registrants


P a g e | 149 This is a reminder that you have signed up to attend the Austin Pets Alive! orientation scheduled for (date). The orientation program will last approximately two hours and provide information about APA!‟s goals, programs, and the progress toward making Austin a No-Kill City. It will also give you the opportunity to learn about volunteer opportunities in further detail and select the area(s) in which you would like to work. You will need to attend an orientation session before you may begin volunteering for APA! . The session will be held in (location, directions, parking info) Please bring $20 to cover the cost of an APA! t-shirt and other materials. If you‟d like to donate more, you‟re more than welcome to do so. If this cost would present a barrier to you becoming a volunteer, please let us know. Also, attached is the Orientation Handout. Please print this and bring it with you to the orientation. This will help APA! save the printing costs, leaving us able to spend more on saving lives. Please arrive 15 minutes early to the orientation. This will allow time for everyone to sign-in and get settled so the orientation can start on time. We look forward to meeting you at the orientation program, and to working with you in APA! APA! Volunteer Coordination Team

Team Leader Invitation to Orientation Hello, team leaders: The next volunteer orientation is scheduled for (date, time) This time we‟ll be at (location, direction, parking info) We‟re asking those of you who plan to speak on behalf of your team to sign up on our doodle poll prior to orientation: (doodle poll URL) If you are unavailable, or if you think there‟s someone else on your team who is an effective speaker, please feel free to have them represent your team by signing up on the doodle poll in their own name. We would like one person to represent each department or team shown on the choice sheet, and for the dog program representative and cat program representative to share the “stage” while speaking about each department (ex: cat foster & dog foster will go up together). Please respond to the doodle poll by _________ so we will know who‟s planning to attend. Thanks, Volunteer Coordination Team

Standard response to emails expressing volunteer interest (Highly recommend use of Google “canned responses” to create standard replies and vary as needed) Hi (name), Thanks for your interest in volunteering with Austin Pets Alive! The first step to becoming a volunteer with APA! is to complete our online application here: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/get-involved/volunteer/


P a g e | 150 Once you have filled out the Volunteer Application, you will receive an email prompting you to sign up for a Volunteer Orientation. At the Orientation you will learn more about our organization and all the many diverse volunteer opportunities that are available. Prior to an orientation, you can still come walk dogs at our main location at 2807 Manchaca Rd. The times we most need walkers is from 7-9 am and from 8-10 pm: however, we can always use people between 9 am and 8 pm as well. All you need to do is show up and ask to speak with the shift lead or dog counselor and they will get you to fill out a short term waiver and get you started walking dogs!! Thanks again, (name) APA! Volunteer Coordination Team

Standard response to emails requesting group volunteer opportunities Thank you for your interest in APA! We are always in need of volunteers, and would love to work with your group. We do ask for at least two weeks' notice to arrange something and make sure we're prepared for you! To get started, please let me know the following: How many people are in your group? Is anyone under 18? Any specific requirements you have (available certain days of the week, need to volunteer for a certain number of hours, etc.) Once I get a little more information, we can begin coordinating a project. Group projects take place at our 2807 Manchaca Rd. location and tend to fall into one of the following buckets: ď&#x201A;ˇ

Dog Walking: We need groups of 6-8 people every day 7-9am and 8-10pm to walk our dogs. If your group is larger than 6-8 but would like to participate, you can split into smaller groups and cover multiple shifts on multiple days.

ď&#x201A;ˇ

Facilities Project: Groups of up to 25 people can come to our building (preferably sometime 9am - 5pm) to work on a project such as painting, organizing supplies, arranging dog kennels, or even light yard work. Members of the group can take turns rotating out to walk dogs.

I look forward to hearing back to you!

(name) APA! Volunteer Coordination Team NOTE: If there's a specific event coming up where help is needed, we highlight that instead of dog walking/building projects. For underage groups, we list fundraising and a tour as the only option. Groups usually contact us with varying levels of info up front, so we adjust the response accordingly. Decide what volunteer positions are essential. In other words, stick with the basics and create a solid foundation. For example, make sure there are efficient sanitation, safety, and disease protocols in place. Do


P a g e | 151 you have Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for both staff and volunteers written? Do you have good staff retention rates? If not, why are staff members leaving? Remember, until basic operations are in place, adding volunteers can make things worse. The last thing you want are volunteers who spread word in the community that your program is not run well, thereby damaging your reputation. Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x; programs and community service restitution should not be implemented until the organization has a solid foundation and an established volunteer program.


P a g e | 152 Code of Conduct

Austin Pets Alive! (APA!) is a 501(c) 3 (nonprofit) organization run almost exclusively by dedicated volunteers. Our mission is to promote and provide the resources, education and programs needed to eliminate the killing of companion animals. The Volunteer Code of Conduct is a statement of behavioral principles and expectations. It reflects how we respect and treat each other and the animals at Austin Pets Alive! and provides a philosophy that guides our decision-making. It incorporates principles of personal responsibility, respect, compassion, and safety. All Volunteers are asked to sign a Code of Conduct prior to volunteering, indicating that they will adhere to the highest standard of professional conduct. This Code of Conduct asks that all volunteers:

● ● ●

Represent Austin Pets Alive! in a polite and professional manner. Share and promote the culture, purpose, and objectives of APA! Demonstrate respect and kindness towards our animals, staff, clients, donors, and other volunteers. ● Keep commitments and arrive on time for your volunteer session. ● Be prepared and ready to work to an acceptable standard. ● Treat each other with courtesy, sensitivity, tact, consideration, and humility. Always share feedback or concerns in a respectable manner. Value our role in ensuring the safety of each other, the animals, and the community. Lead in a responsible, patient and motivational manner. Recognize and congratulate the achievements of others. Endeavor to balance organizational and individual needs. Follow all procedures and protocols to the best of our ability at all times. Promote healthy and safe work practices during volunteer projects and training. Signature: _______________________ Date: _________


P a g e | 153 Age Guidelines

Effective day of age guidelines These requirements are effective on April 1, 2011. Volunteers under 18 years old who began providing services prior to this date will be allowed to continue in their roles at the discretion of APA!. In all instances, authorizing services to be performed by volunteers under the age 18 will be done on a case-by-case basis at the sole discretion of APA!. Definition of volunteer types Regular volunteers: Individuals who complete the online application process, attend a new volunteer orientation session, are added to the APA! volunteer database, and provide one or more volunteer services on an indefinite basis. Short-term individual volunteers: Individuals who perform voluntary services or participate in events on a one-time basis or on a limited number of occurrences within a fixed time period. Short-term volunteers must complete the Short-Term Volunteer Agreement and Release each time they help out and, ideally, those who do so repeatedly will be contacted and encouraged to go through the application and orientation process to become regular volunteers. Group volunteers: Short-term volunteers who participate in events or perform voluntary services as part of a group outside of APA! This may include, but is not limited to, corporate groups, school groups, Girl or Boy Scout troops, or student organizations. Each member of the group must complete the Short-Term Volunteer Agreement and Release each time they help out.

Age Guidelines Regular volunteers and individual short-term volunteers

All individuals must sign the APA! Short-Term Volunteer Agreement and Release. Individuals under 18 years old must also obtain a parent or guardian signature on the APA! Short-Term Volunteer Agreement and Release each time they help out.

Individuals under 18 years old must be directly supervised by a parent or other adult designated by the parent at all times.

○ ●

Individuals under 18 who wish to volunteer but do not have adequate parental supervision may be referred to the PEAK program.

Individuals that are at least 18 years old may handle an animal.


P a g e | 154 ●

Individuals that are 16 or 17 years old may handle an animal under the supervision of a parent or other adult designated by the parent.

Individuals under 16 may not directly handle an animal, but may accompany their supervising adult while he/she handles an animal.

Group volunteers Each group member under 18 years old must have his/her parent sign the APA! Short-Term Volunteer Agreement and Release each time they help out. Group volunteers with members under 18 may not handle animals as their volunteer activity. They may be permitted incidental contact during their volunteer experience strictly at APA!‟s discretion. Group volunteers with members under 18 will primarily be directed to activities that will benefit animals through fundraising and community awareness. Underage groups with 12 or fewer members who complete fundraising activities and wish to present their donation to APA! in person may be offered a “behind the scenes” tour of the APA! Adoption and Resource Center. A 10-15 minute presentation to their group by an APA! representative may also be offered. At APA!‟s discretion, some underage groups may be offered alternatives to fundraising. Underage groups with 12 or fewer members may be directed to the PEAK program. If short-term volunteer projects suitable for young volunteers are available at the APA! Adoption and Resource Center or upcoming APA! community events, these opportunities may be offered, at APA!‟s discretion, as an alternative to fundraising. Groups with members under 8 years old may participate in fundraising activities off of APA! premises, but do not qualify for any alternatives on-site. 5. Underage group volunteers are required to have a minimum of one adult present during any activity or service provided to APA! on our premises or at our events. APA! reserves the right to limit the size of the group and/or require additional adult supervisors as needed. 6. As with all group volunteers, underage groups must provide APA! with at least two weeks‟ notice if a specific volunteer date is requested. The group must also provide APA! with the number of expected participants, including how many are under the age of 18, as well as any additional details needed by APA! to determine the safest and most productive volunteer activity.

In Closing: Again: Recruit, Educate, Act, and Inspire!!


P a g e | 155

The Adopt Line Team: Virtual Front Line of APA

About the Adopt Line Team How adopt line was born In Nov 2009 Dr Jefferson sent out a plea to the volunteer team. No one had enough time to promptly answer all the emails and voicemails coming into APA, and adoptions were being lost. Three volunteers answered the plea, and the adopt@ team began.

Who emails or calls the adopt line? 

The adopt@austinpetsalive.org address is featured on the APA website (in the „contact us‟ section and under each foster cat and foster dog profile link), in Petfinder, Craig List ads, and other venues we market our rescues.

The APA phone number which „flows‟ into our adopt@ inbox is the main phone number provided on the APA website.


P a g e | 156

Our Growth Two years ago, roughly 20-30 emails and calls were coming in daily. Today that number has exploded to 110-130 a day. During the Bastrop fire crisis of 09/11, 250-300 calls and emails poured in every day. Daily rate 140 130 120 110 100 90

Daily rate

80 70 60 50 40 Dec-09

Feb-10

Apr-10

Jun-10

Aug-10

Oct-10

Dec-10

Feb-11

Apr-11

Jun-11

Aug-11

We now have 10-15 volunteers who sign up as their schedule allows. We answer inquiries 365 days a year, 14+ hours a day.


P a g e | 157 Why this team is critical 

The adopt@ team enables APA to promptly answer all incoming adoption inquiries in a professional and consistent manner.

Response time is directly correlated to successful adoptions (the quicker you get an interested adopter in front of a rescued animal, the more likely they are to adopt him/her).

Even when the dog/cat in question isn‟t an option (already adopted, not a great fit), we can offer up alternative choices.

Some of the emails and almost all of the calls coming in are for other groups within APA, we ensure those groups are notified of these calls/emails so they can address them quickly.

When those difficult scenarios come up, we have the experience and personnel able to handle the situation in a polite, professional manner (adoption fee criticism, pitbull adoptions, behavioral issues, returns, etc).

Adopt line team structure The team is currently comprised of one team leader and 10-15 volunteers. Everyone takes shifts as they can. The team leader tends to take anything that‟s not filled, so someone with availability is ideal (I typically put in 20-30 hours a week). The team leader must also: 

Have great customer service skills

Have people management skills

Be computer/internet literate

Be comfortable under pressure/in difficult situations

Be able to dedicate time to recruiting/training of team members

Be knowledgeable of APA‟s overall structure, processes, procedures

Team members must: 

Have great customer service skills

Be computer/internet literate

Be able to contribute at least a couple of hours a week

Building Your Team APA had the benefit of gradual organic growth. The adopt@ team grew from 3 volunteers to 10-15 over a period of 2 years. We went through several shuffles as we tried to come up with the best structure. First the team was divided into a group for cats and another for dogs, we also initially only handled emails and left vmails to another group. Gradually it became evident that it was easier to have one team handle all of the main email/vmail traffic coming into APA.


P a g e | 158 Volunteering for this team is very rewarding and team morale/satisfaction is high. Due to the nature of a volunteer organization, however, the team leader must dedicate time regularly to the recruiting and training of new team members in order to keep up with increasing volume and volunteer turnover.

Sample Recruiting Email Sent to Volunteer Base: ****The APA! adopt@ team needs your help!!**** The adopt@ team is the crucial link between potential adopters and our dogs and cats who need loving homes. When potential adopters contact APA! via email or voice mail with questions about or interest in our rescues (after spotting a dog or cat on APA's website, local ads, or national sites like petfinder.com) our team emails or calls back with information on how to meet that specific animal. We answer emails and return phone messages 365 days a year, 14 hours a day, and receive an average of 150 emails and vmails a day, so signing up for as little as an hour once or twice a week can help! Being part of the adopt@ team is an extremely rewarding position in which you are enriching the lives of adopters and saving the lives of rescues alike! The work schedule is flexible (you can sign up for as long or short a shift as you like, the team shares a calendar so that it's easy to see which days/hours are still open) and the work can be done from any computer. On average it takes under 2 minutes to answer an inquiry, so our team members take shifts while working, studying, at home paying bills, watching tv, etc. You will need to be able to: * use simple APA! databases and spreadsheets to find the information needed * coordinate with Dog and Cat Foster and Adoption personnel as needed * possess good communication and customer service skills * have daily email/internet access (the vast majority of inquiries are handled through email, on average less than 10 inquiries per day need call backs via phone). Help save lives! Every dog and cat we adopt opens up a spot so we can save another life. This team has been a crucial component in APA‟s increased adoptions since it‟s inception in late 2009, responding promptly to inquiries dramatically increases the likelihood of adoptions taking place. If you would like to contribute to APA!‟s continuing adoption success, please let me know! I will be scheduling training in the several following weeks (training takes about an hour).

Getting Started Technology is constantly changing, so the team leader must be comfortable exploring new applications, upgrades, and software packages and always improving the tools the team uses. This manual provides a snapshot of current procedures for adopt@, however as technology keeps improving and the organization keeps growing, many of these procedures could be markedly different in no time at all!

Setting up the Gmail inbox The adopt@ team uses Gmail for various reasons: 

Widespread use (most volunteers are familiar with Gmail)

Ease of use with Google companion products - GDocs, GVoice and GCalendar


P a g e | 159 

Threading of responses

Canned responses

Gmail - Widespread use Gmail is a very popular mail application, most volunteers are already using it, those who don‟t quickly see its advantages for use with adopt@, and are rapidly fluent.

Gmail - Ease of use with companion products Once a volunteer logs into the adopt@ inbox, they automatically have access to adopt@austinpetsalive.org‟s Google Documents, Google Voice and Google Calendar.


P a g e | 160 Gmail - Threading

makes it easier to follow a conversation and cuts down on the number of items in the inbox. Several people can chime in (as often happens with all the different people involved in an adoption at APA) an all the conversations are kept in a single email thread as long as the subject is unchanged. (1) Threading

(1)

Gmail threads by email subject line â&#x20AC;&#x201C; if the subject is changed, this starts a new email thread under that new subject.


P a g e | 161 Gmail - Canned responses Canned responses are a lab available in Gmail. They allow you to compose your reply once and save the message text with the "Canned responses" button. Later, you can open that same message and send it again and again. The adopt@ team uses canned responses in over 90% of our email responses.

Getting canned responses set up

-In Gmail, click 'Settings' in upper right hand corner, then click 'Labs' -Click 'Enable' on the 'Canned Responses' lab -Click 'Save Changes' at the bottom of the screen -To test drive it and set up a canned response available to you later, click 'Compose Email' -Compose an email you are going to use often (or copy one of the canned responses provided in the appendix) -Then click 'Canned Response' below the subject line, click 'New Canned Response', and give what you have just composed a title (for example â&#x20AC;&#x153;dog has been adoptedâ&#x20AC;?) That's it, the text in that email has been saved as a canned response, going forward you can just select that canned response from the drop down menu Canned responses, Insert XXX to populate your email with that text. The average response for adopt@ takes under a minute thanks to canned responses!


P a g e | 162

Final notes on canned responses: -When possible, include a sentence rerouting adopter back to adopt@ in case the cat/dog they are interested in doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x;t work out -When possible customize each response based on adopterâ&#x20AC;&#x;s information -Encourage team members to continue creating new canned responses to handle common situations, or as they see an especially great response go out!


P a g e | 163 Gmail – Signature All emails go out with an APA signature. Although each volunteer on shift has to sign his/her name manually to all emails, Google can be set up to have an automatic signature at the end of a message. Signature is available under “settings” , the adopt@ team uses the following signature below the volunteer‟s manual signature: Adoptions Volunteer For more ways to help Austin become a No Kill city click on the following links: Interested in volunteering? http://www.austinpetsalive.org/get-involved/volunteer/ Interested in becoming a foster parent? http://www.austinpetsalive.org/get-involved/foster/


P a g e | 164 Setting up Google Calendar 

Volunteers sign up as they have time.

There are no preset days/hours per volunteer.

Some volunteers take 20+ hours per week, others 1-2 hours a month.

Shifts can be changed as late as necessary, sharing a calendar means that these changes are instantly evident.

Creating a shift is very simple, volunteers just click “create event”, fill in their name to replace “Fill in event” in the create event screen, put the date and start/end time of their shift and click save.


P a g e | 165 Setting up Google Voice The adopt@ team uses Google Voice for various reasons: •

Transcribes and forwards vmails to gmail inbox

Most calls can be handled without a callback

Free callbacks & protection of identity

The Google Voice Inbox


P a g e | 166 Google Voice – Transcribing and forwarding of calls to gmail inbox

Google Voice – Most calls can be handled without a call back 

90% of incoming calls aren‟t adoption related, they are forwarded to the correct group within APA for handling


P a g e | 167 

Adoption calls for foster cats or dogs are forwarded, in transcribed email form, to the foster for a call back

Google Voice – Free call backs & protection of identity 

When a call back is necessary, Google Voice will ring a number, connect your personal phone to that call, and the caller sees the main APA phone number (the # assigned to the Google Voice account) as the caller ID.

Setting up Google Documents The adopt@ team uses Google Documents for various reasons: 

Only one set of documents need to be updated/edited


P a g e | 168 

Great way to share guidelines, new protocols, etc

Owners of documents from other groups only have to invite adopt@ to the document (vs. all the different volunteers who are part of adopt@)

Easy access from any other Google application


P a g e | 169

Ready to Answer Emails/Vmails Prepare Your Workstation - Computer with multi-tab browser 1. Inbox 2. Calendar 3. Petpoint 4. Foster dog tracking sheet 5. APA website 6. The Adopt@ resource guide

Adopt Line 4 Most Common Email Inquiries 1. Foster dog 2. Foster cat 3. Dog at adoption site 4. Cat at cattery


P a g e | 170 Answering the Top 4 Inquiries Step by Step Foster dog inquiry When a potential adopter sees an ad for one of our dogs on Craig‟s List or Petfinder, they are instructed to contact adopt@austinpetsalive.org in order to meet that dog. If they see the dog on our website, and the dog is in foster care, clicking on the „in foster‟ link also brings up an automatic email to adopt@.

When that email arrives in the inbox, the volunteer on shift takes the following steps: 1. Look the dog up in PetPoint in order to verify his/her location and availability


P a g e | 171 2. Begin to reply to adopter‟s email using canned response

3. Look up the dog in the foster team‟s “APA Dog Foster Tracking Spreadsheet” (the foster team has shared this with adopt@ so the team can access it through Google Documents) and obtain the foster‟s email information

Note: The adopt@ team mostly uses this spreadsheet instead of PetPoint in order to get real time updates on contact information and also dog adoption status (it can take a few days to process an adoption through our systems, however the dog foster team can immediately update the spreadsheet to reflect availability).

4. Attach an application 5. Blind copy the foster on the email (protecting the foster‟s privacy)


P a g e | 172 6. Copy the Dog Foster Adopt Team (this team helps both the foster and the adopter through the remaining steps of the adoption process)

Done!

Foster cat inquiry With over 500 cats in the foster program and no dedicated „cat foster adopt team‟ like we have in the dog foster program, the response for foster cats has to be a little different. Cat inquiries originate in the same manner as other inquiries – from our website and ads run by our marketing team.

When that email arrives in the inbox, the volunteer on shift takes the following steps: 1. Look up the animal in PetPoint to verify location and availability (same as with dogs)


P a g e | 173

2. Reply to adopterâ&#x20AC;&#x;s email using the appropriate canned response. 3. Forward email sent to adopter to the catâ&#x20AC;&#x;s foster with further instructions (fosters are not blind copied because they usually need more instruction than the dog fosters due to the lack of a cat foster adoption team). Foster contact information can be found under the Edit Person menu in PetPoint.

4. Done!


P a g e | 174 Dog at adoption site inquiry When a potential adopter sees a dog they want to meet on our website, if the dog attends our adoption sites, the location field will say “Visit XXX at Site.‟ Clicking on that link shows the adopter which site the dog is attending.

If the adopter sees a site dog on Craig‟s List or Petfinder, they are instructed to contact adopt@austinpetsalive.org in order to meet that dog. Many times adopters will also contact the Adopt line for a dog they see on the APA website, disregarding the “Visit at Site” link. When that email arrives in the inbox, the volunteer on shift takes the following steps:


P a g e | 175 1. Look the dog up in PetPoint in order to verify his/her location and availability

2. Check specific site location on the APA website

3. Reply to adopterâ&#x20AC;&#x;s email using canned response.


P a g e | 176

4. Done!

Cat at cattery inquiry When a potential adopter sees a cat they want to meet on our website, if the cat is in one of our catteries, the location field will say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Visit XXX at Site.â&#x20AC;&#x; Clicking on that link shows the adopter the specific cattery.


P a g e | 177 If the adopter sees a cattery cat on Craig‟s List or Petfinder, they are instructed to contact adopt@austinpetsalive.org in order to meet that cat. Many times adopters will also contact the Adopt line for a cat they see on the APA website, disregarding the “Visit at Site” link. When that email arrives in the inbox, the volunteer on shift takes the following steps: 1. Look the cat up in PetPoint in order to verify his/her location and availability

2. Check cattery hours on the APA website

3. Reply to adopter‟s email using canned response, attach cat adoption application.


P a g e | 178

4. Done!

Other Emails 90% of emails can be answered with a canned response. Please see the appendix for a list of our most used canned responses. Fee inquiries, general procedure questions, requesting that a dog attend a specific adoption site, are all commonly received emails. Any difficult or otherwise unanswerable emails should be forwarded to the team leader for review. The adopt@ team uses the label “Admin – to review” to label any emails/calls needing further review.


P a g e | 179 Adopt Line Voice Mails The bulk of voice messages are not adoption related. The calls meant for PR, Donations Team, Rescue, PASS, Volunteering, Medical, etc are forwarded to the appropriate team for handling. Be sure to maintain a very detailed and up-to-date list of contacts!

1. Foster cat or foster dog calls – forward the call to the foster using the appropriate canned response, no call back is necessary, the foster will contact the caller directly. 2. Site dog or cattery cat calls – call adopter back and direct them to the correct site location or cattery (look up these locations the same way as detailed in the email section above), include hours.

Funny Stories: 

Wanting to return Sarge

“You are in it for the profit”

Repeat callers/pranksters

Wrap Up – Benefits of a Strong Adopt Line Team


P a g e | 180 

The team enables a higher percentage of inquiries being turned into adoptions by providing quick turnaround and direction.

The team can extend your program into hours when the shelter is not open and provides an important bridge to people who are searching for pets online.

The rapid response with consistent answers ensures that the policies and procedures of the organization are communicated clearly and effectively.

The team reduces the burden on other parts of the organization by having knowledgeable volunteers direct messages to their intended target within the organization.

The team provides an effective and efficient means of quickly identifying problems (potential adopters who are lost, fosters with sick animals, people with complaints, media requests, businesses looking for partners) and ensuring that the message is delivered and follow-up occurs.

APPENDIX - CANNED RESPONSES Here are some samples, many can be differentiated further (for example, create a female foster dog vs. male foster dog canned response) to reduce the amount of customizing needed each time the response is used).


P a g e | 181

General: Defending our fees All of our rescues are already spayed/neutered, wormed, up-to-date on all their shots and treated for any skin conditions. Our average cost on each cat and dog we rescue is actually twice what we charge, but we subsidize the rest of our costs through donations. We pull 99% of our rescues from local shelters, you should check there directly. They have a ton of great dogs and cats, and their prices are lower since they are subsidized by tax dollars. You should take a look there; they have so many dogs and pups in desperate need of a home!

Townlake Trail Dogs - Weekend 'take a dog for a jog' program The trail site is open Saturdays & Sundays from 9am-noon. We will close if it is storming/raining heavily or temps will be below 40 degrees or above 100 degrees while we're out with the dogs. Site closure will be listed on our website: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/events/daily-dog-locations/ -Members of the public do not need to bring anything with them but will need to be willing to provide a name and phone number and spend a few minutes talking to a volunteer about the personality of the dog they'll be taking out and our safety protocols for the trail. We have dogs of varying energy levels so runners and walkers are both welcome. -You must be 18 or over to walk a dog though minors may accompany an adult on a dog walk, as long as we have a dog appropriate to be checked out with children. Because we bring our larger, high energy dogs to get exercise, we cannot always guarantee that there will be a child appropriate dog for families. -We do recommend getting there early to ensure you get a dog to walk, especially during the warmer months when the dogs are not always able to go on more than one walk due to the heat.

Trail Site directions: The trail site is located at 2300 Stratford Drive. If you're heading west on Barton Springs Rd., turn right on Stratford and follow it to the 2nd parking lot on your right (the larger one under Mopac, not the smaller one across from the fields). We are directly on the hike & bike trail underneath the Mopac overpass

Positive Feedback Thank you so much for sharing your story and pictures with us; we love happy endings! If you get a chance (and haven't already), we would really appreciate it if you would post your pics and story on www.austinpetsalive.ning.com. We try to track our adoption stories there, hopefully giving people who are concerned that adopting a 'rescue' means adopting a pet that has 'something wrong with it' a chance to see that it's just a stereotype. There are so many wonderful rescues out there and so many families that are totally thrilled with their new pet, and we want to spread the word! Thanks again, and congratulations! Give XXX a big hug and a kiss from us!


P a g e | 182 Lost Pet Hi, I am so sorry you have lost your pet! APA! does not take animals from the public so your pet would not have been brought to us, but here are some great tips you can use to find your lost baby. First of all place a lost ad on Craigslist and do flyers and posters. You can google "Lost Pet Flyers" and come up with some templates. Make sure your flyers have a large photo of your pet so people can see it from their car while driving by. Go door to door and let everyone know you have lost your pet and ask people to keep an eye out. Be sure to check with all the shelters surrounding your area. Go there in person, don't just call. If you check with Town Lake Animal Shelter in Austin they have a way you can search their website by "days in shelter" so you can see any animals brought in each day. One of the best websites for Pet recovery is www.missingpetpartnership.org. Look under "Recovery Tips". There will be info there you never dreamed about! For instance, did you know cats rarely ever roam far from home and are probably hiding somewhere very close by? Dogs, however, definitely can and do roam far from their homes and can be found miles away. This website will give you invaluable tips on where to look for your pet! Here is a great article Best Friends Animal Society did on finding lost pets: http://www.bestfriends.org/theanimals/pdfs/allpets/findinglostpet.pdf Don't give up! Keep checking the shelters daily or as often as possible!

How to get to APA HQ: The APA! Adoption and Resource center is at 2807 Manchaca Road in south central Austin. If you are coming from downtown, take Lamar Blvd south, past Barton Springs road, and past Oltorf Road. Do you know where Matt's El Rancho Restaurant is? Or the Goodwill on S. Lamar? When you see Matt's El Rancho on your left, look for Goodwill on your right side, there is a signal light at the Goodwill, where Manchaca intersects with S. Lamar, make a left turn there on to Manchaca, there is a purple building that sells used furniture on east corner of this intersection, just past this is a our driveway, there is a sign at the street, once your turn left into the driveway, you will see the APA! building straight ahead. Just drive back and park. I hope this helps! If you click on the heading APA! Adoption and Resource Center in the list of dog adoption locations, a google map screen will open with more details. http://www.austinpetsalive.org/events/daily-dog-locations/ If you are still confused, contact us at adopt@austinpetsalive.org and let us know where you are coming from and we can make sure that you arrive!

Wants to Adopt a Pet as a Gift We discourage people from giving pets as surprise gifts because we'd like the whole family to meet the pup (kitten) to make sure it'd be a good forever match. Especially to make sure that the person who will be responsible for taking care of the pup (kitten) gets a chance to meet it before hand. I'm not sure if that's what you were intending but we highly recommend having the whole gang pick the pup (kitten) together!


P a g e | 183

Dogs Overview of the Dog Adoption Process Thanks for your interest in adopting an APA rescue! We have 2 different procedures depending on whether the dog/puppy is going out to our daily adoption sites or is in a foster home. The full list of available dogs and puppies is available at http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/dogs/. Click on the picture of the dog or pup you are interested in. If the location field says "Visit XXX at site", just click on that link and it will show you where that pup is today. You just head out to where he/she will be that day, spend time with them, if you are interested in adopting them, you fill out an application (the adoption counselor at the site will have some), and if your application looks good, you pay the adoption fee and take your new pet home. Here is an overview of the process: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/how-toadopt-a-dog/ If the location field says "In Foster" then he or she is in a foster home. You can click on the "In Foster" link and it will send us an email, or you can just email us directly at adopt@austinpetsalive.org to let us know you'd like more information on this pup and to potentially meet him/her as well. We would have the foster parent contact you to arrange a meet n' greet, and if after meeting the pup you want to pursue an adoption, then you would fill out and submit an application, and lastly finalize the adoption with a counselor at one of our adoption sites. Why don't you take a look at our available dogs and puppies (http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/dogs/) and let me know who you are interested in specifically? Or, if you have specific preferences for breed, sex, size, age, temperament, let me know what they are and I will send you a list of dogs that meet your criteria.

Dog Fee Our adoption fee varies per dog. The price is listed on each dog‟s record. This fee includes: * spay or neuter surgery * heartworm test on dogs over 6 months * first or more vaccinations * first or more deworming treatment * microchip * personality evaluation * one month of pet health insurance * Note: sometimes adoption fees will be higher if a puppy/dog had a lot of medical costs. (*) We also have a „seniors for seniors‟ program, where people over 60 can adopt dogs over 8 for free. Please keep in mind that each dog costs APA around $300, more if that dog was injured, sick or very young when rescued, so any donations above the adoption fee are very appreciated


P a g e | 184 Dog at one of our Adoption Sites Thank you for your interest in an APA! dog! XX attends our daily adoption events. You can check our daily dog location schedule on our website (http://www.austinpetsalive.org/events/daily-dog-locations/); it's updated every morning around 9:30. Once you find out where XX will be, you can head out there to meet XXX. Please keep in mind that many of our dogs initially "tune out" strangers who come to meet them (they are approached by so many people all day long!) so I would strongly recommend that you bring some really yummy treats, go on a walk outside of his pen and away from the commotion, and then after about 15 minutes just sit down with him and pet him, and give him time to be himself around you and relax. ((Use the prior sentence only for dogs over about 6 months old, not necessary for pups)). We will have an adoption counselor there that can answer your questions about any of our dogs and pups. Please refer to our website for our adoption process and requirements: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/how-to-adopt-a-dog/ Finally, if XXX doesn't work out for any reason, please keep checking back at http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/dogs/, we get new dogs every day! Be sure to email us at adopt@austinpetsalive.org if you have any other questions.(If you know the dog is at a site the day the email inquiry comes in, you can send a link to the site...highlight the link you want to send, then in your email click the blue hyperlink icon on the toolbar (it looks like a mobius) and enter the link there, rename it something easy. Cleans emails up a bit)

Adopter requesting a Dog be at a specific site the following day: Thank you for your interest in an APA dog! Isn't XXX a cutie?! I will certainly request that she go to our XXX site tomorrow, however you should check our daily dog location schedule on our website (http://www.austinpetsalive.org/events/daily-dog-locations/) tomorrow around 9:30. Sometimes due to counselor availability, weather or available dogs, our program manager just isn't able to get all the dogs where requested. We will have an adoption counselor there that can answer your questions about any of our dogs and pups. Please refer to our website for our adoption process and requirements: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/how-to-adopt-a-dog/ Finally, if XXX doesn't work out for any reason, please keep checking back at http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/dogs/, we get new dogs every day! Be sure to email us at adopt@austinpetsalive.org if you have any other questions.

Foster Dogs Email Thanks for your interest in adopting an APA! rescue dog! Isn't _____ a cutie?! He/She is currently in foster care and although I believe he/she is still available, it is important to note that other adopters may have been in touch with the foster and it is always possible that _____ may already have other interest or an adoption pending. Here are the steps involved in meeting and possibly adopting him/her: Step 1: I'm forwarding your contact information to the foster family. They will contact you to answer any questions you might have and to set up a meet-and-greet. If you have not heard from the foster within 24 hours please contact the Dog Foster (DF) Adoption team at dog-foster-adopt@austinpetsalive.org. Step 2: If after the meet-and-greet you want to pursue the adoption, please fill out the attached application and return it to the DF adoption team (copied on this email, dog-foster-adopt@austinpetsalive.org). Because there may be other interested adopters it is in your best interest to submit your application and schedule a meet and greet as soon as possible. **From this point on you will be working directly with the foster family and the Foster Dog Adoption Team. Please contact them (dog-foster-adopt@austinpetsalive.org) with any questions you may have regarding adoption and the adoption process. They will help you with everything involved in adopting your new family member.


P a g e | 185 Please remember that if _____ doesn't work out for any reason, to keep checking back at http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/dogs/, we get new dogs every day! Be sure to email us at adopt@austinpetsalive.org if you have any other questions about other available pups.

Foster Dog Phone Call -(call into adopt â&#x20AC;&#x201C; email to foster parent ): XXX (Caller) at xxx-xxx is interested in XXX (dog), would you give them a call? Please have them email the dog foster adopt group at dog-foster-adopt@austinpetsalive.org if they end up meeting your foster dog and want to pursue an adoption, that way they can email the potential adopter back with an overview of the process and an application and help them with the adoption process! You should also contact dog-foster-adopt@austinpetsalive.org if you have any questions about setting up meet 'greets or if you have any other adoption related questions.

Dog has been Adopted Thanks for your interest in XXX, however he/she has been adopted. Please be sure to check our website (http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/dogs/) to see all the other available dogs and puppies in our program. We have many wonderful dogs looking for forever homes! Be sure to email me at adopt@austinpetsalive.org if any catch your eye!

Out-of-Town Adopters - Dogs Thanks for your inquiry about an APA! dog. Although we prefer that our adopters be local (it's much easier to ensure our rescues are being properly cared for if we can follow up locally), we will allow out-of-town adopters with excellent applications to adopt one of our rescues. For all out-of-town adoptions, we require a reference from a vet and an application filled out ahead of time. Also, if you rent, we require a letter from your landlord or copy of lease that states there are no breed/size restrictions, and proof that any pet deposit has been paid. Please refer to our website for all the information on our adoption process and requirements (http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/how-to-adopt-a-dog/). Out of town adopters have to personally apply for adoption in Austin, and have to allow for enough time to get to know the puppy or dog (30 mins minimum), a face to face interview with one of our adoption counselors, and processing of all paperwork (for site dogs this usually takes 2 hours, for foster dogs it can take 2 days to finalize the adoption). Out of town adopters also have to make all travel arrangements for their new pup. Finally, please note that our adoption counselors have final say on the approval of any adoption application, and if a particular dog receives multiple good applications for his/her adoption, preference goes to in-town adopters. If in spite of all these limitations you are still willing to pursue adopting from us, please email us at adopt@austinpetsalive.org and we can get the process started!

Wanting to Adopt Two Pups at once (two adults is fine, multiple cats is great...this is only an issue with puppies) We discourage potential adopters from adopting two pups at once. It can lead to aggression and resource guarding issues, and reduced bonding with the human owner/family. Without intensive effort on the side of the owners, the pups bond more to each other than anyone/anything else, which can lead to socialization and training issues. Here are a couple of articles on the subject as well: http://buddyschance.typepad.com/positive_dog_training_blo/2007/04/adopting_litter.html http://dog-care.suite101.com/article.cfm/why_raising_two_puppies_together_is_not_a_good_i Don't get us wrong, we'd love to have you adopt 2 pups from us!!! We just suggest that you adopt one, train and socialize it for about 6-12 months, and then get another.


P a g e | 186

Overview of the Cat Adoption Process Thanks for your interest in adopting an APA rescue! We have 2 different procedures depending on whether the cat or kitten is in one of our catteries or in a foster home. The full list of available cats is available at http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/cats/. Click on the picture of the cat or kitten you are interested in. If the location field says "Visit XXX at site", just click on that link and it will show you which cattery the cat is located. You just head out to that cattery during the specified hours, spend time with them, and if you are interested in adopting them, you fill out an application (the adoption counselor at the site will have some), and if your application looks good, you pay the adoption fee and take your new pet home. Here is an overview of the process: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/how-to-adopt-a-cat/ If the location field says "In Foster" then he or she is in a foster home. You can click on the "In Foster" link and it will send us an email, or you can just email us directly at adopt@austinpetsalive.org to let us know you'd like more information on this cat and to potentially meet him/her as well. We would have the foster parent contact you to arrange a meet n' greet, and if after meeting the cat you want to pursue an adoption, then you would fill out an application and bring it with you to one of our adoption sites during the specified hours to finalize the adoption with a counselor. Why don't you take a look at our cats and kittens (http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/cats/) and let me know who you are interested in specifically?

Foster Cats Email (2 parts): Part 1 - email to Adopter: Thank you for your interest in an APA! kitty! Isn't XXX a cutie?! I'm going to forward your contact information to his/her foster parent so they can get in touch with you, answer any questions you might have, and also set up a meet n'greet. If XXX doesn't work out for any reason, please look through http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/cats/, we have so many cats and kittens looking for great homes! Be sure to email me at adopt@austinpetsalive.org if any catch your eye! (*) Another great option is to become a foster for APA, kitten season is underway and we are in desperate need of foster homes to help save as many as we can! Fostering is a great way to help save lives and find the perfect kitten as well. APA provides all the medical support, as a foster you provide love, care and transportation. Please click here to find out more, we would love to tell you more!!!! http://www.austinpetsalive.org/get-involved/foster/

Part 2 - email to Foster Someone is interested in XXX! Please contact the potential adopter (copy and paste name & contact info) to answer any questions they might have and also potentially set up a meet n'greet with your kitty. Please contact Tessa Copeland at tessa.copeland@austinpetsalive.org if you have any questions about adoption policies or procedures.

Fost Cat Phone Call -(call into adopt line, email sent to foster): XXX(caller) at xxx-xxx is interested in XXX (cat), would you give them a call, answer any questions they might have and set up a meet n'greet? Please contact Tessa at tessa.copeland@austinpetsalive.org if you have any questions about the adoption process.


P a g e | 187 Cat at Cattery Thank you for your interest in XXX, she/he is a great kitty! He/she is currently staying at our cattery at XXX (copy and paste location link). The adoption hours are (copy and paste hours from site), hope you can make it out to meet her/him! Please refer to our website for our adoption process and requirements: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/how-to-adopt-a-cat/ I've attached an application in case you want to fill one out ahead of time, the adoption counselor at the cattery will also have copies there. If XXX doesn't work out for any reason, please look through http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/cats/, we have so many cats and kittens looking for great homes! Be sure to email me at adopt@austinpetsalive.org if any catch your eye! (*) Another great option is to become a foster for APA, kitten season is underway and we are in desperate need of foster homes to help save as many as we can! Fostering is a great way to help save lives and find the perfect kitten as well. APA provides all the medical support, as a foster you provide love, care and transportation. Please click here to find out more, we would love to tell you more!!!! http://www.austinpetsalive.org/get-involved/foster/

Cat has been Adopted Thanks for your interest in XXX, however (she/he) has been adopted. Please be sure to check our website (http://www.austinpetsalive.org/adopt/cats/) to see all the other available cats and kittens in our program. We have many wonderful cats looking for forever homes! Be sure to email me at adopt@austinpetsalive.org if any catch your eye! (*) Another great option is to become a foster for APA, kitten season is underway and we are in desperate need of foster homes to help save as many as we can! Fostering is a great way to help save lives and find the perfect kitten as well. APA provides all the medical support, as a foster you provide love, care and transportation. Please click here to find out more, we would love to tell you more!!!! http://www.austinpetsalive.org/get-involved/foster/

Cat Fee Our cat adoption fees are tiered according to age, with the exception of Siamese mixes, which are $175. Cats under 2 years of age are $125, those between 2-10 years are $75 and those over 10 years are $25. This fee includes: * spay or neuter surgery * FeLV/FIV testing * first or more vaccinations * first or more deworming treatment * microchip * personality evaluation * one month of pet insurance. Please keep in mind that each cat costs APA around $300, more if that cat was injured, sick or very young when rescued, so any donations above the adoption fee are very appreciated!

Multiple Kitten Fee Our multiple-cat adoption fee is $220 for two, and if you're interested in three the fee is $300. This fee includes: * spay or neuter surgery * FeLV/FIV testing


P a g e | 188 * first or more vaccinations * first or more deworming treatment * microchip * personality evaluation * one month of pet insurance.

Out-of-Town Adopters - Cats Thank you for your interest in an APA kitty! We do allow out of town adopters to adopt our cats, however this involves a trip down to Austin to personally meet the kitty in question, spending at least 30 minutes with it, filling out the application and interviewing with an adoption counselor in person, and then arranging for the cat's travel back to your home. Unfortunately these requirements are hard to meet for many people outside of Texas. If you would still like to pursue XXX's adoption, please email us at adopt@austinpetsalive.org, and we can send you an application so that we can make sure you are likely to be approved before you make your trip to Austin.

Info Request for FELV+ Cats Posts about FELV on the APA Blog: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/2011/05/adopt-an-felv-cat-featuring-chandler/ http://www.austinpetsalive.org/2011/05/adopt-an-felv-cat-watch-out-world-its-pippi-longstocking/ We can also copy Lindsay on the email and reference her for more info lindsay.mccay@austinpetsalive.org

FIV FAQs What is FIV? FIV stands for feline immunodeficiency virus. It is a virus that lives in the blood and saliva of felines. Is FIV contagious to humans? No. This virus can only survive inside of the feline body. Is it contagious to any animals? Yes, it is contagious to felines only. It is not contagious to dogs or other species. How do cats get FIV? Just like human HIV, it can only be spread through sex and deep penetrating bite wounds only. It is not spread by grooming, eating after each other, sharing a litter box, etc. Do FIV cats need medication? Nope, you treat them just like any other cat What, if anything, does FIV do to a cat? It can cause a weakened immune system, similar to HIV but much less severe. Most FIV cats live long normal healthy lives. Sometimes they can get oral ulcers from the virus, and if they do get sick from something they can get a lot sicker faster than a normal cat. So catching illnesses (like the kitty flu) early in an FIV cat is important. But lots of people own FIV+ cats and don't even know it. Will FIV live in my house or carpet? No. The FIV virus dies very rapidly in the environment. You don't have to worry about carrying it on your clothes or anything. You can safely house FIV negative cats in the same place you previously housed FIV positive cats without risk of transmission. Will FIV get my personal cats or other foster cats sick? No. So long as you follow standard quarantine procedures (i.e. keep your foster cat in a separate room from personal cats) there is no risk of transmission. In fact, at APA! we allow our FIV+ cats to live in the same enclosures as FIV negative cats and don't worry about spread of disease since our animals


P a g e | 189 are all neutered. The only risk would be if a cat was super aggressive to other cats and causing serious bite wounds - in that case they just need to be separated to keep them from fighting. Myths and truths about FIV: http://www.austinpetsalive.org/2010/09/myths-and-truths-about-fiv/


P a g e | 190

Medical Program Organizational Chart Veterinarian oversees the work of:      

Veterinary Technicians- trained nurses on staff to help with surgery, treating shelter animals, vaccinations, testing Veterinary Coordinators- volunteers who are able to act as “dispensary” for shelter/foster animals needs before a building was acquired. Often had fosters meet at their homes to pick up meds for routine illnesses such as URI, dehydration, diarrhea. Medical Data Entry- records are a very important part of a legal veterinary practice. Data entry is essential to providing the best possible care and communicating that to future owners and veterinarians. Parvo Ward – all treatments in the ward have to originate with the veterinarian and then are implemented by the volunteers and staff Bottle Baby – all treatments are authorized and created by the veterinarian, then used over and over again for the babies. Ringworm- all treatments are created by the veterinarian and then implemented by staff and volunteers for duration of care.

Every state has its own laws regarding shelter veterinary care. Most states are pretty cognizant of the financial struggle most nonprofits have and their limitations in hiring veterinary staff. In Texas, for example there are a few laws that are important to APA‟s operations.  Veterinarians are the ONLY people who can do surgery and order controlled substances.  Veterinarians must keep medical records for 3 years, rabies certificates for 5 years, and drug log up to date at all times. Controlled drugs must be locked at all times.  Medications that are prescribed to adopted animals, must be authorized by a veterinarian. Veterinary technicians (with or without accreditation) can anesthetize animals, provide Rabies vaccinations, and euthanize animals but only under direct Veterinary supervision. Shelter staff can diagnose, treat, and prescribe meds for shelter owned animals only. Shelter staff can order non-controlled medications through a medical distributor. We recommend you buy and read “Shelter Medicine for Veterinarians and Staff” by Miller and Zawistowski to learn more about the legal intricacies of running a shelter.


P a g e | 191

Standard Questions to Determine Health Status All animal guardians (foster, caretakers) should be asked: 1. 2.

What is your pet here for today? Is your pet eating/drinking well? (If they just came from the shelter, the person transporting won‟t

know the answers to these questions. Just write on the form “just picked up from TLAC”) 3. 4.

Is your pet vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, or sneezing? Is your pet‟s activity level normal?

If anything is abnormal, ask the following: 1. 2. 3. 4.

How long has this been going on for? Has your pet been on any treatments for it already? If so, what medications? Are they still on them? When did they finish them? Describe the condition: a. If not eating/drinking normally – how much are they eating/drinking? When was the last time you saw them eat or drink? If not eating, are you force feeding? How much? b. If having V, D, C, or S – how often does this happen? What does it look like (i.e. diarrhea, what color and consistency is it)? c. If abnormal activity level – will it get up to go to the bathroom? Will it respond when you talk to it? Or does it just lay there and not respond much?

Vaccine Protocol 1.

Kittens>/= 6wks: Give 1st FVRCP vaccine immediately at intake. Repeat q 2wks until 16wks of age. Then repeat annually. 2. Puppies >/=6wks: Give 1st DHLPP vaccine immediately at intake. Repeat q 2wks until 16wks of age. Then repeat annually. 3. Puppies >/= 6wks: Give Bordatella vaccine once immediately at intake. Repeat annually. 4. Cats and Dogs >/=12 wks: Give Rabies vaccine once. Repeat again in 1 year. Then repeat q 3yrs. 5. Cats >/= 16wks @ intake: Give 1st FVRCP vaccine immediately at intake. Repeat once in 2wks. Then repeat annually. 6. Dogs >/= 16wks @ intake: Give 1st DHLPP vaccine immediately at intake. Repeat once in 2wks. Then repeat annually. 7. Dogs >/= 16wks @ intake: Give Bordatella vaccine immediately at intake. Repeat annually 8. Cats that live in foster homes with other indoor/outdoor cats: Must get leukemia vaccinated once, repeat in 2 wks, if ever exposed to a cat that goes indoor/outdoor. Vaccine at foster‟s expense. Foster cats are NEVER allowed outside.

Protocol for incoming animals from shelter (TLAC) Dhlpp and KC should have been given on intake at TLAC o If >14 days, booster o If not given on intake, administer and notify Dr. Jefferson that vaccinations weren‟t given at tlac Rabies o Should be given at tlac o If not, vaccinate if vet is present Heartworm test for DOGS only o If positive: ivermectin heartworm prevention given at 0.01cc/10lbs


P a g e | 192 o If negative: ivermectin heartworm prevention given at 0.03cc/10lbs Medications that must be given on intake o Strongid o Frontline- usually given at tlac Fur loss o Skin scrape • If positive for mange, Rx appropriate medications, send foster with appropriate handouts o If positive but pt is heartworm positive, Rx Promeris • If negative, may start mange treatment if symptoms are typical, recheck if uncertain or if condition worsens. URI symptoms present o Temp, antibiotics, +/- nebulizer, appropriate handouts. Injury, HBC etc o Pain meds, verify what‟s been given at tlac o Contact vets Microchip o EVERY DOG and CAT >4 months of age

Protocol for wellness visits Routine visits Foster must fill out wellness exam Obtain thorough history, record date and A number. If foster doesn‟t know A number, record foster name. Vaccinations (fvrcp & dhlpp) start at 6 wks of age then q 2 weeks until 16wks of age Deworm at 2 wks, then q 2 weeks until 8wks of age Flea prevention on intake, then monthly Heartworm prevention for dogs, given monthly Follow vaccination protocol, routine deworming, monthly prevention meds If cat is adoption ready o Cat should stay at building for adoption § Notify Cat Adoption Manager or on duty adoption counselor § Perform and enter cattery entrance exam into ppoint

Protocol for illness visits Follow illness flow chart and medication dosage chart Make sure foster is aware of contagious diseases and has basic knowledge of pts condition. Fill out Illness detail template Inform foster of importance of recheck before medication is finished Copy and paste foster email communications/updates pertaining to illness/condition/injury etc. Forward email communications to vets if applicable Put patient and foster on “on-going” patient board if critical or not routine.


P a g e | 193

Doctor communication If not routine illness/injury, schedule recheck with vet ASAP. Email vets@austinpetsalive.org about case. If critical, call on call vet

Common Medical Issues Facing Shelter Animals 

Upper Respiratory Infection (URI) o Cats: Can be caused by a wide range of viruses such as Calici, Panleukepenia, Herpes, Corona. o Dogs: Kennel Cough (aka Bordetella), Distemper are the most common causes. o URI is characterized by weepy, sometimes ulcerated and swollen eyes, nasal discharge, sometimes oral ulcers, fever, and inappetance. It can result in pneumonia if the pet is immunosuppressed. Diarrhea o Stress or diet related o Worms- roundworms, hookworms, whipworms o Viruses- parvo, distemper, panleukepenia, o Other- giardia, coccidia, IBD, intestinal obstruction Skin Conditions o Fleas o Malnutrition o Mange  Demodex  Sarcoptic o Ringworm Heartworms

Shelter Cats and Upper Respiratory Infections 

Almost all kittens/cats pulled from a shelter (or even a pet store) are going to develop a cold when they are pulled out. This can go away on it's own once the kittens are out of the shelter, eating good food, and getting lots of love from you! Often these colds (upper respiratory infections) will need antibiotics, please read the following information to learn what to look for and how to help your kitty through this.

Symptoms: Sneezing Green or yellow discharge from the nose or eyes Lethargy Lack of appetite

If your kitty is sneezing and/or has discharge: At this stage antibiotics are generally not needed. If your kitty is getting stopped up he/she may stop eating, so it is important to keep the nose and eyes as clear as possible. Keeping them clean with


P a g e | 194 wet cotton balls or a wet cloth is a good idea. You can also purchase a product called "Little Noses" Saline Drops for human infants at any drug store or WalMart. Put 1-2 drops in each nostril 2-3 times a day for a few days to help keep the nose clear and make the kitty less likely to stop eating. If there is a lot of yellow/green eye discharge we may need to get some ointment for the eye - this is a prescription and you will need to contact Lindsay. If your kitty is lethargic and/or not eating: At this stage we need to do more aggressive treatment. If they stop eating for more than 24-36 hours this can be a big deal for a small kitten. Please contact the Medical Team if this occurs. Until they write you back follow the Little Noses instructions above. You should also try warming the food up in the microwave, feeding wet food instead of dry, if he/she really doesn't want to eat you could try something cheap and smelly like Friskies or tuna (packed in water not oil). Always keep in mind: These infections can definitely be contagious to your other cats in the house. With all new cat additions to a home I would recommend keeping them separate so your cats don't catch anything. Give them separate bedding, food/water dishes, litter boxes and scoopers, etc. Wash everything with hot water and bleach to prevent spreading illnesses to other cats you bring home. Its also a good idea to wash dishes and bedding regularly for sick animals so they don't keep getting reinfected. If you use eye ointment don't share amongst other cats unless instructed to, even if they have the same symptoms, they could have different viruses! The same applies to the use of "Little Noses". Thanks so much for your help in saving these kitties' lives!

Upper Respiratory Infection treatment protocol for cats under the care of APA! 1. For ease of use, all cats with any of the following symptoms will be considered infected with a "URI" a. Sneezing more than a few times a day b. Opaque nasal discharge c. Opaque ocular discharge d. Congestion

Treatment 1. Opaque Ocular Discharge: a. If conjuctiva red/inflamed in conjuntion w/ocular discharge i. Rx BNP OU TID-QID X 10 days b. If no redness/inflammation of conjunctiva: no eye treatment needed c. If severe inflammation, redness, or cloudy/discoloration of eye: ii. Gently clean away crust/discharge w/warm wet wash cloth - hold on eye and allow crust to break down and easily come off, don't rub off iii. Rx BNP OU TID-QID X 10 days iv. Rx other eye ointments or drops as deemed necessary by Dr 2. Opaque Nasal Discharge: a. If lungs sound clear, no open-mouth breathing, gums pink on PE i. Rx Amoxicillin 50mg/10lbs po BID X 7-10 days. b. If lungs sound harsh, open mouth breathing, or gums are pale on PE ii. Rx Baytril 22.7mg/10lbs po SID X 5-7 days. iii. Recommend nebulize at minimum TID (more often depending on severity of disease) 15 minutes at a time. Solution recipe: A. Add to 1L bag NaCl and keep refrigerated! B. Gentocin 100mg/mL 40mL C. Dexamthason 2mg/mL 20mL


P a g e | 195 D. Albuterol ____mg/mL 20mL c. If non-responsive to first round of antibiotics i. May switch to Doxycyline Liquid 22mg/10lbs po SID X 10 days ii. May switch to (or add in) Zithromax ___mg/10lbs po SID X 3 days, then twice a week for 3 weeks. d. If not eating well, force feed. See Force Feeding Protocol for instructions and nutritional requirements for force feeding animals. 3. Congestion a. Nebulize as recommend in section 2b. b. keep nose clear of crust/discharge w/warm wet wash cloth TID-QID c. Little Noses Pediatric Drops available OTC TID - QID 2-3 drops in each nostril d. Put in bathroom when showering so steam from shower will be breathed in and help e. If struggling to breath Oxygen therapy should be considered 4. With all symptoms or forms of "URI", recheck the animal BEFORE running out of medication if any symptoms are present. Eating is #1 most important thing in cats, so insuring continued eating as listed in the URI handout and Force Feeding Instructions handout is paramount.

Nebulizing your foster animal When kitties/puppies become congested, nebulizing can dramatically speed up the recovery process. The medicated nebulizing solution you get from APA‟s medical team contains antibiotics, steroids (for inflammation) and bronchodilators. This solution needs to be refrigerated. The nebulizing compressor unit includes: (1) Air tubing to be connected to the unit itself as well as the (2) air tubing connector, located on the (3) nozzle which is inside the (4) medication cap (the medication cap has lines with numbers that indicate mls or cc‟s). Inside of the nozzle is a little removable piece called the (5) baffle, there is another small plastic piece that connects to the medication cap and the mouthpiece. All of the pieces are necessary to make the unit work properly. Please make sure your unit has all of the pieces and is returned with all of the pieces. To nebulize your kitty, you will need to put them in a carrier (plastic or cardboard, doesn‟t matter) and cover the carrier with a large towel or garbage bag. Slip the mouthpiece into a hole in the carrier (usually it can be placed into an area of the carrier door, or you can enlarge one of the breathing holes on the cardboard carrier.), making sure that the animal cannot chew on any of the parts, and fill the medication cap with approximately 4-5mls of the medicated nebulizer solution. The nebulizer unit is very loud when turned on and may stress your animal, so what you may want to try is setting the unit on a pillow or towel to muffle the noise a bit... :D Run the nebulizer for 15-30 minutes at a time as often as every hour, but at least 2-3 times daily depending on how congested your puppy/kitty is. The more you nebulize the better! Just make sure that the animal is not being overheated (or getting too cold) inside the carrier while being nebulized. If you are having technical problems with your nebulizer or if your unit is missing any pieces please contact medtechs@austinpetsalive.org . If you accidentally leave your solution out in room temperature for more than 1 hour it is probably not as potent as it should be and should be replaced with more solution. Please return your nebulizer, with all of its parts, as soon as your foster animal no longer needs it. If you aren‟t sure if you‟re foster animal still needs to be nebulized, please email medtechs@austinpetsalive.org.

Severe Upper or Lower Respiratory Infections Sometimes cats will get a severe upper respiratory infection, or they will get a lower respiratory infection. These are usually URIs accompanied by not eating, lethargy, depression, abnormal temperature, and dehydration. These cats need to be on antibiotics - make sure you get with a med tech to get the proper medications. While it may seem like these critical cases need to be hospitalized, we generally have more luck with them in the home. In a hospital they will be scared, alone, surrounded by other animals, and in a dark cage. In your home they will be the


P a g e | 196 center of your attention, in a warm, loving environment with someone dedicated to their care. It is much less stressful and they generally do better at home. Below are some tips on nursing them through this difficult time. If not eating - If they seem uninterested in food I would recommend: * warm the food in the microwave for a few seconds to make it smelly and warm * offer wet food instead of dry * offer cheap, yummy wet food like Friskies - try different flavors * offer tuna fish packed in water (not oil) * put a little on their lips to encourage them to eat, make sure they see where it is, don‟t expect them to eat wet food that‟s been sitting out for a few hours and isn‟t as appetizing. * Purchase a tube of something called NutriCal from PetSmart or Petco - it is a nutrient rich, calorically dense supplement that comes in a tube that looks like a toothe paste tube. It tastes really good and is packed full of vitamins. You can offer this to them - the amount to give is written on the tube. * Offer human baby food - like mashed turkey or chicken. It is very important that kitties eat regularly! If a cat doesn‟t eat for 12-24 hours, we need to start force feeding (I.e. if he eats breakfast, isn‟t interested in dinner, and still won‟t eat breakfast the next day we need to start force feeding that morning.). Please refer to your force feeding handout for details on how to force feed and how much. If very congested - if they have a lot of nasal discharge or are open mouth breathing *Clean their nose with a warm, wet wash cloth - try to get as much snot out of it as possible *Put them in the bathroom with you when you take a hot shower - let them sit in the bathroom with the steam. *Use Little Noses Pediatric drops (available at Walgreen, Walmart, CVS, etc) 2-3 drops in nose, 2-3 times a day (I generally do this after I clean the nose to get the down in there gunk). *Nebulize at minimum 3-4 times daily for 15 minutes at a time. Nebulizer solution and nebulizers are available through the medtechs and make a big difference in recovery time. We are always short on nebulizers, so if you have the ability to purchase one for your fosters you can get them at the South Lamar People's Pharmacy without a prescription for around $40. If dehydrated - if you pull up on the skin at the “scruff” area and the skin just stays up, or goes back slowly, this can be a sign of dehydration. We need to get them started on SQ fluids - the electrolyte fluid mixture that you inject in the scruff region 1-2 times a day. Contact your medical tech to get set up with fluids. Check Temperature - you can get a really cheap, fast, digital thermometer from Walgreens or CVS. You can take a rectal temp (it helps to use a little dab of KY-Jelly or other lubricant first). A cat‟s temp should be between 100F - 102.5F. *If it is over 104F you may want to put a little ice in a bag and wrap it in a towel and put it near the kitty. You can give SQ fluids also if you have them available to lower temperature. Take them off of a heating pad. *If the temp is lower than 99F - wrap them up really well in a towel leaving only the head exposed. Put them on a heating pad turned on low only (higher settings can burn them). If you don‟t have a heating pad, you can also fill a sock with rice, tie the end, and microwave it for 3 minutes and put it next to their blanket. Don‟t take them out of their warm cocoon blanket at all or else you‟ll just cool them off again. It is important to keep checking the temp every 5-10 minutes to make sure you don‟t overheat them or cool them off too much.

Prognosis: Respiratory infections are the number one killer of our cats and kittens. Young kittens (less than 8 weeks old) have the most difficulty making it through this, though adult cats can also have a really hard time. Making sure they are eating enough, or force feeding if they aren't, are one of the keys to making sure a cat lives. Getting the animal regular checkups at the clinic is very helpful too - make sure you never run out of medication while your cat is sick. Even if they are getting better, if they are not 100% you will need to refill the meds until they are 100%. Even missing one day of


P a g e | 197 medication can make a big difference. Stopping a prescription before it is done can also lead to bigger, stronger bacteria so make sure you finish your meds. Keep in mind, respiratory infections are caused by viruses, so there are no drugs available for cats to treat the infection. We give antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections they get while sick, and give supportive care.

Herpes Viral Conjunctivitis: A Feline Problem The conjunctival membranes of the eye are basically the pink part under the eyelids and the lining of the eyelids themselves. When they are irritated, they redden and can become itchy, dry, and uncomfortable. The cornea, or clear dome-like covering of the eye, can become involved in the inflammation. It can become cloudy or even ulcerated. Tear production can be reduced leading to a chronically dry, uncomfortable eye.

Baby Kittens: A Special Situation

Herpes infection is extremely common in young kittens, especially those facing other stresses (fleas, poor nutrition, environmental cold etc.). Feral kittens, waifs of the streets, outdoor kittens, shelter kittens, etc. are all high risk for herpes infection. Young kittens can produce so much ocular discharge that their eyes gum closed, sealing the infected secretions around the eye. It is important that the eyelids be opened manually to allow drainage of secretions as well as application of medicine. The swelling of the conjunctivae can be so severe that the eye itself is not visible. In severe cases, the eye can rupture and become permanently blinded. Treatment is crucial and response to topical therapy is usually dramatic. Herpes infection typically also causes respiratory signs: snotty nose, congestion, etc. These signs can result in lifethreatening loss of appetite and dehydration in a young kitten, while signs are generally minor in an adult cat whose immune system is mature. Kittens with obvious discomfort should be examined by a veterinarian. Oral antibiotics will most likely be needed and sometimes hospitalization is also necessary for proper supportive care.


P a g e | 198 Adult Cats Since kittens are so commonly affected with herpes, it is not unusual to find oneself in possession of an adult cat with a history of herpes infection. These individuals will have recurring conjunctivitis in times of stress. Typical signs include squinting slightly in one eye, a noticeable increase in eye discharge (usually brownish in color), redness of the conjunctivae, or all of the above.

How do we Know it is Herpes? We don‟t and for this reason, we mark the chart “viral” rather than “herpes”. Herpes is a life long problem that will affect a cat‟s adoptability. We only adopt out healthy cats and so until a cat proves that it is unable to clear the ocular virus, we do not label them “herpes”. There is only one test that is accurate enough to be worth doing if one wants to know for sure if the cat has herpes or not, and that is the PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test. This is a DNA test that amplifies viral DNA so that even one single virus can be detected in a sample from a conjunctival swab. The extreme sensitivity of this test has made it somewhat problematic for laboratories to run. Prior to PCR technology, serum antibody levels were run but widespread vaccination against herpes has made these results difficult to interpret. At this point, the clinical presentation of the patient is what leads to the diagnosis of herpes in most cases.

How Can we Treat it? There are several treatment methods that can be combined in the treatment of feline herpes eye infections:

Topical Antibiotics These quell secondary bacterial invaders and are helpful in controlling initial infections or severe recurring infections. It is important to realize that antibiotics do not affect the herpesvirus itself; they only work on secondary bacteria; however, often this is enough to make the cat comfortable until the virus goes dormant.

Topical Anti-virals There are several eyedrops available that act directly against the herpesvirus. They include: idoxuridine (APA uses this for any cat/kitten with severe swelling of eyelids-but it is no longer commercially available and must be obtained from a compounding pharmacy). If the cornea is involved in the infection, this is a clear indicator that antiviral medications would be needed.


P a g e | 199 Oral Lysine Herpesviruses as a group are highly dependent on an amino acid called arginine. Without arginine, a herpesvirus cannot reproduce. The amino acid lysine is taken up by the virus in favor of arginine. We can take advantage of this situation by saturating the virus with lysine and thus suppressing the virus‟s ability to replicate. Lysine is readily available in most health food stores as a tablet or capsule. One should be sure that the formula used is free of the preservative propylene glycol because cats can have blood reactions against this compound. A month or so of supplementation is required in order to determine if supplementation has been helpful.

Can Humans get Feline Herpes? Can Cats get Human Herpes? Happily, humans and cats cannot share their herpes viruses. Feline herpes is contagious among cats only and human herpes is contagious among humans only.

Canine Kennel Cough Information for Foster Homes Keys to preventing the spread of infection 1. Always remember that vaccines do not completely protect a dog that is exposed to kennel cough although even a recent vaccine will provide some immunity. For maximum protection of your own dogs, they should receive the canine kennel cough vaccine at least 1 week and not more than 1 year before bringing in foster dogs into your home. 2. Keep dogs isolated. Some URI pathogens can spread even to otherwise healthy, vaccinated pet dogs (e.g. canine influenza).Medication and other treatments should be given to dogs with kennel cough after other dogs in the home have been handled. 3. Refrain from bringing your foster dog to pet stores, dog parks, obedience training, or other places young puppies may visit as long as the dog is showing any symptoms of illness. Remember some dogs infected with serious illness such as canine distemper may be infectious to others while showing only mild signs themselves. 4. Before an animal returns to the shelter or goes to a new home, it should be free of all signs of illness for at least 14 days

A few things to consider when fostering an animal with kennel cough 1. Many dogs in shelters are euthanized because of respiratory disease. If dogs with respiratory disease are placed up for adoption, veterinarians and citizens in the community may lose faith in the shelter, resulting in fewer adoptions and yet more dog euthanasia. 2. Do not overburden yourself and your home. If you have too many animals, you increase the risk of disease and spread in your home and you exhaust yourself. Burned out rescuers provide no benefit to animals. If you need a break, take it. 3. Lots of dogs with respiratory disease get well if given a low-density, clean supportive environment. If you can provide this and keep numbers of dogs down, you can make a real difference.

Canine Distemper Virus  Symptoms – nasal discharge, lethargy, anorexia, tremors, seizures, diarrhea, death  Airborne Transmission- coughing near each other, sharing water bowls (much like the spread of the human cold) can all cause disease spread.  Diagnosis – no good, inexpensive test available. Diagnose based on symptoms.  Prevention – timely vaccination before exposure to the virus is the only way to prevent


P a g e | 200  Treatment – strong antibiotics, supportive care, pain medication, time to let virus pass (can take weeks to months) *There is no cure for distemper*

Distemper Control Protocol Step One: Make sure 100% of shelter population is vaccinated now. If not, do it today. Have staff affix Vaccinated stickers to animals that are current on vaccines so you can see at a glance on a walk through the shelter if they are in compliance. Step two: Implement Vaccination protocol for incoming animals ASAP Step three: Remove all puppies and small breed dogs who are exhibiting signs of illness to foster (don‟t euthanize). Have them return in 14-21 days for spay/neuter and adoption if healthy for at least 10 days before surgery. Isolate all larger breed dogs that cannot find foster from others if they are exhibiting signs of lethargy, inappetance, and URI. Isolation can occur in one building. Does not have to be strict isolation- just can‟t allow them to breathe on other dogs within 10 feet. Do not euthanize for illness. If moving them is impossible, leave them where they are and focus on vaccinations. Step four: Do not do surgery on animals who are sick with URI or who were not vaccinated at intake. Surgery will push them over the edge and cause full blown symptoms. Send new owners with pets unfixed but take deposit and set appt time for 2 weeks from now. Send home with medications to treat URI.

Distemper Advisory (sent out with adopted dogs during Distemper outbreak at shelter): Recently there has been a nasty virus, Distemper, found in our community. This virus is very easy to prevent with a simple vaccination (the DHLPP). We have given all of our dogs the appropriate vaccinations and they should not be harboring this virus. However, Distemper can mimic kennel cough. At this point, we believe that any dog in our care with signs of kennel cough, actually only has kennel cough. This letter is just a precaution so we can ensure swift treatment should other symptoms besides a cough arise. Please contact our medical team immediately if you see any of the following symptoms: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

A lack of interest in food. Extreme lethargy (it is ok to sleep and take naps but not be lethargic all day long) Severe nasal discharge Severe coughing especially if it is accompanied by heavy breathing Tremors of muscles (not regular old shivering but spasms) or seizures Eye problems such as not wanting to open them

We will be in touch with you as fast as we can should you see these symptoms. Again, 99% of our dogs are just experiencing kennel cough so please do not let this stop you from adopting or fostering a great shelter dog who really needs a home. We just want to be proactive about getting you the information you need so you can watch for further symptoms and be in touch.


P a g e | 201 Other dogs in your household, as long as they have been vaccinated, should be immune from this disease. We do advise any home with puppies under 4 months who havenâ&#x20AC;&#x;t received at least 3 vaccinations or older immunocompromised dogs, only adopt or foster dogs with no signs of kennel cough. Thank you for making room in your family for a dog on death row!

Pneumonia in Dogs The most common causes or types of pneumonia: Viral Pneumonia (usually the result of canine distemper virus infection or a complicated upper respiratory infection). Bacterial Pneumonia (often secondary to severe kennel cough or other upper respiratory infection, aspiration, or secondary to either of the above causes.) In most cases of pneumonia there is a bacterial component. This means that no matter what started the pneumonia, bacteria have joined in adding their own special pus, fever, and potential for disaster; in most cases, management of the bacteria is vital.

Symptoms of pneumonia * Symptoms may include coughing (may sound wet or crackly), nasal discharge, fever, loss of appetite, lethargy, difficulty/labored breathing. Some or all of these symptoms may be present. Coughing is a hallmark symptom. Treatment will always include antibiotics, sometimes multiple types of antibiotics. Nebulization is similar to vaporization and involves a piece of equipment called a nebulizer. The nebulizer creates a mist of fine fluid droplets which can be combined with antibiotics or airway dilators. Unlike vaporized droplets, though, these droplets are small enough to penetrate down into the lung. (Vaporizers make larger droplets which mostly penetrate to the sinuses only. They are used to moisten upper airway secretions while nebulizers moisten lower airway secretions). Nebulized saline or water may carry antibiotics with it thus providing an additional source of moisture and antibiotic for the sick lung thus deeply treating the infection.

Physical Therapy A technique called coupage is helpful at mobilizing respiratory secretions. Cup your hand and gently but rapidly taps the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x;s chest wall repeatedly. This loosens some of the deeper secretions and helps them move into airways. Material in the airway generates coughing which removes these materials from the body. Coupage should be performed at least four times daily and should be continued at home as long as the patient has a cough. Coupage after each nebulizer treatment.

Home Care The following tips are recommended as long as the patient is coughing:


P a g e | 202 Do not allow prolonged exposure to extreme cold or wet weather. Keep your pet primarily indoors. Nebulize for at least 20 minute intervals a few times daily. You cannot nebulize too much. With severe pneumonia, it is recommended to nebulize as much as possible. If you are nebulizing the patient in a covered crate, check to make sure it does not get too hot inside the crate. Perform coupage at least 4 times daily and allow light exercise to promote the cough. Do not try to suppress the cough with over-the-counter cough suppressants. We want the infected material in the chest to be coughed up. Use the antibiotics as directed. Expect several weeks and sometimes months for full recovery. DO NOT DISCONTINUE ANY MEDICATIONS WITHOUT A CHECK UP. MISSING EVEN ONE DAY OF ANTIBIOTICS CAN LEAD TO DEATH OR PERMANENT DAMAGE. Pneumonia is a serious infection and often takes several weeks to months for a full recovery.

Prevention of URI in dogs (specifically the deadly Distemper) Vaccinations immediately upon intake into any shelter (before an animal enters the main shelter areas) are the single most important ingredient to eliminating death of shelter animals from URI. By the time animals reach APA they have already been exposed to deadly viruses at the City shelter. It was left up to APA to fix the vaccination protocols at the City shelter. You need to know your stuff!

Malpractice as it applies to vaccine decision making:  Distemper (and any other Upper Respiratory) epidemics in a shelter are the product of negligence because all are preventable with simple vaccinations  With regard to malpractice involving vaccination, the scenarios that could give rise to a lawsuit are as varied as the imagination allows. For example, a practitioner who chooses not to vaccinate an animal could potentially be sued for negligence if the animal contracts the disease for which vaccination was foregone.  There is no excuse for not vaccinating appropriately upon animal intake  It is considered malpractice and can be punishable  100% of the animals have to be vaccinated prior to shelter intake to prevent an epidemic  A shelter is only a safe haven if the animals that enter can survive their stay General/Standard Vaccine Guidelines for Shelters: It is the opinion of the Vaccination Task Force that all vaccines categorized in Table 3 as recommended be administered at time of admission on all dogs older than 6 weeks (4 weeks in cases of disease outbreaks). It is strongly recommended that immediate vaccination on entry be made a priority in all shelters. Delaying vaccination, even by a few hours, may increase the risk of infection subsequent to exposure. Failing to immediately vaccinate an animal on entry could compromise an effective disease prevention program and possibly lead to sustained, shelterwide outbreaks of an infectious disease.

Ideal Shelter Vaccination Protocol ALL animals are vaccinated and possibly treated for fleas/ticks before taken into the shelter housing areas (including vet services)


P a g e | 203 o

No exceptions even if animal is dying or very sick. There is no veterinary discretion on choosing to vaccinate. This is a shelter protocol applicable to ALL animals entering shelter. Vaccines must be given to 100% of the animals upon arrival.

o o o

DHLPP, Bordetella, and Frontline for dogs FVRCP, CVR, and Frontline for cats Vaccines must be stored properly and not mixed more than 30 minutes prior to administration. For litters that all look alike, vaccinator should have paint pen to mark puppies as they are vaccinated to avoid missing one or duplicating vaccinations in one puppy.

o

Animals coming into the shelter “over the counter”: 

  

Place animals in hold kennels (near intake area) upon intake. o Place any animal with known symptoms of diarrhea, lethargy, or URI in a more isolated area using a crate if needed o Front staff places kennel card on each animal‟s hold cage Front staff calls for vaccinator as soon as animal(s) are put into cages. Vaccinator vaccinates in holding areas and places “Vaccinated” sticker on each kennel after vaccines are administered. Transporter does not move animals to shelter cages unless kennel card has bright “Vaccinated” sticker on it.

Animals picked up by Animal Control in the field: 

 

Take animals out of trucks and place in holding kennels in truckport. o Place any animal with known symptoms of diarrhea, lethargy, or URI (Upper Respiratory Infection) in a more isolated area using a crate if needed o Animal Control Staff places kennel card/animal info card on each hold cage Animal Control staff calls for vaccinator as soon as animal(s) are put in hold cages and truck is empty Vaccinator vaccinates in holding areas and places “Vaccinated” sticker on each kennel after vaccines are administered. Transporter does not move animals to shelter cages unless kennel card has bright “Vaccinated” sticker on it.

I would strongly recommend that any staff that fails to comply (intake staff that fails to call for vaccinator, vaccinator that places stickers falsely, or transporters that remove animals with no sticker), is treated with pretty severe consequences. Failure to vaccinate an animal endangers a life, makes the shelter look really bad, and costs everyone a lot of money.

Standard Diarrhea Protocol: 1. Watery: Metronidazole 2. Brown Diarrhea in Kittens and Puppies: Panacur and Marquis +/- Kaolin (NOT kaopectate)


P a g e | 204 3. Brown Diarrhea in Adults: Give it 24 hours before reacting with medications- could be nutritional/stress/excitement 4. Bloody Diarrhea in Puppies: test for parvo, if positive, treat for parvo. If negative, treat with metronidazole and panacur. 5. Bloody Diarrhea in Adults: Metronidazole then Panacur if no effect in 24 hours 6. Diarrhea with Vomiting: Start subcutaneous treatment of fluids, reglan, and Penicillin immediately then add oral meds for diarrhea. 7. Repeated diarrhea: fecal test

Severe diarrhea in Shelter Cat and Kittens  R/o parasites first:  Fecal test (unless obviously yellow like coccidia) o If find parasite, treat appropriately o If do not find parasite, do consecutive trials of the following with kaolin and Intestinal diet  started at same time as first round of meds:  Metro 10mg/kg/day x 2weeks  Marquis SID x 5 days  Panacur BID x 7 days  Tylan powder – pinch in food bid x 10 days  Give each medicine at least 2 days to work before adding another, if add another, keep on the first one until prescription is finished o If some improvement within 48 hours of starting one med, continue that med upon Dr recommendation even if not completely cured o

If no improvement after all have been tried, then it is considered Chronic Diarrhea

Chronic Diarrhea Protocol Try the following all at once:     

250mcg Vit B12 weekly x 6 weeks Ask questions about hyperthyroid, consider test or empirical treatment Limited ingredient diet trial Abdominal palpation by Doctor for masses Tests (if have equipment and/or funds): o § Fecal cytology: Roll a moistened swab against the rectal wall and stain. If neutrophils are present, do a fecal culture for salmonella, clostridium, and campylobacter. If eosinophils are present, re-worm with fenbendazole. o § Trictrichomonas test- insert a moistened swab a few cm into the rectum and examine the mucoid part of the feces for motile organisms. They look like this: LongLink @ www.ncsu.edu... Even better is to perform a colonic flush and then examine:http://www.ncsu.edu/project/cvm_gookin/buttflush.mov . Once the sample has been checked, if you can't see them, you can culture them in an InPouch tritrich test kit. More information here: LongLink @ www.cvm.ncsu.edu... If have funds: o § Lab Fecal test: give the owner a collection jar and ask her to collect a fecal sample on 3 consecutive days. Ask the owner to keep the jar in the fridge and pool the samples together into it. Send the sample to the lab and request centrifugation and ZnSO4 float to check for worm ova, giardia, cryptosporidium, and coccidia. Perform a giardia antigen test and consider cryptosporidium IFA.


P a g e | 205 o § Test for Cobalamine/folate/fpli, tli o § Consider thyroid test If feel certain it is not infectious based on above protocols, try o o

§ Prednisone 2mg/kg/day with Pepcid AC 2.5mg sid § “Raw” diet or all meat diet (Instincts or Wellness brands)

Hairloss Treatment Protocol Dogs a. If hair loss seen: perform skin scrape and PE b. Skin scrape = neg i. If itchy and scaly/scabby/infected skin (esp on ear tips and tail tip) probably sarcoptic mange 1. Treat w/ Selamectin ____mg/lb once topically. Repeat q 2wks X 3 treatments. Is not contagious after 2 weeks. 2. Treat all animals in contact w/ infected animal prophylactically w/ Selamectin ____mg/lb q month. 3. If skin is infected (red, inflamed) Rx Cephalexin ___ mg/lb po BID X 14-21 days depending on severity of infection. May need to refill for additional weeks if redness and inflammation are not resolved. ii. If not itchy, and hair loss is in patches w/o infected skin probably ringworm 1. Can try to fluoresce w/ black light (if fluoresces it is definitely positive, if no fluorescence then still possible positive). 2. Rx Ketaconazole ___mg/lb po SID X 28 days. 3. Lym Dip to resolve faster every 3 days until resolution of symptoms. Apply dip, do not rinse or dry off, allow to drip dry (but keep warm!). 4. Immune compromised animals (i.e. young puppies, sick animals, etc) could get the disease, so dipping q wk will help prevent. Adult, healthy dogs are at low risk for ringworm and need no prevention. 5. Humans can get this disease (though the mite doesn‟t live long on humans). Simple good hygiene practice will prevent this. c. Skin Scrape = positive i. If pos for sarcops mites, treat as listed above. ii. If pos for demodectic mites: 1. Rx Ivermectin 1% 0.1cc/10lbs po SID X 6 weeks. There can be NO lapses in treatment! 2. Recheck skin scrape 4 weeks and 6 weeks into treatment. 3. If both skin scrapes are negative, okay to stop treatment. 4. If final skin scrape is positive, extend treatment for 2 weeks and recheck again at end of 2 weeks. 5. May have flair up at stressful events anytime in life (i.e. surgeries, illnesses, moving, etc.) 6. Is completely non-contagious to animals or humans.

Cats a. If hair loss seen: perform PE i. If small, crusty hair loss lesions probably ringworm 1. Rx Itraconazole ___mg/lb po ___ X ___ days. 2. Lym dip to resolve faster q 3 days until resolution of symptoms. Apply dip, do not rinse or dry off, allow to drip dry (but keep animal warm!).


P a g e | 206

ii.

3. Quarantine from other cats (other than housemates) and strictly no adoption events. Lym dip prophylactically other cats in house q wk. If adult, healthy cat, and hair loss is only over hind end, is not crusty, and is “thin hair” as opposed to complete baldness than probably flea allergy/over grooming due to stress 1. Apply frontline, revolution, or advantage at appropriate dose q 2wks until resolved. 2. Make sure eating good quality diet and in low-stress household. 3. Okay to go to adoption events with this.

Demodectic Mange in Dogs o

Mange is a parasitic skin disease caused by microscopic mites. Demodectic mange, also called “demodex” is the most common form of mange in dogs. It is caused by the demodectic mange mite, a parasite which lives in the hair follicles of affected dogs. All dogs have a few of these mites on their skin. As long as the body‟s immune system is functioning well, these mites cause no harm.

Contributing factors o

Compromised immune system and stress, ie: young, old or ill animals.

Causes/Transmission o

o

Demodex most often occurs when a dog has an immature immune system, allowing the mites to grow rapidly. Consequently, this disease occurs primarily in dogs less than 1 year of age. In most cases, the immune system matures as the dog grows. Adult dogs with demodex are usually immune compromised. Since the mite is found on virtually all dogs, exposure of a normal dog to one with demodex is not dangerous. The other type of mange, called sarcoptic mange, is contagious between dogs.

Clinical signs o

o

Areas of bare skin, usually beginning on the face, especially around the eyes. A dog with only a few patches of fur loss has what is called localized demodectic mange. If the disease spreads to many areas of the skin, it is called generalized demodectic mange. Dogs with demodex are usually not itchy unless they develop a secondary bacterial infection.

Diagnosis o

Diagnosis is made by a deep skin scraping that is examined under the microscope. Usually, large numbers of mites are found.

Treatment An oral medication is administered once daily for 4-8 weeks depending on the severity of the disease. o If a puppy is diagnosed with this disease, it is important that the medication is adjusted as the puppy grows. This adjustment must be made by the veterinarian. An antibiotic may be prescribed if there is a secondary bacterial infection. A bacterial infection can cause the skin to become red, inflamed and sometimes very itchy. A high quality diet, stress free environment and maturing immune system also contribute to faster healing. Fish oil supplements are also beneficial. Demodex is not transmissible to humans. o

o


P a g e | 207

Sarcoptic Mange in Dogs o

Sarcoptic mange is also known as “scabies” Sarcoptic mange is caused by a microscopic mite that burrows just beneath the surface of the skin and sometimes on the surface.

Contributing factors o

Compromised immune system, stress

Causes/Transmission o o

Sarcotpic mange is cause by a microscopic mite. This mite feeds on material in and on the skin. Sarcoptic mange is contagious to people and other animals. Usually, healthy adult humans and animals are not as susceptible. Close contact with an infected host is required.

Clinic signs o o

The presence of sarcoptic mites causes severe itching. The dog may chew and scratch its skin constantly. This leads to the loss of large amounts of fur, especially on the legs and belly. Frequent scratching and itching often leads to secondary bacterial skin infections.

Diagnosis o

Diagnosis is made by a skin scraping examined under the microscope. However, only a small number of mites may be present and are sometimes difficult to obtain on a skin scrape. Because of this, a dog may be strongly suspected of having sarcoptic mange but multiple skin scraping exams are negative. A presumptive diagnosis can be made because the signs are quite typical.

Treatment o

An oral medication is prescribed once weekly for 6 weeks. After 3 weeks of medication, we suspect the dog is not contagious. An antibiotic will likely be prescribed if a skin infection is present. Benadryl may be given to help relieve the itching. A high quality diet and stress free environment will contribute to faster healing. Fish oil supplements are beneficial as well. Pain medication may also be prescribed in severe cases.

2011 APA Cat Ringworm Protocols RW Program Goals: 1. Rescue and rehabilitate cats/kittens from TLAC with suspected ringworm.

2. Provide backup for cats/kittens in cattery with active ringworm or exposure. Itraconazole Treatment    

Initial treatment length is 2 weeks on, 2 weeks off, 2 weeks on, unless otherwise specified by MedTechs (ie. 7 day treatment for exposure, etc.) Itraconazole dose will be adjusted weekly based on weight in .1cc/lb increments. Weight must be documented weekly. Weekly exams should be performed by RW staff members to document hair growth and skin texture. Documentation should include progression of existing lesions, development of new lesions, and photo documentation. Rechecks should be performed by MedTechs every two weeks per APA! guidelines.


P a g e | 208  

Oral treatment may be extended to a maximum of 6 weeks. If further treatment is needed a liver panel must be run to determine hepatic health and safety. Treatments should not exceed 6 weeks unless authorized by Dr. Jefferson.

Lym-Sulfur Treatment       

Treatment length will be 3 weeks, with 2 dips per week for a total of 6. Lym-Sulfur to water ratio is 1cup:1gallon using warm water only . Let the solution completely coat the cat to the skin, use cotton balls to treat areas around the face and ears. Do not get into ear canals/nose/eyes. Flush with water if solution drips into the cat‟s eyes to prevent irritation. Irrigate ears with a small amount of alcohol to remove any water that may have dripped into the cat‟s ears. All cats should be dipped one final time if being transferred to : foster, cattery, or RW recovery area. Kittens under 12 weeks should be completely dry before returning them to their cage.

RW Ward Protocols           

Bleach solution (1:10) should be made fresh daily. Use Rocal/hand sanitizer between cages to prevent the spread of illness.

Do not room cats together who are at different levels of treatment to avoid re-exposure. Rocal scoopers in between cages. Food/water bowls should be returned to the same cage if not washed. Food should be kept in plastic containers or sealed 2 feet off the ground. Litter boxes and bowls should be bleached for ten minutes then washed at least once weekly. No litter or clay should be put down drain. Spray then wipe with a paper towel, then rinse. Clean syringes should be used for each medication administration- never reuse a syringe! Dirty syringes should be flushed and placed in a water/bleach solution then hand washed or run through a dishwasher. Laundry be changed and washed with bleach at least twice weekly. Cages should be cleaned with Rocal and bleach twice weekly. Make sure not too toxic of a smell before putting cats back in. If residents present with URI, persistent vomiting or diarrhea, etc., staff should fill out a Wellness Form and notify the MedTech on duty.

RW Recovery/Exposure Ward    

Residents from cattery who have been exposed to possible RW should be housed in the Recovery/Exposure Ward and monitored for 7 days. Residents who have completed treatment and show no visible lesions, but have not been cleared by the MedTechs should be housed in the Recovery/Exposure Ward Residents in the Recovery/Exposure Ward should be dipped 2 times per week for the length of their stay. This should remain a very temporary option.


P a g e | 209 Treatment in Foster Care    

Cats diagnosed with or suspected of having RW in Foster Care should be reported to the RW Team and should leave their appointment with the Fostering RW 101 document and a follow up card. Fosters should be checked by MedTechs every two weeks per foster guidelines. Foster Parents should adhere to Sections I and II regarding Itraconazole and Lym-Sulfur Treatments detail above. The RW Team will help dip fosters with advanced notice. Foster Parents need to email ringworm@austinpetsalive in advance and show up to Dazey‟s Ward no later than 6pm.

Heartworm Protocol (revised April 17, 2011) The APA heartworm treatment protocol has been revised in an attempt to reduce complications secondary to heartworm treatment and get dogs through the treatment in a timelier manner, thus increasing their adoptability and reducing the time needed to be in a foster home. Any dog who is determined to be heartworm positive will immediately begin treatment with Doxycycline at 10 mg/kg (4.5 mg/lb) BID for 3 weeks 2 days prior to anticipated treatment date: 

Each dog must be examined by a staff veterinarian prior to deciding to proceed with Melarsomine (Immiticide®) treatment. The following information must be provided prior to examination by the veterinarian:    

Animal ID# Intake date (must be at least 30 days out of shelter) Illnesses and treatments since intake Other conditions

On examination the following information must be collected from foster/owner:      

If eating well Any coughing, if so, when does it seem to occur Level of exercise and any evidence of intolerance (gets out of breath, refuses to walk long distances, mm become pale/cyanotic during periods of excitement, etc.) Any weight loss URI history or symptoms and associated treatment

The veterinarian will examine the dog‟s overall condition as well as performing an auscultation prior to ok‟ing the animal for treatment.    

Begin treatment with prednisone at 1 mg/kg PO SID 48 hours prior to the 1st injection Send home tramadol dose to be administered in AM prior to treatment Schedule 1st injection in 48 hours and then another the day after the 1st injection (try to schedule multiple treatments at one time to cut down on the waste and expense)

The foster/owner will again be asked the above questions


P a g e | 210 The veterinarian will examine the dog‟s overall condition as well as performing an auscultation prior to ok‟ing the animal for treatment.

FIV Positive Quarantine and Testing protocol for cats under the care of APA! Kittens >/=4wks old: Test with Leukemia/FIV IDEXX Snap combo test (as per intake protocol). If positive for FIV use the following protocol:   

Retest for FIV using IDEXX SNAP test 1 month later. If still positive, okay to adopt out, no quarantine needed. Inform potential adopters that the cat may have FIV. The test could also be positive due to previously being vaccinated for it. If the adopter chooses they can have a test done that will tell if it is more likely to be from vaccine or from actual infection, though there is no 100% test for this. FIV is contagious through deep bite wounds and sexual intercourse only. Kitten will be spay/neutered so no risk of intercourse. Playing/regular fights will not spread the disease, however, if this cat is severely aggressive towards other cats in household it may put them at risk.

FeLV (Feline Leukemia Virus) Who Gets It and How the Disease is Spread The feline leukemia virus is spread from cat to cat through casual contact. It can be transmitted through saliva (sharing food bowls, grooming each other, etc.), urine, blood, and from mother cat to kittens during pregnancy. This disease cannot be transmitted to your family or your dog.

How is FeLV Diagnosed? The screening test for FeLV is generally an ELISA snap test (often in combination with the feline immunodeficiency (FIV) test). All individuals here for adoption were tested for FIV and FeLV via this method. False FELV positives do occur with these tests, so APA will always retest the kitty with serum rather than whole blood. 90% will be negative after that serum test. If still positive, APA will retest 3-4 weeks later at which point some cats will be negative. If still positive, APA will retest 3-4 weeks later again. Cats older than 1 year of age who test negative tend to remain negative, even with exposure, due to natural resistance to infection at that age. * This is not widely known so very important to retest with serum rather than assume it is truly positive.

Vaccinating There is a vaccination available for feline leukemia. This vaccine does not interfere with ELISA testing for the disease, but it is mainly recommended for at risk cats. APA does not routinely vaccinate for FeLV. It is recommended that you vaccinate other cats in your household prior to bringing in a FeLV positive cat.

Symptoms Many cats are exposed to the virus but become immune. This is especially true for older cats. Other cats may be carriers of the disease, potentially infecting other cats while remaining asymptomatic themselves. Often times, symptoms of disease may not occur until the cat becomes stressed. Infections that a normal cat would be able to fight off are difficult to treat and can lead to life threatening disease due to


P a g e | 211 immunosuppression. FeLV positive cats are also predisposed to developing certain types of cancer. The documented life expectancy for a FeLV positive cat is 3 years past diagnosis, but many experts suggest life expectancy can be improved with proper care and regular veterinary visits.

Fostering/Owning a FeLV+ Cat Here are a few guidelines to follow if you have a FeLV positive cat in your care:        

Seek regular veterinary care and guidance for you cat Even minor infections can be life threatening, so veterinary care should be sought out as soon as any abnormalities are detected Keep up on recommended vaccinations and parasite prevention Feed a high quality diet Keep your cats indoors Consult with your veterinarian about prevention for other household cats Do not feed raw foods Spaying and neutering cats also helps to prevent spread of disease and overpopulation


P a g e | 212

Spay/Neuter Documents:

Post-Operative Care Instructions for your foster pet  Your foster pet received general anesthesia today and surgical sterilization. Please read the following information: 1. Your foster will probably be pretty groggy when he/she gets home. Some animals are very groggy, some are less so - size, weight, age, sex, etc. can all contribute to how “drunk” they will act. This will include, large pupils, stumbling, meowing/whining, disorientation, fear, hallucinations, etc. This is all completely normal, and should wear off a couple of hours after taking them home. 2. Your foster received absorbable sutures today - meaning there is no need to remove them. The stitches are buried underneath of the skin so you won‟t see them on the outside, and we seal the outside of the skin with a little tissue glue. If the glue peals off, don‟t worry, it is mostly cosmetic and not actually holding anything together. 3. A little licking of the incision is okay after surgery, though it is important to discourage it. If they lick too much


P a g e | 213 they could cause in infection, or if they chew on the incision they could tear the stitches out. They are licking excessively, you can either: A. get an e-collar (the big cone shaped collars) from an APA representative for free or buy one from PetSmart B. For cats you can cut the toes off of a sock and slip it over the body like a “tube dress” C. For male dogs you could put a pare of boxers or underwear on and attach it with a small strip of duct tape on the fur on their back (just use a little, and don‟t put it on the belly or areas that don‟t have fur) 4. Check on the incision regularly, if it is very swollen, has a lot of discharge, or is bleeding contact the technicians at medtechs@austinpetsalive.org 5. If the incision gets dirty, clean it with hydrogen peroxide and a cotton ball or clean rag. Don‟t use Neosporin (it usually makes them want to lick), bandages or any other cleaners on the incision. 6. Very important: Your pet received inject able pain medication as well as the pain meds we sent you with. Don‟t use any other pain medications other than the ones we sent you with today - Aspirin, Tylenol, Novox, Rimadyl, Deramaxx, or Metacam would be toxic if given in conjunction with the pain medication we injected them with today. The pain meds you were sent with are safe to give them and should be given whether they show signs of discomfort or not - animals are, by instinct, very good at hiding pain. 7. No swimming or bathing for the first 5-7 days after surgery unless directed by a vet. 8. Large male or female dogs, or female cats should have restricted activity for the first 5-7 days, no running, jumping, or too much playing. Male puppies or any male cats can have normal activity. 9. Puppies and kittens feed like normal, adult animals should eat a small meal tonight.

Fading Kitten Syndrome Fading Kitten Syndrome is a life threatening emergency in which a kitten, sometimes ones that were previously sick, “crashes” and begins to fade away. If not dealt with by a foster parent immediately, it can result in death. If you are fostering kittens 12 weeks or younger, it is a very good idea to familiarize yourself with this handout so you know what to do if it happens. This is a common problem in kittens under 8 weeks old.

Symptoms:   

Extreme Lethargy - not getting up, unable to stand, not responding when pet Gasping for breath Meowing/Crying out

When this happens, it is vital that you take these immediate steps! FKS is caused by 2 things : Hypothermia (being too cold) and Hypoglycemia (not enough blood sugar). You must combat both of these things or the kitten will die.

Treatment: Step 1- Get them warm: Create the “burrito” towel. Immediately wrap the kitten up in a towel like a burrito leaving their face exposed only. Their whole body, tail, ears, and paws should be in the towel, only nose and mouth exposed. Do not take the kitten out of the towel to adjust them, check on them, etc. - this is very important! Every time you take them out you will make them cold again, even if it is only for a second. You must apply an extra source of heat (listed below). The kitten‟s body can‟t warm itself up with just a towel alone, you have to apply extra heat. Also, your body temperature is much lower than what a kitten should be, so trying to warm them up with your body heat won‟t work either.


P a g e | 214 If you have a heating pad - Then wrap a heating pad *turned onto low* around the towel - duct tape it or secure it around the towel so it stays wrapped around them. Don‟t let the heating pad touch them directly, it can cause burns, make sure the „burrito‟ towel is between their skin and the heating pad. If you don‟t have a heating pad - you can either

o

o

keep your dryer running full of towels. Grab a new hot one every 5 minutes and wrap this new hot towel around the “burrito” towel. After 5 minutes, trade that towel out for a new hot one. Don‟t remove the “burrito” towel. Fill 2 socks full of rice, tie the ends of them so it doesn‟t spill out. Throw them in the microwave for 3 minutes. Keep them next to the kitten on the outside of the burrito towel. Every 30 minutes reheat one sock and leave the other next to the kitten so she doesn‟t cool off.

Step 2- Get their blood sugar up: Once you get the heat on them, get a bowel or Tupperware and a few tablespoons sugar in some hot water. Stir it up so you get a sugar water solution- you don‟t want it super syrupy like pancake syrup, but you do want it to be as strong as possible while still pretty runny. Using a syringe or your finger give 3 drops every 3 minutes into the mouth. If they aren‟t swallowing, try not to get it down the throat, try to get it on the tongue or gums. Set an egg timer or use the stop watch on your cell phone to make sure you are doing it at least every 3 minutes. Every 5 minutes or 10 minutes will not work, it must be every 3 minutes.

Step 3 - Call an APA medical technician: Call the emergency medical technician„s phone number. Don‟t leave your kitten to make this call or forget to do your sugar every 3 minutes. They won‟t have any extra advice for you that isn„t in this handout, but they will need to be made aware of what is going on.

Prognosis: We generally have very good success with these kittens if you follow the above steps. We DO NOT recommend you rush them to the vet for many reasons: You have the motivation to sit right there with them and make them your top priority. A vet clinic has many patients it is helping and can‟t give your kitten the 100% undivided attention you can give them. Your kitten will continue to be cold/hypoglycemic on the way to the vet, in the waiting room, in the hospital while they try to determine what is wrong, etc. Most kittens won‟t last long enough for them to start the treatments there. Keep in mind, it can sometimes take hours for them to come out of it and start acting normally again. Once they do come out of it, make sure you contact the med techs to discuss what could have possibly caused them to fade in the first place and make sure we have the kitten on all the right medical treatments for any illnesses they have that may have caused it. Also keep in mind, even with all the love and attention and perfect treatment of this condition, some of them still won‟t make it. Cats get pregnant very easily, and have A LOT of kittens, specifically because they are so fragile and die so easily. Try not to blame yourself during this difficult time and focus on all the kittens you have personally saved by opening your home to foster kittens. Remember, if it wasn‟t for you, any kitten you‟ve ever fostered would have been killed at the shelter and never given a chance at life.


P a g e | 215

Force feeding the cat that won‟t eat before it goes into liver failure Supplies needed:    

Human baby food Large syringe (10cc syringes work well for kittens or small cats, 60cc syringes work well for big cats) Plenty of spare towels. Stinky wet cat food, tuna fish, cat treats, etc.

Force feeding instructions: It is very important that kitties eat regularly! If a cat doesn‟t eat for 12-24 hours, we need to start force feeding. To do this, you„ll need to get human baby food from the grocery store. You‟ll want to get a meat based kind (like chicken or turkey), and make sure it doesn‟t have garlic in the ingredient list. Check the calories when you get it - you want to try to find 100 calories per 2.5oz container or something equivalent. It doesn‟t have to be exactly that, but the more calories the better. Draw the baby food up in a syringe and put it in the corner of the cat‟s mouth and squirt a little in. Let him swallow. Repeat. Keep a big, absorbent towel handy, they often spit it out and drool a lot while you do this. Wrapping the towel around them like a bib sometimes helps with the mess. We recommend feeding them small amounts more often, rather than large amounts of food only a couple of times a day. Kitties get sick of it/angry very quickly and will fight it some times, so if you can give smaller amounts more frequently they usually tolerate it better. They need to eat 20cc per 1 pound of body weight each day. This is based on the 100 calorie per 2.5oz baby food - if your food is much lower in calories please increase the volume of food accordingly. Please use the chart below to figure out how much to feed depending on the number of times a day you feed: Weight

total cc/day

2X/day

3X/day

4X/day

5X/day

2lbs

40cc

20cc

13cc

10cc

8cc

3lbs

60cc

30cc

20cc

15cc

12cc

4lbs

80cc

40cc

27cc

20cc

16cc

5lbs

100cc

50cc

34cc

25cc

20cc

6lbs

120cc

60cc

41cc

30cc

24cc

7lbs

140cc

70cc

48cc

35cc

28cc

8lbs

160cc

80cc

55cc

40cc

32cc

9lbs

180cc

10lbs

200cc

90cc

62cc

100cc

69cc

45cc 50cc

36cc 40cc


P a g e | 216 Continue to offer stinky wet cat food, tuna fish, etc. every day while you are force feeding. At least once a day try warming the wet food up, putting it on their lips/in their mouth, putting it next to their face, etc to try and coax them to start eating again. It usually takes anywhere from 2-14 days for a cat that stops eating to start wanting to eat again, so just keep offering food until they get interested in it again! 90% of cats that are already in liver failure can be saved with aggressive feeding plans!

Miscellaneous Hospital Forms: Illness Form for Check Ups Please fill out top half of form: Animal name__________ id #_____________ Foster name____________ Why is this pet in for an exam today?_______________________________________________________ Please describe symptoms ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________ How long has each symptom been seen? ______________________________________________________ Is pet better, worse, or same since symptoms started? ______________________________________________________ Is the pet eating/drinking/active? If not, please explain how long or any other details. ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ If diarrhea, please circle best description: watery/yellow/grainy/pudding like/black ______________________________________________________

For clinic use below here: S: O: A: P: Communication: What is tentative diagnosis?_____________________________________________ Is this contagious? _____________________________________________ Does animal need to be in foster or can they be in adoption areas or adopted out? When should this be resolved? _____________________________________________ What is next step if this doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x;t resolve? _____________________________________ Is this a chronic issue? _____________________________________________ What should happen if it worsens? _____________________________________________ What symptoms are we looking for if worsens? _____________________________________ What is long term prognosis? _____________________________________________


P a g e | 217 What will adopter need to do? ____________________________________________ Is this pet critical? _____________________________________________ What does caregiver need to watch to ensure there is no lapse in medical care? Next exam date:__________

Treatment Sheet Patient Name: ______________________ ARN #: ____________________ Date:_______________

Reason for hospitalization: _________________________________________ Expected length of stay: ________________________ (Symptoms of illness)


P a g e | 218 Foster name & contact information: ______________________________________________________________________________

Type of Medication/Tx _______________________ Dose: ____________________________________________________________

Date 9:00 AM 2:00 PM 7:00 PM

Type of Medication/Tx _______________________ Dose: ____________________________________________________________

Date 9:00 AM 2:00 PM 7:00 PM

Type of Medication/ Tx _______________________ Dose: ___________________________________________________________

Date 9:00 AM 2:00 PM 7:00 PM

Date: __________ Notes: _______________________________________________________________

Cattery check off list (to be filled out before cats go to adoption centers to live to ensure they are clear of contagious disease) Catâ&#x20AC;&#x;s name:__________________________ A#______________________ Date:____________ Any signs of illness?_______ If yes, explain___________________________________________ Has this cat ever had ringworm__________ Has this cat been exposed to ringworm?_________ Any worms noted in poop?__________ Any fleas seen in last 48 hours?________________ (to be filled out by foster above line) (to be filled out by medtech below line) Checked for: Eyes/nose clear of discharge/swelling: ___Yes/No___ If no please describe:_________________


P a g e | 219 Signs of URI: Yes/No___ If yes please describe:_________________ Ear mites:_______ Yes/No Rx: Fur loss (checked ears, tail, paws):______ Yes/No ________ Rx: Live fleas/flea dirt:_Yes/No_ Date of last frontline:_______ FL given today?___Yes/No___ Black light test: Yes/No_ Pos/Neg Vaccinations up to date:__ Yes/No _____ List vaccines given today:__________________ Combo tested:____ Yes/No __ If bottlebaby, was retest performed?_____ Yes/No ___ S/N____ Yes/No __ Microchip #____________________________________ Current meds if any to be given in cattery: ______________________________________________________________ Has this cat been cleared to live in the catteries? Yes/No_________________________ Medtech initials:____________


P a g e | 220

Dog Adoptions Three Ways: Saving Lives Through Innovation Introduction Your thriving dog adoptions program will be the lifesaver of countless dogs in your community. You don‟t have to have a large budget, tons of staff, or even your own shelter building to start saving lives today. You just have to have the drive, some limited supplies, and a few trained adoption counselors. This manual will go over how APA! runs a dog adoptions program responsible for saving thousands of dogs in Central Texas that were previously considered by some to be “unadoptable.”

Getting Started Building a Relationship Your Local Open Intake Shelter. In order to start saving lives you will need to have a relationship developed with a local kill shelter. This is the shelter from which you‟ll be pulling dogs on a regular basis and the shelter that you‟ll be helping towards making your community a No-Kill community. Here in Austin, our open-intake shelter is Town Lake Animal Center most commonly referred to as TLAC by APA! staff and volunteers. Even if you‟ve got a history of contentious relations with your local open-intake shelter you will need to build a strong working relationship based on respect and trust. It will be important to be sure that not only your staff but your volunteers sees the open-intake shelter as your partner and not your enemy or adversary. This is a topic that should be directly discussed during staff trainings and volunteer orientations. It can be helpful to keep in mind that the staff working at the open-intake shelter are usually kind, goodhearted people who also care about the animals and will be thankful that you are giving the dogs they‟ve worked with a second chance at a new life. APA! volunteers and staff have been approached, numerous times, by kennel techs or other staff at TLAC and sincerely thanked for giving the dogs we‟re pulling a second chance. Remember, also, that shelter killing can become a very institutional mind-set; it can be hard for shelter directors to see that there are other options available to them because admitting that there is another adoption is to admit that you‟ve unnecessarily killed defenseless animals. However, from the very day you start working with your open-intake shelter they are your partner towards making your community a No-Kill community; any previous animosity needs to take a backseat to your new goal or it will impede your progress.

Selecting Dogs for Your Program Once you‟ve developed a relationship with an open-intake shelter it‟s time to start reviewing the dogs on the at-risk list and to start getting ready to pull your first dogs into your program. At APA! we have a Dog Rescue Team that evaluates every single dog on the at-risk list each day. These evaluations, which will be discussed in further detail in the Rescue Team presentations, help us to determine a dog‟s adoptability, current health status, the type of home that would be best for the dog, any potential issues of which we‟ll need to be aware


P a g e | 221 when seeking a new home for this dog and whether the dog is one that is a good fit for the APA! adoptions program.

Necessary Materials and Staff to Complete Your First Adoption Prior to beginning an adoptions program there are some materials and staff that will be necessary to get started. You don‟t need a large staff or a lot of fancy materials. To start you‟ll just need some basic materials and at least one staff member or even a dedicated volunteer who is willing to work a regular shift as a staff member would.

Set Your Adoption Fee Structure and Basic Rules One of the first things that you‟ll need to do is to determine what your organization‟s adoption fees and standards will be. Will you use one set fee for all dogs? Will you have some sort of sliding scale depending on age of the dog, health o the dog, and length of stay? What will your basic adoption standards be? Will you have basic requirements for adoption that all applicants must meet? Some common concerns with adoption standards are: Will you adopt to applicants under the age of 21? What type of proof regarding pet deposits, breed or weight restrictions etc. will you require from a landlord if a renter wishes to adopt? What sorts of circumstances will cause to deny an adoption?

Adoption Materials You‟ll need some basic adoption packets prepared before your first day of adoptions. A basic adoption packet at APA! includes an adoption application, a contract, a medical history sheet, and a basic take home instructions packet. We also have a series of additional handouts that we add to adoption packets depending on the individual dog and adoption circumstances. These additional handouts cover a wide range of issues, mostly related health and behavior, and they are all included in your materials. Your adoptions team would then discuss these handouts with the potential adopter and all relevant information is disclosed to the potential adopter prior to completing a contract. Other materials and items needed to complete an adoption are basic office supplies such as pens, twopocket folders to use as adoption folders, a few clipboards for adopters to use to fill out their applications, a folding table, and a couple of chairs that your counselor can sit at with potential adopters to discuss an application or complete an adoption. All of these items can be obtained without a great deal of expense to your organization. Folding tables and chairs are usually very easy to find at garage sales, on websites such as Freecycle or Craigslist, or even sitting in an unused corner in the basement of many homes. Folders, pens, and printing paper can be purchased in bulk. The greatest expense will be the printing of adoption packets – whether printed by your organization or through a local printshop. The materials provided are as brief as possible but it is necessary that they be several pages long so that all the relevant information to make for a successful adoption is included. Don‟t be afraid to ask local printshops or office supply stores for donations; the worst they can do is say no and if you don‟t ask you could lose out on a great opportunity! APA! has had success in having printing services donated by a local printshop.

At Least One Trained Adoption Counselor Finally, to complete your first adoption you‟ll need at least one trained adoption counselor. Generally, this is a staff member. However, APA! recently conducted a pilot program in training a few of our most


P a g e | 222 dependable volunteers to complete adoptions. The program was very successful and has now been expanded to an official volunteer team. This small but dedicated team of volunteer adoption counselors has been very helpful to APA! during busy adoption days; it allows us to complete more adoptions, have short or no wait times for adopters, and to have extra “staff” on hand without stressing the already limited budget of a small organization.

Basic Animal Care Items Required for Any Type of Adoption Site You‟ll need a few basic items to care for the dogs, even if you are conducting an in-shelter program where the dogs‟ primary care is not the responsibility of your organization. Dog walking supplies: leashes, collars, harnesses, and clean up bags. APA! prefers: sturdy nylon four foot leashes, a mixture of clip-end leashes and slip or kennel leads; a small supply of thin six foot drag leads; flat nylon collars and martingale collars; and standard harnesses for all small dogs and Easy-Walk harnesses for dogs undergoing leash training. It is APA! policy that all dogs under 25 lbs. and all dogs considered to be a flight risk wear a standard harness with a six foot thin drag lead at all times. Dogs who tend to pull while walking are outfitted with martingale collars and/or Easy-Walk harnesses. These items can generally be purchased in bulk through online warehouses (APA! uses PetEdge.com) for lower prices than you would find at other pet supply stores; also keep an eye out on sales and stock up when prices are reduced. Other supplies include: a variety of training style treats, clean up bags, and a well-stocked first aid kit that includes supplies to care for minor injuries to humans or dogs. The first aid kit should include (at minimum) some basic bandages, vet wrap, sunscreen safe for pets and people, antiseptic to clean wounds, saline to be used as an eye flush, and at least one adjustable Elizabethan collar. Be sure to check the first aid kit regularly to replenish used supplies and discard any expired supplies.

Record Keeping and Banking You‟ll need a few basic record keeping plans to begin an adoptions program. You‟ll need to decide if you want to use a software program to maintain your behavior, medical, and other records all in one place or if you‟d prefer to only keep physical files. You will also need bank accounts set up to deposit adoption fees, purchase supplies, deposit donations, and pay for staffing. APA! uses PetPoint software to maintain our files for each animal in our program. The software is relatively easy to navigate and accessible from anywhere with an internet connection, including on a smartphone. This software allows for APA! Staff and administration to share information across teams in a very effective manner. It also links to our website and allows for the dogs‟ biographical information and marketing photos/videos to be uploaded onto the website. APA! has also developed an accounting log used by all adoption counselors on a daily basis to track adoptions and donations at their respective sites. The accounting log is included in your electronic materials.

Training Your Staff and Adoptions Volunteers Overview The training required will depend on the protocols you have chosen. However, any training program should include both reviews of employee manuals and protocols in addition to hands-on training at an adoption site or event prior to going solo.


P a g e | 223 Training: Staff Adoption Counselors At APA! new staff adoption counselors are asked to come for a working interview prior to being hired. The potential new hire assists current counselors for several hours at site so that they can learn more about APA!, our mission, and get a true understanding of just how physically and mentally demanding the work of an adoption counselor can be. During that working interview the potential new hire will get to see: the adoption site itself, basic dog care, customer service in action, and any adoptions that take place. The working interviews generally last for either the first or second half of a shift so the potential hire will also see either sit set-up or site breakdown. If the working interview is successful and the candidate is hired, he or she is given an APA! Dog Counselor Handbook to review/learn and then completes a weekâ&#x20AC;&#x;s worth of training shifts. The APA! Dog Counselor Handbook is included in your electronic materials.

Training: Volunteer Adoption Counselors Volunteer adoption counselors are recruited from within our existing pool of experienced volunteers so they are already familiar with APA!, our mission, our general policies, and have usually seen at least one adoption take place. Prior to training, the volunteer counselors are given copies of the APA! Dog Counselor Handbook and other adoption protocol and then attend a training session with the Adoptions Manager and Volunteer Adoption Counselor leads. These one-time, in classroom training sessions usually last approximately two hours. At this training, the new counselors are given the chance to review some sample applications for red-flags or concerns; walked through an entire adoption process; each part of the application, contract, and take home packets are explained; and the volunteer counselor is given the opportunity to ask questions. Volunteer counselors are then expected to shadow a staff counselor or experienced volunteer counselor until they are comfortable completing an adoption on their own. How many adoptions the volunteer counselor shadows is determined on a case-by-case basis by the volunteer and the Adoptions Manager depending upon the volunteerâ&#x20AC;&#x;s experience, comfort levels, and needs. As a general rule, volunteer adoption counselors will not be asked or permitted to complete the adoption of any dog with special circumstances. For example, a dog with a lengthy behavior history or any bite history would be an adoption that a staff counselor must complete unless the volunteer counselor is specifically authorized to do so by the Adoptions Manager.

The Adoption Process Introduction Austin Pets Alive is committed to an open adoption policy. It is our job to help those seeking to rescue a companion animal find the one that is best suited for them. We use our knowledge of dogs in general and the personalities of specific dogs as talking points to help guide people to making the right decision and adopting the perfect pet for them. We are in a unique position to not only find homes for the thousands of homeless pets in our area, but also to help educate the public regarding responsible pet ownership. It is a requirement that all adoption counselors are courteous and respectful at all times when dealing with the public.


P a g e | 224 Adoption Fees APA!‟s base adoption fee is $150. However, fees are increased for dogs that have received extensive medical care while in our program. If dogs have been in APA!‟s care for an extended time period, are elderly, or have chronic health conditions we often reduce their adoption fees. However, for heartworm positive dogs we include heartworm treatment in the $150 fee. If the adoption fee (without treatment) would be lower than $150 the adopter would then have the choice whether to give the $150 fee and include treatment or to give the lower fee. If the adopter chooses to give the lower fee he must begin heartworm treatment with this dog within 30 days and provide proof to APA! that this has been done. Counselors should strongly encourage adopters to take advantage of the $150 treatment option; treatment at a private vet is substantially more costly, particularly for larger dogs. Currently, many vets have a waiting list for treatment due to a shortage of the Immiticide used for treatment. Also, if after discussion with the adopter the Counselor is concerned that the dog will not receive treatment with the adopter then the Counselor must discuss this with the Adoptions Manager prior to approving the application.

Application Protocols Prior to applying to adopt a dog, the potential adopter must spend time actually interacting with and getting to know the dog. For adult dogs, this means that the adopter must take the dog out for a walk in addition to meeting the dog in its ex-pen or kennel. We require a bare minimum of 30 minutes of interaction between the dog and adopter but would like to see a longer interaction period.

Counselor Role While the potential adopter interacts with a dog the counselor should observe the interaction and engage the adopter in conversation. The goal is to gain a perspective on the person‟s pet history, their family and lifestyle, why they want to adopt, what sort of pet they are looking for, and what sort of pet might be suitable for them. Whenever possible, the counselor should try to point the adopter to dogs that might be a good fit for them BEFORE they get attached to one specific dog. For example, if the adopter tells you they have children you‟d want to steer them away from any dogs that we know do not do well with children. APA! is always very open and upfront about the dogs in our program. We disclose health and behavior history, training needs or challenges, heartworm status etc. during our conversations with adopters. Our goal is that there are no surprises when adopting a dog from APA!, everything is laid out for the adopter prior to making a final adoption decision. We are incredibly honest but try to present information in a way that is not discouraging or off-putting. For example, as an unfortunate fact of life for dogs in Texas that were not on preventatives in their previous homes, the majority of the adult dogs in our program are heartworm positive. If an adopter isn‟t familiar with heartworm disease or heartworm treatment these are things that can sound scary or off-putting and could cause an adopter to choose not to adopt an adult dog or not to adopt this particular dog, even if he is a perfect fit for their lifestyle and they would be a great adoptive home. However, if you present the


P a g e | 225 information in an honest, but optimistic fashion, it is easier for the adopter to learn that heartworms are very common, are treatable, and are not a danger to their other pets or children.

Screening Applications and Red Flags When a person has decided that they are interested in adopting one of our dogs they must fill out an adoption application. The counselor should encourage the potential adopter to be as thorough as possible and to answer every question honestly. Once the application is completed, the counselor will review the application with the adopter. The counselor makes note of any red flags present on the adoption application and then further discusses those areas with the potential adopter. The counselor should ask probing, direct questions regarding areas of concern and make notes regarding the applicant‟s answer on the face of the application. Continue discussing the issue or area of concern until you have adequate information to understand the issue and make a fair determination of whether to approve the application or seek denial from the Adoptions Manager. Common Red Flags 1. History of outdoor only pets, desire to make APA dog an outdoor only dog, or desire to leave APA! dog unattended in the yard while the owner is not home or overnight. a. APA!, as a rule, doesn‟t adopt out dogs to be outdoor only dogs and also don‟t want APA! dogs to be left outdoors unattended. b. If someone is looking for an outdoor only dog we often know of dogs at TLAC that may be a better fit as an outdoor dog. In that instance, the counselor should get the applicant‟s name and email address; the Adoptions Manager will put the Rescue Manager in touch with the applicant so that she can point them in the direction of pets that may be more appropriate to their lifestyle. 2. History of surrendering pets to shelters or giving away pets. a. Many of the dogs in our program have been to several homes in their lives. Each of these changes is incredibly stressful for the dog so we want the home to which we adopt the dog to be the home in which he spends the rest of his life. b. The counselor should find out the individual situation of each pet given away or surrendered. 3. History of pets dying from neglect or lack of care. a. For example, we‟ve had applications where people‟s dogs died of heat stroke after being left outdoors in the desert or where wild animals killed people‟s dogs after they were left outdoors unattended in a rural area. b. The counselor should find out the individual situation and use this as a time to discuss best practices for pet care. 4. Current breeding activities. a. Use this as a way to discuss the merits of spay/neuter, the dangers of breeding and importance of responsible breeding. b. This alone is not an absolute bar to adoption. However, we would NOT pre-adopt out an unaltered pet to anyone with other unaltered pets in their home. c. If the applicant is otherwise a great home for the dog and wishes to adopt an unaltered animal please contact the Adoptions Manager; we‟ll need to put the dog into an APA! foster home until it is spayed or neutered rather than setting the adopter up as the foster. 5. Adoptions as a gift to someone else. a. We don‟t allow adoptions as a gift to someone else. However, we do offer gift certificates to sponsor an adoption the recipient would then need to come meet our dogs, select the dog that is best for their lifestyle, and complete the full application process. 6. History of physical reprimands/spanking or hitting dogs.


P a g e | 226

7.

8.

9.

10.

a. Use this as a time to discuss the merits of positive reinforcement based training. The counselor should find out what kinds of reprimands the APA! dog would be subject to in this home. APA! uses only positive, reinforcement based training. Desire to adopt multiple dogs at one time. a. We generally do not adopt out multiple dogs, especially puppy littermates, out together. If someone wants to adopt two dogs at once discuss with them potential problems that can arise from adopting two dogs at once such as the dog focusing more on its littermate than the owner and thus lacking incentive to bond with or listen to the owner and the possibility that the littermates may not enjoy each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x;s company as they grow up. b. There are some situations in which we make exceptions to this rule. Most commonly this would be older, bonded dogs who have come into our program together or become incredibly bonded while in our program. However, this would need to be approved by the Adoption Manager. Adopter under 21 or adopter that lives with or is supported by parents. a. Discuss with young adopters the many years of commitment that come with adopting a dog, talk about changing life plans at that age, and if the applicant is reliant on parents for support (financially or they live with them) call the parents. Renters a. Renting is not a bar to adoption by any means. However, especially when the applicant seeks to adopt a bully breed, it is recommended that they seek landlord approval prior to adoption. Adoption by anyone under the age of 18. a. Legally, an applicant under 18 cannot execute a contract and thus cannot adopt.

Denying an Application If you have reviewed an application, had a detailed discussion regarding all red flags or areas of concern, and believe that this is not a good home for the dog in question then the Counselor MUST discuss this with the manager on duty, adoptions manager, or dog program manager prior to denying an adoption. Complete denials are somewhat rare in the APA! program, often rather than a complete denial we are able to either re-educate the applicant so that they can address the area of concern or are able to steer them towards a more appropriate dog in our program. However, counselors should be prepared that if they do receive approval to deny an adoption the applicant will not be pleased. Try to avoid a scene, stay calm, and always remain respectful of the customer. If the customer becomes violent or threatening politely ask the customer to leave and/or call 911. If the applicant isnâ&#x20AC;&#x;t a home appropriate for an APA! dog but could be a good home for a different dog (i.e.: wants a working dog or outdoor ranch dog), point them towards the local open intake shelter; there may be dogs more appropriate for their lifestyle there.

After Approval: The Contract and Basic Take Home Packet If the application is approved, the adopter must then fill out an adoption contract. It is imperative that the contract be legible; if the counselor has noticed that the applicant has messy handwriting then the counselor should fill out the areas of the contract for the adopterâ&#x20AC;&#x;s contact information. The contract MUST have an email address for the adopter; this is how APA! stays in touch with adopters, sends medical records to the adopter, sends microchip information to the adopter; and sends health insurance information to the adopter. If your adopter does not use email (often an elderly adopter) please ask for the email address of their closest relative or friend.


P a g e | 227 The adopter him or herself must always be the one to initial and sign the contract. Fill out every section of the contract but DO NOT initial the contract terms or sign the contract until the entire Basic Take Home Packet is reviewed and the adoption is complete. The Basic Take Home Packet includes all the information that APA! has found is needed for a successful adoption including medical history, vaccine information and due dates, basic training information, and steps to ease the transition into a new home. Go through every page and review all the information with the adopter. Be sure to answer any questions that come up and explain all information until the Counselor is confident that the adopter fully understands all important points and factors about taking this dog home. When the Basic Take Home packet is completed there are two checklists on the back. One is for the adoption counselor to ensure that they have made all proper disclosures. The other is for the adopter to make sure they understand all of the discussed areas. Counselor and adopter should go through the two checklists together before signing at the bottom of the checklists. Check to see if there are any extra handouts that may be relevant to this particular dog. We have handouts on a variety of subjects including common health and behavior issues. Check the dog‟s folder to see if there are any additional handouts and go over them as thoroughly as the Basic Take Home Instructions. If you feel an additional handout should be in the file but isn‟t please pull an extra out of your Adoptions Kit and review it with the adopter. If you are working an adoption site at a PetSmart there is an additional PetSmart form which allows your organization to benefit from the PetSmart charities program.

Additions to the Contract If there are any additional clauses that need to be added to the contract the Counselor should add them and have the adopter initial them. APA! believes that full disclosure makes for more successful adoptions, happier dogs in new homes, and happier adopters. So, we lay all the cards out for adopters before a final adoption decision is made. A great rule of thumb is: When in doubt, disclose! You will never regret disclosing relevant information to potential adopters but you would definitely regret failing to do so. Then, anything outside of the norm that we have disclosed we add as an additional clause on the contract. A common APA! disclosure is our “Shark Tank” Disclosure. The APA! Shark Tank is a behavior modification/rehabilitation program for small dogs with bite histories. When adopting out a small dog with a bite history we have created a contract addendum with relevant information to tiny biters who are working on rehabilitation of these behaviors. Then, on the contract we add the clause “I have read and understand the Small Dog Bite History Addendum. I agree to the terms contained therein.” The adopter would then initial that clause.

Special Circumstances: Pre-Adopts, Dogs Requiring Surgery or with Chronic Health Issues Pre-Adoptions You need to determine if you will allow pre-adoptions of unaltered dogs. At APA! we allow pre-adopts but set the new adopter up as the dog‟s foster parent. APA! retains ownership of the dog and is responsible for the dog‟s care until the neuter is completed. The adoption fee is due at the time of the pre-adopt. If the


P a g e | 228 pre-adopt occurs during a reduced or no fee adoption event we require a $100 pre-adoption deposit that is returned to the adopter on the day of surgery. If there is ANY concern that the adopter will not bring the dog back for surgery or if the adopter has any unaltered pets in their home then the dog cannot go home with them as a pre-adopt. If the adopter is otherwise a great home, we can complete the pre-adoption but will put the dog in an APA! foster home until surgery. Chronic Health Issues Sometimes, if a dog suffers from a chronic health issue that will require continued care and an adopter who will be a perfect home for this pet is concerned about the cost of care for this issue, APA! will offer to assist the adopter with vet care related to that issue. The adopter would still be responsible for all routine vet care such as vaccines and preventative medications as well as any unrelated illnesses or injuries. But APA! can help the adopter to order maintenance medications at a reduced cost over a private vet etc. This would need to be approved by the Adoption Manager and Health Director or Lead Veterinarian. At APA! any such requests must be approved by the Adoptions Manager and Dr. Jefferson.

Special Circumstances: Heartworm Positive Dogs For heartworm positive dogs we include heartworm treatment in the $150 adoption fee. If the adoption fee (without treatment) would be lower than $150 the adopter would then have the choice whether to give the $150 fee and include treatment or to give the lower fee. If the adopter chooses to give the lower fee he must begin heartworm treatment with this dog within 30 days of adoption and provide proof to APA! that this has been done. Counselors should make clear the dire consequences of failure to provide treatment and strongly encourage adopters to take advantage of the $150 treatment option. Treatment at a private vet is substantially more costly, particularly for larger dogs. Also, many vets currently have a waiting list for treatment due to a shortage of the Immiticide used for treatment. If after discussion with the adopter the Counselor is concerned that the dog will not receive treatment with the adopter then the Counselor must discuss this with the Adoptions Manager prior to approving the application. An addition should be made to the contract for heartworm positive dogs. Depending on the adopter‟s choice it would read either “Heartworm positive dog. Fee is $150 with Treatment at APA!” or “Heartworm positive dog. I decline treatment through APA! and agree to have the dog treated at my own vet, at my own expense within 30 days. I understand that if not treated, heartworm disease can be fatal. I understand that treatment is mandatory and agree to submit proof of treatment to APA!”

Handling Returns APA! operates on an open adoption policy. If for any reason an adoption is not working out we require that the dog come back to APA!, even if the adoption took place several years ago.


P a g e | 229 Every APA! Adoption packet includes information related to returns and our dog adoption counselors discuss returns during the adoption process to ensure that adopters are aware that the dog would need to come back to APA! All APA! Adoption paperwork includes the contact information for the Adopt-Line team, who handle the logistics and scheduling of returns. Of course, we want to prevent returns before they happen so we tell all adopters to get in touch with us at the first sign of an issue so that we can offer support such as behavior advice, trainer or vet referrals, or vet care through our APA! medical team to the keep the dog in its adoptive home.

Overview: Three Types of Adoption Programs Overview There are three types of adoption programs that APA! uses in order to save as many lives as possible from local kill shelters. These models have helped APA! to develop a high-quality but high-volume dog adoptions program and to save thousands of lives thus far. You can start saving lives as soon as you return home, even without your own shelter building in which to house dogs or an established foster network to house dogs. An in-shelter program is a perfect first step to saving some lives. Then, as your organization develops you can grow into off-site adoptions and on-site adoptions.

In Shelter Adoptions Goals and Purpose When you are starting out, an in-shelter program is a great way to begin saving lives without yet having anywhere to house dogs overnight (your own building or foster homes) or any partners for off-site adoptions. Then, as your city reaches no-kill status (>90% live outcome) you can use an in-shelter program to save those few adoptable dogs who are still being killed each month but that you cannot pull into your program for whatever reason. An in-shelter program will give you the opportunity to market at risk dogs in one of two ways: Taking dogs from the at-risk list to off-site adoption events if you have off-site space available and working on-site at the kill shelter for adoptions to get dogs directly out of the shelter and off of the kill list. APA has conducted both types of programs through a partnership with Town Lake Animal Center, the City of Austin‟s open intake shelter.

Logistics of Working Within the Shelter System: APA @ TLAC The APA @ TLAC program is a program by which APA! has an adoption counselor located at our openintake shelter every day. That counselor is dedicated to adopting out dogs on TLAC‟s at-risk list from directly within the shelter without them first being pulled to APA!‟s adoption building or a foster home. This program was developed through a collaboration with the TLAC director and staff and on its very first day was responsible for two long-stay death row dogs leaving the shelter alive with happy and loving families! Obviously, this type of program can only occur with the consent and support of your local open-intake shelter. You‟ll need permission to have a staff member at the shelter every day, permission to interact with


P a g e | 230 the dogs, permission to hang signage on certain kennels, permission to speak with the public, and permission to adopt the dogs out through your program rather than through the shelter itself. You will need to develop a strong working relationship based on mutual respect and understanding to successfully work from inside the city shelter to adopt out dogs on death row. Dogs on death row that are adoptable will be identified by the Dog Rescue Team and selected for this program by the Dog Rescue Manager

Benefits of an In-Shelter Program The most immediate benefit of an in-shelter program is that with this type of adoption program the shelter itself remains responsible for the housing and daily care of the dogs. This is a great option for a newly formed organization that has not yet developed the resources to provide routine medical care, housing etc. for the dogs. There is little start up cost for a program such as the APA! @ TLAC program because you do not need supplies such as ex-pens, crates, storage for food/treats, transport vehicles, housing for the dogs etc. These things are all provided by the shelter. Your start up costs would include adoption packets, staffing, some signage for the kennels, and some form of identification for the staff (APA! staff wear APA! t-shirts and name badges).

Daily In Shelter Schedule In Austin, the shelter opens at 11:30AM every day. APA! Staff report directly to TLAC at 10AM to prepare for the day and work with the dogs. From 10AM to 11:30AM the APA! staff member works with the dogs, updates signage, updates their notes on the dogs, and gets to know any new dogs in the program. Starting at 11:30AM when the public begins arriving at the shelter the APA! staff memberâ&#x20AC;&#x;s focus switches to providing customer service to everyone in the area of the APA! @ TLAC kennels, introducing dogs to their potential adopters, and completing adoptions as necessary. During times of inclement weather or slow traffic the APA! @ TLAC staff member works the dogs through basic obedience skills such as loose-leash walking, calm entry/exit from a kennel, and focus on the handler to increase adoptability. At the end of the day the APA! staff member goes to the APA! Building to prepare night accounting logs, an end of day report, and to submit any adoption paperwork as we would for any other adoption site.

Individualized Customer Service APA! Staff talk to every potential adopter that walks through the area where our kennels are located and talk to them about our dogs to provide individualized customer service, which experience has shown works very well to increase adopter confidence and adoption numbers. There is no such thing as just browsing! On the first day of the APA! @ TLAC program the APA! staff members noticed a young couple who said they were just browsing. We persisted and spoke to them a bit to get a sense for their lifestyle. During that conversation it quickly became apparent that Atticus, or Kennel 167 as he was known to TLAC staff, would be a great match for this active, energetic couple. We sent them on a walk with Atticus; they fell in love and ended up spending a couple hours with him getting to know him and talking about adopting him. Atticus, a big black pittie with very high energy levels and demanding


P a g e | 231 exercise requirements, ended up being the very first dog adopted as a part of the APA @ TLAC program. The individualized customer service worked and a life was saved!

In Shelter Adoptions If a potential adopter decides they‟d like to adopt one of the APA! @ TLAC dogs, the dog is outcomed to APA! by the shelter. APA! then completes the adoption using the standard APA! adoption procedures and packet. We do match our donation fees to the TLAC fees, with the exception of heartworm position dogs that will be treated at APA! The adoption fee and any additional donations are paid directly to APA!

Off-Site Adoptions of Shelter Dogs Once you have set up a structure for off-site adoptions by partnering with an off-site location, gathering necessary supplies (discussed below), and purchasing transport vehicles you can expand your in-shelter program to include off-site adoptions. This type of program is a model developed by our Adoptions Manager while working at a previous rescue group and is how APA! started to conduct off-site adoptions before having anywhere to house dogs ourselves. If you are going to conduct off-site adoptions of shelter dogs you‟ll need to develop a structure to determine when the dogs will be picked up, who will be allowed access to the dogs, how the dogs will be scheduled to attend the off-site event, and when the dogs will be returned at the end of the day. When APA! was running this type of program we picked dogs up from the open-intake shelter before it opened each morning and returned them after the shelter closed each evening. We had a dedicated bank of kennels in an area to which our staff had keyed access. Detailed information relating to how APA! picked up the dogs from TLAC, who was permitted to handle the dogs, and how APA! returned the dogs who had not been adopted to TLAC in the evening is included in the Dog Adoption Counselor Handbook.

Off-Site Adoptions Benefits of Off-Site Adoptions There are several benefits to an off-site adoption program. First, you‟re able to conduct adoptions without having a facility. This is a huge benefit for start up groups and is how APA! operated until we began renting our current building in Summer 2010. Off-site adoptions will also raise your group‟s presence in the community. Your staff, volunteers, and dogs will be seen all over town at various sites. That‟s excellent, free publicity. Finally, the APA! Adoption Sites are where the majority of our donations come from; kind people walking past a few ex-pens of cute dogs and a dedicated counselor who choose to drop a few dollars in one of the several donation jars at each site.

Off-Site Logistics: Selecting and Approaching a Partner When we are scouting off-site adoption partners we first look at the demographics of the selected neighborhood to determine if this is an area that would be a good fit for our program. We also examine the cleanliness and organization of the store. We prefer to work with stores and partners that are clean, well organized and have a great staff! These are stores at which the customers will be happier and therefore much more likely to adopt or give us donations.


P a g e | 232 When we‟ve scouted a potential partner we then visit that site several times to get a sense of the traffic through the store, where the best place for us to set up our equipment would be, and whether this is a site with adequate traffic for adoptions and donations. Once we‟ve decided to work with a partner we will request a meeting with the store manager or property manager to come to an agreement as to our location, hours etc. To that meeting you‟d want to bring your 501(c)(3) forms, statistics related to adoptions, some examples of success stories, and all program information. Finally, be sure that you are ready to start operating at the new site THAT day – have your materials, staffing etc. already in place.

Prior to Opening Sites Before your first day at an off-site location you need to have at least one trained adoption counselor per site. You‟ll also need to determine which dogs are going to each site. When you are a smaller organization with few dogs and even fewer staff members these can be easier choices. But, as your organization grows you‟ll need to be more mindful of the mix of dogs you are sending to each site. For example, it might not be a good idea to send two boredom barkers to a site together; they‟ll probably bark at each other all day, upsetting the other dogs, annoying the public, and stressing out your counselor. Finally, you need to determine how many dogs you want to send to each site. To each site we generally send two larger dogs, one to two medium dogs, one to small dogs and two to six puppies. We aim to have a good mix of colors, breeds, sizes, coat types, and ages at each site. Generally, APA! sites operate at least six ex-pens of dogs at each site. This could be six individual adult dogs, a few pens of dogs who are adults but bonded partners, or could include one or more litters of puppies. For larger litters (5+) or litters of highly desirable puppies (i.e.: purebreds) we try to split them into smaller groups and send them to several different sites.

Supplies Needed These are some basic supplies needed to run your first off-site adoption event. This is a list of the basics; you may find that you need more items or different items but this is what has worked for APA!

Safety or Sanitation Supplies Bleach and hand sanitizer are your best friends at an adoption site. You‟ll need at least one bottle of bleach and at least one large bottle of hand sanitizer to keep with your supplies in addition to one small bottle of hand sanitizer for each ex-pen. You will also need antibacterial soap, sunscreen, and a first aid kit stocked with items for dogs and humans. We use large Tupperware bins at site as basins in which we can sanitize items or even bathe a dog. Finally, every site should be equipped with items necessary to break up a dog fight should one happen. At APA! we supply each counselor with an air horn and citronella spray.

Basic Dog Care Items Basic dog care items are largely similar to the items you would need for an in-shelter program. However, you will also need water or access to water (Yes you can run an adoption site without running water!!), food


P a g e | 233 and water bowls, linens/bedding for the dogs, and grooming items such as nail clippers, brushes, and shampoo. If your site does not have access to running water youâ&#x20AC;&#x;ll want to be sure that your counselor brings enough water for drinking and cleaning each day. APA! has run several sites without running water

Adoptions Materials You will need your standard adoption packets, some extra blank packets and additional handouts for specific topics, your folding table/chairs, and writing utensils. APA! also recommends that at least one large donations jar and three small donations jars be included in every adoption site to remind people that we are a small organization, we do run on donations, and we are appreciative when they are given.

Dog Containment First, you will need a secure method in which to transport dogs to the off-site. APA! uses transport vans with the seats removed that are then safely stacked with crates to transport the dogs. Dogs always ride in crates. You can also have volunteers transport dogs in their private vehicles if you do not yet have transport vehicles. The vehicles need to be in good working condition and have climate controls that work very well. You will also need one ex-pen per adult dogs, zip ties to secure pens, and crates.

Weather Related Items Tents or sunshades to shield dogs from blistering sun or light rain. Ice, misters, and fans for hot summer days. Blankets or sweaters for colder days.

Pre-Site Checklist The List Each day on our website, we publish a list of where every dog will be that day. This allows the public to find their favorite dog and come to meet him. The list also helps us to ensure that we are sending a good mix of dogs to a site. The list is compiled late at night or early in the morning by the Dog Adoptions Manager and the two Assistant Dog Adoptions Managers.

Preventative Medications Before going to site each day, APA! staff adoption counselors administer basic preventative medications or vaccines due for the dogs in their care that day. These preventatives include dewormers, heartworm prevention, and flea/tick prevention. These basic vaccines (DHLPP and Bordatella) and preventatives are discussed in further detail both in the Dog Adoption Counselor Handbook as well as in the presentation regarding shelter medicine. The adoption counselors administering these preventatives rather than taking the dogs to the medical clinic allows the medical staff to conserve their limited time and resources for those patients who are more critically ill or injured or those that need a thorough exam such as an annual exam prior to a Rabies vaccine.

Organizing Files and Supplies At APA! the two lead counselors for the day (the on-site counselors) arrive before the off-site counselors and organize the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x;s files. First the files are checked for updated medical and behavior information from our


P a g e | 234 file management software, Pet Point. The files are then organized by site, ready to be picked up by the offsite counselors on their way out the door. These files also contain the dogâ&#x20AC;&#x;s adoption packet. Each off-site counselor also keeps a site kit with them every day that has extra adoption packets, APA! materials, and office supplies.

Loading Dogs If you have a central location at which the dogs are housed and then transported to sites each day it is important to have protocols in place to ensure that the dogs remain safe in the vehicle during loading/unloading at the start and end of each day. In Austin, the main concern is keeping the vehicle cool during high temperatures. Each APA! transport vehicle is outfitted with an alarm that sounds if the temperature in the transport vehicle raises above a set temperature. Staff Counselors also need to check on their vans every 5-10 minutes to ensure that a comfortable, safe temperature is maintained.

Daily Off-Site Schedule Counselorsâ&#x20AC;&#x; shifts start at 10AM. They arrive at APA, gather their files and supplies, walk their dogs for the day, and then load them into temperature controlled transport vehicles. They then leave for site at approximately 10:30-10:45AM. Site should be set up by 12PM and dogs fed/medicated. Evening meal and medication happens at 6PM followed by site breakdown and return to APA. Please be sure to place each dog in the same crate that they were in for the morning transport. Upon returning to APA the dogs are walked again and put into their overnight kennels. Counselors then clean out their vans, sanitize crates for 10 minutes with a 1:30 bleach/water solution, gather dirty laundry, and restock van with supplies (blankets, food etc.) for the next day. Deposits are prepared, adoption log, and end of the day email completed prior to the end of the shift at 8PM. The dogs will be walked again between 8PM and 10PM by the Volunteer Walking Team.

Site Logistics Depending on the preferences of your adoption site partner you may be setting up indoors or outdoors. At APA! we set up outdoors when the weather is safe to do so and indoors when it is too hot outside. Keep in mind, when setting up ex-pens, that they should all be at least 6 feet apart from each other to prevent the spread of communicable diseases such as Upper Respiratory Infections.

Sanitation and Set Up Each day the entire area where dogs will be set up needs to be sanitized prior to setting up or putting any dogs out. We sanitize dog bowls, ex-pens, leashes, and hard toys in a 1:30 bleach/water solution and allow 10 minutes contact time. Bowls, leashes, and toys can be sanitized in a Tupperware bin used as a basin. The ex-pens can be set up and then sprayed with a 1:30 bleach/water solution. Also spray the ground where the ex-pens will be to kill any germs on the sidewalk or ground, especially in areas where young puppies will be. Once the site is sanitized, get the dogs out of their crates one at a time and allow them to go to the bathroom before putting them into their ex-pens. Obviously, clean up any feces.


P a g e | 235 Hang smaller donation jars and small bottles of hand sanitizer on ex-pens. Don‟t forget to hang the dogs‟ kennel cards or nametags on their pens, and give each dog some bedding and toys. Once site is set up provide the dogs with food and water and then administer daily medications.

Managing the Site Daily Dog Care Throughout the day we give the dogs short walks for bathroom breaks while still maintaining control of the site. If it is slow, we work on basic obedience skills with the dogs and also groom the dogs by bathing them (weather permitting) or trimming their nails. You should also have a bucket or trashcan nearby, but out of sight, for used clean up bags. When a dog goes to the bathroom immediately clean up all feces and discard appropriately.

Managing the Dogs‟ Behavior While at Site If two dogs are barking at each other you can put a visual barrier such as a sheet or shade between the dogs. If that doesn‟t work you can re-sanitize and swap out ex-pens to put a non-reactive dog between the two barkers. You can also give the dogs chew toys to keep them occupied; however be mindful of whether you have any resource guarders at your site. Do not give chew toys to resource guarders. If a dog is trying to climb out of or escape its pen you should first put a drag lead on the dog so that if it does get out you can catch it more easily. Next, zip-tie a lid onto the dog‟s ex-pen so that the dog cannot climb over the fence.

Managing the Public We want the public to interact with the dogs, take them for walks, and get to know them! It‟s the best way to determine if that dog would be a good fit to become a new member of their family. However, please remind visitors to sanitize their hands before and after each kennel. If someone wants to walk a dog, please get the dog out for them to avoid escapes and take their keys or other valuable item (driver‟s license) while they walk the dog.

On-Site Adoptions Introduction Once you have the resources to rent or purchase a central shelter location some new challenges will arise. You‟ll be able to save more lives (!!) but some of those dogs will be more behaviorally challenged than the typical dog that you‟d been pulling up to that point from the open-intake shelter. You can also expect there to be increased traffic at that location and also a higher number of dogs at on-site adoption events.

Behaviorally Challenged Dogs As you move closer and closer to No-Kill status you can expect that some of the dogs you will be pulling will have more behavior challenges than those you were pulling when you first began your journey towards making your city No-Kill. These aren‟t bad dogs or unadoptable dogs but they may have some issues such as reactivity or escaping.


P a g e | 236 It will be imperative that you set structures in place at your shelter to keep these dogs safe, to work towards improving that behavior, and finding a new home. Specific protocols for behavior management will be discussed in Ariana Gum‟s materials and presentation.

More Dogs, Only Two Counselors At APA!‟s shelter space we generally have approximately 40 dogs that need to stay on-site each day rather than going out to site. To care for those dogs we have two on-site counselors, one behavior manager, and one adoptions manager on-site at any given time. The adoption counselors are responsible for the direct care of the dogs and the adoptions. The moral of the story? Rely on your volunteer force!!

On Site Schedule The two on-site counselors arrive at 7AM to get organized for the day, get the dogs into playgroup or their outdoor kennels, and get the files ready for the other counselors to bring to site. The dogs are walked and moved outside starting at 7AM by both the adoption counselors and the volunteer dog walking team. The counselors are also responsible for walking any dog that is labeled as a “staff only” dog. The dogs are given water immediately upon being moved outside, are fed at 10AM, and are given breakfast and morning medications shortly thereafter. On-site dogs are fed again and moved indoors for the night at around 6PM. For the rest of the day, the counselors remain with the dogs in the outdoor kennel areas to talk to the public, introduce them to dogs, make sure dogs get out for bathroom breaks, and conduct adoptions.

Emergency Situations Foul Weather You need to develop a plan, in advance, for how to deal with foul weather so there is no confusion when the issue arises. At APA! the Adoptions Manager or Dog Program Manager can make the call to close a site early due to bad weather. If a site is closed early, the dogs are brought back to the APA! building and remain there for the rest of the day. The off-site counselor will stay on-site for the rest of their shift to help care for the dogs.

Stolen Dog If a dog is stolen make note of the person‟s description, vehicle they are driving, license plate number, and direction of travel. Call 911 to report the theft. Give the police the suspect‟s description and the dog‟s description. Call the Dog Adoptions Manager to alert her to the situation and await further instructions. Most importantly – keep yourself and the other dogs safe. Do not confront a violent person or a person with a weapon.

Stolen Donations Jar Treat this situation as you would a stolen dog. Most importantly keep yourself and the other dogs safe. Donations can be replaced; you cannot.


P a g e | 237 Loose or Escaped Dog If You Are Alone At Site If you are alone at site, call the dog adoptions manager immediately and watch the direction in which the dog has fled. While keeping your site under control try to coax the dog back with treats, sweet talking, and praise. Stay low to the ground and use soft, gentle tones rather than scared or excited tones. Do not yell or run after the dog, he will run further and faster away from you. You can try traveling the opposite direction of the dog, sometimes he will follow you or try to throw some treats in the transport vehicle or another ex-pen; sometimes the dog will go to the treats and you can then secure the dog.

If You Have Help Have your helper call the Adoptions Manager. Grab some treats and a leash and follow the dog. If you know the dog, drop low to the ground and try to coax the dog back to you. Call the dog, sweet talk the dog, toss treats towards the dog in a little treat-trail back to you and attempt to calmly capture the dog. Try to never run after a dog, particularly towards a road. The dog will think it‟s a game and will run faster away from you. However, if the dog is already in full flight run after him trying to keep him in sight. Take your phone with you so you can update your helpers and the Adoptions manager.

If You Don‟t Immediately Catch the Dog If you do not quickly catch the dog, have flyers made, call in support for a search party, and go door to door with flyers. Do not give up! APA! has recovered dogs after a week on the run. Just keep looking.

Sick Dog Handling sick dogs is a regular part of holding a job with any rescue group. It is paramount that counselors are able to identify basic diseases that are common in animal shelters. Identifying these diseases at their earliest stages can quite literally save the lives of many, many animals. Each instance of illness should be handled as a "worst-case scenario" and counselors should take every precaution to prevent contamination from one dog to another. Reporting each and every symptom of illness to the medical team is crucial. Many diseases begin with innocuous symptoms that can quickly escalate, resulting in a disastrous situation within a shelter environment. Those who handle the dogs each day are best equipped to identify symptoms at an early stage and it is expected that each adoption counselor will be on constant lookout for disease symptoms. If you have concerns that one of the dogs at your site is sick immediately separate the dog from the other dogs. Put it in an X pen at least 4 feet away from the rest. Contact your medical team to relay the symptoms and seek instructions. Make the dog comfortable, observe eating/drinking patterns and stool characteristics. Check gum color and skin turgidity. If possible, take the dog's temperature. If the dog is eating, drinking, active: Alert your on-duty manager of the dog‟s condition, make him as comfortable as possible, and keep him separated from other dogs for the rest of the day.


P a g e | 238 If the dog is not eating and drinking, or is lethargic: Call your on-duty manager and await instructions regarding the dog being picked up from site or seeking emergency medical treatment.

Dog Fight Most importantly: STAY CALM!! The more scared or upset you are the harder it will be to break up the fight and the more likely it is that you will get bitten in the process. First, safely break up the fight. Try not to grab at the dogs‟ collars. Grabbing a collar during a fight makes it much more likely that you‟ll receive a redirection bite. Instead, sound your air horn, use your citronella spray aimed at the dogs‟ noses, or spray water on the dogs to get them to separate. The dogs should focus on the discomfort of the loud noise, cold water, or citronella spray long enough for you to break up the fight. Next, separate the dogs, secure them, and administer basic first aid as needed. Clean up all scrapes and scratches with Chlor-Hex solution or antibacterial soap and warm water. Alert the dog adoptions manager on call and the behavior manager. If there are any punctures, clean them thoroughly. If there are serious wounds that will not stop bleeding and you are off-site at a Petsmart, go into the Banfield and ask for help. If you are not at a site with a Banfield clinic please call the adoptions manager back and arrange for the injured dog to be picked up and taken immediately to see a veterinarian. If you are bitten while breaking up a fight: Separate the dogs, secure them, attend to your own wounds, and then attend to the dogs.

Bites Happen: How to Deal with Them First, safely return the dog to his ex-pen and separate the dog from the public by putting a lid on the ex-pen and writing DO NOT TOUCH on the dog‟s kennel board. The dog should not be handled by the public or volunteers for the rest of the day. If the dog bit a volunteer or a member of the public you need to get their full contact information and have them write down what happened. If a child was bitten you need the child and parent‟s information. Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and warm water. If the skin was not broken no further medical attention is required. If the skin was broken, check to see if it is a puncture wound or a scratch. If it is a puncture wound you should seek medical attention to avoid infection. If it s a scratch would it is usually sufficient to keep the area clean and watch for signs of infection such as redness or swelling. If the wound is serious and will not stop bleeding, call 911. If you are alone at site call the dog adoptions manager and dog behavior manager to have someone come cover your site while you go to Urgent Care for medical attention. ALL bites, regardless of whether they break the skin, must be reported to the Adoptions Manager and Behavior Manager. A bite is a learning opportunity. It tells us something new about the dog‟s behavior, something we need to work on with the dog, and also may tell us what type of home is appropriate for the dog. For example, if we find out through a bite that a dog is a resource guarder it tells us that 1) We need to work with this dog on safely relinquishing resources, and 2) this dog may not be appropriate for a home with young children. Failure to report a bite makes it much more likely that the dog will be adopted without full disclosure to the adopter, that it will not be a successful placement, and you have opened your organization up to unnecessary liability. Failure to report a bite will result in immediate corrective action.


P a g e | 239

Adoptions Materials Included in Your Electronic Files APA! Dog Counselor Handbook APA! Factors to Consider Before Adoption APA! Medical Sheet APA! Adoption Application APA! Adoption Contract APA! Basic Take Home Instructions APA! Unaltered Dog Adoption Protocol APA! @ TLAC Protocols APA! Accounting Log APA! Bite Protocol APA! End of Day email (sample) APA! Owner Surrender Form APA! Sample Dog List APA! New Hire Forms APA! New Hire Training Forms (Days 1 through 3) APA! Preventative Meds Administered by Counselors APA! Foster Dogs at Site Protocol APA! Small Breed Dog Protocol APA! HQ Morning Checklist APA! Protocol for Dogs to Attend Off-Site Events/Fundraisers APA! Customer Service Protocol Heartworm Treatment at APA! APA! Pre-Surgery Instructions APA! Adoption Protocol for Behavior Dogs APA! Disease Sheets


P a g e | 240 APA! Customer Service Expectations of Staff APA! Heartworm Positive Adopter Expectations APA! Dog Adoption Fee Schedule APA! Donations Needed APA! Sanitizer Signs APA! Wish List APA! On-Site Evening Checklist APA! HQ to Foster Checkout APA! Small Dog Addendum


P a g e | 241

Dog Foster Program Getting Started Prior to starting your foster program you will need the following materials, protocols and people in place: A foster application & agreement/release form Initial core group of foster parents to start program The means to communicate your foster needs to those foster parents A system to track the dogs in your program Resource materials, guidelines or handbook for foster parents to follow A protocol for foster parents to pick up their foster dogs The means to provide medical care including: Spay/neuter, vaccination, deworming, heartworm testing and microchipping.  A system to provide support to foster parents to assist with questions, crises and concerns  A system or process for the adoption of foster dogs.       

Foster Application & Release The application needs to provide basic demographic and contact information as well as information on living arrangements and other pets in the household. It should gather enough information so your screeners don‟t have to ask for too much additional information, and yet not be too intimidating or time consuming for the applicant. We started out with a paper application (see attachment #2) but a web based application is ideal.

We initially started with a paper release that was done for every dog that was placed (see attachment #4); however, we later combined this with the application. This enabled us to ensure that every foster parent had seen and agreed to the terms by virtue of having completed the application.


P a g e | 242

Initial Fosters It‟s important to have a beginning base of foster parent volunteers before you begin pulling dogs. You will continue to add to this core group but you have to have some people on board to help with those first dogs. These may be friends, neighbors or just other people in the community who have the same desire to save these animals.

Communication As the Rescue team begins to send requests for foster to you, you must have the means to convey these needs to your foster parents. We use a Yahoo group but you could start with any basic e-mail distribution list of your foster parents.

The foster pleas should include as much information as possible about the dog. Following is a list of some of the information you will need from your rescue team:        

Kennel # or animal ID#, if applicable Does the dog have a name? How long and why the dog needs foster? How soon the dog needs to be picked up? Does the dog need a medical assessment? Any noted illnesses, aggression or reactivity, fear level, etc.? Do you need to contact Rescue before sending the foster to the shelter. Include a photo if possible


P a g e | 243 It‟s important to be honest about any potential issues. Although, it may be appropriate to post general information and then discuss specific concerns when someone comes forward to foster. It‟s a matter of finding balance between not scaring people off and not wasting your time responding to inquiries from people who are not appropriate for this dog. When someone responds to the plea you need to evaluate whether or not this is an appropriate placement. Some questions to ask include:     

Do they have other foster dogs/cats in their house? Do they have their own dogs/cats? If so, are they current on vaccines? Do they have small children? Do they have the ability to keep the foster pet separate from their own pets?

As tempting as it is to send the dog to anyone who responds, it‟s very important that you take care with the initial match. You don‟t want to endanger a foster or give them a bad experience by placing a dog that is not appropriate for their home. For example we will not place small, fearful dogs in foster homes with small children. There is just too great a risk for a bite. See attachment #12 (DF Placement Process for more details).


P a g e | 244

Tracking foster dogs We use Petpoint as our official dog tracking system. However, we created a simple Google spreadsheet to track the dogs that are currently in the system. The spreadsheet can be edited by key team members and viewed by other APA teams. It allows the entire team to view and track the progress of the dog through foster care. Basic demographics, status of medical care and adoption activities are readily available to all.

Resource Materials We started with a foster handbook http://volunteer.austinpetsalive.org/Dog-Foster-Care-Handbook.html that had a lot of good information about dog care; however, we developed most of our processes and protocols as we went along. We also realized that most of our foster parents did not take the time to read our handbook so we developed a series of correspondence designed to send to them at the time they needed the information. Copies of this correspondence are available in the attachments section.

External Protocols The protocols that needed to be developed immediately have to do with external entities. It‟s critical that any agreements that you have with other organizations are conveyed to your foster parents. This avoids misunderstandings, confusion and frustration for your foster parents and the other organizations. An example of that is the “Protocol for picking up dogs from TLAC (attachment #14). Initially we contracted with another organization for our spay/neuters so we had specific guidelines for this interaction too.

Medical Care As noted above we initially contracted out our surgeries and some of our medical care – evaluating stool samples, orthopedic surgeries… Most of our preventive care has always been done in house. Vaccines and HW/Flea tick prevention were all administered by trained Adoption counselors or by DF volunteers. The DF


P a g e | 245 Manager kept supplies of routine medications and vaccines for disbursement under the order of our veterinarian.

Medical Protocol Dhlpp (stands for Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parvo Virus) If less than 16 weeks old: They start getting this vaccine at 6 weeks of age. We give booster DHLPP vaccines every 2 weeks after that until they are 16 weeks of age. They cannot have vaccines any closer together than 14 days apart because the body won't be ready for it and the vaccine might not work. We vaccinate more frequently than regular vet clinics because our dogs are at a very high risk for contracting disease (due to being handled by a lot of people, being around a lot of other dogs, etc). If 16 weeks or older: They get this vaccine once and then one more booster 2 weeks later. Than one DHLPP 1 year later. Than every 3 years thereafter. Bordatella Intranasal (otherwise known as Kennel Cough vaccine squirted in the nose) Start at 6 weeks of age or upon entry to program. You just need one Intranasal Bordatella vaccine once per year, no boosters needed. It doesn't protect against all strains of kennel cough, so dogs can still get the disease even after getting vaccinated, but it is definitely helpful/better than nothing. Rabies - this protocol is determined by Texas State Law and doesn't vary within Texas. Different states have different laws though. We technically use a 3-year vaccine. Less than 12 weeks: a puppy should get vaccinated at 12 weeks of age. It cannot be any earlier by law. It will then get a booster 1 year later (cannot be more than 12 months later). Then they get vaccinated once every 3 years after that. 12 weeks or older: If you don't have proof that the dog received a rabies vaccine in the past year (in the form of a certificate), you have to get 1 rabies vaccine now, and then booster it 1 year later, than it is good every 3 years after that.

Medical protocol by age:  

   

0 wks o Frontline every 4 weeks 6 Weeks o Heartworm prevention (Ivermectin) o Bordatella o DHLPP every 2wks/2wks apart until 16 wks. Minimum of 2 for adults, 3 or 4 for pups) 8 Weeks o Spay/neuter 12 wks o Rabies 6 months o Heartworm test Puppies: o 2wks of age: 1st Strongid o 4wks of age: 2nd Strongid o 6wks of age: 1st DHLPP, Bordatella, Ivermectin hw prevention, Frontline o 8wks of age: 2nd DHLPP, 3rd Strongid, Spay/Neuter (if healthy), Microchip o 10wks of age: 3rd DHLPP, Ivermectin, Frontline o 12wks of age 4th DHLPP and rabies


P a g e | 246 

o Adults o o

14wks of age: 5th DHLPP, Ivermectin, Frontline @ intake: 1st Strongid, DHLPP, Bordatella, Heartworm test (dogs> 6 mos.), Ivermectin hwprev if negative, Frontline, spay/neuter, microchip, rabies 2wks later: 2nd Strongid, DHLPP

Ongoing support It‟s nearly impossible to have experienced fosters, or resource materials, that will address every situation so it is important that your foster parents have access to someone who can answer questions or help triage a crisis. Because we are dealing with living beings it is important for fosters to have this access pretty much 24/7. A delay in responding could mean life or death for an injured or sick dog. Initially, this was the Dog Foster Coordinator, the same person who performed all the other DF program functions. As the program grew a team of DF mentors was created to address this need.

Foster Dog Adoptions It‟s also important to have a system in place to get your foster dogs adopted. When APA first began pulling dogs we did not have our own shelter. Every dog that was pulled had to go in to foster care. All of the healthy, adoptable dogs had to be taken to our adoption sites every day and then picked up again in the evening by their foster parent. Eventually we obtained space to house our dogs overnight. After that, many of the healthy, adoptable dogs stayed in the adoption program – going out to sites daily and spending the night in the facility. However, this was not appropriate for many dogs, including young puppies, sick or injured dogs and reactive or fearful dogs that did not do well at the adoption sites. Therefore we had to develop a system for these dogs to be adopted out of their foster homes (see attachments #20-25). Initially we tried to have as many as possible of our foster dogs go out to sites. However, as our program grew we shifted our approach to trying to adopt as many foster dogs as possible directly out of their foster home. This is not only healthier and less disruptive for the dog, it empowers our foster parents and frees up space for other dogs at our sites.

Dog Foster Team Organization As noted above, initially all of the Dog Foster team functions were handled by a single DF Coordinator. As the program grew it became necessary to expand to a system of teams. (see attachment #1). These teams developed somewhat organically, depending on the greatest need. There are four key teams that interact directly with the foster parents. They are, Foster Placement, New Foster, Foster Mentoring and Foster Adoption. While the number of volunteers in each team has continued to grow this division of labor has continued to work well. Breaking the responsibilities down to these key areas has allowed the team members to become more proficient and focus their energies to better assist the foster parents. The foster program also has volunteers dedicated to Foster Recruitment, Foster Appreciation, Donated Resources and Special Events. As our organization grew some previous positions, like medical and behavior volunteers, have moved to other areas within the organization. Below is a brief description of current teams and positions.

Dog Foster Manager (DFM) Responsible for the development and management of the Dog Foster Program (DFP). Including the development of policy and training; and the supervision of all DFP leads to ensure that foster parents are trained and available and that all dogs are safe and receive the care they need.


P a g e | 247 Dog Foster Placement Team Responsible for the intake of all dogs in to the foster program. This includes coordinating with Rescue team to post pleas and match dogs with appropriate fosters, and facilitating their move in to foster care.

If at all possible have another team do the direct rescue assessments. It‟s too emotional to have this in one group. The Placement team has to be able to push back if no fosters available. The team needs the ability to reach all fosters with pleas, must be available during the hours that Rescue is making assessments. However, there must be a process in place to address emergency needs. Most of our pleas come in during local shelter hours but some exceptions, e.g., bottle babies must be “pulled” & placed within hours. It‟s important to get all pleas out asap, we require that they be posted within 2 hours. (See attachments 12-14)

New Dog Foster Parent Team (and Foster Application Screeners) Responsible for processing all foster inquiries and screening applications to bring new fosters into the program. Our web based foster application generates an e-mail when it is submitted. The new foster team lead forwards this e-mail to one of our screeners who then conducts the interview However, if you are using paper applications these can be scanned and faxed to screeners or hand delivered. (see attachments - # 2-11)

Dog Foster Mentor Team Responsible for the ongoing management and support of foster parents, including the monitoring of animals in foster care. This team is also responsible for ensuring that all appropriate medical care is provided for dogs in foster care, including scheduling of vaccines, spay/neuter surgeries and other medical needs.  Need to be available and responsive to foster parents. Need to provide support 24/7, at least for medical emergencies. Foster parents need to have someone to talk to when they are panicking and also to help triage to determine if emergency medical care is needed.  Our mentors schedule all medical including spay/neuter surgery. Our cat program has fosters work directly with med team however we found that it is more effective to have team members do this. The dog program is very dependent on moving animals through quickly which can only be accomplished if all vaccinations/surgeries are done when they are due.

Again, these responsibilities were initially handled by one person. Although this was very customer friendly – fosters only had one person to work with, increased continuity –it could not be maintained as our program grew. We tried several alternatives, including assigning a mentor to specific dogs, but ultimately decided on a group approach. To accomplish this we created a Mentor e-mail box dog-foster-coordinator@... As a central mailbox for questions. The Mentors worked out a schedule for covering the mail box, along with a system for filing the correspondence to maintain continuity. Our Google DF spreadsheet also helps with this as all team members have access to the spreadsheet. The spreadsheet is updated with key information like vaccinations, surgery dates and if the dog is going out to adoption sites. (See attachments # 15-19)

Dog Foster Adoption Team Responsible for assisting fosters with all activities related to the adoption of their foster dog or puppy. Our goal is to have as many dogs as possible adopted directly from the foster home. This not only reduces their exposure to disease (especially young puppies) it also reduces the workload at adoption sites, which allows


P a g e | 248 our shelter program to handle more dogs. It‟s important to have a clear protocol for fosters to follow that addresses things like meet‟n‟greet procedures and adopter selection (see attachment #23). We try to find the best possible home in shortest time possible. However, it‟s important to balance the foster parent‟s desire for the perfect placement, with the organization‟s need to place the dog quickly. Also, you must have processes in place that are defendable to protect the reputation of the organization. If adopters feel that adoption decisions are based on emotion, or personal judgment of them, they will feel cheated and generate ill will towards the organization. Generally speaking our puppies can stay with the foster until they are about 8-10 weeks old. If they are not adopted by then the foster has the option to take them to an adoption site daily or “surrender” them to our shelter. This team also uses a generic mail box to handle the workload.

Dog Foster Recruiting Coordinator Responsible for recruiting new foster parents in to the program and retaining existing foster parents. Our Recruitment Coordinator or the team lead attends every Volunteer Orientation. We‟ve learned that it is important to do something that grabs the volunteer‟s attention - that gets to the heart of what fostering is all about. For example we use personal stories and when possible will even bring a foster dog to the Orientation. We have found that our reputation and visibility in the community are the best recruiters of new foster parents. As more people hear about our work, more come forward to volunteer and to foster. We have also found that it is useful to use difficult situations to recruit new foster parents. Utilizing Craig‟s List, social media and the news media when you have a sad case can garner sympathy and recruit specific fosters. We have evolved to the point where we have a steady influx of foster parents. However, we have had a little more difficulty in recruiting specialized fosters, for example, EG, for Medical, Behavior, Bottle Babies and moms with litters. We continue to work on this. In the meantime we try to identify and develop these fosters at every opportunity. The flip side of recruitment is retention. It‟s important to constantly recruit as turnover is unavoidable. At the same time, you want to do everything you can to keep good fosters. We try to retain our foster parents by providing good customer service and showing our appreciation at every opportunity. We know we can‟t do this without them! Some appreciation efforts we have tried include a Newsletter, e-mails for special cases and “meet-ups” gatherings that include fosters parents, their dogs and the DF team.

Other Necessary Support for Foster Team: It‟s critical to have behavioral and medical support for your foster parents. We now have a behavior team and a full medical clinic. However, when we started, we had neither. As with all necessary supports it‟s important to look at what you have and recruit for what you need. Initially we identified a foster parent who was very knowledgeable about training and dog behavior. She was recruited to provide behavioral and training support for the foster parents. This included addressing behavior issues ranging from typical puppy stuff to adult behavior issues like separation anxiety. This person also provided training guidance so that foster parents can begin working with dogs on everything from potty training to basic commands. This not only makes the foster experience more successful it also makes the dogs more adoptable. In addition we recruited volunteers who had some medical experience who could provide basic medical services to foster dogs. This included vaccinations, deworming, providing preventive care like flea tick and heartworm, as well as general health assessments. Often these services were also provided by trained Adoption Counselors while they were at site. However you provide it, support in both these areas is critical to the well being of the dogs and a successful foster experience.


P a g e | 249 The foster parent support that the team provides is constantly changing. An example is our DF Donated Resource Coordinator. Our foster parents are asked to provide everything for their foster dog except medical care. This means all food, treats, beds, crates… When we started to receive donations of food and other items, this position was created to help distribute and deliver these donations. In addition to the positions outlined here, it‟s important to have data management support either within the team, or within the organization. This includes support with your data bases (Petpoint, Zoho, Google) as well as with your website and any social media like Facebook and Twitter. Currently the DF program is also supported by a team that handles and redirects adoption inquiries and a Dog Marketing team that helps with marketing of individual dogs. This includes posting to CL, Facebook, Twitter, creating bios and obtaining videos and photos. However, these services were initially provided by members of the DF team. Just as you need to continually recruit new foster parents, you also need to continually recruit new foster program team members. It is inevitable that you will have turnover and as your program grows you will need more help. We have found that it is best to cast a wide net and then work with the new team member to find the position that best suits them. It is also important to be able to let go and give up control. It‟s not likely that you will find someone that will do something exactly as you did it, however, it‟s possible that they will do it better. Or at least they will find their own way – one that is at least as effective. It‟s also important to be flexible. Take advantage of the unique skills and abilities that each volunteer brings to the table.

Sample Foster Flow 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

13.

14.

Prospective foster parent submits foster application from APA website (exhibit A) New Foster team lead assigns the application to a Screener Screener reviews application, does a Google search and conducts a phone interview (exhibit B) If approved, New Foster Team Lead sends Welcome letter, Contact List and other correspondence to new foster parent (exhibits C,D & E). Foster parent is also invited to the DF Yahoo group Foster parent sees a plea requesting foster for two 5 wk old puppies Foster Placement team talks with foster parent and if good match arranges pick up (see exhibits F & G) Foster parent picks up puppies, usually from our city shelter (TLAC) Foster parent transports puppies to APA medical clinic for check up (also deworming & flea treatment, if needed) and collar/tags DF Mentor sends “placement” e-mail (see exhibit H) When pups are 6 weeks old the foster parent takes them to APA clinic for DHLPP & Bordatella vaccines Adoption Lead sends protocol to foster parent, outlining adoption strategies (see exhibit I) When pups are 7 weeks old (1 week prior to spay/neuter) they are posted to APA web and “meet‟n‟greets” begin. Every effort is made to get the pups pre-adopted before surgery. Foster parents are encouraged to reach out to friends and family via social networking like Facebook. Potential adopter submits adoption application to the DF Adoption Lead for review. If adoption meets her approval and foster parent is in agreement, pre-adoption is set up at one of the APA adoption events. At 8 weeks the puppies are spayed or neutered and microchipped. If they have been pre-adopted they can be picked up from surgery by their adopters.


P a g e | 250 15. Puppies that have not been pre-adopted are picked up by foster parents who will then take them out to adoption sites on a daily basis. If the foster parent is unable to do this, or can no longer keep the puppies, they can be “surrendered” to our shelter where they will stay until they find their forever home. 16. Once foster dogs are adopted out or surrendered the foster parent can respond to another plea and take in another foster dog. We only allow one foster (or one litter at a time). This is to avoid disease contamination and also to keep from overwhelming a foster parent.

Workshop Attachments Dog Foster Team 

DF Organizational Chart – Organizational chart of the DF team that includes job title, description, specific duties, qualification and performance measures

New Dog Foster (Parent) Program 

     

Foster Application and Release https://creator.zoho.com/austinpetsalive/forms/formperma/Foster_Application/ - This is the current, web based application for fostering. It is used for both the dog and cat program and prospective “parents” only need to complete one application. Original Foster Application - This is the original paper version of the foster application Original Foster Release - This is the original version of the foster release. One was done for each individual dog in foster. The current, application tied release is just done once per foster parent. New Dog Foster Lead Procedures – These are the specific procedures that the team lead follows to assign and process foster applications New Foster Screener Training – This is the training guide that is given to all new foster application screeners. New Dog Foster FAQ – This is a list of questions that frequently arise during the screening interview. Welcome E-mail – This is the e-mail that is sent to a new foster parent when they are approved to foster. Initially we sent a longer letter but we recently changed to an e-mail version because we had some feedback that indicated that people were less likely to open attachments. Foster Parent Contact List – This is a list of contact information for the foster parents. Initially they received names and contact information for the entire team. As the team grew we revised this to only include key contact information. We also included contact information for people external to the team, such as the medical clinic. What to Expect When Fostering Puppies – This is an outline of some of the specific behaviors foster parents should expect when they have puppies. This was developed after having a rash of young foster parents taking on puppies and then wanting them moved immediately for what are essentially typical puppy behaviors. Dog Foster Yahoo Group Netiquette – This is a brief explanation of the Yahoo group and guidelines for using it. Originally every member could post to this group so we had more prescriptive guidelines about what and when to post. Eventually we limited posting ability so this form is less critical now.

Placement Team 

DF Placement Protocols – These are the placement protocols that the coordinators follow when posting foster pleas and matching foster parents.


P a g e | 251  

Foster Match E-mail – This is the e-mail that is sent to a foster parent as soon as they are matched with a foster dog. Pick Up from TLAC Protocol – Since most of our foster dogs are picked up from our local shelter (Town Lake Animal Center – TLAC) we developed this protocol for the foster parents to follow when picking up a dog from them. It is sent with the Foster Match e-mail when appropriate. .

Mentor Team 

   

Mentor Initial Letter – This is the e-mail that is sent to a foster parent very soon after they pick up their foster dog. It includes specific reminders about identifying and reporting medical emergencies as well as what to expect in the coming weeks. It includes specific information about any upcoming vaccines and surgeries. Mentor FAQ - This is a list of questions that the DF mentors are frequently asked by foster parents. It is used as a training tool and reference guide for new mentors. Pre-Surgery Instructions – These are the instructions that are sent to foster parents the prior to their dog coming in for spay/neuter surgery Nursing Mom Sample E-mail – This is an example of an e-mail sent to foster parents that have taken in a pregnant dog. A similar e-mail is sent if they take in a mom with young litter. Ringworm FAQs – This information about ringworm can be sent to fosters who are considering taking in a dog with ringworm and also to current fosters who have a dog that has been diagnosed with ringworm

Adoption Team 

 

 

Automated E-mail Response – This is the e-mail that people receive when they contact the Adoption team at the dog-foster-adopt@ e-mail address. A similar automated response is also sent from the Mentor e-mail box. Since most of our volunteers work and can not always check e-mail frequently, these were developed to redirect inquiries to the appropriate place and ensure that emergencies were addressed quickly. Foster Dog Adoption Protocol – This is a general overview of what foster parents can expect in the adoption of their foster dog. Site List – This list is sent every evening to the team that oversees the off site adoption events. It lets them know which foster dogs will be attending the various sites the following day(s). Since our adoptions are also finalized at site it also includes a list of those adoptions and where they will take place. The foster dogs is not present for this so they just need to ensure that the dog‟s file is at the correct site. It also includes a listing of any foster dogs that are going to be “surrendered” to our shelter. These are dogs that no longer need foster but have not yet been adopted. New Foster Adoption Protocol E-mail – This is an example of an e-mail that is sent to a foster to remind them of the adoption protocol and to obtain names, photos and bios when needed. Foster Site Selection E-mail – This is an example of the e-mail that is sent to the foster parent to determine which adoption site they would prefer to use. Since our sites are spread out across the city they can select a site that is convenient to their home or work. Adopter Site Selection & Instructions - This is an example of the e-mail that is sent to the adoptive family to determine where and when they would like to finalize the adoption. As with the foster families this allows them to select a site that is convenient to their home or work.


P a g e | 252

Dog Behavior Program Handbook

Louie The infamous Louie the dog who inspired APA to rename the behavior dogs “Louie‟s Fresh Start Team”. His initial behavior evaluations were great – mouthy, easily overstimulated, mentally a puppy in a big dog‟s body. Louie was in and out of bite quarantine. He was so exuberant it took two people and a muzzle to walk him. Here‟s just a portion of an email received from Louie‟s foster… “1. He is extremely destructive. He has chewed blinds, torn at furniture and carpet, destroyed shoes, ripped throws, destroyed throw

pillows, destroyed Tupperware, glasses, and plates, electrical cords, jewelry, cell phones, laptops, and paper products. He doesn't seem to have a preference. Absolutely anything, and I mean anything that he can grab with his teeth he will. He has stood on his hind legs to grab things from the kitchen counters, tables, chairs, high shelves, in keep putting things higher thinking he can't reach them and somehow he does. Candles, vases, picture frames, the yard hose. He has pulled a bottle of red wine off of my wine rack and smashed it, then running through the wine and broken glass and tracking it on the carpet before I could get him away. He has jumped up and grabbed a pack of cigarettes and chewed them to pieces before I could get them away from him. He is ALWAYS crated at night and when we leave the house. This is what he does when I'm watching him. 2. When he begins to bite something inappropriate I verbally "eh eh" him, he looks at me, then continues digging in. If I raise my voice louder, clap my hands, or anything of the sort, he doesn't budge. The second I walk towards him, he grabs the item and bounds away. By the time I catch him, it is usually too late. The can has completely lost its affect and in fact seems to make him aggressive. If I shake the can at these times he runs at me barking growling and biting. He also comes at me biting if I try to take something away from him that he's destroying or that is dangerous for him. 3. He also likes to bite for seemingly no reason at all. When he gets mouthy with us, I usually verbally correct him, then try to redirect with a command or an appropriate chew toy he can play with. He will stop long enough to get his treat or toy reward, then come right back at me.”

A plan was implemented and Louie began to improve. Louie‟s behavior plan included the use of approved handlers only and tutorials at a local training center. After being in the shelter for over 5 months Louie‟s perfect family came along. Here‟s what his adopters had to say in a recent update, “He is so awesome, never a dull moment!! You guys are to thank for introducing us to him. And I hope this program/APA can get more dogs like him adopted to good homes also! Just hope we as a family can be a testament to everyone out there.”


P a g e | 253

Implementing a Plan Coding dogs & using color collars 

The dogs have all had a behavior test by a trainer and/or behaviorist and their results have been added to PetPoint. The dog's A number will now contain one of the following letters: E, H, M, L, G. These designations go hand in hand with the dog's collar colors.  E = Extreme safety precaution needed, and is identified by Dark Blue Collar.  H = High safety precaution needed, and is identified by a Light Blue Collar.  M = Medium safety precaution needed, and is identified by a Purple Collar.  L = Low safety precaution needed, and is identified by a Pink Collar.  G= Good to go, and is identified by a Green Collar

Behavior Codes and Color Coded Collars Dark Blue Collar - “E”xtreme safety precautions needed. Approved Handlers Only. These guys have been evaluated by a professional Dog Behaviorist. In order to ensure their safety, we are limiting the people that can take them out to play. These guys are on a specific training protocol, as set forth by their Behaviorist, and we want them to succeed! In order to ensure their safety, their kennels must be locked when these dogs are unattended. This does NOT mean that they must be locked away and forgotten, it simply means that we need to make sure that nothing bad happens to them. Whenever a volunteer, BB/BS, staff member, or potential adopter wants to interact with these guys, they MUST be accompanied by an Approved Handler. The only people that are able to approve handlers for these dogs are a Manager. We want them to have a great time and enjoy their lives, and find a wonderful home, we simply want them to be safe and sound! Dogs in Bite Quarantine will be Dark Blue during bite quarantine.


P a g e | 254 Light Blue Collar - ”H”igh safety precautions needed. Experienced Handlers and B&E Only. These guys have been evaluated by various trainers and/or professional Behaviorist(s) and have special training needs. This means that they are wonderful dogs, they just need a little special care in order to maintain their safety and well being. These guys may only be walked by an experienced handler, as identified by a manager or counselor with permission from a manager. They need a little help with leash manners, reactivity, dog-dog interaction, guarding, and other things like that. We are working on a specific training plan for each of them and we really want to see them succeed and find their awesome forever home soon! When they go on walks or play romps with a volunteer, BB/BS, and/or adopter, they must be accompanied by an Approved Handler. Let's get these amazing doggies on the road to success! Purple Collar - “M”edium safety precautions needed. These guys would love to go for walks and play times in the yard, but please check in with an Adoption Counselor, Trainer, or Shift Lead before taking them out to play. These dogs are great! They are on the road to their new home quickly, and we want to keep them safe and happy until they arrive! These dogs have shown minor safety concerns, so please help them continue on the road to success! Pink Collar - “L”ow safety precautions needed. These guys are great! They simply need to work on a few manners and would love to learn some new tricks! We would love it if volunteers, walkers, staff, potential adopters could work on tricks like sit, loose leash walking, target, recall, etc. These doggies want to succeed and let's help them on their journey!! Green Collar - “G”ood to go! Please follow all safety precautions, such as critical distance, and please work on basic obedience. These dogs are awesome, let's keep them that way! If you look up Louie in PetPoint, you will see that he is now designated by his ARN as A587451E. If you look up his Behavior Test, he has been identified as "E".

Programs for Dogs & Volunteers         

Love on a Leash - general dog walking (G, L, M) Behavior &Enrichment (G, L, M - with focus on M) - prevention of behavior issues Mentor Program (long stays and M, H, E - any dog we have had over 1 mos) - advocate, one on one attention, training, advertising Louie‟s Team (advertisement, fundraising for H, E, some M) - providing funding/advertising/events for the dogs Louie‟s Fresh Start Approved Handlers (H, E) – must complete training specific to each dog individually Ttouch (shy, nervous, tense, anxious, mouthy, high strung dogs) - combination of specific bodywork and “agility” course work Playgroups (social, energetic G, L) - can be a group of dogs who play well together or two dogs - supervised interaction. Trail Site (high energy dogs) - dogs taken to local trail to be checked out by the public to walk/run the trail. Jog A Dog (high energy dogs) - volunteers who take our high energy dogs for runs.

Training Volunteers, Staff & Dogs 

Volunteers & Staff do training with the dogs  Maintain a Volunteer flow chart


P a g e | 255 Training plans The basics for dogs - sit, watch, wait (especially at thresholds) - more adoptable, but also provides consistency among handlers, and gives the dog a sense of self control and self confidence Louie‟s Workshop (a monthly event) Advanced training opportunity for Dog Mentors and Approved Handlers. Louie's Workshop is a hodgepodge "train the human/train the dog" session where anything can happen. We might: learn new training or handling techniques, create training plans for high-needs dogs, talk about concerns or issues we're experiencing with a dog, run through some training exercises with dogs in a group or individual class setting, etc.  

Each workshop is different based on the needs we have at that time. It's an opportunity for us to get together and make sure we're meeting the needs of every Louie's Team dog. EXAMPLE TOPICS FOR SEPT 17: 1) Revisit the "Big 4" cues we want to push with every Louie's Team dog: (auto)-Watch, Wait, Leave it, and Target 2) Talk about other exercises and cues for the Louie's Team dogs. 3) Demo the balanced leash 4) Address questions and concerns handlers have had with dogs they've worked with


P a g e | 256 Dog Walking 101 Interacting With Your Dog o

o

o

o

Calm Voice & Relaxed Body Language ● Use calm tones and confident but relaxed body posture when working with the dogs. Using an excited voice will get the dogs too worked up and using a loud voice (yelling) can make them nervous and hesitant to train with you. Your energy will transfer to the dog and he will react accordingly to what you project. Talk to Your Dog! ● Marker words are used to give a verbal cue for specific positive or negative behaviors. We use good or yes to mark positive behaviors and eh eh or no to mark negative behaviors. In addition to communicating with your dog using marker words, it helps just to talk to them! Talking to your dog keeps them more engaged and focused on you and, thus, more likely to respond positively to your time together. Reinforcement ● Just remember, when an action is reinforced it is more likely to be repeated. Be very careful about what you reinforce when interacting with the dogs. You may be reinforcing an unwanted behavior without even knowing it. Every time we let a dog out of pen we are reinforcing whatever they are doing right before they get out…..which is often jumping up, barking or just over excitement in general. If we pet or interact with the dogs when they jump up on us that ensures that they will jump on their new owners….because that is what you are supposed to do to get attention right? ● The behavior we‟d most like to reinforce in the shelter environment is good eye contact. A dog that watches us is better able to learn from us, and better able to cope with the challenges of shelter life. Therefore, anytime Spot makes eye contact – whether we asked for it or not – he should be rewarded with treats, praise, or both. Respecting Your Dog‟s Body Language and Cues ● IGNORING WHAT A DOG IS TELLING US IS HOW BITES HAPPEN. Always go slowly and pay attention to your dog‟s comfort level. If you notice your dog freeze, tense up, cower, flinch, squeal, or otherwise show discomfort, fear, or the desire to get out of a situation – STOP. ● Give your dog time to recover and return to a loose, relaxed body posture before proceeding. Shaking it off (full body shake), relaxed, wagging tail, relaxed ears, relaxed mouth/facial muscles, and relaxed body posture are indicators that your dog is feeling comfortable again. If in doubt, ANY STIFFNESS = STOP.  *Please remember that a minor bite incident may not be a big deal to you but that it has serious 

consequences FOR THE DOG. In addition to the stress a dog must feel to bite and the reinforcement of a negative behavior and lack of trust in humans, the dog must now go through a 10 day bite quarantine – a very stressful experience. Furthermore, the dog will have a bite record which makes adoption far more difficult, regardless of the circumstances of the bite incident. We ask that you please take this possibility and what it means for our dogs very seriously and don‟t let “being in a hurry” ever get in the way of safety.*


P a g e | 257 Walking Nicely on a Leash This can admittedly be tedious, but it has a HUGE impact on a dog‟s adoption chances – particularly with our medium to large pups. A potential adopter who takes a dog out and gets dragged down the sidewalk is not very likely to take the dog home.

o

o

Stop in Your Tracks If Spot pulls the leash taut, stop walking immediately. As soon as he puts slack in the leash, begin moving forward again and praising. Repeat as needed. This takes some time but it is very clear. Change Directions Quickly If Spot pulls the leash taut you can quickly turn in the opposite direction. This does two things: encourages him to watch you closely to know where to go and puts him slightly behind you. You can then reward him for being in a good position.

Pens, Kennels, Crates, and Doors o

o

Removing Dogs From Pens and Kennels  Before approaching Spot‟s pen or kennel, take a few moments to observe your surroundings. Are there other dogs entering or exiting the area? If so, wait for them to finish before getting Spot. Take a moment to consider how you will get Spot out of the building or pen area – what is the “path of least resistance” that will help you avoid obstacles such as other dogs or people? Lastly, look to see if Spot‟s kennel has special instructions on it - if so, follow these instructions or ask someone for assistance.  If Spot is in a pen or run, always enter Spot‟s pen or run before leashing him. Do not try to open the door and restrain him by the collar while clipping on his leash. Before entering the pen or kennel to leash up Spot, make sure that he has 4 paws on the floor. Do not enter the pen if Spot is jumping or pushing against the door. You may choose to turn your back and wait for Spot to get down or lure him off using a treat.  The same rule goes for clipping the leash to Spot‟s collar or harness. You may turn your back and wait for Spot to stop jumping or darting around or use a treat and ask Spot to sit. You entering the pen, and Spot going for a walk are big rewards for Spot and we want to use them to reinforce good behavior. The “4 on the floor” rule also helps Spot calm down and establishes a less chaotic start to your walk together.  When exiting the pen or kennel, position your body and the dog in a way that you can step in front of the dog if he darts for the door. If Spot has 4 paws on the floor, you may begin cracking the door open. If Spot moves to dart or push out the door, quickly shut the door (or take hand off the knob if you haven't gotten the door opened yet) and step in front of him. Try not to use the leash to keep him away from the door opening - use your body to block. Repeat as needed until Spot understands that you will exit the pen politely together. Finally, ask Spot for eye contact by saying “Watch Me”.  As you leave the kennel area, try to keep Spot in the center of the aisle and ensure that you have enough leash control to prevent him from engaging other dogs. At the same time, make sure Spot has enough slack so that he can‟t redirect onto your hand should a conflict occur. Doors and Thresholds  The rules for exiting the pen or kennel also apply for entering/exiting all doors and thresholds. We do not let Spot barrel around corners, into or out of the building/play pens, etc. This is a


P a g e | 258

o

safety issue in addition to an exercise in self-control. If another dog is on the other side of the door Spot just barreled through ahead of you, we may have a less than pleasant incident. Make sure you Spot can‟t exit without your consent, and always ask for a “Watch Me” before leaving. Returning Dogs To Pens and Kennels  As with removing Spot from the pen or kennel, take a moment to observe your surroundings and use a “short leash”. Recognize that Spot may really, really not want to return to his kennel, and you may have to gently assist him in returning by doing the following: - Use a high value treat, hold it directly to his nose, and walk alongside him using the treat as a lure to get him to his kennel. If he goes willingly, toss the treat to the back of the kennel and unclip his leash, taking care to block the entrance and hold his collar. - If Spot doesn‟t want to walk alongside you, crouch down, move forward a few steps ahead of Spot, and offer him a treat. Spot should move forward to take the treat. Repeat until you are at the kennel.  Once Spot is safely in his kennel or pen, thoroughly check the latch or handle to make sure he can‟t get out.

Handling Common Behaviors o

o

o

Jumping Do not pull the dogs from their pens when they are jumping. If Spot is jumping on you while you are working with him you can either turn your back and ignore him or you can step towards him. By stepping towards him you are entering his personal space and he will back away from you, then you can praise him. If you are approaching a dog that is with another person and he starts to jump up, turn and walk away. He loses you when he jumps on you. Repeat this until you can approach with no jumping and reward him with attention or treats. Mouthing Mouthing is a serious behavior issue and should, ideally, be handled by trained staff and volunteers. If teeth touch human skin, even playfully or accidentally, this is mouthing. If you are playing with Spot when he mouths you immediately stop playing and ignore Spot. If he continues to mouth put him back in his pen. Spot loses human interaction for mouthing for at least a minute and then give him another chance. If he continues mouthing go back to ignoring him. This repetition is how dogs learn. You may also try to redirect Spot‟s focus. You may do this by giving him an appropriate object to chew on or by redirecting him using a “target” command. Leash Reactivity Leash reactivity is a form of barrier frustration. Generally these reactive dogs are friendly; they are just frustrated that they cannot freely go greet other dogs. In some cases the reactivity can be due to prey drive, for example, reactivity towards bikes and joggers. Fast moving objects are supposed to be chased right?  In the context of the dog walking program, your best bet for handling leash reactivity is to always maintain critical distance between Spot and another dog and work to keep Spot‟s focus on you. You may do this by using treats, talking to Spot, or (if you know them) using a “target” or “watch me” command.


P a g e | 259

Thanks for taking me on a walk!

Louie‟s Fresh Start Condos – APA rescued a lot of “behavior” dogs before having the condos. o

o

You don‟t need the space to start saving these dogs. You just need to have a plan.  Behavior plan for each type of dog (handfeeding, gentle leader, easy walk, eating food as rewards not from a bowl, stimulation work every day, etc)  Behavioral fosters/foster breaks, send to a class together. Teaching dog and foster. Get an idea of what dog is like in home, give them a break from the shelter.. Locks are placed at the entrance to all Louie‟s Fresh Start dogs‟ enclosures or condos limiting handling to Approved Handlers only in order protect dogs and people.

Plan for the Long stay/behavior dogs o

Behavior/Longstay go hand in hand - the behavior dogs will likely be longstays and the longstays will likely begin to show behavioral issues.  Naughty dogs come in all shapes and sizes  Requires extra advertising & support  Unable to attend off-site events  Need physical AND mental stimulation  feeding out of kongs, using puzzle toys  Ttouch & agility yard  practicing the basics throughout the day

Reporting an Incident Dog Incident Protocol Incidents must be reported on the day that they occur or the day you are notified of them. Define: Reportable incidents


P a g e | 260  Aggression towards humans  Bite  Aggression towards dogs or other animals  Behavior Concerns Reporting of incidents:   

Same day email sent to managers Subject Line: “Incident” Please describe the incident to the best of your ability. Please make sure to list if you saw it, or who reported it to you. Please include the names of any other people who were present so we can get more information from them if needed

Incident will be noted in Petpoint same day by managers who will decide what plan of action, if any, needs to take place, update Petpoint, and send an update email of the incident and plan decision to the behavior team, counselors, and Ellen. If the dog is in foster, the foster coordinators will also be copied on the email. This email will be sent out asap.

Behavior Dog Transition to Foster Protocol When a dog with the letters M, H, E are transitioned to foster from HQ or from one foster to another, the following must occur. 1. Plea is sent to dogfosterplea@austinpetsalive.org, copying manager and must include the following:  Dog‟s description (breed, age, size)  Dog‟s reason for foster (sick, escalating behavior, etc)  Dog‟s reason for letter next to id#. This should be basic enough to prevent having to write a book but should clearly explain the severity of the problem. Example: “Fluffy” bit another dog in a fight, he has chased a small dog, he has bitten a walker (minor skin break), etc… and therefore he is listed as a H, M, or L  Dog‟s needs while in foster.  Medical: (example: give all meds as directed, recheck in 10 days)  Safety: (example: needs to not be around any other pets due to concerns of prey drive or will run away so never let outside without a leash)  Behavioral: (example: always walk with gentle leader, never walk within eye sight of another dog, never leave loose in yard)

2. Pick up instructions:  Dog must go home with appropriate equipment (gentle leader or easy walk or martingale)  Foster must meet with manager for brief tutorial on care while in foster  Foster and manager must sign Behavior Foster Checkoff List

Adoption Protocol for Behavior Dogs Upon adoption of every dog with a M, H, or E next to their letter in Petpoint, the following must occur:


P a g e | 261 1. Adoptions are processed by a manager. 2. Adopter is verbally made aware of all instances in Petpoint that reflect unusual behavior 3. Counselor writes “I am aware of all notes in record of this dog‟s behavior concerns” and then a line is drawn next to that for the adopter to initial and date. 4. Any special equipment that this dog needs is explained to adopter and they are encouraged to go purchase (ie gentle leader). 5. Adoptions of these dogs are reported to manager the same day. 6. Dog behavior manager calls new owner within 24 hours to make sure they are aware of any special needs (no kids, introduce men slowly, recommend gentle leader, do not let loose in yard, no meeting other dogs, etc….)

Small Dog Bite History Addendum This addendum is to be used for every adoption of a small dog with a bite history. Counselors have the adopter sign, then the Counselor signs as a part of the adoption process when disclosing the dog‟s bite history. Make a copy of the addendum to go with the adopter‟s file and the original is to stay with APA and should be faxed with the contract. If you do not have access to a copier while at site, please keep the original. This does not replace the requirement that specific approval be received for any adoption of a dog coded H or E or an adoption of a small dog (<25lbs.) into a home with young children. After signing, please add the following clause to the adoption contract and have the adopter initial: I have read, understood, and agreed to the small dog addendum.

Sample addendum: I am aware that the dog I am adopting has a bite history. I have carefully read and reviewed APA!‟s behavior notes and agree to take on the personal risk of owning a dog with a bite history. I am taking on this risk willingly and with knowledge of the dog‟s behavior. I understand that it is very possible that this dog will bite again. Understanding these risks, I agree to follow the recommendations of APA Staff and Adoption Counselors to help prevent a bite before it happens by taking proper precautions. These precautions include keeping a harness and six foot drag lead on this dog for at least 60 days post-adoption and ensuring that new people go very slow with this dog and give him the time and space necessary to feel secure prior to reaching for him, petting him, or attempting to pick him up. I further agree to seek mandatory behavior training with this dog within 14 days of adoption to build confidence, develop a bond between dog and owner, and to learn to deal with fear based aggression. Date: Dog‟s Name and ARN: Counselor Printed Name: Counselor Signature: Adopter Printed Name: Adopter Signature:


P a g e | 262

Behavior Assistance Sent Home With Every Adopter       

Tips for a Smooth Transition Teach Your Dog How to Be Alone & To Love His/Her Crate Introducing A New Dog to Your Current Dog Introduction to Cats I am having a problem with my new dog! What do I do? Affordable Dog Training In Austin Important Information About Returns

Tips For A Smooth Transition 6 SIMPLE STEPS to help make your new dog‟s transition a success! 1. 2.

3.

4. 5. 6.

Use Our “Teach Your Dog How To Be Alone” Protocol (see separate document for step by step) Feed Meals from Interactive Food Toys or By Hand – Feeding your dog from toys like the Classic Kong, Kong Wobbler, and Kibble Nibble give your dog a job to do and help teach him/her to settle and focus their mind. Use food as rewards for teaching your dog‟s name, sit, and down. Make Rules and Set Limits - Establish rules and limitations immediately and stick to them consistently. It does not matter what the rules are, so long as you have rules. Good rules to start with are “no furniture”, “no bed”, and “no access to some rooms”. Let you dog earn privileges and freedom by proving that his/her behavior can be trusted. Set Up A Structure – Give you dog at least one 20 minute on leash walk per day. Do not allow pulling on walks. If you dog pulls, turn around and start walking the other way. Wait for Food/Wait at Doors – Teach your dog self control by showing him/her how to sit and wait at doors and for meals. Attend an APA Sunday Behavior Class – Sunday classes take place first and third Sundays of every month and the Austin Pets Alive! Resource Center on 2807 Manchaca Ave, near S. Lamar Blvd. For puppies under 5 months, class begins at 2:30pm. For dogs over 5 months, class begins at 4pm.


P a g e | 263 Teach Your Dog How To Be Alone & To Love His/Her Crate! The transition from shelter to home can be very difficult for a dog. Many shelter dogs have never had the opportunity to bond with a human. So when they find their way into a loving home the bond to the new owner can be particularly strong. They panic when the owners leave because they don't want to be alone again. They have no idea if you are coming back. They will try anything to get out of the house or crate, often destroying anything in their path in their quest to get out and find their mom or dad. The following protocol will help ease the transition for your dog and teach him that when you leave, it is just temporary. This protocol is written to take place over the course of 2 days, to help fit into the realities of most people's lives. However, the more gradual and patient you can be going through the steps, the more likely you are to be successful. Day 1:    

  

Put comfy blanket or towels in crate. Use something you are not afraid will be destroyed. Keep crate door open. Stand outside the open crate, drop really good treats (like bits of hot dog, cold cuts, or cheese) in the crate, and praise your dog for entering. Drop treats while he is in the crate. Throughout the day drop really good little bits of food in crate. Do this especially when he's not looking. We want him to start periodically checking his crate on his own to see what deliciousness might be hidden. Tie a stuffed Kong toy to the inside of the crate a few times a day. To stuff the Kong, line the inside with a little peanut butter, and stuff the Kong with delicious food and treats. Feed all meals in crate. Try feeding meals in the Kong. At no point will you physically put him in crate or lock him in crate. At no point will the crate door close.

Day 2:  

 

Repeat Day 1 exercises. When he is relaxed and eating his Kong or food, you will shut the crate door for 3 seconds then open. If he gets out of kennel, throw some treats in and repeat exercise. If he remains relaxed, you will try 6 seconds. Then try 12. Work up to about 1 min. If he can be relaxed (focused on a Kong/food) in the crate for 1 min with you in the room, you will step out of the room for 30 seconds. Make sure the Kong still has lots of tasty stuffing left in it before you step out of the room. If he is relaxed for the 30 seconds, enter and let out. Then repeat, doubling the time. If at any point in this process, he begins to demonstrate panic (whine, scratch at door, bark, etc), wait until a brief break (even a split second) in the demonstration, then let out of crate. Go back to your last successful step, and repeat that step. You will build the duration of leaving the room in increments, until you can leave the house. First leave for 1 minute. Then 5 minutes. Work up to 30mins.


P a g e | 264 ď&#x201A;§

At that point you may try leaving your dog in his crate for more extended periods, with plenty of stuffed Kongs to occupy his time.


P a g e | 265

Introducing a New Dog to your Current Dog Relationships between dogs can be complex, much more than our usual understanding of the "alpha dog" pack model suggestions. There are things you can do to make sure this meeting is a success. If you know both dogs are friendly with other dogs, this meeting should be pretty easy. 1. Location for the meeting 

DO meet on neutral ground where neither dog is likely to feel territorial. Have both dogs on leash and only introduce two dogs at a time.  DON'T have the meeting in your backyard with one or both dogs off leash. You never know when one dog is going to take offense to something the other dog does and you won't have any control over the situation. 2. Walk it off 

DO go for a long walk with each dog being handled by a calm, relaxed adult handler, with each dog taking turns being in front. Keep the leashes loose, since pulling on the leash might communicate to the dog that you are worried about the meeting. Maintain about 10 feet between each dog at first, slowly decreasing the distance as you walk and things go well.  DON'T stop, stand around, get busy talking or fail to pay attention to the dogs. It is important to keep moving so the dogs don't get too intense or focused on each other in the beginning. 3. Keep it positive 

DO praise and reward the dogs lavishly, even if things don't start out going well. Take turns with each dog getting their attention, asking for a Sit or Stay and handing out plenty of rewards. Take breaks from the introductions to give a massage or sniff something interesting.  DON'T correct or punish the dogs if they do not get along. Also, don't move the introductions along too quickly. As a general guideline, an introduction should take at least 30 minutes. 4. Pay attention 

DO praise and reward the dogs if they try to play by pawing or play bowing with their legs stretched out in front of them. They may want to be best buddies. Allow them to briefly sniff each other and praise. Continue your walk and periodically allow them to sniff and investigate together.  DON'T take the leashes off (yet) even if it looks like the dogs are getting along together. Keep walking and giving them opportunities to enjoy the walk together. 5. If they don't get along 

DO pay attention to body language. If they stiffen their bodies or stare at each other, hair up and teeth bared, then it doesn't look good for the dogs becoming buddies. Keep walking. If they lunge at each other trying to fight, separate them and don't try any more introductions on your own. Contact the APA! behavior team or your trainer to assist.


P a g e | 266 

DON'T correct the dog, pull on the leash, punish or threaten, or continue the introductions if the dogs try to fight. Just like you may not like everyone you meet, a dog may not like every other dog he meets either. 6. Taking the dogs home 

DO transport one or both dogs in separate crates. At home, put your dog's toys and bones, food bowl and bed away first thing since these items could be sources of conflict. For the first few weeks, separate the dogs for high value treats and meals. After the dogs become best friends, then they may be able to share these things together.  DO keep the new dog separate from your dogs for at least 7 days. This will give time to see if the new dog has any contagious illnesses and allow you to teach the new dog the house rules.  DON'T leave the new dog alone, unsupervised with your dog. Keep a leash on the new dog for the first couple of weeks so that you can easily redirect or remove the new dog if any conflicts break out. 7. A word about puppies 

DO introduce a puppy to your dog in the same way outlined above. Keep in mind that if the puppy hasn't had all his shots yet, you may need to cut out the walk and meet at a friend's house (neutral ground) that you know if free from diseases the puppy could catch.  DON'T force your older dog to bear endless hours with a new puppy. Puppies can annoy older dogs and the dog may lose patience with the puppy. Take frequent breaks and until the puppy is older, allow the puppy and the older dog to play only in short spurts. If you have any questions or problems during the introductions, please contact the APA! behavior team or your trainer to assist you.


P a g e | 267 Introduction to Cats Day 1: 

Secure the cats in a separate room the dog cannot go into. Make sure the cats have everything they need because they will be there the entire first day.  The dog and cat/s will not be introduced until the second day so that the dog has time to get used to the new house first and also get used to the scent of the cat. Day 2 and 3: 

Put the new dog on leash and bring the cat into the same room, holding the cat at this point. If you have any other dogs they should be out of the room. Reward your new dog for staying calm as the cat is brought closer. Do not get the cat within reach of the dog yet. You want to be able to get your dog's attention in the presence of the cat, if you cannot gain focus from the dog do not bring the cat any closer. Constant praise for both animals if they are remaining calm. If the dog lunges or gets over excited, remove the cat. Do this several times during the second and third day.

Day 4: 

Assuming your new dog is remaining calm around the cat they will get to meet today. Your dog is still on leash. The cat is let down to investigate the dog and you are watching to make sure the dog doesn't try to lunge after the cat. If the cat swats the dog you are watching to make sure the dog backs away and shows respect for the cat at this point. If the dog gets over excited, remove the cat. Your dog is encouraged to sniff and investigate the cat. ***If your dog is still very intense around the cat you should consult with a professional to evaluate the situation.

Day 5: 

If the dog is doing well and is responsive to you around the cat you can try him off leash with the cat. They are supervised the entire time and you are watching for any inappropriate behavior. Reminders:   

Even dogs that respect cats indoors may go after cats outdoors so be very careful having your dog and cats in the backyard together. This is a general time frame and you may need to add more time to the process if you are having a hard time reading the new dog. In my professional opinion new dogs and cats should not be left alone together for the first 6 months you have the dog. You are still getting to know your new dog and what he/she will do in every circumstance. Crating is ideal when you aren't around. The cat can become more accustomed to the dog while the dog is crated as well which will help in the long run.


P a g e | 268 I am having a problem with my new dog! What do I do!? For basic problems, contact the Austin Pets Alive Behavior Team at DogBehavior@AustinPetsAlive.org Examples of problems we can help with:       

Potty Accidents Playful Nipping/Biting Destructive When Left Alone Crying/Whining When Left Alone Growling/Fighting With Other Family Dog Barking At/Chasing Family Cat Barking At Dogs When On A Leash

****** For more serious problems, seeking professional training is a necessary step in dealing with behavor issues. See our handout called Affordable Trainers in Austin for some great professional trainers in town!


P a g e | 269 Affordable Dog Training in Austin: 1)

2)

3)

4) 5) 6) 7)

8)

9)

The Center for Canine Training and Behavior: 6901 Old Bee Caves Road, Austin, TX 78735. www.tcctb.com or call 512.721.8496 or email info@tcctb.com for details! Petsmart Training: Call your local PetSmart! They offer an 8 week training program for $109.00 (with adoption you get a discount!). They also offer private sessions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 one hour classes for $209.00 (you get a discount with adoption!). Please call 512.358.0127 for details!! Austin Humane Society: Offers a 4 week class for $55. You can get more info about their class at www.austinhumanesociety.org Kim the Dog Trainer: Offers an 8 week course for $200. Private Sessions are available as well. Contact Kim at 512.796.5783 or kimthedogtrainer@gmail.com for more info. Nancy Cusick with Train My Dogs: Offers group classes for $200 and also offers private sessions. Phone 512.507.4484 or go to www.trainmydogs.com. Training By Tara: Offers different types of training solutions at fair prices. Please call Tara at 512.402.4229 or www.trainingbytara.com. Austin Dog Alliance: Offers different types of 6 week classes like puppy, god citizen, agility, etc. Classes start at $150 and with a coupon through APA!, offer a 10% discount. www.austindogalliance.org Love-A-Bull: A new, nonprofit education and advocacy organization, invites new members to join the group in order to participate in free, basic skills dog training for pit bulls and pit mixes. Contact www.love-a-bull.org for the next training session start date. Usually at Southpaws Playschool in south-central Austin. Steve DeBono, CPDT-KA: Offers $50 in your home private sessions and $100 classes for dogs recently adopted from Austin area rescues and shelters. Visit www.stevedebono.com or phone 512.436.3647 for details.


P a g e | 270 Important Information About Returns If you are considering returning your pet because of a behavior problem, please contact our behavior team. We have resources to help you solve problems before you feel that returning the pet is the only solution. We hope you will work with us to try to keep your pet rather than give up on him/her. New additions require time to adjust. It is traumatic for animals to be returned after being in a home. Please let us help you work it out so the pet can stay. Please email our behavior team at Dog-Behavior@AustinPetsAlive.org and we will be happy to give you advice. You are contracted to contact us if you need to rehome this pet at any time in the future. Even if you have found someone that would like to adopt your pet, please contact us so we can contact them about the adoption. 

This is a serious commitment and decision that you should be sure about BEFORE you adopt, not after.  Your adoption donation is not refundable at any point after the adoption because  Once you have made a donation, we use that money to help other animals and it is no longer available. If you choose to surrender your pet, please call or email us and we will usually reply within in a few hours. We need to schedule a time for you to come in. Adopt@austinpetsalive.org 512-961-6519


P a g e | 271

Parvo Program

What is parvo? The Caninie Parvovirus infects rapidly dividing cells such as: the intestinal cells, bone marrow cells, lymph system cells, and fetal cells. The virus is also extremely hardy, and can survive in organic material (feces, soil, etc) for over a year. While the original CPV only affected dogs, since the virus can rapidly mutate there are variants that also effect Raccoons. Because of this we recommend later on in the trash section that you not leave your trash from the parvo ward out for very long. Symptoms of an infected dog as: lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea. If you notice any of these symptoms it is highly recommend you test the dog as quickly as possible so that you can isolate the dog if the results come back positive. You will also want to disinfect their kennel thoroughly. A Parvocidal cleaner (Bleach, RoccalD, Oxivir) needs to be used to disinfect the area to prevent other dogs from getting infected.

About the Austin Pets Alive parvo ward


P a g e | 272 How we got started The Austin Pets Alive! parvo ward started in November 2008 when Dr. Jefferson took home some very sick puppies that had parvo. She used one of the bathrooms in her house as the 'official' parvo ward, and treated over 300 dogs in it for 2 years. During that time she was able to assess the dogs and treat them around the clock. You will see a bit later in this document that her success rate increased every year. When she first started she did not vaccinate on intake of parvo dogs and as a result had some losses to distemper. Since IV pumps are costly, she started out with IV drips & also utilized IV bolus treatment, both of which are discussed later in this manual under the Advanced treatment section. In August 2010 Austin Pets Alive! found a building to rent as a dedicate place for a lot of the programs, and built a dedicated parvo ward. Shortly after that we began building up a volunteer team to treat the dogs under the supervision of our Veterinarians & Vet Techs.

Our numbers throughout the years Tracking overall numbers can be a good measure to see how many dogs you are treating and roughly how effective you are being at saving lives, setting a goal of 80% survival rate is ideal and anything higher than that is amazing! As mentioned above, APA!â&#x20AC;&#x;s parvo ward started in Dr. Jeffersonâ&#x20AC;&#x;s house, so between 2008 and 2010 the dogs being treated would receive around the clock check-ups and care. As she improved her treatment methods over the months her survival rate increased quite a bit. In late 2010 APA! got a dedicated building and with that we built a parvo ward. As we have built up our parvo ward team, while our survival rate is still quite high we think we will see a steady improvement over the years as our volunteers gain more knowledge and understanding of assessing and treating the dogs.


P a g e | 273 250

Yearly Parvo data

200

150

100

50

0 2008

2009

2010

2011

Dogs Test Postive

Dogs Survived Treatment

Date

Dogs Tested Positive

Dogs Survived Treatment

Survival Rate

2008

14

10

71.43%

2009

161

135

83.85%

2010

224

200

89.29%

2011

167

137

82.04%

Total:

566

482

85.16%


P a g e | 274 35

2011 Parvo data

30 25 20 15 10 5 0 January

February

March

April

May

Dogs Tested Positive Date January February March April May June July August Total:

Dogs Tested Positive 31 22 13 21 30 31 13 6 167

June

July

August

Dogs Survived Treatment Dogs Survived Treatment 26 19 10 16 22 29 11 4 137

Survival Rate 83.87% 86.36% 76.92% 76.19% 73.33% 93.55% 84.62% 66.67% 82.04%

Cost breakdown Minor Treatment

Supply 18ga needles 3cc syringe w/needle Baytril Injectable Lactated Ringers Solution Metochlopramide Metronidazole tablets 250mg Polyflex Fluid administration drip set Canned Puppy Food

Moderate Treatment

Quantity 1 3 1.5cc 150.0cc 1.0cc 1 1.0cc 1 1

Frequency per day 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 1 2

# of days 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3

Total Used 6 18 4.5cc 900.0cc 6.0cc 3 6.0cc 1 6

Price of Container $4.44 $51.42 $163.00 $19.24 $5.60 $66.62 $35.64 $1.99 $1.50

Amount in Container 100 600 250 12000 30 250 150 1 1

Price for 15lb dog $0.27 $1.54 $2.93 $1.44 $1.12 $0.80 $1.43 $1.99 $9.00

Total

$20.52


P a g e | 275

Supply IV Catheter Zonas Tape roll for cath Vet Wrap for cath Heparin (to flush catheter) 0.01ccs Clear IV Ampicillin 0.6cc Polyflex SQ Anzemet 0.14cc Zantac 0.3cc Lactated Ringers Solution Boluses Lactated Ringers Solution SQ Potassium Chloride Vitamin B Dextrose 50% Solution Hetastarch 18ga needles Baytril Injectable Metochlopramide Metronidazole tablets 250mg Fluid administration drip set 1cc syringe w/needle 3cc syringe w/needle Canned Puppy Food

Quantity 3 0.02 0.5

Frequency per day 1 1 1

# of days 1 1 1

Total Used 3 0.02 0.5

Price of Container $0.83 $12.35 $30.13

Amount in Container 1 12 36

Price for 15lb dog $2.49 $0.02 $0.42

0.02cc 0.6cc 1.0cc 0.14cc 0.3cc

1 3 2 1 1

3 3 6 3 3

0.06cc 5.4cc 12.0cc 0.42cc 0.9cc

$13.09 $3.00 $35.64 $46.05 $33.33

10 10 150 5 40

$0.08 $1.62 $2.85 $3.87 $0.75

150cc 150cc 1.3 bottle 1.3 bottle 5cc 15cc 1 1.5cc 1.0cc 1 3 2 5 1

3 2

3 6

$19.24 $19.24

12000 12000

$2.16 $2.89

1

1

$0.65

1

$0.85

1 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 2 2 2

1 3 3 6 6 6 3 1 6 6 6

1350cc 1800cc 1.3 bottle 1.3 bottle 30cc 45cc 12 9.0cc 18.0cc 3 3 24 60 12

$2.82 $1.65 $24.96 $4.44 $163.00 $5.60 $66.62 $1.99 $17.53 $51.42 $1.50

1 50 500 100 250 30 250 1 100 600 1

$3.67 $0.99 $2.25 $0.53 $5.87 $3.36 $0.80 $5.97 $4.21 $5.14 $18.00

Total

$68.77

Severe Treatment

Supply IV Catheter Zonas Tape roll for cath Vet Wrap for cath Heparin (to flush catheter) 0.01ccs Clear IV Ampicillin 0.6cc Polyflex Anzemet 0.14cc Zantac 0.3cc Lactated Ringers Solution Boluses IV Lactated Ringers Solution SQ

Quantity 3 0.02 0.5

Frequency per day 1 1 1

# of days 1 1 1

Total Used 3 0.02 0.5

Price of Container $0.83 $12.35 $30.13

Amount in Container 1 12 36

Price for 15lb dog $2.49 $0.02 $0.42

0.02cc 0.6cc 1.0cc 0.14cc 0.3cc

1 3 2 1 1

6 6 10 6 6

0.12cc 10.8cc 20.0cc 0.84cc 1.8cc

$13.09 $3.00 $35.64 $46.05 $33.33

10 10 150 5 40

$0.16 $3.24 $4.75 $7.74 $1.50

150cc 150.0cc

3 2

6 10

2700cc 3000cc

$19.24 $19.24

12000 12000

$4.33 $4.81


P a g e | 276 Dextrose 50% Solution Potassium Chloride Vitamin B Hetastarch 18ga needles Baytril Injectable Metochlopramide Metronidazole tablets 250mg Fluid administration drip set 1cc syringe w/needle 3cc syringe w/needle Nutrical Take Home Oral Baytril 22.7mg tabs Panacur Oral Canned Puppy Food

5cc 2.7 bottle 2.7 bottle 15cc 1 1.5cc 1.0cc 1 5 2 5 1

2

3

$1.65

50

$0.99

$0.65

1

$1.76

1 6 10 10 10 3 1 10 10 1

30cc 2.7 bottle 2.7 bottle 90 20 15.0cc 30.0cc 3 5 40 100 1

1

1

1 1 2 1 3 1 1 2 2 1

$2.82 $24.96 $4.44 $163.00 $5.60 $66.62 $1.99 $17.53 $51.42 $5.00

1 500 100 250 30 250 1 100 600 1

$7.61 $4.49 $0.89 $9.78 $5.60 $0.80 $9.95 $7.01 $8.57 $5.00

1.5 3 1

1 1 2

10 3 10

15 9 20

$0.69 $100.53 $1.50

1 1000 1

$10.35 $0.90 $30.00

Total

$133.16

1 1 1 1 1 5 1 30 1

$1.47 $0.20 $0.60 $0.99 $0.10 $23.04 $0.40 $0.80 $0.40

Total

$27.99

Every dog gets the following no matter severity of treatment Parvosal Cleaner 0.2 1 1 Bleach 0.2 1 1 Laundry Soap 0.2 1 1 Paper Towels 1 1 1 Sharps container 0.01 1 1 Parvo Test 2 1 1 Hand Soap 0.2 1 1 Rawhides 1 1 3 Dog Shampoo 0.1 1 1

Average Total

0.2 0.2 0.2 1 0.01 2 0.2 3 0.1

$7.35 $0.99 $2.99 $0.99 $9.61 $57.60 $1.99 $7.99 $3.99

$100.80

Why we know you can be successful Austin Pets Alive!â&#x20AC;&#x;s parvo ward is operated by a medium sized volunteer team that comes from various backgrounds. We have a few people that are in college and are working toward being in the medical field, but we also have a few people that also have no previous medical background are just as effective at treating the dogs in our care. While Austin Pets Alive! is lucky to have two great veterinarians on staff, you should be able to find a veterinarian and/or vet tech that can come and recommend treatments and help you with some of the more advanced treatments such as IV catheters. We highly recommend having a veterinarian or vet tech oversight for your parvo program. You will also want to check your local laws on what is required when treating animals, for example in Texas pets are property and the owner of said property can do whatever they want to it as long as itâ&#x20AC;&#x;s not cruel.


P a g e | 277

Preparing to open a parvo ward Required items for a parvo ward Before you start you parvo ward and save your first puppy there are a few essential items you will need to get started, including: cleaning supplies to help contain the parvo virus to your designated “parvo ward” area and also to help prevent the spread of other diseases between patients, general dog care supplies to take care of the dogs while they are fighting the parvo virus, and then medical supplies to treat the dog patients with. All these supplies should be restricted to the parvo ward to help prevent the spread of the parvo virus to other areas.

General supplies General supplies you need for the parvo ward.

Clothes You should get a couple sets of scrubs & old shoes that can be used in the parvo ward. Instead of scrubs you could use old shirts and pajama pants.

Toilet paper Used to pick-up poop from the dogs and then flush down the toilet.

Mini-fridge Some medications need to be stored cold, so you will need something to keep them in.

Cleaning Supplies This is a list of cleaning supplies you will want to get for the parvo ward. These are important to ensure you don‟t spread the parvo virus outside the ward and that you don‟t spread other diseases between dogs if you are taking care of multiple patients.

Parvocidal Cleaner Disinfectant that kills multiple bacteria and viruses (including the parvovirus). Roccal-D or Oxivir are both great as they kill parvo and other bacteria . This is used to disinfect yourself between dogs and before leaving the parvo ward, along with cleaning up rooms after the dogs.

Bleach A general household cleaner that can kill the parvovirus. It is used when washing the laundry in the parvo ward. It can also be used in a spray bottle, diluted with water (1 part bleach, 32 parts water) to clean rooms after the dogs.

Laundry Detergent Any type of detergent is fine, you just need something to be able to clean the laundry used in the parvo ward.

Hand soap You will want an anti-bacterial hand soap so you can wash your hands between dogs to prevent spreading other germs and diseases.


P a g e | 278 Dish soap Any type of dish soap so you can wash the dishes the dogs use for water & food.

General supplies for dog care While you probably have a lot of this already, these will be used solely for the parvo ward. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x;s best not to take items out of the parvo ward once they have been used to prevent the spread of the virus to other areas of your shelter.

Bedding (towels, sheets) Old sheets and towlels work great for dog bedding. You can normally find some inexpensive items at Goodwill or any other thrift store.

Bowls To give water & food to the dogs.

Food (dry & wet) You will want a few different types of food so that you can try out a variety of foods when trying to get the dog to eat. The reason you want a few different varieties, is that if a dog is eating and still vomiting with a certain type of food we have noticed they are less prone to continue eating if we keep giving them the same type of food since they are associating the sickness to that food smell/taste.

Toys Things to keep the dogs occupied when they are feeling better but not quite free of the parvo virus yet.

Dog Shampoo Needed for cleaning the dog after the are parvo free.

Nail Clipper Needed for clipping their nails after they are parvo free

ToothBrush Used to scrub their nails and paws after they are parvo free to remove any dirt, fecal matter, etc.

Warmth A lot of the dogs will need things to provide extra warmth. Sweaters for smaller dogs are a good thing to have on hand since smaller dogs tend to need the extra warmth the most. Heating pads are also a good thing (always make sure you put a towel on top of the pad so it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x;t get too hot for the dog). Also fleece blankets are another good thing to have on hand to wrap up the dogs with if they are cool.

Medical supplies Thermometer To take the dogs temperatures.

Lubricant To make taking the dogs temperature & also doing the parvo tests less uncomfortable for them.


P a g e | 279 SNAP parvo testing kits Testing kits used for checking dogs for the parvo virus when they are showing symptoms at your shelter, and also when you think they are cured from your wardâ&#x20AC;&#x;s treatment. These are stored cold.

Syringes 1cc, 3cc, and 10cc syringes.

18 Gauge needles Used for giving subcutaneous (SQ) injections of Lactated Ringers.

Plain Lactated Ringer bags Solutions used for giving dogs fluids: Plain Lactated Ringer Solutions (LRS) or .9% Sodium Chloride Solution.

IV Lines Lines used to connect to the Lactated Ringer bags.

DHLPP vaccines Used to provide in-take vaccinations to the puppies. A series of vaccinations to project against Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis, Parvo, and Parainfluenza.

Frontline A medication used on in-take to fight fleas and ticks. You can choose another flea/tick medication for this if you choose.

Bordatella A vaccination used on in-take to fight against Kennel cough.

Sterile Water Used to reconstitute dry-filled medication vials such as Polyflex and Ampicilin.

Baytril An antibiotic that is clear (somewhat yellow) in color. It is one of the main medications used during treatment.

Polyflex An antibiotic that is white, viscous, and opaque. It needs to be stored cold. It is another one of the main medications used during treatment

Metoclopromide (Reglan) A anti-emetic (reduces vomiting) that is clear in color. It is one of the main medications used for our parvo treatment.

Strongid A de-wormer that is yellow, viscous, and opaque.

Metronidazole An anti-infective that comes in pill form 250mg and 500mg.


P a g e | 280 Where and how to purchase medical supplies Online purchases MWI Veterinary Supply: https://www.mwivet.com

Through a vet office You can go to a local Veterinarian to order medical supplies as well.

Saving your first parvo puppy Now that you have all your supplies you are ready to start saving lives!

Pre-Treatment In-Take Containment If a dog came from your program you will want to make sure to thoroughly clean the area they were in using a parvocidal cleaner. Roccal-D needs to sit 10 minutes to be fully effective. Oxivir also needs to sit if you are using that. We will generally do a spray down and wipe up everything that can be, followed by another spray down that you let air dry. If dogs come in crates from another shelter, before taking the crate out of the parvo ward you will want to thoroughly clean that. Any laundry that is inside the parvo ward should not leave unless you have cleaned it three times with soap/bleach (as outlined in the laundry section).

Testing You should verify there was a test done on the dog and it came back positive before you bring them into the parvo ward.

Companionship If dogs come in the same litter, we normally keep them in the same room to give each other some company. You can also do this with non-litter mates. There are a few things you need to be careful with though. If there is a chance a dog has distemper don‟t put them in a room with other dogs. Also you don‟t want to room dogs with each other if they are on an IV drip/pump so that you don‟t get IV lines tangled up.

Vaccinations Some shelters vaccinate on in-take so you will want to check what vaccinations the dog has received recently. Make sure they are updated on the following vaccinations:

DHLPP It comes with 2 vials: a sterile diluent and dry powder vial. You mix the sterile diluent into the dry vial. Then draw the well mixed medication into your syringe and administer SQ into the right shoulder.


P a g e | 281 Bordatella It comes with 2 vials: a sterile diluent and dry powder vial. You mix the sterile diluent into the dry vial. Pull the mixed solution into your syringe and remove the needle. Apply a nasal applicator to the syringe and administer to both nostrils.

Frontline This medication dose depends on the dogs weight, they receive 0.3cc for every 10lbs of body weight. It is applied to the neck skin.

Filling out patient chart information See (Parvo Intake Paperwork) and (Parvo Dog Treatment Sheet). You will want to make sure you note the date of any vaccinations you did on the Intake Paperwork and all other relevant information.

Treatment Each time you go to treat the parvo dogs you will want to look through all the patients and see if there are any that need to be taken care of sooner than others based on their appearance, the amount & type of feces & vomit present in their room. ALWAYS wash your hands between patients. This section will only discuss SQ treatment, later on we have a section that will discuss IV treatment and the medications associated with that.

Checking patients status Before medicating any dogs you will want to assess how they are doing & note all observed information on their Treatment Sheet:

Weight You donâ&#x20AC;&#x;t have to weigh the dogs every time. You should weigh them upon in-take, and if they are doing very poorly you may weigh them occasionally to determine exactly how much weight they are losing.

Temperature It is not necessary to take their exact temperature every time, though we do on the very sick dogs.

Circulation Check the color of their gums, they should be pink. If they are gray or white their circulation is really low. You can also do a capillary refill test by pressing your finger again their gum for a second and lift off to see how quickly color returns. Color should return immediately for healthy circulation, if it doesnt that means they are very dehydrated or have very poor circulation. One of the tests we do every time we look at a dog, is feel their paws. Often that gets confused with body temperature checks. The real purpose is to assess circulation. A dog that is shocky or about to go into shock because of Parvo will have cold paws from lack of circulation (the body is trying to conserve energy to prevent dying). This is a sign that iv fluid bolus and/or hetastarch are needed asap.

Attitude We generally measure lethargy by a few states: Semi-comatose, Lethargic, Quiet, Alert, and Reactive(QAR), & Bright, Alert and Reactive(BAR). This is done just by observing the dog and their reaction to you entering their room.


P a g e | 282 Hydration When you touch their gums you can feel if their gums are moist or dry. If nauseous or recently vomiting, gums will be wet with saliva but that doesn't mean they are well hydrated. In general, it is pretty hard to over-hydrate a parvo puppy because they are losing so much fluid from vomit and diarrhea. That is why we sometimes do three times per day treatments, to help increase fluids in the face of massive fluid losses.

Feces & vomit Look for feces and vomit, and note what they look like. Feces of concern are: runny, bloody, dark. Vomit is never good, but be on the lookout for: syrupy vomit. See the below sections on types of feces and vomit for more information.

Signs to watch out for & how to react Types of Feces Bloody – This is normal for dogs with parvo, generally you want to look at how much is there during assessment. Between the feces, vomit and urine you can get a good idea of how many fluids have left the dog since you last saw them. You react through normal treatment. Serumy (looks like Karol Syrup) - This means their intestines are leaking proteins. You react to this by giving hetastarch (discussed below in the advanced treatment section). Black – This is digested blood, and you will normally see this when the dog is getting over parvo and their system is cleaning out.

Types of vomit Bloody – This means there are ulcerations in their stomach. You should give them some sort of antacid, such as Pepcid or zantac. Bright yellow/green – This means there is too much acid in their stomach. Again you can give them an antacid, such as Pepcid or zantac. Watery/clear – This means you are letting them drink too much water. While it may seem like drinking water is a good thing to rehydrate them, the dog doesn‟t know how much water is enough so will over drink and vomit. Instead of giving plain water, mix with wet or dry food and then the dog won‟t drink as much plus they will be getting some nutrients from the food.

Abscess Caused by Baytril not being absorbed and or diluted enough. If you see this, you will want to make sure you are giving Baytril with Plain Lactated Ringers and also changing up the locations that you are giving other medications. If you see an Abscess forming, do not administer more Baytril to the same location, change to somewhere else.

Preparing & administering medications Generally speaking, dogs will receive Baytril, Polyflex and Metoclopromide until they are starting to eat a good amount again. Once they are eating, we swap them over to Metronidazole. If the dogs are very sick they will get more and that is discussed in the advanced treatment section.


P a g e | 283 Plain Lactated Ringer Dosage amount 100cc for every 10lbs of body weight, 2 to 3 times per day.

Administering First check that the dog is absorbing fluids from previous treatments. If they are not, you will want to lower the amount of fluids given or skip fluids for one treatment. To check that, you look for a „sack‟ of fluids that is under their skin. Connect a clean 18 gauge needle to the end of the line on the LRS bag. If you are giving the dog Baytril with other medications you will want to bring a second clean needle to change out between the Baytril injection and the others. Note how much fluid is in the bag currently, and where it will be at once you give the correct amount of fluids, it can be helpful to make a line with a permanent marker. Then you will lift up a „tent‟ of skin, basically scruff the dog, between the shoulder blades and push the needle into the skin. Open up the line so and check that the bag is flowing, you may need to move the needle around a bit to get a good flow. If you need to give Baytril and other medications, then you‟d do the Baytril first then close off the line after at least 20cc of LRS and replace the needle with a new clean one. Make a „tent‟ of skin in a different location and inject under the skin, open the line again until the desired amount of fluids has been given. When you are giving SQ medications (Baytril, Polyflex, etc) you can inject them into the LRS line so that they go in with the LRS. See below for recommendations on when to give the various medications with the LRS.

Baytril (100mg/mL) Dosage amount 1cc for every 10lbs of body weight, once per day.

Administering Baytril is always given SQ (NEVER IV) and must be accompanied by at least 20cc of plain LRS or it will cause an abscess. If there are other SQ medications, the Baytril must be injected in a different location than the others. We generally give Baytril first and then set the SQ line to a different location. Draw up the proper amount of Baytril into a syringe and inject into the IV line when giving at least 20cc of LRS.

Metoclopromide (Reglan) (5mg/mL) Dosage amount 0.5cc for every 10lbs of body weight, 2 to 3 times per day depending on amount of vomit.


P a g e | 284 Administering Draw up the proper amount of Metoclopromide and when giving LRS, inject into the IV line. You can give this as quickly as you want when giving with LRS.

Polyflex (200mg/mL) Dosage amount 0.5cc for every 10lbs of body weight, 2 to 3 times per day depending on how sick they are.

Administering Polyflex is always given SQ (NEVER IV)! Prior to drawing up the Polyflex, you will want to shake the bottle vigorously to ensure it is well mixed. Polyflex also stings, so we recommend this is one of the last medications you give to the dog. Draw up the proper amount of Polyflex and when giving the LRS inject into the IV line.

Strongid Dosage amount 1.0cc for every 10lbs of body weight, once after they are eating again.

Administering Without a needle on a syringe, draw up the proper amount of Strongid and give to the dog orally. It is best to give it in smaller amounts, 1-2cc at a time, if they are getting a larger dose so they have time to swallow it.

Metronidazole Dosage amount 125mg for every 10lbs of body weight, once per day for 3 days after they are eating again.

Administering If required break the pill in half or forth so that it is the right amount of medication for the dogs size. If the dog isnâ&#x20AC;&#x;t too squirmy you can pinch your forefinger and thumb on either side of the dogs mouth to get them to open and then drop the pill into the back of their throat. Hold the dogs mouth shut, with their nose in the air and massage the dogs throat. You can also gently blow on the dogs nose. Wait to see that the dog swallows. You can also put the pill into a treat or wet food and get the dog to eat it that way.

Cleaning up their room Youâ&#x20AC;&#x;ll want to make sure to pickup any solid poop with toilet paper and flush it down the toilet. Using a towel and a parvocidal cleaner to wipe up any diarrhea from the floor and wipe up any diarrhea from the sheets. Replace all their dirty sheets with fresh ones. If they have any toys that are dirty you will want to replace those too. Place all their dirty laundry & toys in the washer (or dirty laundry hamper to wash later).

Post-Treatment When to test & testing When a dog has been active and responsive for treatments, eating solid food, drinking water, has had solid formed feces, and no vomit for two consecutive shifts then the dog is ok to test.


P a g e | 285 The SNAP tests have instructions on them so you should review them in case they change between when this document was written and when you are testing.

Cleaning the puppy and their room After your dog is parvo free you are ready to remove them from the parvo ward and get them ready to be adopted. When removing a dog from the parvo ward you have to be very mindful of not contaminating areas outside. Our washtub for the dogs is outside of our parvo ward so we follow a few procedures that can be helpful depending on how your area is setup:      

        

Setup a clean crate with some bedding/towels (non-parvo ward ones) inside. Get a clean towel (non-parvo ward one) to dry the dog after he is bathed. Also get a clean hospital gown (non-parvo ward one). Roll up scrub pants to your knees so they are not dragging on the ground and take off parvo shoes. Have a tub filled with a parvocidal cleaner to disinfect your feet. Have the shampoo, nailclippers, and toothbrush ready at the wash tub, and make sure the water is warm. Remove any collar from the dog o You can soak it in a bowl of 30parts water: 1part bleach if it is not too dirty while you bathe the dog. o I the collar is soiled, place in the parvo dirty laundry. (make sure to keep any tags that belong to the dog with their paperwork) Pickup the puppy from the parvo ward and carry him/her to the washtub. Make sure to step completely into the footbath on your way outside of the ward. Set the puppy in the washtub. We have a leash in the tub that we put around them to prevent them from jumping out. Thoroughly wash the dog with shampoo from head to toe including anal area, ear tips, mouth, and feet. Use toe clipper to clip off the very tips of the toe nails Use toothbrush to scrub the pads, tops of each nail, and underneath each nail. Rinse and re-wash the dog from head to toe again with shampoo. Put on the clean hospital gown so that when you pickup the puppy he/she isn‟t touching your parvo clothes. Dry off the puppy with the clean towel you have set aside. Place them in their crate after they are dried off, you may need to give them extra towels to keep them warm if they are particularly small or young. Spray off all their paperwork & any collar tags that were removed from dirty collar with a parvocidal cleaner and place on top of crate. Your puppy is now ready to be picked up and processed into your adoption program!

Next is cleaning up their room so it is ready for your next patient:   

Much like you do during your regular treatment days, you will pick up all solid poop with a paper towel and flush in the toilet. Wipe up all liquids with a towel and place the towel in the wash. Sweep up all food, lint, hair, etc into a dustpan and place in trash.


P a g e | 286     

Fill a bucket/sink with 1in of warm water and soap, and use a mop to put soapy water all over the floor in the room. Mop up sections at a time and squeeze into the sink. Caked on poop you will need a scrapper to scrape it off (clean the scrapper afterward). Once everything has been cleaned, spray Rocall on every surface and let it sit & air dry. Use 409 on windows inside/out.

How to deal with deceased dogs This will be one of the toughest parts of having a parvo ward. Losing a puppy is never pleasant, but unfortunately it will happen. The one piece of advice we can give you is that while you may lose some, your parvo ward is saving a lot of lives and giving so many dogs a second chance. Our protocol for deceased dogs is the following:   

      

Ensure the dog is deceased. Get a clean towel and place the dog on it. With clean hands get a clean bag (we normally have a few of those thicker black garbage bags), place the dog in the bag being careful not to let the outside of the bag touch any poopy areas on the floor. Seal the bag and place the bag in a cleaner area of the parvo ward (we use our kitchen area) With clean hands get a second bag, bring the dog in the first bag to a clean area and place inside the second bag. Wash hands and seal second bag Spray outside of bag with parvocidal cleaner and set bag outside of parvo ward in a tub or in a crate. Label the bag with any sort of shelter identification number and its name. Write died on patient paperwork, and put paperwork in whichever bin you use for processing dogs into your pet database. We drop our deceased dogs to the local city shelter and let the know their shelter#, and make sure they are aware the dog was parvo positive so they are extra careful to not contaminate their shelter.

General Parvo ward best practices This section is best practices to use on a daily basis to avoid spreading parvo outside of your designated ward area. You should ready through all of these and incorporate them in your own ward, along with putting up any friendly reminder signs for your parvo team to remember.

Clean room for entering & exiting the ward Our parvo ward has an entrance with a footwash tub that we keep filled with about an inch of parvocidal cleaner, along with some clothes hooks to hang our street clothes up when changing into scrubs. 

Entrance: o Step inside door and no further. o Take off street clothes including socks. o Step across tape line and put on scrub top and bottom. o Put on clogs/parvo shoes. o Do not step near door/sink again in these clothes. Exit:


P a g e | 287 o o o o o

Remove scrub tops and bottoms and shoes BEFORE crossing tape line into door/sink area. Step into door/sink area and wash hands in sink by door. Put on street clothes. Use bottle of disinfectant to pour a little in the foot bath then walk out through foot bath Make sure both feet step firmly in foot bath disinfectant then lock door and leave.

Parvo ward specific clothes & shoes It is recommended you have clothes that stay in your parvo ward to be used in there. We have a lot of scrubs in ours which can be purchased at thrift stores for not very much. We also have a couple pairs of shoes. We find the rubber clogs (like crocs) are good as they clean easily if they end up getting messy. You will want to wash these fairly regularly, or if they get visible poop on them you should also wash them.

Washing hands between patients Always wash your hands thoroughly between each patient. This will prevent other diseases from passing between patients. If you have any ringworm or mange pups it is also a good idea to spray off your clothes with Roccal or Oxivir after handling those dogs.

Daily inventory Depending on if you have a medical clinic you may or may not have access to additional medications. At Austin Pets Alive we keep a majority of our medications in our medical clinic and when we run low on certain medications in the parvo ward we let the clinic know. We take an inventory of all our medications every shift (twice a day) to make sure the following shift will have enough medications to treat all the patients, it also lets us know when we are getting low on certain medications and can let the medical clinic know. If they end up needing to order meds to restore our stock, the daily inventory helps them know in advance.

Laundry Keeping on top of laundry is very important in the parvo ward. Since a lot of the sheets and towels are soiled with fecal matter you want to make sure those gets washed ASAP to attracting flys. Unless we have very critical patients, we try to start a load of laundry at the beginning of each shift. We also make sure the dryer and washer are off before leaving to avoid any fires. Here are our washing and drying check lists: 

Washer: o Do not overload washing machine o Make sure towels are evenly distributed to avoid washer stopping. o Use ¼ cup detergent and ¼ cup bleach o Set cycle to 4 minutes. Dryer: o Clean lint filter each time o Push on to start and open door to stop o Dryer will not stop on its own so make sure stopped before leaving for the shift.

General Cleaning Dishes You‟ll want to keep dishes clean between dogs. Wash them well with a sponge and liquid soap. If a dog‟s dish has poop or pee on it you should wash it off.


P a g e | 288 Hallways & kitchen area It is a good idea to clean the common area where you prepare medications, do laundry, wash dishes, etc on a regular basis (once per week). We do the following:    

Sweep and collect in dustbin then put in trash. Mop with warm soapy water to decrease spread of virus starting near door and working inward towards dryer then into kitchen/storage area (start in cleanest area first and move to dirtiest). Spray all floor surfaces with a parvocidal cleaner and let dry. Spray the dryer, fridge, washer, and toilet with a parvocidal cleaner (in that order) and wipe with rag, then wash rag used to clean these surfaces in washer.

Trash & Recycling You‟ll inevitably get a lot of trash and recycling inside your parvo ward. You will always want to be extra careful when removing both from the parvo ward to avoid contaminating any outside areas. Here are our disposal procedures: 

Trash: o When bag is full, remove from can and set on clean floor area. Continue to fill bag until truly full. Replace bag in can (if out, there are more in other bathroom). o Tie up full bag of trash and spray entire outside with a parvocidal cleaner including bottom of bag and ties. Then set in clean area of entrance. o When finished with parvo care, take bag to trash can being careful not to set down on any surfaces or rub up against things on way out. Trash should be taken out right before trash pickup to prevent raccoons from getting into the trash. (reminder: some forms of the canine parvovirus can infect raccoons). Recycling: o When box is full, spray outside of box with a parvocidal cleaner and set near entrance so it can be put out in recycling area on Wednesday night for pick up on Thursday (our recycling pickup day).

Expanding your Parvo program Once you get the procedure of caring for parvo puppies down, you may want to look at expanding your program so you can take in and care for more parvo puppies. Expanding your program can come in a few different areas: The first of which would be getting a team together so that you always have someone that has been trained to cover all the shifts required for caring for your dogs. We also notice in Austin that there are busy seasons for parvo puppies, so having a team will help to treat more dogs during that time. If you have the space and resources, you can also look into building a parvo ward from the ground up to meet all the requirements. And finally there are some more advanced treatment methods for parvo puppies that require more medical knowledge and a vet/vettech to help with. These treatment methods will increase your survival rate greatly, especially for puppies that are very sick.


P a g e | 289 Building and training a team of volunteers APA! has had great success with volunteers with no medical background, so do not limit yourself when you are looking to increase the size of your team. You will hopefully have a volunteer recruiting team built up (see other handbook on building a volunteer team for better details), you should utilize this to get people interested in the team.

Training Training should be very hands on, we recommend the embedded learning method of “Watch one, Do one, Teach one”. Have your new volunteer watch you perform a specific procedure on one of the dogs, be sure to explain each step that you are taking and why the step is important:    

Assess the dog Draw up the medications Give the medications Make relevant notes and observations on the medical chart.

On the next dog have your new volunteer perform all the procedure. If the other dog ends up requiring additional medications you should step in to show them those only. Encourage them to ask clarifying questions and try to let them figure everything out on their own, but definitely step in if you see them about to make a mistake. On their second or third training session, have the new volunteer teach the procedure to you or if you or someone else. This will help them remember not only what they are doing with each step but why each step is taken. One thing to note about the Austin Pets Alive volunteer team is that they are not required to calculate dosage amounts for the animals. All of that is done by the medical team on a daily basis and dosage amounts required are written on the chart for the volunteer to follow.

Building a dedicated parvo ward Clean room When building out a parvo ward, the clean room is a very important part so that you can properly disinfect before leave the ward and avoid spreading the virus to other parts of your shelter. Our clean room has a door to the outside and a curtain to the ward so that people can change out of their street clothes and into the parvo scrubs in privacy. We also have a sink to wash our hands before changing back into our street clothes. And also have a foot wash tub that we put a parvocidal cleaner into, and step into the tub before leaving the ward. The clean room also has a spray bottle of parvocidal cleaner to spray off your feet, hands, etc so you can be extra careful. Another crucial part of the clean room is having a designated “street clothes” area and a designated “parvo area. We have a line of tape on the floor that we never let parvo clothes, shoes, etc cross.


P a g e | 290 Washer & Dryer Having a washer and dryer inside of the ward helps immensely with doing laundry regularly and not having to bring laundry outside of your parvo ward.

Separate rooms Having separate rooms with glass doors or at least windows on the doors is another good thing to consider. Windows or glass doors allow you to do a quick patient check without having to go into each room. The separate rooms also allow you to prevent the spread of other various diseases between the dogs.

Sink & Toilet A sink with a garbage disposal is nice when washing dishes and will help prevent the sink from getting clogged by food, not to mention a sink also lets you wash your hands between each patient using antibacterial soap. A toilet is good to dispose of toilet paper that you use to pick up feces with to prevent spreading the virus outside of the ward area.

Advanced treatment methods For pretty much every one of the advanced treatments you will need someone (a vet or vet tech) that has been trained in putting in and monitoring IV catheters.

IV catheters IV catheters are fragile, so when disconnecting the IV line to administer any medications via IV you will want to be very careful not to pull on the catheter when disconnecting the line. This can cause the catheter to come out of the vein and then all medications would be going under the skin (sq) instead. When administering IV medications always keep an eye on the catheter area for swelling. If swelling occurs, stop IV medications and contact your trained professional to come look at the catheter and possibly set it again.

IV Medications Heparin This is an anticoagulant (blood thinner) that prevents the formation of blood clots. It is used to flush the IV catheters when there is a clot formed and the pump or IV drip is no longer flowing properly.

Dosage amount Never inject straight Heparin into a dog! To create a “flush”, get a 3cc syringe and pull in about 0.5cc of Heparin from the vial. With the syringe needle pointing upward push all the air and heparin back into the medicine vial. You only need the amount of Heparin that is left in the tip of the syringe. After that you fill the syringe with plain Lactated Ringer solution (we normally have a bag hanging above the sink that is labeled “For Flush only” to create flushes for the dogs)

Administering To un-clot an IV, get your 3cc flush syringe and connect it to the IV catheter. See if you can push the liquid in, if that works then reconnect the IV line and see if the drip/pump starts flowing again. If simply pushing liquid into the catheter doesn‟t work you can try „plunging‟ which is attempting to push liquid in and also pulling liquid out. You may see some blood come into the syringe with this. That generally means the clot is gone and you should be able to push liquid in easily. Try connecting the IV drip/pump again. We also use the flush between each IV medication to ensure it doesn‟t drip out of the catheter between medications.


P a g e | 291 Ampicillin This is the IV equivalent of Polyflex (listed above in the normal treatment section). It is clear instead of the vicious white fluid of Polyflex. Just like Polyflex this comes in a vial with dry powder that you have to reconstitute with sterile water.

Dosage amount 100mg (cc amount depends on the fluid amount used when reconstituting the dried powder) for every 10lbs of body weight, 2-3 times per day.

Administering IV only.

Anzemet This is a long acting anti-vomit that is used in addition to the reglan if there is lots of vomiting occurring.

Dosage amount 0.15cc for every 10lbs of body weight, once per day.

Administering SQ or IV.

Zantac An antacid

Dosage amount 0.5 cc for every 10lbs of body weight, once per day.

Administering Hetastarch It is a starch derivative that is used as a plasma volume expander. Used to help circulation.

Dosage amount 10 to 20mL per kg per day

Administering Given IV only!

Dextrose Sterile sugars for low blood sugar

Dosage amount It comes at 50% strength in the bottle. You want to dilute into IV fluids to get the dextrose to 5% strength.

Administering Given via IV pump or drip.


P a g e | 292 Nutrical A high-calorie dietary supplement that is brown and viscous. It‟s used to increase a dog‟s blood sugar and energy when they have not been eating for a while

Dosage amount follow bottle instructions - used when they can hold it down & for longer parvo cases to get their blood sugar and protein levels up

Administering Without a needle on a syringe, draw up the proper amount of Strongid and give to the dog orally. It is best to give it in smaller amounts, 1-2cc at a time, if they are getting a larger dose so they have time to swallow it.

IV Fluid Bags We generally mix our IV bags of plain lactated ringers, 5% strength dextrose, 3cc per L of reglan, 20mEq per bag of KCL/Potassium Chloride. Normal infusion rate is 20mL per hour per 10lbs of body weight, up to 50mL per hour per 10lbs of body weight.

IV Bolus Treatment This is used for very dehydrated dogs to get them extra fluids into their system. It is just plain LRS given (make sure bag doesn‟t have KCL or Reglan already mixed!) via an IV drip over about an hour. 100mL per 10lbs of body weight. Since it is possible to over hydrate a dog, you will want to monitor this to ensure you don‟t give too many fluids. You can either pay close attention to the IV drip while giving the dog some extra attention/love. Or if you have to step away make sure the bag only has the amount you need to administer so no more is given if you don‟t return on time.

Learning from mistakes and overcoming roadblocks Chester‟s story He had jugular catheter, and the catheter came out of the vein so IV medications were going under the skin including Dextrose. This caused the skin to slough off (as pictured). While seeing this on a jugular catheter is difficult, it was a reminder that we need to pay attention when administering IV medications if there is any swelling around that area. That means the catheter has come out of the vein. It was also another great reminder on why you never give Dextrose or Hetastarch SQ. Again if you observe swelling when administering IV medications, then stop treatment and contact your vet/vettech to come check out the catheter.

Tina and Pepper‟s story Tina was hit by parvo pretty bad and ended up passing away under our care. Her siblings were lucky to not get hit as bad by parvo and


P a g e | 293 made it out fine. Pepper came into the parvo ward shortly after Tina, and she was reacting very similarly to Tina. Our team knew if we didn‟t act quickly we could lose her too. We were lucky to have some plasma that had been donated to APA! when a few of our dogs had heat stroke, so Pepper received 3 plasma transfusions along with Hetastarch, Dextrose, etc to make sure she had everything she needed to stay hydrated and fight off parvo. Some of our staff would stay the night to ensure her IV pump was running and getting her the medications she required.

IV pumps woes Another lesson that has been learned, our IV pumps have had issues where they clog up overnight and the dogs were not getting their fluids. This was due to the IV lines being placed where they normally are, in the middle of the arm. Because the catheter may reach close to the elbow, when the dogs lies down to sleep it kinks the line and stops the pump. Instead we place the catheters closer to the dogs wrist area so it isn‟t as likely to kink when the dog bends its arm.

Forms & Documents used by Austin Pets Alive This section shows what our typical forms look like. Look in the Parvo directory on your media CD to get easy to print versions of all of these forms.

Patient in-take form We fill out this form on in-take so that we can enter him into our pet database (Pet Point) and once the dog comes out of the ward we update the database with all his medical information.

Daily patient medical form Our vet staff comes in to evaluate the dogs on a daily basis, and will fill out which medications they recommend for them. The volunteer team follows these recommendations, and if they notice anything odd with the dog during the assessment portion they will notify the medical team and will sometimes be told to administer additional medications. This is noted on the chart as well under the notes section.

IV pump log We created this since our pumps were getting clogged overnight. Each shift writes down the rate of infusion, along with what current to be infused number is. Then if someone comes in one the next shift and the pump is clogged and not running they can determine how long the pump was running before it was clogged and how long the dog has been without additional fluids.

Inventory sheet We fill this out after each shift to ensure that the next shift won‟t be missing any important supplies or medications. If anything is missing we notify the medical clinic to get stocked up, or in the case of food & cleaning supplies we can get those from outside of the parvo ward and set them near the door before we leave.

Volunteer Schedule Sheet Our volunteer lead sends this sheet out weekly to let people know what their schedule is.


P a g e | 294 Post Parvo Hand-out This is given to owners that come to us for treatment of their parvo dogs so that they are well informed on what they dog had and how to monitor their health and avoid spreading to other dogs.


P a g e | 295

Cat Adoptions Four Ways! Introduction Your thriving cat adoptions program will be the lifesaver of countless cats in your community. You don‟t have to have a large budget, tons of staff, or even your own shelter building to start saving lives today. You just have to have the drive, some limited supplies, and a few trained adoption counselors. This manual will go over how APA! runs a cat adoptions program responsible for saving thousands of cats in Central Texas that were previously considered by some to be “unadoptable.”

Getting Started Building a Relationship Your Local Open Intake Shelter. In order to start saving lives you will need to have a relationship developed with a local kill shelter. This is the shelter from which you‟ll be pulling cats on a regular basis and the shelter that you‟ll be helping towards making your community a No-Kill community. Here in Austin, our open-intake shelter is Town Lake Animal Center most commonly referred to as TLAC by APA! staff and volunteers. Even if you‟ve got a history of contentious relations with your local open-intake shelter you will need to build a strong working relationship based on respect and trust. It will be important to be sure that not only your staff but your volunteers sees the open-intake shelter as your partner and not your enemy or adversary. This is a topic that should be directly discussed during staff trainings and volunteer orientations. It can be helpful to keep in mind that the staff working at the open-intake shelter are usually kind, goodhearted people who also care about the animals and will be thankful that you are giving the cats they‟ve worked with a second chance at a new life. APA! volunteers and staff have been approached, numerous times, by kennel techs or other staff at TLAC and sincerely thanked for giving the cats we‟re pulling a second chance. Remember, also, that shelter killing can become a very institutional mind-set; it can be hard for shelter directors to see that there are other options available to them because admitting that there is another adoption is to admit that you‟ve unnecessarily killed defenseless animals. However, from the very day you start working with your open-intake shelter they are your partner towards making your community a No-Kill community; any previous animosity needs to take a backseat to your new goal or it will impede your progress.

Selecting Cats for Your Program Once you‟ve developed a relationship with an open-intake shelter it‟s time to start reviewing the cats on the at-risk list and to start getting ready to pull your first cats into your program. At APA! we have a Cat Rescue Team that evaluates every single cat on the at-risk list each day. These evaluations, which will be discussed in further detail in the Rescue Team presentations, help us to determine a cat‟s adoptability, current health status, the type of home that would be best for the cat, any potential issues of which we‟ll need to be aware when seeking a new home for this cat and whether the cat is one that is a good fit for the APA! adoptions program.


P a g e | 296 Necessary Materials and Staff to Complete Your First Adoption Prior to beginning an adoptions program there are some materials and staff that will be necessary to get started. You don‟t need a large staff or a lot of fancy materials. To start you‟ll just need some basic materials and at least one staff member or even a dedicated volunteer who is willing to work a regular shift as a staff member would.

Set Your Adoption Fee Structure and Basic Rules One of the first things that you‟ll need to do is to determine what your organization‟s adoption fees and standards will be. Will you use one set fee for all cats? Will you have some sort of sliding scale depending on age of the cat, health of the cat, and length of stay? What will your basic adoption standards be? Will you have basic requirements for adoption that all applicants must meet? Some common concerns with adoption standards are: Will you adopt to applicants under the age of 21? What type of proof regarding pet deposits etc. Will you require a letter from a landlord if a renter wishes to adopt? Does landlord require declawing? What sorts of circumstances will cause to deny an adoption?

Adoption Materials You‟ll need some basic adoption packets prepared before your first day of adoptions. A basic adoption packet at APA! includes an adoption application, a contract, a medical history sheet, and a basic take home instructions packet. We also have a series of additional handouts that we add to adoption packets depending on the individual cat and adoption circumstances. These additional handouts cover a wide range of issues, mostly related health and behavior, and they are all included in your materials. Your adoptions team would then discuss these handouts with the potential adopter and all relevant information is disclosed to the potential adopter prior to completing a contract. Other materials and items needed to complete an adoption are basic office supplies such as pens, twopocket folders to use as adoption folders, a few clipboards for adopters to use to fill out their applications, a folding table, and a couple of chairs that your counselor can sit at with potential adopters to discuss an application or complete an adoption. All of these items can be obtained without a great deal of expense to your organization. Folding tables and chairs are usually very easy to find at garage sales, on websites such as Freecycle or Craigslist, or even sitting in an unused corner in the basement of many homes. Folders, pens, and printing paper can be purchased in bulk. The greatest expense will be the printing of adoption packets – whether printed by your organization or through a local printshop. The materials provided are as brief as possible but it is necessary that they be several pages long so that all the relevant information to make for a successful adoption is included. Don‟t be afraid to ask local printshops or office supply stores for donations; the worst they can do is say no and if you don‟t ask you could lose out on a great opportunity! APA! has had success in having printing services donated by a local printshop.

At Least One Trained Adoption Counselor Finally, to complete your first adoption you‟ll need at least one trained adoption counselor. Generally, this is a staff member. However, APA! recently conducted a pilot program in training a few of our most dependable volunteers to complete adoptions. The program was very successful and has now been expanded to an official volunteer team. This small but dedicated team of volunteer adoption counselors has been very helpful to APA! during busy adoption days; it allows us to complete more adoptions, have short or


P a g e | 297 no wait times for adopters, and to have extra “staff” on hand without stressing the already limited budget of a small organization.

Basic Animal Care Items Required for Any Type of Adoption Site You‟ll need a few basic items to care for the cats, even if you are conducting an in-shelter program where the cats‟ primary care is not the responsibility of your organization. Cat supplies: collars, soft, fluffy linens, food, water (both kitten & adult. Wet & kibble), variety of cat toys, clumping litter, litter boxes, nail trimmers, extra carriers & treats. These items can generally be purchased in bulk through online warehouses (APA! uses PetEdge.com) for lower prices than you would find at other pet supply stores; also keep an eye out on sales and stock up when prices are reduced. Other supplies include: cleaning supplies such as paper towels & disinfectant. A basic first aid kit. If you can afford it, a microchip scanner is invaluable especially when cats look alike!

Record Keeping and Banking You‟ll need a few basic record keeping plans to begin an adoptions program. You‟ll need to decide if you want to use a software program to maintain your behavior, medical, and other records all in one place or if you‟d prefer to only keep physical files. You will also need bank accounts set up to deposit adoption fees, purchase supplies, deposit donations, and pay for staffing. APA! uses PetPoint software to maintain our files for each animal in our program. The software is relatively easy to navigate and accessible from anywhere with an internet connection, including on a smartphone. This software allows for APA! Staff and administration to share information across teams in a very effective manner. It also links to our website and allows for the cats‟ biographical information and marketing photos/videos to be uploaded onto the website. APA! has also developed an accounting log used by all adoption counselors on a daily basis to track adoptions and donations at their respective sites. The accounting log is included in your electronic materials.

Training Your Staff and Adoptions Volunteers Overview The training required will depend on the protocols you have chosen. However, any training program should include both reviews of employee manuals and protocols in addition to hands-on training at an adoption site or event prior to going solo.

Training: Staff Adoption Counselors At APA! new staff adoption counselors are asked to come for a working interview prior to being hired. The potential new hire assists current counselors for several hours at site so that they can learn more about APA!, our mission, and get a true understanding of just how physically and mentally demanding the work of an adoption counselor can be. During working interview the trainer observes how well the potential counselor is with verbal commands, if they understand cat behavior and how they physically handle the cat. In addition are they friendly, outgoing with the public. See how they reason and problem solve etc. If the working interview is successful and the candidate is hired, he or she is given an APA! Cat Counselor


P a g e | 298 Handbook to review/learn and then completes a week‟s worth of training shifts. The APA! Cat Counselor Handbook is included in your electronic materials.

Training: Volunteer Adoption Counselors Volunteer adoption counselors are recruited from within our existing pool of experienced volunteers so they are already familiar with APA!, our mission, our general policies, and have usually seen at least one adoption take place. Prior to training, the volunteer counselors are given copies of the APA! Cat Counselor Handbook and other adoption protocol and then attend a training session with the Adoptions Manager and Volunteer Adoption Counselor leads. These one-time, in classroom training sessions usually last approximately two hours. At this training, the new counselors are given the chance to review some sample applications for red-flags or concerns; walked through an entire adoption process; each part of the application, contract, and take home packets are explained; and the volunteer counselor is given the opportunity to ask questions. Volunteer counselors are then expected to shadow a staff counselor or experienced volunteer counselor until they are comfortable completing an adoption on their own. How many adoptions the volunteer counselor shadows is determined on a case-by-case basis by the volunteer and the Adoptions Manager depending upon the volunteer‟s experience, comfort levels, and needs. As a general rule when completing an adoption for a special case (medical needs/history) the process may need to be overseen by a senior adoption counselor.

The Adoption Process Introduction Austin Pets Alive is committed to an open adoption policy. It is our job to help those seeking to rescue a companion animal find the one that is best suited for them. We use our knowledge of cats in general and the personalities of specific cats as talking points to help guide people to making the right decision and adopting the perfect pet for them. We are in a unique position to not only find homes for the thousands of homeless pets in our area, but also to help educate the public regarding responsible pet ownership. It is a requirement that all adoption counselors are courteous and respectful at all times when dealing with the public.

Adoption Fees    

APA!‟s cat adoption fees are as follows: $125 for kittens/cats up to 2 years of age. $75 for cats 2 to 10 years $25 for cats that are 10+ years

Application Protocols Prior to applying to adopt a cat, the potential adopter must spend time actually interacting with and getting to know the cat. We require a bare minimum of 20 minutes of interaction between the cat and adopter but would like to see a longer interaction period.


P a g e | 299 Counselor Role While the potential adopter interacts with a cat the counselor should observe the interaction and engage the adopter in conversation. The goal is to gain a perspective on the person‟s pet history, their family and lifestyle, why they want to adopt, what sort of pet they are looking for, and what sort of pet might be suitable for them. Whenever possible, the counselor should try to point the adopter to cats that might be a good fit for them BEFORE they get attached to one specific cat. For example, if the adopter tells you they have children you‟d want to steer them away from any cats that we know do not do well with children. APA! is always very open and upfront about the cats in our program. We disclose health and behavior history, training needs or challenges, etc. during our conversations with adopters. Our goal is that there are no surprises when adopting a cat from APA!, everything is laid out for the adopter prior to making a final adoption decision. We are incredibly honest but try to present information in a way that is not discouraging or off-putting. For example, if adopting out a shy kitty, let adopter know there will be an adjustment period without making adopter fear that the cat will never bond with them..

Screening Applications and Red Flags When a person has decided that they are interested in adopting one of our cats they must fill out an adoption application. The counselor should encourage the potential adopter to be as thorough as possible and to answer every question honestly. Once the application is completed, the counselor will review the application with the adopter. The counselor makes note of any red flags present on the adoption application and then further discusses those areas with the potential adopter. The counselor should ask probing, direct questions regarding areas of concern and make notes regarding the applicant‟s answer on the face of the application. Continue discussing the issue or area of concern until you have adequate information to understand the issue and make a fair determination of whether to approve the application or seek denial from the Adoptions Manager.

Common Red Flags History of outdoor only pets, desire to make APA cat an outdoor only cat, or desire to leave APA! cat unattended in the yard while the owner is not home or overnight. a. APA!, as a rule, doesn‟t adopt out cats to be outdoor cats and also don‟t want APA! cats to be left outdoors unattended. There are exceptions to this if a cat clearly was an outdoor cat before APA and seems happiest being indoor/outdoor. We do have a hard fast rule of no outdoor cats under 6 months old unless feral. b. If someone is looking for an outdoor only or outdoor/indoor cat counselor should get in touch with Barn Program manager so that she can point them in the direction of pets that may be more appropriate to this lifestyle. 2. History of surrendering pets to shelters or giving away pets. a. Many of the cats in our program have been to several homes in their lives. Each of these changes is incredibly stressful for the cat so we want the home to which we adopt the cat to be the home in which he spends the rest of his life. b. The counselor should find out the individual situation of each pet given away or surrendered. There are instances beyond the persons control that are not likely to happen again. The person‟s attitude will help to tell you if it will happen again. 1.


P a g e | 300 3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

History of pets dying from neglect or lack of care. a. For example, we‟ve had applications where people‟s cats died of heat stroke after being left outdoors in the desert or where wild animals killed people‟s cats after they were left outdoors unattended in a rural area. b. The counselor should find out the individual situation and use this as a time to discuss best practices for pet care. We have all had bad things happen to us even with good intentions. Find out if this will happen again or if it was just a really tragic accident. Current breeding activities. a. Use this as a way to discuss the merits of spay/neuter, the dangers of breeding and importance of responsible breeding. b. This alone is not an absolute bar to adoption. However, we would NOT pre-adopt out an unaltered pet to anyone with other unaltered pets in their home. c. If the applicant is otherwise a great home for the cat and wishes to adopt an unaltered animal please contact the Adoptions Manager; we‟ll need to put the cat into an APA! foster home until it is spayed or neutered rather than setting the adopter up as the foster. Adoptions as a gift to someone else. a. We don‟t allow adoptions as a gift to someone else. However, we do offer gift certificates to sponsor an adoption the recipient would then need to come meet our cats, select the cat that is best for their lifestyle, and complete the full application process. History of physical reprimands/spanking or hitting cats. a. Use this as a time to discuss the merits of positive reinforcement based training. The counselor should find out what kinds of reprimands the APA! cat would be subject to in this home. APA! uses only positive, reinforcement based training. Adopter under 21 or adopter that lives with or is supported by parents. a. Discuss with young adopters the many years of commitment that come with adopting a cat, talk about changing life plans at that age, and if the applicant is reliant on parents for support (financially or they live with them) call the parents. Renters a. Renting is not a bar to adoption by any means. We verify with apartment complex that cats are accepted and ask adopter if landlord has a declaw policy. Adoption by anyone under the age of 18. a. Legally, an applicant under 18 cannot execute a contract and thus cannot adopt

Denying an Application If you have reviewed an application, had a detailed discussion regarding all red flags or areas of concern, and believe that this is not a good home for the cat in question then the Counselor can deny application. Complete denials are somewhat rare in the APA! program, often rather than a complete denial we are able to either re-educate the applicant so that they can address the area of concern or are able to steer them towards a more appropriate cat in our program. However, counselors should be prepared that if they do deny an adoption the applicant will not be pleased. Try to avoid a scene, stay calm, and always remain respectful of the customer. If the customer becomes violent or threatening politely ask the customer to leave and/or call 911. If the applicant isn‟t a home appropriate for an APA! cat but could be a good home for a different cat (i.e.: outdoor only cat), point them toward a different cat or the local intake shelter.


P a g e | 301 After Approval: The Contract and Basic Take Home Packet If the application is approved, the adopter must then fill out an adoption contract. It is imperative that the contract be legible; if the counselor has noticed that the applicant has messy handwriting then the counselor should fill out the areas of the contract for the adopter‟s contact information. The contract MUST have an email address for the adopter; this is how APA! stays in touch with adopters, sends medical records to the adopter, sends microchip information to the adopter; and sends health insurance information to the adopter. If your adopter does not use email (often an elderly adopter) please ask for the email address of their closest relative or friend. The adopter him or herself must always be the one to initial and sign the contract. Fill out every section of the contract but DO NOT initial the contract terms or sign the contract until the entire Adoption Packet is reviewed and the adoption is complete. The Adoption Packet includes all the information that APA! has found is needed for a successful adoption including medical history, vaccine information and due dates, basic training information, and steps to ease the transition into a new home. Go through every page and review all the information with the adopter. Be sure to answer any questions that come up and explain all information until the Counselor is confident that the adopter fully understands all important points and factors about taking this cat home. When the Adoption Packet packet is completed there are two checklists on the back. One is for the adoption counselor to ensure that they have made all proper disclosures. The other is for the adopter to make sure they understand all of the discussed areas. Counselor and adopter should go through the two checklists together before signing at the bottom of the checklists. Check to see if there are any extra handouts that may be relevant to this particular cat. We have handouts on a variety of subjects including common health and behavior issues. Check the cat‟s folder to see if there are any additional handouts and go over them as thoroughly as the Adoption Packet. If you feel an additional handout should be in the file but isn‟t please pull an extra out of your Adoptions Packet and review it with the adopter.

Additions to the Contract If there are any additional clauses that need to be added to the contract the Counselor should add them and have the adopter initial them. APA! believes that full disclosure makes for more successful adoptions, happier cats in new homes, and happier adopters. So, we lay all the cards out for adopters before a final adoption decision is made. A great rule of thumb is: When in doubt, disclose! You will never regret disclosing relevant information to potential adopters but you would definitely regret failing to do so. Then, anything outside of the norm that we have disclosed we add as an additional clause on the contract. A common disclosure is a bite history or medical or special need that adopter is made aware of.

Special Circumstances: Pre-Adopts, Cats Requiring Surgery or with Chronic Health Issues Pre-Adoptions You need to determine if you will allow pre-adoptions of unaltered cats. At APA! we generally don‟t allow unaltered cats to be adopted. They are harder than dogs to get back in for surgery so we prefer to spay/neuter before release to new home.


P a g e | 302 Chronic Health Issues Sometimes, if a cat suffers from a chronic health issue that will require continued care and an adopter who will be a perfect home for this pet is concerned about the cost of care for this issue, APA! will offer to assist the adopter with vet care related to that issue. The adopter would still be responsible for all routine vet care such as vaccines and preventative medications as well as any unrelated illnesses or injuries. But APA! can help the adopter to order maintenance medications at a reduced cost over a private vet etc. This would need to be approved by the Adoption Manager and Health Director or Lead Veterinarian. At APA! any such requests must be approved by the Adoptions Manager and Dr. Jefferson. Our theory is that if we provide the care and the cat goes to a home, that is better than us providing the care and tying up a foster home indefinitely. We can at least save another cat even if we don‟t save any money.

Handling Returns APA! operates on an open adoption policy. If for any reason an adoption is not working out we require that the cat come back to APA!, even if the adoption took place several years ago. Every APA! Adoption packet includes information related to returns and our cat adoption counselors discuss returns during the adoption process to ensure that adopters are aware that the cat would need to come back to APA! All APA! Adoption paperwork includes the contact information for the Adopt-Line team, who handle the logistics and scheduling of returns. Of course, we want to prevent returns before they happen so we tell all adopters to get in touch with us at the first sign of an issue so that we can offer support such as behavior advice, trainer or vet referrals, or vet care through our APA! medical team to the keep the cat in its adoptive home. If a cat is being returned to Austin Pets Alive! from being adopted, it needs a new felv/FIV test if ANY of the following is true: 1. It was adopted longer than 30 days ago OR 2. It ever went outside in the adopter's home, even if just escaped for a few hours OR 3. The cat was exposed to any other cats, other than fellow APA cats. The combo test should be done immediately upon intake, just like a TLAC cat.

Overview: Four Types of Adoption Programs Overview There are four types of adoption programs that APA! uses in order to save as many lives as possible from local kill shelters.  

In City Shelter Adoptions Offsite Adoption Events


P a g e | 303  

Offsite Adoption Catteries APA Building Adoptions

These models have helped APA! to develop a high-quality but high-volume cat adoptions program and to save thousands of lives thus far. Customer service is the most important piece of each model because if we don‟t engage adopters, the cats can‟t find homes, and we can‟t save more. You can start saving lives as soon as you return home, even without your own shelter building in which to house cats or an established foster network to house cats. An in-shelter program is a perfect first step to saving some lives. Then, as your organization develops you can grow into off-site adoptions and on-site adoptions.

In Shelter Adoptions Goals and Purpose When you are starting out, an in-shelter program is a great way to begin saving lives without yet having anywhere to house cats overnight (your own building or foster homes) or any partners for off-site adoptions. Then, as your city reaches no-kill status (>90% live outcome) you can use an in-shelter program to save those few adoptable cats who are still being killed each month but that you cannot pull into your program for whatever reason. An in-shelter program will give you the opportunity to market at risk cats in one of two ways: Taking cats from the at-risk list to off-site adoption events if you have off-site space available and working on-site at the kill shelter for adoptions to get cats directly out of the shelter and off of the kill list. APA has conducted both types of programs through a partnership with Town Lake Animal Center, the City of Austin‟s open intake shelter for dogs, and will work in the future for Cat Adoptions. We do recommend this method if possible since it is the least costly for your organization.

Logistics of Working Within the Shelter System: APA @ TLAC The APA @ TLAC program is a program by which APA! will have an adoption counselor located at our openintake shelter every day. That counselor is dedicated to adopting out cats on TLAC‟s at-risk list from directly within the shelter without them first being pulled to APA!‟s adoption building or a foster home. Obviously, this type of program can only occur with the consent and support of your local open-intake shelter. You‟ll need permission to have a staff member at the shelter every day, permission to interact with the cats, permission to hang signage on certain kennels, permission to speak with the public, and permission to adopt the cats out through your program rather than through the shelter itself. You will need to develop a strong working relationship based on mutual respect and understanding to successfully work from inside the city shelter to adopt out cats on death row. Cats on death row that are adoptable will be identified by the Cat Rescue Team and selected for this program by the Cat Rescue Manager

Benefits of an In-Shelter Program The most immediate benefit of an in-shelter program is that with this type of adoption program the shelter itself remains responsible for the housing and daily care of the cats. This is a great option for a newly


P a g e | 304 formed organization that has not yet developed the resources to provide routine medical care, housing etc. for the cats. There is little start up cost for a program such as the APA! @ TLAC program because you do not need supplies such as ex-pens, crates, storage for food/treats, transport vehicles, housing for the cats etc. These things are all provided by the shelter. Your start up costs would include adoption packets, staffing, some signage for the kennels, and some form of identification for the staff (APA! staff wear APA! t-shirts and name badges).

Daily In Shelter Schedule In Austin, the shelter opens at 11:30AM every day. APA! Staff report directly to TLAC at 10AM to prepare for the day and work with the cats. From 10AM to 11:30AM the APA! staff member works with the cats, updates signage, updates their notes on the cats, and gets to know any new cats in the program. Starting at 11:30AM when the public begins arriving at the shelter the APA! staff memberâ&#x20AC;&#x;s focus switches to providing customer service to everyone in the area of the APA! @ TLAC kennels, introducing cats to their potential adopters, and completing adoptions as necessary. At the end of the day the APA! staff member goes to the APA! Building to prepare night accounting logs, an end of day report, and to submit any adoption paperwork as we would for any other adoption site.

Individualized Customer Service APA! Staff talk to every potential adopter that walks through the area where our kennels are located and talk to them about our cats to provide individualized customer service, which experience has shown works very well to increase adopter confidence and adoption numbers. There is no such thing as just browsing! On the dog side, the first day of the APA! @ TLAC program the APA! staff members noticed a young couple who said they were just browsing. We persisted and spoke to them a bit to get a sense for their lifestyle. During that conversation it quickly became apparent that Atticus, or Kennel 167 as he was known to TLAC staff, would be a great match for this active, energetic couple. We sent them on a walk with Atticus; they fell in love and ended up spending a couple hours with him getting to know him and talking about adopting him. Atticus, a big black pittie with very high energy levels and demanding exercise requirements, ended up being the very first pet adopted as a part of the APA @ TLAC program. The individualized customer service worked and a life was saved! It will work for cats too!

In Shelter Adoptions If a potential adopter decides theyâ&#x20AC;&#x;d like to adopt one of the APA! @ TLAC cats, the cat is outcomed to APA! by the shelter. APA! then completes the adoption using the standard APA! adoption procedures and packet. We do match our adoption fees to the TLAC fees. The adoption fee and any additional donations are paid directly to APA!

Off-Site Adoption Events of Shelter Cats Once you have set up a structure for off-site adoptions by partnering with an off-site location, gathering necessary supplies (discussed below)., you are ready to host events.


P a g e | 305 If you are going to conduct off-site adoptions of shelter cats you‟ll need to develop a structure to determine when the cats will be picked up, how the cats will be scheduled to attend the off-site event, and when the cats will be returned at the end of the day. We have a volunteer team dedicated to working out all these logistics in advance and then allowing fosters to bring their cats with them to these events. We prefer for fosters to stay and “sell” the personalities of these cats but often they just have to drop off for the day.

Off-Site Adoption Catteries for Shelter Cats A great way to increase your cage capacity and allow cats to have many adoption venues is through the use of catteries at Petsmart and Petco. We also have cages set up at local pet stores and even an Airstream that doubles as a cattery in a popular walking district downtown. The cats are brought to these events once en mass and then as adoptions occur, more cats are brought in to take their places.

Off-Site Adoptions Benefits of Off-Site Adoptions There are several benefits to an off-site adoption program. First, you‟re able to conduct adoptions without having a facility. This is a huge benefit for start up groups and is how APA! operated until we began renting our current building in Summer 2010. Off-site adoptions will also raise your group‟s presence in the community. Your staff, volunteers, and cats will be seen all over town at various sites. That‟s excellent, free publicity. Finally, the APA! Adoption Sites are where the majority of our donations come from; kind people walking past a few pens of cute cats who choose to drop a few dollars in one of the several donation jars at each site.

Off-Site Logistics: Selecting and Approaching a Partner When we are scouting off-site adoption partners we first look at the demographics of the selected neighborhood to determine if this is an area that would be a good fit for our program. We also examine the cleanliness and organization of the store. We prefer to work with stores and partners that are clean, well organized and have a great staff! These are stores at which the customers will be happier and therefore much more likely to adopt or give us donations. When we‟ve scouted a potential partner we then visit that site several times to get a sense of the traffic through the store, where the best place for us to set up our equipment would be, and whether this is a site with adequate traffic for adoptions and donations. Once we‟ve decided to work with a partner we will request a meeting with the store manager or property manager to come to an agreement as to our location, hours etc. To that meeting you‟d want to bring your 501(c)(3) forms, statistics related to adoptions, some examples of success stories, and all program information. Finally, be sure that you are ready to start operating at the new site immediately – have your materials, staffing etc. already in place.

Prior to Opening Sites Before your first day at an off-site location you need to have at least one trained adoption counselor per site. Events are staffed as they come up. Catteries need to have at least one counselor there for a few hours every day to ensure that the cats are represented well and there is good customer service. Most catteries are


P a g e | 306 open to the public whenever the store is open and the pet store staff will care for the cats when you are not there. You want to make sure you have a specific agreement about what they will and won‟t do. You‟ll also need to determine which cats are going to that site. When you are a smaller organization with few cats and even fewer staff members these can be easier choices. But, as your organization grows you‟ll need to be more mindful of the mix of cats you are sending to each site. For example, it might not be a good idea to send two really cranky fiv+ cats to a site together; they‟ll probably hiss at each other all day, upsetting the other cats, annoying the public, and stressing out your counselor. Finally, you need to determine how many cats you want to send to each site. To most events, we generally send two larger cats, one to two medium cats, one to small cats and two to six kittens. If it is a mega event, we have sent up to 50 cats at once! We aim to have a good mix of colors, breeds, sizes, coat types, and ages at each site. We do like to make sure all are healthy before attending because this is an ideal place for foster cats to pick up illnesses. No one wants that. If anyone is particularly at risk (like little kittens), we will isolate them somewhat like on a table a few feet away from the other cats and maybe even with a sheet over most of their cage.

Supplies Needed These are some basic supplies needed to run your first off-site adoption event and for the Catteries. This is a list of the basics; you may find that you need more items or different items but this is what has worked for APA!

Safety or Sanitation Supplies Roccal and hand sanitizer are your best friends at an adoption site. You‟ll need at least one bottle of Roccal or other disinfectant that is effective against ringworm and at least one large bottle of hand sanitizer to keep with your supplies in addition to one small bottle of hand sanitizer for each group of cages.

Basic Cat Care Items Basic cat care items are largely similar to the items you would need for an in-shelter program. However, you will also need water or access to water (Yes you can run an adoption site without running water!!), food and water bowls, linens/bedding for the cats, litter, toys. If your site does not have access to running water you‟ll want to be sure that your counselor brings enough water for drinking and cleaning each day. Gallon jugs work fine.

Adoptions Materials You will need your standard adoption packets, some extra blank packets and additional handouts for specific topics, your folding table/chairs, and writing utensils. APA! also recommends that at least one large donations jar and three small donations jars be included in every adoption site to remind people that we are a small organization, we do run on donations, and we are appreciative when they are given. Signs are critical to letting the public know who you are and what you do and why you need support. Check with the pet stores first about what kind of signage and jars they allow if any.


P a g e | 307 Cat Containment First, you will need a secure method in which to transport cats to the off-site. Cats always ride in crates. You can also have fosters transport cats in their private vehicles. The vehicles need to have climate controls that work very well. You will also need one wire crate for each cat or group of kittens/friends at the events. The Catteries should be big enough for the cats to play, get away from their litter, and stretch out. We also recommend that the counselor allow the cats play time each day when they can get out of their cages and really stretch.

Site Checklist The List Each day on our website, we publish a list of where every cat will be that day. This allows the public to find their favorite cat and come to meet him. The list also helps us to ensure that we are sending a good mix of cats to a site. The list is compiled late at night or early in the morning by the Cat Adoptions Manager and volunteers.

Preventative Medications All cats should have Cattery Check Lists done prior to their arrival so that we can ensure that all vaccines are up to date and they have been checked for illness.

Organizing Files and Supplies The counselor or coordinator must check the files for updated medical and behavior information from our file management software, Pet Point. These files also contain the cat‟s adoption packet. Each off-site counselor also keeps a site kit with them every day that has extra adoption packets, APA! materials, and office supplies. If a new cat goes to a cattery, it is essential that their file goes with them.

Loading Cats Anytime cats are transported anywhere, climate control and safety are priorities. We need to ensure a cat won‟t escape and won‟t be accidentally left in a hot car. Escapes are heartbreaking and they WILL occur.

Daily Off-Site Schedule Counselors‟ shifts start at 1PM. They arrive at the cattery, check each cat for signs of illness, then clean each area if hasn‟t already been cleaned by the store or cattery volunteers. Medications are given during the shift if needed (most catteries do not have cats on meds). Counselors gather dirty laundry, and make a list of anything that needs to be restocked for the next day. Deposits are prepared, adoption log, and end of the day email completed prior to the end of the shift 6pm.


P a g e | 308 Managing the Site Daily Cat Care Throughout the day we give the cats short play breaks while still maintaining control of the site. If it is slow, they can often be let out into the room that houses the cattery to play while the counselor cleans. Each cage is cleaned of feces, litter swept from cage floor, bedding shook out or replaced, and fresh food and water are given.

Managing the Cats‟ Behavior While at Site If two cats are hissing at each other or are really cranky when people touch them, you can re-sanitize and swap out cages to put a non-reactive cat between them. You can also give the cats toys, catnip to keep them occupied. If they can‟t calm down and are dangerous to visitors, they must be plead to foster and a sign “do not touch” placed on their cage.

Managing the Public We want the public to interact with the cats, pick them up, engage in play, and get to know them! It‟s the best way to determine if that cat would be a good fit to become a new member of their family. However, please remind visitors to sanitize their hands before and after each kennel. If someone wants to take out a cat, please get the cat out for them to avoid injuries.

On-Site Adoptions Introduction Once you have the resources to rent or purchase a central shelter location some new challenges will arise. You‟ll be able to save more lives (!!) but some of those cats will be more behaviorally challenged than the typical cat that you‟d been pulling up to that point from the open-intake shelter. You can also expect there to be increased traffic at that location and also a higher number of cats at on-site adoption events.

Behaviorally Challenged Cats As you move closer and closer to No-Kill status you can expect that some of the cats you will be pulling will have more behavior challenges than those you were pulling when you first began your journey towards making your city No-Kill. These aren‟t bad cats or unadoptable cats but they may have litter box issues, etc. It will be imperative that you set structures in place at your shelter to keep these cats safe, to work towards improving that behavior, and finding a new home.

More Cats, Only One Counselor At APA!‟s shelter space we generally have approximately 50-70 cats at once. To care for those cats we have one counselor. The adoption counselors are responsible for the direct care of the cats and the adoptions but we have been trying to build up a Cat Care Team of volunteers to help with the daily petting, scooping, feeding, and cleaning.

On Site Schedule The on-site counselor arrives at 11AM to get the cats fed, watered, medicated, and litter cleaned by both the adoption counselor and the volunteer cat team. Cats are checked every 2 hours to keep all feces out of boxes, sweep up spilled litter, clean water refreshed, etc...


P a g e | 309 For the rest of the day, the counselor remains inside with the cats to talk to the public, introduce them to cats, keep up files, and conduct adoptions.

Emergency Situations Stolen Cat If a cat is stolen make note of the person‟s description, vehicle they are driving, license plate number, and direction of travel. Call 911 to report the theft. Give the police the suspect‟s description and the cat‟s description. Call the Cat Adoptions Manager to alert her to the situation and await further instructions. Most importantly – keep yourself and the other cats safe. Do not confront a violent person or a person with a weapon.

Stolen Donations Jar Treat this situation as you would a stolen cat. Most importantly keep yourself and the other cats safe. Donations can be replaced; you cannot.

Loose or Escaped Cat The Cat Counselor on duty is responsible for searching for and finding a loose cat. Please follow the instructions below.

If you notice a cat is missing: 1. Start foot search immediately, ask any volunteers around if they are free to help you search 2. Notify all departments in the building or at the pet store, including the mgmt. at stores 3. Put a “loose cat- please notify someone if you see a ______ colored cat” note on the front door to notify those coming in the building to be on the look-out 4. If cat not found before closing, put out water and canned food for the cat on the floor of the main area where the cat is likely to be looking for food. 5. If cat still missing by the morning, request a trap from other volunteers and set trap before you leave that night from work. 6. Use a ladder and flashlights to search all areas of the building, including on top of the metal vents 7. Notify Lindsay to update PetPoint and Naomi to notify the microchip company in case the cat may have gotten out of the building 8. Send daily updates about what you are doing to search to mgmt.

If you watch a cat run out of their crate or enclosure: 1. Close the enclosure to make sure no other cats get loose while you‟re catching the loose cat. 2. If the cat runs into another room, close the door so they can‟t run past you out of the room again. 3. Ask for someone to help you if you aren‟t able to catch it alone- but make sure you and the volunteers do not just grab a scared cat- you will get bit! Use a towel for easier handling or try to get it to enter a crate. 4. Post a note on the front door as above that there is a loose cat if you can‟t catch it immediately

If a cat gets loose while outside: 1. Try to determine where the cat went from any witnesses.


P a g e | 310 2. Cats will generally follow walls in whatever direction they are running until they find a place to hide. Get help immediately and quietly (so as not to scare the cat) follow the walls until you find a quiet place to hide and look for the cat. Search under cars if the cat ran under the cars first. Search repeatedly in case hiding in an engine or wheel well- cat will eventually come down to escape the heat and lie on the pavement. 3. Get help to put notes on everyone‟s cars to let them know to search for the cat in their engine before turning their engine on 4. Look online at www.missingpetpartnership.org and look under “recovery tips” to ensure you have exhausted all options 5. If the cat is not found within 1 hour, posts must be made to the yahoo groups and/or facebook for help and the search should be delegated to a leader who will continue searching wholeheartedly. 6. Notify Lindsay and Naomi so they can update PetPoint and notify the microchip company 7. If not found by that night, set trap if there is one at the building. If not, put a plea out for volunteers to bring you one.

When a loose cat is found: 1. If missing inside more than a few days, or if missing outside and clearly distressed, the cat must be seen by the medical clinic to make sure there are no injuries and that they are still in good health. 2. Notify all teams that the cat has been found 3. If the cat escaped from an enclosure, put them in a cage instead to ensure that they don‟t escape again 4. Update PetPoint location and add note that the cat may be a possible flight risk for future reference. 5. Notify Behavior Manager so that she can give behavior advice if necessary. 6. Remove all “loose cat” signs.

Sick Cat Handling sick cats is a regular part of holding a job with any rescue group. It is paramount that counselors are able to identify basic diseases that are common in animal shelters. Identifying these diseases at their earliest stages can quite literally save the lives of many, many animals. Each instance of illness should be handled as a "worst-case scenario" and counselors should take every precaution to prevent contamination from one cat to another. Reporting each and every symptom of illness to the medical team is crucial. Many diseases begin with innocuous symptoms that can quickly escalate, resulting in a disastrous situation within a shelter environment. Those who handle the cats each day are best equipped to identify symptoms at an early stage and it is expected that each adoption counselor will be on constant lookout for disease symptoms. If you have concerns that one of the cats at your site is sick immediately separate the cat from the other cats. Contact your medical team to relay the symptoms and seek instructions. Make the cat comfortable, observe eating/drinking patterns and stool characteristics. Check gum color and skin turgidity. Cats in particular are very prone to stressful anorexia. This can then become full fledged liver failure. It is vital that all cats are observed eating and not allowed to lose weight/not eat while under your care. If the cat is eating, drinking, active: Alert your on-duty manager of the cat‟s condition, make him as comfortable as possible, and keep him separated from other cats for the rest of the day.


P a g e | 311 If the cat is not eating and drinking, or is lethargic: Call your on-duty manager and await instructions regarding the cat being picked up from site or seeking emergency medical treatment.

Bites Happen: How to Deal with Them First, safely return the cat to the cage and separate the cat from the public by putting a sign on the cage that says DO NOT TOUCH . The cat should not be handled by the public or volunteers for the rest of the day unlesss it was an accident and not because the cat is worked up. If the cat bit a volunteer or a member of the public you need to get their full contact information and have them write down what happened. If a child was bitten you need the child and parent‟s information. Wash the affected area thoroughly with soap and warm water. If the skin was not broken no further medical attention is required. If the skin was broken, check to see if it is a puncture wound or a scratch. If it is a puncture wound you should seek medical attention to avoid infection. If it s a scratch would it is usually sufficient to keep the area clean and watch for signs of infection such as redness or swelling. If the wound is serious and will not stop bleeding, call 911. If you are alone at site call the cat adoptions manager and cat behavior manager to have someone come cover your site while you go to Urgent Care for medical attention. ALL bites, regardless of whether they break the skin, must be reported to the Adoptions Manager and Behavior Manager. A bite is a learning opportunity. It tells us something new about the cat‟s behavior, something we need to work on with the cat, and also may tell us what type of home is appropriate for the cat. For example, if we find out through a bite that a cat is terrified of dogs 1) We need to find a home with no dogs. Failure to report a bite makes it much more likely that the cat will be adopted without full disclosure to the adopter, that it will not be a successful placement, and you have opened your organization up to unnecessary liability. Failure to report a bite will result in immediate corrective action.

Adoptions Materials Included in Your Electronic Files     

Adoption Center Request From Cat_Adoption_Handouts Cat Adoption Checklist details for counselors Cat Adoption Checklist RWWaiver


P a g e | 312

Cat Foster Manager Manual

Cat Foster Program Organization Chart Cat Foster Manager Job Description: Manages all cats, 6weeks of age or older, that are in foster homes or need to be moved into, or out of, foster homes. This does not include moms with babies until the babies turn 8weeks of age, but does include any kittens that â&#x20AC;&#x153;graduateâ&#x20AC;? the nursery team at 6weeks of age.

Job Duties:


P a g e | 313 ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Coordinate with Cat Rescue Manager on who needs foster homes at shelters Coordinate with Adoption Center Manager on who needs foster homes at the adoption center, and coordinate moving cats from foster into the adoption centers. Coordinate with Neonatal Ward Manager on who needs foster homes at the nursery that are of age. Plea for foster homes to the Cat Foster Yahoo Group to find foster homes for all in need Individually email any new foster parents or potential foster parents to see if they are willing to foster. Update any cats‟ location in PetPoint software if they move into, out of, or within the foster program Send “Medical and Marketing” needs emails to foster parents when they get a new foster cat or when a kitten graduates nursery team. Monitor inventory of cats in the program. Answer foster parents questions, concerns, etc. Ensure that cats overdue for vaccines, spay/neuter, etc are processed by the overdue team, including forwarding severely overdue cases to the legal department.

Team members Foster Screener Lead Recruits, trains, and manages Foster Screeners. Coordinates screeners to ensure applications are dealt with in a timely manner. Helps screen new fosters. Coordinates with foster manager any changes to foster screening rules, general foster. protocol changes, etc.

Foster Screeners Opens the Zoho foster application spreadsheet. Screens the oldest applications first by calling all phone numbers listed and leaving messages if no answer. Make notes on Zoho spreadsheet about result of phone call (i.e. left message, approved, withdrawn, denied and reason). Email cat foster approved email list with a copy of application and the results of the screening.

Foster Mentor Lead Recruits, trains, and manages Foster Mentors. Ensures mentors are responding to foster parents in a timely manner and is the go-to person for foster parents with questions about their mentor. Runs weekly reports about overdue fosters and distributes this information to overdue foster lead and foster mentors.

Foster Mentors Assigned to certain letters of the alphabet and are in charge of all new foster parents whose last name starts with those letters. (i.e. The foster parent Jane Doe would be under the mentor who is assigned the letter D). Emails their foster parents to welcome them to the program and introduce themselves at the start of fostering. Emails occasionally to check in and see how things are going. Answers any questions the foster home may have.


P a g e | 314 Overdue Foster Lead Recruits, trains and manages foster followup volunteers. Receives the overdue reports each week and distributes to volunteers. Ensures contacts are being made and recorded in computer system. Communicates any unresponsive foster parents to cat foster manager. If there is severe lack of communication/overdue fosters, coordinates with legal department to send a legal physical letter to foster requesting the foster adopts the cat at a discounted rate or returns the cat by a certain date.

Foster Followup Volunteers Emails and calls foster parents on their list each week. Records any correspondence in computer system. Reports any non-responsive foster parents to overdue foster lead.

Behavior Team Leader Evaluates behavior issues for cats in foster care, adoption centers, and at area shelters. Determine behavior modification strategies, including barn placements when necessary. Recruits safe barn placements for TNRelocations (cats that can not be TNRâ&#x20AC;&#x;d back to where they came from and need to be relocated for safety reasons). Recruits, trains and manages behavior fosters and behavior volunteers. Oversees all barn placements.

Behavior Fosters Specifically trained and willing to foster kittens in need of socialization, cats with modifiable behavior issues, or pregnant/nursing feral cats, until the kittens are able to be weaned.

Behavior Volunteers Help find safe barn placements for TNRelocate cats. Assists Behavior Manager in taking cats to barn placements and introducing them into the area in a safe, controlled way. Assists in answering foster/adopter behavior questions/concerns.

Duties Finding Fosters The yahoo group should be your primary source for finding foster parents. All new foster parents are sent a link that allows them to sign up onto the yahoo group when they are first approved. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pleasâ&#x20AC;? should be sent out to the yahoo group, including pictures if available, whenever a cat needs a foster home, following the plea writing protocol.

New fosters The cat foster approval team is in charge of approving new foster parent applications that come in from the website. All approvals are done on the phone or in person. This ensures that all questions the potential foster parent may have are answered as well as confirming they can follow all of our guidelines. These are the main points the approval team conveys to potential foster parents: Quarantine protocol and making sure the person has that ability. If they can not quarantine we recommend they do not foster but instead volunteer in the nursery or adoption center. Or if they


P a g e | 315 have healthy, indoor only, personal cats; they can foster healthy cats, currently located in an adoption center, that are in need of a break for behaviour reasons as they have been in the adoption center for too long a period of time. The (your organization name here) vet clinic: hours of operation, who to contact with questions, emergency phone number, where it is located, expectation that foster parent transports to and from clinic for all medical needs, and that they keep up with their fosters medical needs without reminders. Illnesses – explain briefly URI, ringworm, other common shelter illnesses. Indoor only policy. Adoption policy (all cats must be surrendered to an adoption center when requested or regularly attend adoption events). Yahoo group information. The cat mentor program information. Once a new foster parent is approved, the approval volunteer will forward the person‟s application (including contact information) to the cat foster manager, other approval volunteers so they know the person has been screened, the nursery team leaders, and the data entry person to enter the foster parent into PetPoint. The cat foster manager should then email the new foster parent with the list of available cats to foster. If the foster parent is wanting a specific type of cat (older kittens/adults, bottle babies or pregnant cats) the appropriate team will contact the foster parent. If the foster parent is undecided whichever team has a higher need will contact them. If a new foster parent does not reply within 3-4 days, a second email should be sent. If still no reply, cat foster manager should email the approval volunteer to request they call them back and make sure they are still interested in fostering and that we have the correct email address on file.

Foster Recruitment Cat Foster Manager regularly corresponds with the PR team, to write blogs, post on Craigslist, etc. when in need of new fosters. In addition the “Types of cats that need foster” handout should be utilized as well as pictures of cats that currently need a foster. Pictures work best.

Getting the cat out of the shelter and into the foster home Once you find a foster home for kitty in need of foster parent, it is time to get the kitty to the foster parent! 

If the cat is from the shelter: o Send the foster parent information on how to pick up the cat from the shelter (see Foster Matching document), making sure to include the cat‟s A# (ID number). o Email the shelter to let them know cat is getting picked up, and by whom, and on what day. o If the cat has bad medical problems, or if the foster home is brand new and the cat has an illness, email the medical staff to alert them. If the cat is from one foster home moving to another: o First ensure that the cat is okay, then email both fosters with each other cc‟d, so that fosters can coordinate the trade off themselves. o Request that you are informed when the trade off is completed. If the cat is from a “mass pull” from a shelter: o Discuss with medical intake team what time they think the cats will be ready for pick up. o Have foster parents come during a specific time to ensure an efficient, easy pick up (break up times into 2 or 3 different segments for multiple foster parents).


P a g e | 316 When the foster cat first gets to the foster home 2. 3.

Update the location in the software system. Email the foster parent the “Medical and Marketing Needs” information, filling out what medical and marketing needs the foster cat has, and make sure to include the cat‟s A# and foster mentor. cc the foster mentor on the email.

Moving fosters into the adoption center 2.

3.

4. 5. 6. 7.

Cats should move into the adoption center once they are: a. At least 8weeks of age and able to eat dry food on their own. b. Totally healthy and symptom free for at least 7-10 days. c. Neutered, vaccinated, Felv negative. d. FIV is okay if not cat aggressive. e. Receive an adoption center entrance exam by medical staff to ensure all medical needs are up to date and the cat is healthy enough. If the adoption centers are full (usually in late spring/summer) and cats are ready, fosters should attend adoption events with their foster cats until there is a space in the adoption center. Foster parents should put their cats on an online waiting list until enough adoptions are done that there is room in the center. If the adoption centers are not full (usually in the fall/winter) cats should stay at the adoption center after neuters or as soon as they are healthy and have had adoption center entrance exams. Adoption center manager informs cat foster manager when cats are left at the center. Cat foster manager can then contact foster home to see if they will take in new cats. Adoption center manager is responsible for updating cat‟s location in software system. Managing the wait list: a. Attempt to go in order of who signed up first to who signed up last, but understand that is not always possible. If a foster parent wants their animal moved out immediately, due to moving, an emergency, etc., bumping them up on the list is better then finding them a new foster home. b. Coordinate with Adoption Center Manager, every day or two, about available space in the center. Especially after big adoption events. c. Use adoption center wait list to determine who can move in, look up the animals‟ records, and ensure they are adoption-ready. d. Email foster parents to let them know their cats are ready to move into the adoption center, and have them schedule medical appointment to be cleared to move into adoption center.

Dealing with foster parents going on vacation/out of town 4.

Request that foster parent check with friends/family to see if someone can pet sit. If a friend/family member is able to pet sit the kitty, make sure to do the following: a. Get the pet sitter‟s name, phone numbers, email address. b. Email the pet sitter and the foster the following info: i. If they see anything wrong with the kittens at all (vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, sneezing, runny eye/nose, hair loss, lethargy, not eating for more than 12 hours) they should email our medical staff at medtechs@austinpetsalive.org ii. If there is a life threatening medical emergency they should call our medical staff at ###-###-#### anytime 24/7 iii. The cats/kittens should not be let outdoors for any reason. If they happen to somehow escape, the pet sitter should immediately contact the cat foster manager so we can arrange for volunteers for search and rescue. iv. If the pet sitter has any questions, they should not hesitate to contact cat foster manager any time.


P a g e | 317 5. 6. 7.

Pet sitters should only be used if the cats are mostly healthy (mild URI okay), and old enough to be left alone for 12 hours straight. If a pet sitter is not available, request from foster the exact dates they will be gone. It is easier to find a foster for a very set period of time then to find a new foster for an undetermined period of time. If kitty needs to be placed with a temporary foster plea for foster like normal.

Dealing with foster parents that get overwhelmed/request their foster cat be moved 2.

Often foster parents will email when they are at their worst/most tired moment. Right after the foster kitty has vomited on the rug, scratched up the couch, chased the dog under the bed, and pooped in their luggage. They will be desperate and just want the cat out. They will not be thinking rationally. a. Step one is to calm them down. Talk them “down from a ledge”. Answer with a lot of detail, any questions/concerns they may have. Forward any department specific concerns to the appropriate people (i.e. behavior concerns to the behavior team, medical concerns to the medical team). b. Ensure they have any appropriate handouts that will help them with the cat‟s specific issues. Most often the fear and frustration comes from a lack of knowledge and detailed URI handouts, pneumonia handouts, force feeding handouts etc. can help with this. c. Reiterate the fact that they are saving the cat‟s life by trying, and offer to help however possible while keeping the foster cat in their home. d. If, after these communications, the foster parent still feels like they can not handle this particular foster cat, see if they are willing to make a trade. Often if they are willing to trade for an “easier” foster cat, finding a new foster home for their current foster cat will be easier. e. Plea for new foster like normal.


P a g e | 318

Barn Cat program

Beginning a Barn Cat program Feral cats that cannot be returned to their original location or otherwise behaviorally challenged cats are a population historically slated for death in a shelter. However, a Barn Cat program gives this forgotten population a real chance at a live outcome. The start-up of a Barn Cat program is often the last thing to occur in a rescue group – struggling to save adoptable kittens and adults is hard enough! But starting a program to relocate this population of cats safely is actually relatively easy. It‟s also an impactful way to tap into a portion of the public who may be unsuited to traditional adoptions, but is eager to provide good care to outdoor cats. 

Basics: o

All cats in (your organization name here) Barn Cat program are fixed, ear-tipped (when possible), vaccinated for Rabies and FVRCP and microchipped.

o

We do not charge an adoption fee for barn cats; however, donations are accepted and often received. Some communities may be receptive to a small fee.


P a g e | 319

Identifying candidates for barn placement both within your program and prior to intake While barn release can be a convenient and life-saving option for many cats, it is important to choose candidates carefully to avoid placing them in a situation to which they are unable to adapt. For a general overview of our policies about barn cat selection, record-keeping and veterinary procedures, see Appendix II.

Appropriate Barn Placement Candidates Ferals: •

Ferals are the easiest population to weed out. Assuming an evaluator is looking at cats on euthanasia lists, a feral can be simple to pick out. Spitting, hissing, lunging and hiding are all typical cues, and while a pet cat may display these behaviors initially, typically they will turn around in several days‟ time. A feral isn‟t much for turning around. Sometimes ferals in shelters are so shut-down as to be hand able, and these are harder to determine – but if there‟s already a barn cat program in place within your organization that cat will have a positive outcome even if she turns out to not be pet material. If a cat has been trapped from a known colony and cannot be TNR‟d (Trapped, Neutered and Returned), an evaluation may be only cursory. TNR is always preferable for a feral cat, but it is common for ferals to be trapped and surrendered by members of the public that are unwilling or vehemently opposed to the cat being TNR‟d on their property. As such, a barn is an excellent back-up plan for such a cat.

Aggressive cats •

An ornery ex-tom-cat who has inflicted multiple deep bite wounds on fosters or volunteers. A cat that experiences pronounced petting sensitivity after only a few strokes, and bites potential adopters and fosters. This situation can be dicey – some of these cats may be adoptable into traditional patient homes. However, if these cats are long-stays within the program, and spend substantial time living in an adoption center or occupying an otherwise high-intake foster home, they may be taking up space in the program with ever-decreasing hopes of being adopted. If the cat has substantial outdoor experience in her owner-surrender notes from the shelter of origin, or shows desire to escape, they may be a candidate for barn placement.

Cats with persistent elimination issues •

Within (your org name here), inappropriate elimination is the #1 reason for return. Obviously, behavioral therapies are preferred. See Appendix I for quick go-to behavioral modification options. Occasionally, though, one may come across a cat with idiopathic


P a g e | 320 elimination problems which are persistent and do not respond to behavioral modifications. In these circumstances, after evaluation of the cats‟ age and previous outdoor proclivities, barn placement may be appropriate.

Cats with no other live outcome options •

Cats with bite history that are slated for euthanasia and have no other options within your program or another program. •

Often, these cats will be ones you may not have the resources to rescue in a traditional adoption program, due to their likelihood of poor behavior in adoption venues, foster or other locations.

Inappropriate candidates for barn placement FelV+ (FIV+ okay!) o

As FIV is passed only through blood transfusions, sex and deep bite wounds, and as deep bite wounds and sex are virtually unheard of in fixed cats, FIV+ cats are perfectly fine candidates for release. Though this is imperfect in terms of the cats‟ exposure to disease, in a low-density outdoor colony with access to cat food they‟re likely to do quite well.

If limited outdoor experience, age > 8 yrs o

This can be stretched as seems appropriate, but an indoor-only 9-year-old cat with a terrible bite history may do poorly outside, especially if the placement is unable to transition them gradually.

Chronic health problems (e.g., diabetes, irritable bowel, cerebellar hypoplasia) Young enough for a socialization program (We have a loose cut-off of 12 weeks for a socialization program). o

If resources are unavailable to commit to taming older feral kittens (>12 weeks), and if it is clear that they have been successfully feeding themselves up until their arrival at the shelter of intake, then releasing them into a barn with access to food is adequate. However, if resources are available for socialization before 12 weeks it‟s clearly preferable.

Declaws. o

Oh, declaws. They‟re tragedies – so much more likely to be aggressive or urinate inappropriately, with so few outdoor options. Occasionally you may run into a declaw with some outdoor experience and severe aggression or elimination issues or both. If the cat is already in your program, and there are truly no other options, I wait patiently for a safe placement who is aware of the cats‟ declawed status, and give the cat a very slow transition


P a g e | 321 period in its new home. However, I do not recommend pulling a known declaw from a shelter and placing it in an outdoor situation deliberately.

Identifying placement locations A happy pair of barn cats frolicking amongst hay bales, or dozens of cats hiding under a shed outside of a hoarder? Assuring safe placements is key for cats‟ safety and volunteers‟ peace of mind. 

Advertising o

Craigslist and links on rescue‟s main website.

o

Clear point of contact from ads (phone number or email address of main volunteer).

Screening o

At the moment, we use an informal over-the-phone survey to confirm that the potential placement has:

o

Covered structure for shelter.

A willingness to feed and water throughout life of the cats.

Some distance from traffic.

Limited history of deaths from coyotes or other predators.

Delivery – we deliver cats to new placements whenever possible. The benefits: 

Avoid placing free cats with hoarders.

Confirm that placement is safe.

Set up release structure safely.

Allows deliverer to pick up any offered donations and acquire paperwork and signatures from placement.

Safe Relocation Procedures 

Old tattered large dog kennels (such as cast-offs from your dog program) make excellent relocation cages. Outfit kennels with a box for hiding, litter box, water and food dishes. Water, food and litter should be kept towards front of cage for easy access.

Cage should be placed in covered area where food will ultimately be placed.

Cat(s) should remain in cage for a minimum of 1 week, preferably 2. o

This will give cats a chance to acclimate and imprint on their new environment.

For general information on transitioning a cat to an outdoor-only lifestyle see Appendix III.

Staffing needs One of the benefits of a barn placement program is that minimal staffing is required. If you do not have a transition cage, but instead do same-day placements, your placement needs may be as limited as 2-4 cats


P a g e | 322 every 2 weeks. A handful of volunteers willing to drive to placements and handle feral cats, and a point person for placement contact is really all that‟s required.

Future plans for barn cat program The Barn Cat program is still in its infancy. As the volunteer base increases, and as we build funds for expansion, we are planning the following: 

Transition cage: o

We‟re beginning to use a modified chicken coop as a transition cage for feral cats. That is, we use the coop to hold feral cats temporarily either while a placement is found or while vet work is awaited. This allows ferals to avoid the high-contagion environment of the shelter. However, we haven‟t quite worked out details (e.g., keeping it cool in Texas heat) so getting the feral coop up and running is an important goal!

Increased volunteer staff for placements.

Faster identification of ferals in the shelter system, to avoid illness. Communication with shelter staff is vital for this step.

Acquisition of better equipment – at the moment we have a neck clamp and gloves. The acquisition of a net and spare humane traps will help substantially. If funding is available in your program, acquiring these items helps volunteers successfully handle feral cats and move them from cage to cage.


P a g e | 323

Bottle Baby Team Care of Orphaned Kittens under 6 weeks Orphaned Kittens Newborn kittens are sometimes orphaned. Success with raising these newborns is based on following basic procedures and keeping important elements in mind. Successful rearing of orphaned kittens requires providing them with a suitable environment, the correct quantities of nutrients for different stages of growth, and a regular schedule of feeding, sleeping, grooming and exercise. You must also provide the stimulus for urination and defecation during the first 18-21 days of life.

Body Warmth You must maintain their body warmth, since kittens do not have the ability to regulate and control their body temperature. Keep them out of drafts. Place a warmed Snuggle Safe disk at the opening of the crate and cover it with several layers of towels. Check on it frequently to ensure that it is not too hot or too cold. Kittens should be able to get away from it if they are too hot so make sure that there is a place in the box that is not as hot as the rest of it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the back of the box most likely. Although not as important in cats over 6 weeks, this is CRUCIAL to babies! We cannot overemphasize the need for warmth in young kittens. If there is nothing else you can do or provide for a munchkin, THIS IS IT! WARMTH. Babies are used to their mom providing a nice 103 degree environment for them, and we must duplicate this the best we can. In the bottle-baby section we will explore this further. Warmth also includes providing a non-drafty environment. For an older animal, all you need do is make sure it has a nice warm, cozy spot to retreat to. For younger pets (less than 4 months) the entire environment should be draft-free and a refuge If a rescued kitten feels cold, warm it immediately but gently. Place it on a heating pad wrapped in towels and on the lowest setting, or warm a hot water bottle to about 100 degrees (wrapped in a towel) and place it with the kitten. DO NOT PUT A KITTEN DIRECTLY ON A HEATING PAD OR HOT BOTTLE! Kittens under 3 weeks canâ&#x20AC;&#x;t control their body temperature. Keep them on a heating pad; set on low, wrapped in towels (at least two layers of towels, or one towel folded over) should cover the pad. You'll know if it's too hot if the kittens tend to sleep on the edges. The heating pad should be used until the kittens are about 4-5 weeks old, or until you notice that they're avoiding it. Your body heat is not sufficient to get or keep the kittens warm! Their mom's temp is 103F!


P a g e | 324 Kittens should be kept in a box or cat carrier in a warm, draft-free place, completely isolated from other animals. Keep the container covered with a towel or blanket; a small towel or cloth inside the carrier will also keep them cozy. Change the bedding of their "nest" daily, since kittens tend to have accidents! As they get older, they will need more room to exercise, play, and explore. Do not feed a kitten until it is warm, since it can't properly digest when cold. It is okay, though, to syringe feed a few drops of 5% sugar water or to rub a little bit of Karo syrup on the kittens‟ lips.

Isolation is the best policy It is also important to keep newborn and young kittens physically separated from other cats for the duration of the kittens‟ stay. Newborn and young kittens are extremely vulnerable to illness. While other cats may be vaccinated and thereby protected from various illnesses, they can still carry and transmit illnesses they have been exposed to. A kitten's immune system is very, very fragile! The 7-day isolation period is even more important for kittens than it is for cats. Why? Imagine a child starting kindergarten. Everybody usually comes home with a cold of some sort. The same holds that kittens will have been exposed to the city shelter. Plus they are younger and have weaker immune systems and are more likely to come down with something than an adult is.

Development Milestones Kittens weigh about 2 to 4 ounces at birth; they should double their body weight in the first week. Eyes open at 7-10 days but will stay blue until they are about 6-7 weeks old, true eye color won't settle in until the kitten's about 3 months old. At about 3 weeks, they will start crawling around. At 3½ weeks, the ears will start to stand up. At 4 weeks, they'll start to play with each other and develop teeth.

Weight Gain Kittens should gain about ½ ounce every day or 4 ounces per week. Weigh them at the same time every day with a kitchen or small postal scale. It's a good idea to weigh them with every meal. Lack of gain or weight loss beyond 24 hours is cause for alarm and it's time to begin syringe feeding. Their bellies should always be rotund-- if you squeeze them between two fingers and slowly try to bring the fingers together; you should NOT be able to do it! If the belly is hard refer to the sections about parasites. You can check to make sure a kitten is properly hydrated by pulling up the skin at the scruff of the neck. If it bounces back nicely, hydration is good. If it doesn't bounce back, or goes back down slowly, they will need to be seen by a member of the med team. Kitten Weight Chart - Weigh Your Kittens Before AND After Every Feeding!


P a g e | 325 Age

Weight

At birth

3.0 to 3.7 oz. (90-110 grams)

2 weeks old

7.0 to 11.0 oz. (200-300 grams)

3-4 weeks old

1.7 to 15.0 oz. (350-450 grams)

5-7 weeks old

1 to 1.5 lbs. (450-700 grams)

8 weeks old

1.7 to 2 lbs. (800-900 grams)

Feeding The change to KMR can cause tummy upset and dangerous vomiting or diarrhea so we introduce it at half strength and taper up to full strength over eight feedings. The dilution rates are listed below. The first four feedings should be eight parts water to one part KMR powder. The next four feedings should be four parts water to one part KMR powder. Feeding nine until weaning is two parts water to one part KMR powder. Any prepared KMR or gruel must be discarded after 24 hours. The nutritional value drops and can even make the kitten ill. Do not feed a kitten until it is warm, since it can't properly digest when cold. It is okay, though, to syringe feed a few drops of 5% sugar water or to rub a little bit of Karo syrup on the kittensâ&#x20AC;&#x; lips.


P a g e | 326 Unfortunately, cow‟s milk is not nutritious enough for kittens - they will slowly starve to death on it. It also causes diarrhea which is extremely dangerous for young kittens. Once a certain type of milk has been started for a group of kittens, it MUST be continued until weaned. Changing formula brands can cause major GI illness. Agra brand Kitten Milk Replacer (KMR) is used in the nursery. Test the temperature of the kitten milk replacement formula (KMR) before feeding. It should be warm, but not hot: around 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Don‟t boil the KMR, since boiling will destroy the nutritional value. You can warm the bottle by placing it in hot water for a few minutes or putting it in the microwave until it reaches 100 degrees Fahrenheit. If constipation occurs, add 1 drop of mineral oil to each kitten‟s feeding no more than once daily until the problem eases. Don‟t overfeed, since it can cause diarrhea and a host of other problems. Feeding equipment needs to be cleaned before and between feedings. Ideally, this would be done by dipping the equipment in boiling water. Since we can‟t do that, we need to wash each bottle and nipple with soapy water until all milk residue is gone, dip in dilute bleach water (1 part Clorox to 30 parts water), or chlorahex solution then rinse in regular water. Ideally, all bottles would be dry before next use. Before each feeding, you should also clean your hands with antibacterial sanitizer or soap and water. You MUST disinfect after you're done with the kittens each time BEFORE handling another litter. This way, the kittens will be protected against one another's germs. You can wear separate pairs of exam gloves for each litter but clean your hands anyway! Below are general guidelines for how much to feed and when to feed: Week of life

Amount to feed

1st week

3.7 cc‟s per ounce of body weight

2nd week

4.9 cc‟s per ounce of body weight

3rd week

5.7 cc‟s per ounce of body weight

4th week

6.3 cc‟s per ounce of body weight

As long as the kitten does not cry excessively, gains weight, and feels firm to the touch, the diet is meeting his/her nutritional needs. Don't forget to weigh your kittens with every meal! A kitten should eat about 8 cc of formula per 30g of body weight per day. Nursing bottles are marked with measurements so it's easy to keep track. Weigh the kittens daily to calculate the amount of formula they need; a kitchen or small postal scale should be used. Keep in mind that the younger kittens are, the more


P a g e | 327 accustomed they are to staying "latched onto" a mom cat's nipple all the time, nursing small amounts periodically. If you notice that your kittens are not eating enough in one feeding, increase the frequency of feedings. Or go back to that kitten after the others have eaten to give him/her another chance to eat at that feeding time. Feedings should occur every 2 hours ideally. If overnight feeding is not feasible, it is important to count the cc's each kitten is getting during the day to make sure that it is the total that the kitten should get per 24 hour period. For 1-2 week old kittens, 4 hours at night will probably be ok. For 3-4 week old kittens, 6-7 hours overnight will probably be OK. Again, it is important that they are getting their total amount during the 24 hour period, especially if there are longer breaks between their feedings. Divide their needed daily intake by the number of required daily feedings, and you'll know how much they should eat each time. Kittens that are extra weak or recovering from a "crash" should eat more frequently. Wear a smock or scrub top for each kitten cage that you put on each time you feed that litter. When you move to the next litter, you can put it on top of the crate until the next feeding unless soiled. Some viruses can live on clothing, and this can help prevent cross-contamination to and from other kittens. Kitten positioning for feeding is very important; this is where the crucial surrogate-mom bonding happens. Reclining a kitten while feeding can cause the kitten to aspirate. This can lead to the kitten â&#x20AC;&#x153;drowningâ&#x20AC;?. The kitten must be leaning forward or flat on it's belly. Different people have different "styles" of bottle-feeding. Kittens are most comfortable in a position similar to the position they'd be in if they were nursing from a mom cat. One position is simply to place the kitten on its stomach on a towel or cloth on which it can cling; it will "knead" its paws on instinct. You can also sit cross-legged on the floor with the kitten inside your legs, and let the kitten place its paws on your leg as it nurses. Remember to keep a towel on your lap for this-and use a fresh, clean towel between litters. Open the mouth gently with the tip of your finger and slip the nipple in. Once your kitten gets the hang of it, they will search out the nipple enthusiastically! You will feel a real "vacuum effect" when the kitten gets into suckle mode. Watch for bubbles in the bottle during suckling and ears wiggling, this means the kitten is suckling successfully! To keep air from getting into the kitten's stomach, hold the bottle at a 45-degree angle, keeping a light pull on the bottle. The kitten should be allowed to suck at its own pace. If a kitten refuses to take the nipple or won't suckle, try rubbing it vigorously on its forehead or stroking its back. This replicates the activity of a mom cat's cleaning and can effectively stimulate the kitten to nurse. Sometimes you will hear a "clicking" noise which means the kitten's nursing instinct is in gear and should be ready for the nipple. Sometimes a kitten is simply picky; there are two kinds of nipples out there, one shorter and one longer, so you might have to make sure they don't prefer one or the other. If you're feeding multiple kittens, you'll have better luck with them eating the required amount if you feed them each several times, taking turns. Feed the first kitten until it stops nursing, feed the second, etc. Then go back to the first and repeat this round-robin. Usually after 2 or 3 nursing turns, a kitten has had enough for one feeding. Kittens that seem too weak to nurse can often be stimulated by rubbing some Karo syrup on the lips. If a kitten still refuses to nurse, and this happens beyond the first few "getting the hang of it" times, it indicates illness. Please contact the vet or vet techs.


P a g e | 328 If you see bubbles coming out of the nose or hear a gurgling the kitten has accidentally suck formula into the lungs; if this happens, hold the kitten upside down until it stops choking. Alert the vet or vet techs so it can be placed on antibiotics immediately. When a kitten has had enough formula, it will usually get some bubbles around its mouth and its tummy will be very rounded, almost pear-shaped. After feeding, you should burp the kitten just like you'd burp a human baby; hold it upright against your shoulder and pat it on the back. Do not over-feed kittens, since this can cause diarrhea and a host of other problems. Kittens under four weeks will go happily to sleep after they're fed and full; older kittens will want some serious play and cuddle time. After each feeding session, you should give each kitten a full-body once over with a barely damp warm washcloth, using short strokes like mom would use. This activity keeps the kittens‟ fur clean, teaches them how to groom, and gives them the attention and mothering that they crave. Do not bathe kittens under three weeks and if you bathe kittens older than that, you must have warmed towels ready to dry them completely. NEVER leave a kitten damp or wet. Remember that changes in diet can quickly cause diarrhea, so keep an eye on your kitten's stools. Consult our guide to stool and urine in the "Basics" section. Diarrhea can be life-threatening to a kitten if left untreated; usually, a dose of one or more types of antibiotics prescribed by your vet will get them back on track. It is very common for them to get sick the first week they are on formula. It's natural for kittens to suckle on each other or on your fingers, even after they're finished eating. If kittens are suckling on each other, apply “YUK” to the kitten. If this does not stop a persistent kitten, you may need to separate them. It is a good idea to check each kittens genitals to ensure that the sucking activity is not causing problems (redness, irritation, penis hanging out, etc…). Suckling on genitals can lead to the urethra swelling shut and having to be surgically reopened. If any of this occurs, please contact the vet or vet techs immediately.

Stimulation for urination and defecation By nature, mom cats lick the "back end" of their babies to stimulate the bowels and bladder on a regular basis. If you are the babies' new mom cat, guess who gets this duty! After each feeding, gently rub the kitten on its low abdomen, as well as the genitals and rectum, with a warm moist cotton ball, cotton pad, or alcohol and fragrance free baby wipe. Make sure you rub only enough to get them to eliminate; overstimulation will irritate the area. Keep an eye out for chafing and lingering dirt. DO NOT let them get chilled. Kittens should (and almost always will) urinate during each stimulation. They should defecate at least once a day. One trick is to slowly count to 60 while you're stimulating a kitten; at that point, you'll know if they're done or if something's on its way out! When kittens get to be about three- four weeks old, they don‟t usually need our help. We can place a litter box in their crate with shredded paper or NON Clumping litter. At the same time, place a shallow pan for the litter box nearby so kittens always have access. This is a good time to introduce the Royal Canin baby cat kibble. Kittens will chew on litter out of curiosity but they will redirect this exploration to tasty kibble!


P a g e | 329 Use shredded newspaper or non-clumping cat litter. The clumping properties will cause it to clump in tummies and respiratory passages.

Weaning You will know that a kitten is ready for the weaning process when it is (a) biting its nipple often and forcefully, and (b) able to lick formula from your finger. The next step is to get the kitten to lap up formula from a spoon. Once they've mastered that, try putting it in a flat dish. Introduce the kittens to solid food by offering warmed canned food mixed into a thin gruel with a little bit of water or KMR. Eventually, you can mix canned kitten food with formula, gradually reducing the amount of formula until they're eating just the food. It is not uncommon for weight gain to slow and minor, temporary diarrhea to occur during weaning.

Place the food in a shallow saucer. Some kittens will begin lapping right away, while others will prefer to lick the gruel from your fingers. Allow them to do so and slowly lower your finger to the saucer. The kittens may bite the edge of the plate or walk in the food. Sometimes it takes two or three meals or more before they really catch on. If a kitten doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x;t seem interested in the gruel at all, try gently opening the kittenâ&#x20AC;&#x;s mouth and rubbing a little of the food on his tongue or teeth. Be patient; the weaning process takes time. As the kittens catch on, begin to thicken the gruel. Remember that as you thicken the gruel, you will need to make sure the kittens always have access to fresh water in a low, spill-resistant bowl. Many kittens are eating gruel well and not yet interested in a bowl of water. Other kittens are so messy and boisterous you can't leave water in their cage without them getting wet and chilled. Keep giving water in the wet food until they are drinking sufficient water to stay hydrated. Kittens will walk through their food & be quite messy. Make sure they are cleaned and DRY before putting them in their cage. If kittens are messy eaters, don't leave gruel or water in their cage. Being wet rapidly causes body temperature to drop.

Cleaning Kitten bedding must be changed daily, and sometimes more often. Wash dirty bedding with a cap full of bleach and fragrance and dye free detergent to disinfect it. Kittens need exercise to promote muscular and circulatory development. However, care should be taken in the first two weeks of life because their internal organs and limbs are extremely fragile. Play with and handle them prior to feeding. At least twice a week, and more often if possible, the babies need to be groomed with a soft, warm, moist cloth, wiping gently in imitation of the mom's grooming style. DO NOT LEAVE A KITTEN UNTIL IT IS COMPLETELY DRY! After each feeding session, you should also give them a full-body once-over with a barely damp washcloth, using short strokes like a mom cat would use. This keeps their fur clean, teaches them how to groom, and gives them the attention and "mothering" they crave. Kittens will often get very dirty and mucked-up in between cleanings; it's okay to wash a kitten with warm water under a sink faucet, but try to focus only on


P a g e | 330 the areas where they need it. A simple "butt-bath" will usually do the trick. Never bathe a kitten under three weeks this way. Your body heat is not enough to warm up a cold kitten – you need to use towels/blankets and heating pads set on low. DO NOT LEAVE A KITTEN UNTIL IT IS COMPLETELY DRY!

Parasite Control You should also check their ears regularly for dirt and, especially after initial rescue, ear mites. Dirt can be cleaned gently with a cotton ball or swab; consult the vet team if you find the telltale ear mite "coffeeground" type dirt. If you find fleas or flea dirt on kittens of any age, let the vet team know. They will get them treated with revolution or frontline at a safe dose. Some kittens are so infested they need capstar orally to kill the fleas within 30 minutes. Young kittens can easily get anemia from flea infestation and really endanger its life. First, use a flea comb to remove as much of the dirt and fleas from the fur as you can. After they have been treated and the fleas are dead (30minutes with capstar, 24 hours with frontline/revolution), give the kitten a bath in gentle soap and warm water. Again, only let them get wet for a few seconds then warm them up asap. Make sure water temperature is warm (but not hot) so as not to chill the kitten. Dry the kitten, with a towel then place in dry warm towels on heating pad on low. Cover with fleece to trap heat in “nest”. DO NOT LEAVE A KITTEN UNTIL IT IS COMPLETELY DRY!

Medical Guide Medical Issues - Warning Signs to Watch For If the kitty does any of these things, even once, you should be concerned. In most instances, it will be nothing, but again we always want to be on the safe side because kittens at this age don't give much warning before they start to crash. Sneezing: watch closely unless severe then call vet team Coughing: watch closely unless severe then call vet team Wheezing: watch closely unless severe then call vet team Tires easily: watch closely Diarrhea: URGENT Straining to urinate or defecate: stimulate, consult vet team if not productive Bleeding from any part of the body Abnormal twitches: URGENT Loss or decrease of appetite: URGENT Change in attitude or behavior: watch closely


P a g e | 331 Lethargic or depressed: URGENT Breathing heavily: URGENT Head slumped in food/water bowl: wake it up, if can‟t URGENT Behavior that is unusual compared to normal behaviors: watch closely unless severe then call vet team

Isolation Because the kittens are rescued from shelter environments, it is very difficult for Austin Pets Alive! to ensure that they will always be healthy. A cat or kitten that appears healthy at the time of rescue could easily begin to show signs of illness several days later. It can take up to 7 days for signs of upper respiratory infection (URI) to develop. Because cats are relatively easy to keep separate, we require dividers between kennels to isolate the kittens in the nursery. Most illnesses should be apparent within those 7 days. They need to have separate food bowls, water bowls, and litter boxes for the duration of their stay.

Common Illnesses in Cats The following information is intended to help you better understand and recognize some of the more common illnesses in cats.

Panleukopenia (Feline Distemper) Panleukopenia (sometimes called feline distemper) is a viral infection that most commonly affects kittens and young cats. Left untreated, panleukopenia is almost always fatal. Even with intensive treatment, the majority of cats showing signs of panleukopenia will die. Unfortunately, this illness can be frustrating to deal with because the virus can survive in the environment for up to a year. This means that other unvaccinated cats can become infected with panleukopenia simply by coming into contact with places where an infected cat has been. A bleach solution is the best way to disinfect areas that may have been contaminated. The vaccine for panleukopenia is considered extremely effective. Signs & Symptoms: Fever, diarrhea, lethargy, vomiting, loss of appetite Treatment: Veterinary care, including fluid therapy and antibiotics Transmission: Very contagious to other cats, especially through contact with infected feces or vomit but also bowls, hands, clothes, etc…

Upper Respiratory Infection (URI) The term “upper respiratory infection” is used to refer to any illness that affects a cat‟s upper respiratory system. URIs are very common in shelter cats. Some of the more serious URIs (for which there are vaccines) are listed separately in this section. Following is information that applies to all upper respiratory infections. Signs & Symptoms: Sneezing, runny nose and eyes, fever, anorexia Treatment: Veterinary care, including antibiotics, and supportive care Transmission: Very contagious to other cats through direct contact of bowls, bottles, hands.


P a g e | 332 Conjunctivitis (Usually an early indicator of a URI) If the eye is crusted shut or puss filled use a warm most cotton ball or soft towel to soak the area. Never pick at crust or force an eye open. There is a potential to further injure tissues this way. As always, not this on the chart and in the log book. Make sure team leaders and med team are alerted. Signs & Symptoms: ,Watery eyes, white, yellow or green discharge. Black crust can be dried blood. Eyelids and third eyelid are red, swollen and raised. Treatment: Veterinary care, including antibiotics, and supportive care Transmission: Very contagious to other cats through direct contact of bowls, bottles, hands.

Ear mites Ear mites are tiny parasites that live in the ear canal. Signs & Symptoms: Itching, scratching, head-shaking, dark brown discharge in the ears - often looks like dirt Treatment: Veterinary care including an injection or ear meds Transmission: Contagious to other cats and dogs, but usually requires direct contact with the infected animal

Ringworm Ringworm is a fungus related to athlete‟s foot, not actually a worm. Signs & Symptoms: Irregularly shaped areas of fur loss; the skin in these areas will usually appear rough and scaly and often the bald patch is round Treatment: Veterinary care, including dips and/or oral medications Transmission: Contagious to other cats, dogs, and people, but usually requires close contact with the infected animal or its bedding

Fleas Fleas are tiny insects that feed on the blood of cats, dogs, humans, and other animals. Although each flea only consumes a small drop of blood, fleas usually attack in large numbers. Signs & Symptoms: Intense itching and scratching, hair loss or “barbering” Treatment: Veterinary care including medications and topical treatment Transmission: Contagious to other cats, dogs, and people

Round, Tape, and Hook Worms Worms affect a cat‟s digestive system. They are most commonly seen in kittens and young cats. Worms are very common in kittens. Signs & Symptoms: Large hard belly, diarrhea, an inability to gain weight but with a voracious appetite Treatment: Veterinary care, including de-worming medication


P a g e | 333 Transmission: Contagious to other cats and dogs, but only through contact with (and subsequent ingestion of) feces.

The Scoop on Poop Below is a guide to the color and consistency of kittens' feces. Pay attention to this whenever the kitten does 'their business', it can be a warning sign of serious health problems. Fecal Color: Brown

Normal color. Be happy!

Bloody

Actual red blood seen in stool.

Mucous

Yellowish/white/clear slimy substance. Can be seen when straining is occurring or excessive diarrhea.

Black

True dark black color to stool. Usually indicates bleeding high in the bowel.

Orange

Usually indicates way too much bile in stool, can occur with reflux.

Yellow

Almost always indicates bacterial imbalance in the bowel. If has diarrhea also, usually related to coccidia.

White

Grossly abnormal color. Usually indicates severe bacterial imbalance and severe infection in the bowel.

Fecal Consistency: Firm

Normal consistency. Be happy!

Formed but soft

Low range of „normal‟. If stools change from firm to soft you should seek medical advice.

'Toothpaste'

Still has somewhat tubular form but falls apart once touched. Watch closely because could turn into diarrhea.

'Cow patty'

Never formed but thick enough it falls into a „cow-


P a g e | 334 patty‟ shape. Liquidy

Just fluid that falls out of rectum, thin and may have mucous.

'The Squirts‟

Animal has no control over bowel and watery fluid squirts out of rectum.

For any poop that is “not OK”, please contact the vet team. All diarrhea is bad in a bottle baby kitten! For any diarrhea, alert the vet team immediately.

Overview of Hydration Okay, this sounds intimidating, but it‟s not. Hydration is basically how much water we have in our system. Since water drives all of our metabolic functions, you can see why adequate hydration is essential. Checking hydration is a lot simpler than trying to spell it. If you pull up on your own skin, you will see the skin snaps right back down. This is called “skin turgor” (how well it snaps back). A well hydrated animal will have quick skin turgor. Below is a guide to checking kitten's skin turgor and their urine color, to ensure proper hydration.

Skin turgor: Immediate snap back

Excellent hydration. Watch however at this stage for over-hydration.

Quick snap but not immediate

Hydrated. Monitor other signs to be sure the kitten is overall (full-body) hydrated.

Snap back within one second

Adequate hydration. However, if ANY other signs, this animal is at risk and needs constant care.

Within 1-3 seconds

Dehydrated. Needs immediate attention. Call vet team ASAP.

Stands up on own

Call vet team immediately!

Urine color: Light yellow

Mildly dilute urine. Overall body hydration should be adequate if no kidney disease. With sick/injured or at-risk animals, this is the color we shoot for.

Yellow

Mildly concentrated urine. Monitor closely and if ANY other signs of dehydration, seek care immediately.


P a g e | 335 Intense yellow

Concentrated urine. Animal is not getting enough fluid for total body hydration.

Dark yellow/almost brown

Extreme dehydration or bilirubin in urine. Call vet team, the kitten may need fluids.

Red/Dark Orange

Call the vet team immediately!

Medication Schedule The APA! veterinary team prescribes any needed medications and decides doses. The med sheet attached to the ltter's chart will tell you what to give and when. Pay close attention to dose and method of administering. Oral and eye meds can have similar names but it's important to use it correctly. Different kittens in the same litter may be getting different doses, sometime one is much larger or smaller than the others. Always finish the medications as prescribed and make notes in the chart and log book about symtpoms you continue to see.

Notes Fading Kitten Syndrome Fading Kitten Syndrome is a life threatening emergency in which a kitten, sometime one that was previously healthy, â&#x20AC;&#x153;crashesâ&#x20AC;? and begins to fade away. If not dealt with by a foster parent immediately, it can result in death. If you are caring for kittens 12 weeks or younger, it is a very good idea to familiarize yourself with this handout so you know what to do if it happens. It is caused by 2 things: Hypothermia (being too cold) and hypoglycemia (not enough blood sugar). You must combat both of these things or the kitten will die. Symptoms: Low Body Temperature â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the kitten feels cool or cold to the touch Extreme Lethargy - not getting up, unable to stand, not responding when pet Gasping for breath Meowing/Crying out When this happens, it is vital that you take these immediate steps! Step 1- Get them warm:


P a g e | 336 Create the “burrito” towel. Immediately wrap the kitten up in a towel like a burrito leaving their face exposed only. Their whole body, tail, ears, and paws should be in the towel, only nose and mouth exposed. Do not take the kitten out of the towel to adjust them, check on them, etc. - this is very important! Every time you take them out you will make them cold again, even if it is only for a second. You must apply an extra source of heat. The kitten‟s body can‟t warm itself up with just a towel alone, you have to apply extra heat. Also, your body temperature is much lower than what a kitten should be, so trying to warm them up with your body heat won‟t work either. Then wrap a heating pad turned onto *low* around the towel - duct tape it or secure it around the towel so it stays wrapped around them. Don‟t let the heating pad touch them directly as it can cause burns. Make sure the „burrito‟ towel is between their skin and the heating pad. Step 2- Get their blood sugar up: Once you get the heat on them, get a bowel or Tupperware and a few tablespoons sugar in hot water. Stir it up so you get a sugar water solution- you do want it to be as strong as possible while still being runny. Using a syringe or your finger give 3 drops every 3 minutes into the mouth. If they aren‟t swallowing, try not to get it down the throat, try to get it on the tongue or gums. Set an egg timer or use the stop watch on your cell phone to make sure you are doing it at least every 3 minutes. Every 5 minutes or 10 minutes will not work, it must be every 3 minutes. Step 3 - Call an APA medical technician: Call the emergency medical technician„s phone number 512-552-2042. Don‟t leave your kitten to make this call or forget to do your sugar every 3 minutes. They won‟t have any extra advice for you that isn„t in this handout, but they will need to be made aware of what is going on. If you believe a kitten has passed, please visit a member of the medical team for them to confirm. Wrap the kitten in a towel, put in a plastic bag and label with the kitten's name and A#. APA! Has a memorial garden where you can place a stone with the kittens name if you'd like. Prognosis: It can sometimes take hours for them to come out of it and start acting normally again. Once they do come out of it, make sure you alert the med team to discuss what could have possibly caused them to fade in the first place and make sure we have the kitten on all the right medical treatments for any illnesses they have that may have caused it. Keep in mind, even with all the love and attention and perfect treatment of this condition, some of them still won‟t make it. Try not to blame yourself during this difficult time and focus on all the kittens you have personally saved by opening your heart to these kittens. Any kitten you‟ve ever fed was given a second chance at life BECAUSE of YOU!


P a g e | 337


P a g e | 338

Bottle Baby Daily Care Sheet Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x;s Date: ___________

Name: A#: Admit Date: Age at Admission:

Date

Notes/ medicines given:

Notes/ medicines given:

Notes/ medicines given:

Notes/ medicines given:

Notes/ medicines given:

Notes/ medicines given:

Notes/ medicines given:

Notes/ medicines given:

Time

Description: Gender: Admit Weight: Diet and Notes:

Weight b4 food

Type of Food

Amount Taken

Weight aft food

Stim? Y N

Output

Init


Medications Animal Name/Number ____________________ Medication _____________________________ Treatment for___________________________ Dosage ________________________________ Frequency ______________________________

8am 12pm 4pm 8pm

Animal Name/Number ____________________ Medication _____________________________ Treatment for___________________________ Dosage ________________________________ Frequency ______________________________

8am 12pm 4pm 8pm

Animal Name/Number ____________________


Medication _____________________________ Treatment for___________________________ Dosage ________________________________ Frequency ______________________________

8am 12pm 4pm 8pm

Animal Name/Number ____________________ Medication _____________________________ Treatment for___________________________ Dosage ________________________________ Frequency ______________________________

8am 12pm 4pm 8pm


Handling Returns Dealing Successfully With a Reality of Rescue

About APA‟s Return Policy From our website under “Adoption FAQs”: What is your return policy? APA! will take back any newly adopted pet if the adoption does not work out for any reason. Please e-mail us at adopt@austinpetsalive.org to start the return process. If you are having behavioral or medical issues with the pet, please specify the problem as APA! may be able to assist. Pets that have been in your care for over 30 days will have to go through our PASS program that is set up to assist owners in rehoming their pets.

Return Rate 

In spite of this „open door return policy‟, APA‟s return rate hovers around 9% in 2011, nationwide shelter return rates are reported at 8-12%.

Barring extreme behavioral cases, all returns are readopted out successfully.

Our Returns Process 

Adopters are contractually required to notify APA prior to rehoming/surrendering their adopted pet anywhere else. Excerpt from APA! Adoption Contract:


I agree not to sell, trade, or transfer ownership of this animal. I agree not to dispose of this pet in any way, but to notify APA!. if I must relinquish custody of this pet at any time. I understand that if the relationship does not work out regardless of the time frame, I am to give APA! the first opportunity to accept the pet. I also understand that I am not entitled to any refunds of monies paid or that APA! will take this pet back.

If adopters do not abide by the contract and surrender one of our rescues to another shelter, the microchip identifies that animal as an APA rescue, and we are notified by the shelter (as long as they scan their animals) and arrange to take that cat or dog back into the APA adoption program.

If adopters do contact APA about a return, then we first ascertain that we can‟t help them keep that animal (through behavioral, medical or resource help). If we can‟t help them keep their pet, then we begin the return process.

10-20% of adopters end up changing their mind about returning the animal once offered some possible solutions, or once they have had time to think it over.

Step-by-step returns: 1. Adopter contacts APA about a return 2. Return personnel contact the adopter to discuss the situation, offering possible solutions to help the adopter keep their pet 3. The adopter is sent an email detailing the return process, including the Owner Surrender Form, requesting important feedback and medical records on the animal in question 4. Medical and/or behavioral groups are involved as necessary 5. A day and time for drop off back at the shelter is arranged 6. The person handling the return sends out an email with the details of the return to the intake team (reactivate the animal in PetPoint), program manager (so they are aware another cat or dog is entering the adoptions program), marketing (so they can start re-running ads for that animal), and behavior group if necessary (if a behavioral evaluation is necessary).

Return reasons can be anything from medical (adopter allergies or poor health), to unrealistic expectations, to simply “changed my mind”. In ALL of these cases return personnel maintain a calm, positive and helpful attitude. Any negativity expressed can potentially endanger the animal (if that adopter gets offended or angry and decides to take the animal elsewhere, etc). As a rule, the dog or cat will end up in a better home the next time around and is better of coming back to APA‟s adoption program.

For those good adopters where the return is due to a bad fit, we offer an exchange with no „expiration date‟. We can‟t afford to offer refunds (unless there are extenuating circumstances), however we are always happy to place another cat or dog into a good home!

Sample Dog Return Email: The email below can be customized based on the situation.


ď&#x201A;ˇ

Obviously the choice to rehome to an acquaintance (with application approval) is not offered to a unfit adopter.

ď&#x201A;ˇ

We sometimes have to take a dog back with none of the paperwork/ tags/etc when the situation warrants it (owner leaving town that day, found dog with our microchip, etc).

I'm very sorry to hear you can no longer keep XXX. Have you checked with friends and family to see if anyone would be interested in taking him? We can authorize a transfer, with updated microchip info and 1 month of free pet insurance, as long as they fill out an application and they are approved (there would be no adoption fee). If you don't know of anyone who could offer him a good home, we can get the return process started. I have attached the owner surrender form, please fill it out and bring it when you come to the Center (we will set up a day and time for drop off after I receive the information below back from you). Some of the questions below are the same or similar to the ones in the attached form, however we need some information up front so we can decide if XXX can go to our kennel facility or needs to go into a foster home, and what medical work he will need: ITEMS -rabies certificate -rabies & microchip tags on a collar -full medical records -any other items you'd like to donate with him (bedding, food, toys, etc) QUESTIONS Who does he get along with (kids, dogs, adults, cats, etc)? Who doesn't he get along with? What level of training has he received by a professional/at a class if any, and what commands does he know (sit, stay, down etc)? Is he house broken? Is he crate trained? Has he ever shown any negative behavior like being destructive, aggressive, barking etc? If so, please describe in detail, especially recent behavior (vs. behavior se's outgrown). Is he leash trained? Does he do well on a leash? Is he food aggressive at all? Are you able to pet him and place your hand in his bowl while he is eating? Does he release toys or other things he's playing with when asked? What type of activities does he enjoy? How much daily exercise does he get on average?


Wh