Page 1

VOLUME 3, ISSUE 8

AUG 2012

PET JOURNAL FREE

WISCONSIN’S RESOURCE FOR ALL ANIMALS www.petjournalmidwest.com

THE CONSEQUENCES OF PET LIMIT LAWS by Cindi Ashbeck Pet Journal Contributor Wausau, Wisconsin has the opportunity to be in the national spotlight during the upcoming weeks and months. You see, Wausau agreed to reconsider the limit regarding the number of pets the city’s residents can own after the Lecker family, a family new to Wausau, was threatened with fines for owning four dogs, two canines too many according to a law passed by Wausau in 1989. Even though Wausau’s Mayor, Jim Tipple, responded to public outcry in March of this year by informing the Leckers they would not be fined pending the city council’s re-evaluation of Wausau’s law in June, even the proposed revised law was so restrictive that the Leckers have since decided to sell their newly-purchased Wausau home. Under the proposed law that was discussed by city lawmakers on June 12 of this year, a maximum of five pets, consisting of any combination of dogs and cats, can be owned or cared for by a single household. Since the Leckers have three cats in addition to their four dogs, even the revised law would have caused them to face fines if it were passed. Photo Courtesy of Legacy Studios

Unfortunately, the Leckers’ situation typifies the plight faced by many other pet owners, animal foster caregivers and rescues regardless of their home states. Many cities and municipalities have ordinances that restrict the number of pets that can be maintained in a household without regard to the ability of a particular household to provide adequate care for its pets.

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EDITORS NOTES

ABOUT OUR COVER MODEL

Our August cover model is Gizmo, he is about 6 years old and was adopted 5 years ago from the Sheboygan County Humane Society. Gizmo, lives with Michelle B., of Sheboygan.

Dear Readers,

Are you intrested in Advertising in Pet Journal? For more information on adThank you for reading the August is- vertising in Pet Journal or on our website sue of Pet Journal. please email us at advertising@petjournalmidwest.com. This month Pet Journal will have a booth at the Mit Liebe German Shephard Become a friend of Pet Journal on Dog Rescue’s Family Pet Fair and Expo Facebook! Join our growing group of Pet on Saturday August 4th at the Brown Journal readers following us, and upload County Fair Grounds. Pet Journal will a picture of your pet(s) to the group and also be available at several other events, it could be featured as our pet of the see the calendar and events pages for a week! listing of these events. Would you like to see your pets in Pet Pet Journal is looking for volunteers to Journal? Email a picture of your pet(s) assist in the delivery of Pet Journal each to petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com month. Time commitment is minimal at and we will feature them in our Reader a few hours per month, to visit locations Pet Page. No email? No problem! Mail in your area. Please contact me at either a copy of the picture to the Pet Jourdistribution@petjournalmidwest.com or nal mailbox, listed below. All pictures 920-393-4818 to discuss which areas received by mail will be returned after are available and would work for you. scanning. Our columnists would love to hear your questions. Contact information is found at the end of their respective columns! We want to be the publication you look forward to reading each month.

Lee J Schneider, Editor

lschneider@petjournalmidwest.com

Photo courtesy of Legacy Studios, Sheboygan, WI.

TABLE OF CONTENTS Photographers would you like to see your work featured on the cover of Pet Journal? Email us at: coverphoto@petjounamidwest.com for submission guidelines.

1 - The Consequences of Pet Limit Laws

15 - Pictures from Manitowoc’s Lincolin Park Zoo 16 - Photos of your Pets

5 - About our Cover Model Editors Notes

17 - Ask the Vet

by C. Ashbeck

6 - Holistic & Natural Options for You & Your Pets hosted by K. Hoelzel hosted by C. Larson

8 - July Calendar 9 - Ask Scrappy!

hosted by Scrappy the Pit Bull

10 - Timly Tick Talk

from The Practical Pet Vet

Alpha Dog

hosted by T. Pool

Pet Journal newspaper is publish by LSRB Media, LLC, on a monthly basis and is available free of charge to readers at various locations in the region that it is printed. The views represented by Columnists or Contributors in Pet Journal do not necessarily represent the views of Pet Journal or its parent company LSRB Media, LLC. Questions or comments regarding content can be made to information@petjournalmidwest.com or by calling our offices at: (920) 393-4818. Pet Journal is always on the lookout for new advertiser’s if you are interested in advertising with us please contact our advertising department at advertising@ petjournalmidwest.com. To contact Pet Journal by mail, please send all correspondence to our mailbox at: Pet Journal, Attn: Advertising Department 3120 S. Business Dr., Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524. If you have any questions for a specific columnist, please contact them via the email at the end of their respective columns. If you have a questions for a specific department, please contact them via their email address list below. General Information ................... petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com Distribution Location Requests ... distribution@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Journal Archives ...................... archives@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Photo Submissions ................ petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com

by J. Guell

Aquarium Maintenance Schedule by M. Verner

18 - Zoo News Love of Compost

by A. Pankratz & A. Kawski

A Skunky Family that doesn’t Stink!

by L. Bankson

19 - Find Pet Journal July Word Search Answers 20 - Grooming your Pets

11 - Pet Adoption Section

hosted by D. Schmidt

12 - Eco News Despite Drought, Kerner Blue Butterflies Recovery making Progress

by S. Minaker

from WI DNR

Burning Restrictions from WI DNR

DNR Park offers Learning Fun at WI State Fair from WI DNR

13 - Breeding Waterfowl Numbers “about average” in an unusual Spring from WI DNR

14 - The Healing Power of Horses by L. Ledbeter

Coming in September

Pet Product Reviews

Sharing the Turf

from catsinternational.org

21 - Pet Journal Word Search 22 - Pet Journal Classifieds 24 - Upcoming Events 25 - Press Releases Trap-Neuter-Return Success in Howard and Suamico

from Cats Anonymous, Inc.

Introduction to Reiki for

Animals at Ivelolharele Retirement Sanctuary, Inc

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AUGUST 2012

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HOLISTIC AND NATURAL OPTIONS FOR YOU AND YOUR PETS NO SUCH THING AS “PEOPLE FOOD”... by Karey Hoelzel, Holistic & Natural Columnist h&n-khoezel@petjournalmidwest.com The windfall apples under our slightly neglected apple tree near the garden have started to attract an assortment of creatures, two of whom I recognize as a couple of the funniest canine apple soccer players in the immediate area, Mattie Mae and Wilson. To their delight, the treasure trove of slightly over the hill, not fit for apple pie apples provide the dogs not only the opportunity for a good game of keep away, but a tasty meal of sorts. To their credit, the winning team always shares the remaining apples with the rest of the players, Gracie Belle and Pfill-up, the rest of the onlookers and the horse, all who had gathered to see what all the excitement was about. All the dogs seem to look forward to apple season, and tomato season, and greenbean and broccoli season... hunting and gathering isn’t only in our DNA, it’s in their too. I do believe if I hear one more time the term “people food” used in conjunction with the sentence “we don’t feed our pets”, I think I’m going to... well, let’s regroup and start thinking outside the bag for a change. There is no such thing as “people” food, there’s just food, whole natural food for everyone. Dogs and cats were eating whole foods long before we humans showed up on their scene. Heck, we’ve even taken credit for “teaching” them how to hunt (for our benefit mostly, since they can run faster than we can). They knew those things instinctively without any help from us humans. Animals, on their own, will seek out plants, vegetables, and nuts to compliment their carnivore diets. Fast forward to today. We’re eating what they used to eat, and to their disappointment and failing health, we’ve substituted dry dog or cat food, and the uneducated among us think that’s an OK deal. Well, its not. Prepackaged dry dog and cat foods are here to stay because of convenience. There are some very good meat based grain free kibbles out there. Having said that, I also want to add that it is the wise

PLEASE DON’T FEED CHICKEN JERKY TREATS YOUR PET MAY NOT BE “PICKY” THEY MIGHT BE SICK!

by Cheryl Larson, Holistic & Natural Columnist human that also adds whole natural raw h&n-clarson@petjournalmidwest.com meats, meaty bones, vegetable (lightly Editors Note: Cheryl, for this months able to determine how the chicken jerky steamed), no onions, greens and fruits column submitted a health advisory on treats from China are causing illness. (no grapes) into a rotation style diet for Pet Treats. This means nothing has changed or imtheir pets. proved since the problem was first identified in 2007. The anti-oxidant, anti-cancer benefits The FDA has issued yet another warnin whole vegetables and fruits apply to ing to veterinarians and pet owners I find this discouraging, not to mention our animals as well as ourselves. about chicken jerky dog treats imported troubling. from China. We need to give back what we, in our I would hope in four years’ time, with ignorance, have taken away from them. The most recent FDA Center for Vet- scientists in at least three different counerinary Medicine (CVM) update is dated tries looking at the problem, the potenRotation feeding is a fantastic way to November 18, 2011. The first warning tially toxic ingredients and/or manuincorporate whole foods into our pets about these products was issued four facturing processes involved with this diets. years ago in September 2007, after the product could be identified. CVM received in excess of 70 complaints There are many good books availinvolving more than 95 sick dogs. (This Needless to say, I highly recommend able that share great information about total grew to 156 by year’s end, accord- you not feed chicken jerky treats – also adding natural foods back into our pets ing to an MSNBC.com report.) sold as chicken tenders, strips and treats lives. “K-9 Kitchen” by Monica Segal, – to your dog or cat or any pet. “Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats” by Per MSNBC.com: “At least 70 dogs Earl Mindell, and “Give Your Dog a Bone” have been sickened so far this year after According to the AVMA, based on preby Ian Billinghurst, DVM, are among my reportedly eating chicken jerky products liminary information about Canadian favorite reads. imported from China, FDA officials said. cases, it appears the problem is more That’s up from 54 reports of illness in prevalent in small-breed dogs fed the When we know better we do better... 2010. Some of the dogs have died, ac- chicken jerky treats regularly and in our pets are the ultimate winners when cording to the anecdotal reports from greater amounts than recommended on we make wiser choices about their nutripet owners and veterinarians.” package labeling. tion. If you’re still feeding your pet chicken jerky treats – which I certainly do not recommend – signs of illness can inIts apple season! clude: • Loss of appetite Gain knowledge... Pass it forward. • Vomiting • Diarrhea, sometimes bloody • Increased thirst and/or urination Editor’s Notes: This months column re• Decreased activity fers to ‘non-Processed Foods’, processed foods like Bacon, Brats and Hot Dogs These symptoms can appear within a should never be given to pets. Look for few hours to days after consuming the Carey’s column next month when she product. If your pet becomes severely ill talks about fruits and vegetables that or the symptoms last for more than 24 are bad for our pets. hours, you should make an immediate appointment with your vet. Carey Hoelzel owns Critters Pet Nutrition, 2593 Fairview Rd, Neenah, WI. Her Blood tests may show an increase in shop caters to those who prefer natural urea nitrogen and creatinine, indicating and holistic free range foods for dogs kidney failure. A urinalysis may point to and cats, offering grain free, raw frozen acquired Fanconi syndrome. and freeze dried foods and treats, natural supplements and Young Living EssenMost affected dogs have fully recovtial Oils. ered, however, some reports the FDA Copyright 2012 Karey Hoelzel. has received have involved dogs who have died from chicken jerky-related illness. What are your waiting for?

Neither the FDA nor U.S. veterinary diagnostics labs working in conjunction with the FDA’s Veterinary Laboratory Response Network (VLRN) have yet been

No recalls have been issued as of this writing for any chicken jerky treat product. Even though chicken jerky treats are cited in recently reported cases in Canada, as well as reports to the AVMA in 2007 - 2009, no one has been able to establish a definitive link between the treats and sick dogs. While the FDA continues to dilly-dally -- searching endlessly for the precise mechanism in chicken jerky treats from China that is causing illness and death in thousands of pets in the U.S. and elsewhere – pet owners are starting to demand action. And it’s no wonder, since the first FDA warning on these popular but potentially deadly treats was issued a very long four and a half years ago, in September 2007. The FDA’s position is they will not implicate nor recall products until a specific contaminant has been identified. The agency maintains chicken jerky treat samples have been tested for drugs, poisons, mycotoxins, heavy metals and certain chemicals, yet the problem remains a mystery.

see JERKY on page 7


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012 7

JERKY from page 6 Symptoms include loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea (sometimes bloody), increased thirst and/or urination, and decreased activity.

Chinese pet owners who can afford to are arranging to import American-made pet food and treats to avoid tainted products made in China. This, while pet owners in the U.S. continue to wait – for nearly 5 years and counting -- for the FDA and retailers to ban potentially deadly China-made chicken jerky dog treats from store shelves.

Recently MSNBC.com got their hands on copies of internal FDA documents which included a log of complaints from pet owners and vets naming three popuAt least a dozen pet food manufaclar brands of jerky treats linked to kidney turers in the U.S. currently export their failure and other serious illness in pets. products to Hong Kong to meet the demand of well-to-do Chinese pet owners According to MSNBC.com: “Of 22 “Priwho don’t want to risk giving the family ority 1” cases listed by the FDA late last dog or cat food or treats made in their year, 13 cited Waggin’ Train or Canyon own country.

Creek Ranch jerky treats or tenders, both produced by Nestle Purina PetCare U.S. pet food companies have even Co., the records show. been instructed not to translate their for-

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Another three listed Milo’s Kitchen could make Chinese consumers suspiHome-style Dog Treats, produced by the cious of the real origin of the ingredients. I wonder if those Chinese pet owners situation converting to an all natural raw Del Monte Corp. The rest listed single who are buying dog and cat food from or dehydrated diet will entice your pet brands or no brand.” However, U.S. pet food companies pro- U.S. companies realize “Made in the to eat and help turn their health around

ducing some of the treats linked to pet illnesses and deaths -- specifically Nestlé Purina PetCare (Waggin’ Train and Canyon Creek Ranch jerky treats or tenders) and Del Monte (Milo’s Kitchen Homestyle Dog Treats) -- along with stores that sell the treats (Petco, Petsmart, Walmart), continue to assert there is no direct connection between the treats and sick and dead pets. One of the biggest frustrations of pet There’s an ironic twist in the ongoing owners trying to avoid poisoning their problems with pet food, pet food ingredog or cat, is that many pet treat packdients, and especially treats made in age labels claim the product was made China. in the U.S., when the reality is one or more ingredients were imported from China.

PLEASE don’t buy or feed chicken jerky treats, chicken tenders, chicken strips or chicken treats made in China to your pet. Play it safe. Buy only food and treats made in the U.S. Buying pet food made in this country won’t remove all risk of winding up with a tainted product, but it will certainly improve your chances of keeping your pet safe.

The Chinese have a cultural preference for dark chicken meat, which means white meat is less expensive. On closer inspection of some chicken jerky treats “Made in the U.S.A.,” the small print shows the chicken actually came from China.

SUBMIT YOUR QUESTIONS TO OUR HOLISTIC AND NATURAL COLUMNISTS!

Country of origin labeling laws require only that products be put together here to make the made-in-the-U.S.A. claim. As long as ingredients are cooked, mixed, or otherwise processed once they arrive in the U.S. from China or elsewhere, the food can be legally identified as being made here.

Some pet owners who have had dogs fall ill or die after eating chicken jerky If you have a question for any of our treats, bought products with labels statHolistic and Natural Columnists, please ing “Proudly manufactured by an Ameriuse the email address at the top of their can company.” respective columns or you can mail your Needless to say, this sort of marketing letter to the Pet Journal mailbox (please ploy is intended to instill confidence in list an Attn: line with the columnist that consumers – in some cases with absoyou would like to answer your message: lutely tragic results. Pet Journal Attn: <insert columnists name> 3120 S Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

U.S.A.” doesn’t necessarily mean they quickly. The dehydrated foods work esare avoiding ingredients produced in pecially well at enticing the sick dogs to eat as they are concentrated in flavor their own country? and smell. We also recommend suppleJust Say NO-NO-NO to All Store ment support for the liver and kidneys to help the body cleanse. If you think your Bought Chicken Jerky Pet Treats pet may have these symptoms, or you … unless you can confidently confirm have been feeding chicken treats, please the treats were not only “assembled” in see your vet and stop in to see the alterthe U.S., but the ingredients originated natives that are available. here as well. Courtesy of Dr. Karen Becker, Mercola Allow me to repeat the advice, please .com DO NOT BUY OR FEED chicken jerky treats, chicken tenders, chicken strips or Editors Note: Cheryl Larson is the chicken treats made in China to your pet – and this goes for any treat you aren’t Holistic Pet Care Consultant at Down To 100 percent sure originated entirely in Earth Nutrition located in Howard. Stop in and check out their large assortment this country. of supplements, organic grocery and pet We have been seeing a number of supplies. dogs, with vague symptoms, picky eaters, loose stools, lethargic, etc. Pet caregivers are struggling to find something their pet will eat, and often the pet gets more chicken treats, just to get them to eat something. Please keep in mind that most animals are not “picky” by nature and that if you are finding yourself in this


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

8

SHOP at Jill’s Pet Shoppe for all your Pet needs!

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A UGUST 2012 SUNDAY Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, Green Bay, WI Nature Center: 8 am - 7:30 pm Habitrek: 9 am - 6 pm NEW Zoo, Green Bay, WI Daily 9 am - 4 pm

5 FRIENDSHIP DAY Open House and Meet and Greet at Amazing Grace Equine Sanctuary, 2 pm - 4 pm. W4985 County Rd FF, Elkhart Lake, WI. Just west of Hwy 57 on County Rd FF in northern Sheboygan Co.

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Lincoln Park Zoo, Manitowoc, WI Mon - Sat: 7 am - 5 pm Sunday: 1 pm - 5 pm

WEDNESDAY 1

THURSDAY 2

Fox Trots, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 10 am - 11 am.

Talon Talks, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 2 pm - 3 pm.

See event poster on page 24.

Menominee Zoo, Oshkosh, WI

FRIDAY DA AY 3

Animal Stories for Preschoolers, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 10 am. See

event poster on page 24.

4 Two Left Paws at Feed Bag, Mequon, 11 am - 3 pm.

See event poster on page 24.

Faimly Pet Fair and Expo, Mit Lirbr GSD Rescue, Brown County Fair Grounds, 10 - 3pm. www.shepherd-rescue. com. Come see the Pet

Daily 9 am - 7:30 pm

6

SA ATURDAY TU URD

Journal booth!

7

8

Quill Thrills, Bay Fox Trots, Bay Beach Beach Wildlife Sanc- Wildlife Sanctuary, tuary, 11 am - 12 pm. 10 am - 11 am. See event poster on page 24.

See event poster on page 24.

9

10

11 Two Left Paws at Petsmart, Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm

Talon Talks, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 2 pm - 3 pm.

See event poster on page 24.

Tween Tuesdays, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 9 - 11 am. See event poster on page 24

13

12

14

15

Quill Thrills, Bay Fox Trots, Bay Beach Beach Wildlife Sanc- Wildlife Sanctuary, tuary, 11 am - 12 pm. 10 am - 11 am.

Two Left Paws at Petsmart, Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm

See event poster on page 24.

See event poster on page 24.

Tween Tuesdays, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 9 - 11 am. See

Nature Nuts: Sprouts, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 9 - 11:30 am. See

event poster on page 24

See event poster on page 24.

Mother/Daughter/Sister Retreat, CoachHorse LLC, Kiel, 1 -5pm. For

Nature Nuts: Sprouts, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 9 - 11:30 am. See

Green Lake Area Animal Shelter Open House, Green Lake, 11 - 4 pm.

more information see poster on page 24.

For more information see poster on page 24.

22

23

24

25

Talon Talks, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 2 pm - 3 pm.

Explore Nature Walks, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 9 am. See

Sheboygan Co. Humane Society at Memorial j Mall, Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm.

21

Winnegame Dog Club Open House, W7245 Manitowoc Rd, Menasha, 11 am - 3 pm. For more

Animal Stories for Preschoolers, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 10 am. See

Quill Thrills, Bay Fox Trots, Bay Beach Beach Wildlife Sanc- Wildlife Sanctuary, tuary, 11 am - 12 pm. 10 am - 11 am. See event poster on page 24.

Talon Talks, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 2 pm - 3 pm.

See event poster on page 24.

See event poster on page 24.

event poster on page 24.

Two Left Paws at PetSmart, Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm.

Tween Tuesdays, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 9 - 11 am. See

Pet Memorial Service at Fox Valley Humane Asociation, Appleton, 2pm.

event poster on page 24

For more information see poster on page 25.

26

27

Fun Day on th Farm, Villa Loretto, Mt. Calvary, 10:30 - 3pm. See event poster on page 25.

28

29

30

31

Quill Thrills, Bay Fox Trots, Bay Beach Beach Wildlife Sanc- Wildlife Sanctuary, tuary, 11 am - 12 pm. 10 am - 11 am. See event poster on page 24.

See event poster on page 24.

Tween Tuesdays, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 9 - 11 am. See

Morning Bird Walks, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, 7 am. See

event poster on page 24

Two Left Paws at Critter Supply, Cedarburg, 11 am - 3 pm.

event poster on page 24

20

event poster on page 24.

17

event poster on page 24

19

information please go to www.winnegamedogclub. com.

16

18

event poster on page 24

Sept. 8 K-9 Cancer Walk, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, Registration 8am, Walkers: $20 entry fee, Children under 12 free

Amazing Grace Equine Sancuary 2nd Annual Fundraiser & Open House, Elkhart Lake, 12 - 5 pm. For more informa-

tion see poster on page 24.

Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, Tues. & Thurs. 4 pm - 7 pm & 1st Saturday 9 am - 2 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

Pet Journal provides this calendar as a service to the local community. If you have an event that you would like listed please email us at: events@petjournalmidwest.com, with the following information: date(s) and time(s) of event, your contact information, a short description of what will be happening, if it is a fundraiser please list who the proceeds are going to and please enter the subject as “PJ Calendar Submission.” Please send this to us no later than the 20th of the month for inclusion into the next months issue. All Events that appear on this page also appear on the Pet Journal website’s Events page, www.petjournalmidwest.com. Events will most likely be posted on the website before going into the printed edition. Thank you.


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012 9

ASK SCRAPPY!

LIMITS from page 1

Common defenses for laws that limit the number of pets a person can own or care for include that such laws prevent an excessive number of noise complaints due to a household’s pets and that they prevent animal hoarding. Proponents also claim that pet limit laws also protect animals from being in abusive, neglectful homes.

by Scrappy, the Lovable Pit Bull Pet Journal Columnist and Mascot askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com

MISTY, ASSISTANT WRITER OF ASK SCRAPPY!

SCRAPPY Hi everyone and happy August! I hope everyone had a great Fourth of July and were able to get in on all the festivities that come the holiday. You know, all the patriotic parades, the fireworks, and, of course, the food. Though extremely yummy to our human friends I hope my four legged friends stayed away from all those brats, hot dogs, treats, and so on. I know, it’s hard to turn away from something so yummy smelling, but you must. It’s especially bad when your sense of smell is so much stronger than our lesser two legged friends, but we must persevere and just say NO. We can’t always depend on our human friends to keep us away from such things, since their will power caves anytime one of us turns on the big eyed, half starved, desperate puppy look. Humans are so easy to manipulate. Teenagers could learn a thing or two from us when it comes to manipulation. Heck, if I was a kid, I’d have my own car, boat, condo overlooking the lake, and an expense account. That’s that power of puppy eyes! Are you like me and find it hard to believe that it’s August. Summer is going by far too fast for my liking. There are way too many summer time activities I need to get done before the dreaded snow arrives. Don’t get me wrong, snow is pretty, fluffy, and allows me to track bunny insurgency much easier, but I need more time to prepare for it. I’m just now finally getting rid of the last of my winter coat and I’m not looking forward to growing a new one. I know it’s not really that bad, but it seems like yesterday I was running around the yard chasing the baby bunnies (just to keep them in check and let them know who is boss) and now it’s August and they’ve reached their ferocious adulthood and are chasing me around the yard. I know I shouldn’t complain since this is Wisconsin and we could have 80 degree temperatures until Thanksgiving, if we’re lucky. It just seems like winter takes forever to be over with and summer is over before you really have a chance to enjoy it. It’s just not fair and I intend to do something about it. I’m not really sure what that will be, but it will involve a lot of angry barking, writing my congressperson, telethons to raise money to extend summer, and grass roots protests. I will not stop until we have year round summer or I could just move to California. Hmmm, there’s a thought. I’m hoping next month to have the promised photo spread of the bunny in-

festation in my yard. It was my intent to have it ready for the August issue, but for some reason the bunnies decided to be camera shy. Usually they are all over the yard. Rarely do I see just a single bunny bouncing around the yard all by his lonesome. I’m beginning to think they run in packs. Before I sign off on this month’s column, I want to remind everyone to keep an eye on your little four legged friends when they are outside on these remaining hot days. Always have a big bowl of fresh water available and an area to get out of the sun. Heatstroke can be deadly and happen in a short amount of time. It only takes a moment to check our bowl for water and see how we’re doing. This should go without saying, but never, ever leave us unattended in a locked car. There really is nothing you can do to make this situation acceptable. Beside the heat, there are so many things in a vehicle that can make us sick or worse. So, if you truly love us, please leave us at home. We promise to be good and not eat your sofa or destroy too much. Once again, I hope everyone is having a safe and fun summer. Just remember not to overdo it. Just like I mentioned above, too much of a good thing can be dangerous to my human friends too. Heatstroke isn’t limited to us. Remember, if something happens to you, what would become of us. Who would feed us, buy us toys, and play with us? See, contrary to a human’s myopic view, it’s really not all about you. So there. Take care and I’ll see you next month

Scrappy Editors note: Scrappy loves to get mail form his fans. You can either email him at the email address above, leave a message for him on his facebook page (www.facebook.com/PJ.AskScrappy), or via postal mail: Pet Journal Attn: Ask Scrappy 3120 S Business Dr STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

The truth is, a person who is abusive or neglectful towards animals would be so regardless of the number of pets he or she had. And these laws do nothing to protect animals from people who have a psychological condition that makes them prone to hoarding anything, including animals. Finally, homes with ten pets are not necessarily noisier than homes that house one or two animals. Certain cities have pledged to enforce their pet limit laws only in instances where a complaint has been filed against someone who has more than the permissible number of pets living in his or her home even if law enforcement officials know that the person owns an “excessive” number of pets. So basically, if someone with a grudge against a neighbor calls in a complaint against another neighbor who owns many animals, the second person would be subject to legal action not because he or she didn’t care for his or her pets, but because the person didn’t get along with his or her neighbor. Who suffers in this scenario? The pets.

When pets are displaced from a home deemed to have too many pets to remain in compliance with a municipality’s pet limit law, they are often placed in a publicly funded shelter instead of being allowed to stay in the home they know and love. As a result, animals who actually have homes take up space and resources that a shelter usually needs to provide for animals who are truly homeless, and the shelter pays the ongoing expenses, expenses that would otherwise be paid by the displaced pets’ responsible owners, related to these animals for indeterminable periods of time. Instead of passing and enforcing pet limit laws which potentially punish people for providing safe, loving homes for as many pets as they possibly can, cities should evaluate the ability of individuals to care for their respective pets on a case-by-case basis, as needed. As the No Kill Advocacy Center claims, “pet limit laws discourage responsible individuals from providing a good home for more needy animals, but will not discourage an irresponsible one from acquiring unlimited animals.” All of us, including the officials responsible for drafting and enforcing the laws that govern the cities and towns in which we live, need to do what we can to protect pets whether they are our own personal property or not. Unfortunately, pet limit laws have the potential to put pets who belong to responsible families at risk to be displaced from their homes or even euthanized.

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PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

10

ASK THE ALPHA DOG by Tamara Pool, Pet Journal Columnist alpha-dog@petjournalmidwest.com This month we are talking about a problem that affects 25-50% of all dogs. Separation anxiety is an enormous problem in the canine world. One of the greatest joys of dog ownership is the tight bond we experience and encourage with our dogs. However, if your dog becomes too reliant or dependant on you, dog separation anxiety can develop. Somewhat ironically, it is one of the major causes for dogs ending up in animal shelters. I wish I could say dog separation anxiety is an easy fix, but the truth is it can be a very difficult and time consuming problem to turn around.

TIMELY TICK TALK from The Practical Pet Vet blog Over Memorial Day weekend I got a FACT: Ticks are found throughout somewhat cryptic text message from a Wisconsin. They live predominantly in friend: tall grasses and shrubs. Ticks sense an approaching animal and HIM: Any tricks besides vasoline to hop on as it passes by. get ticks out. It’s under Liddy’s skin and won’t back out. MYTH: My pet is safe from Lyme disease because I’ve never found deer ticks ME: Tweezers at the base of the head on him. and slow gentle pressure. We need to get Liddy on a flea/tick preventative! FACT: Exposure to one species of tick increases risk of exposure to other speI thought that was the end of it until cies as well. Deer ticks might go unTuesday when I received an urgent call noticed on your pet while they are atat the clinic that they still had been un- tached and feeding because they are so able to pull out the tick and needed help. tiny. Ticks can attach under and in the During my examination I found a small ears and between the toes, places that hairless bump by Liddy’s ear. There was often go unchecked. Ticks engorged no evidence of a bite, no mouth parts with blood look dramatically different left behind. Polite interrogation of the from “empty” ticks, so it is difficult for owner revealed that no one had actually the untrained eye to determine which seen a tick on Liddy. The owner had species of tick is present. Furthermore, found the bump (most likely a tiny cyst) deer ticks are not the only culprit; many and assumed it was tick that had buried species of ticks are known to carry disitself in her skin! eases that can harm people and pets. This interaction reminded me there are many myths associated with ticks, with “ticks crawling under the skin” being a common one. While a client once reported to me that the cause of all her sinus problems was a woefully confused tick that had crawled up her nostril and died (yuck!), ticks do not burrow under the skin of their victims. They do embed their mouth parts in the skin while taking their blood meal, however, and these mouth parts can become lodged in the skin if the tick is improperly removed before it is done feeding.

MYTH: My dog is vaccinated against Lyme disease, so I don’t have to worry about ticks.

FACT: Lyme disease is a common disease transmitted by the deer tick. Fortunately there is an effective vaccine against Lyme disease. However, many dogs in Wisconsin are infected with anaplasmosis, a different disease carried by deer ticks. There is no vaccine to protect against anaplasmosis. Another tick species, the Lone Star tick, has reportedly made an appearance in southern Wisconsin, bringing a collection of “new” Having found a high number of Wood tick diseases to the state. ticks in unusual places this spring (my kitchen sink, porch and pillow) I feel a MYTH: My dog isn’t lame so I know he tick talk is in order. doesn’t have a tick disease. MYTH: “Tick season” occurs only durFACT: Lameness and joint swelling ing the warm summer months. are indeed typical signs of tick disease. Other symptoms may include fever, lethFACT: In central Wisconsin, ticks are argy and loss of appetite. However, out and about from early spring until many dogs found to have tick disease snow covers the ground (often March have no obvious signs of illness. Tick through November). disease screening is a simple blood test recommended as part of a dog’s annual MYTH: My pet doesn’t go “up north” wellness examination. into the woods, so I don’t have to worry about tick bites.

see TICKS on page 19

Of course, you still need to spend lots of fun time together. Step 2 The next step is to get them used to being outside when you are inside (recommended only with a fenced in yard. Otherwise work with you being outside and the dog being inside). Again, start off with very small periods apart and gradually lengthen the time over a couple of weeks. If you try this Separation Anxiety treatment make sure that you don’t just leave your dog outside to get all worked up and stressed. The trick is to start out leaving your dog out for a few seconds, then going out and reuniting before he shows any signs of Separation Anxiety. Give your dog a treat or dog toy to keep his mind off missing you. Only initiate contact with your dog when he is calm and quiet. So it is imperative that you reunite before they too worked up.

Let’s take a look at separation anxiety from your dog’s perspective. You are the most important thing in your dog’s life. Dogs are very sociable creatures and thrive on company for many reasons. If your dog had a choice he/she would spend every bit of his time with you. So it’s only natural that when you go out, your dog can experience varying degrees of distress and anxiety. He becomes confused, vulnerable, doesn’t Step 3 know where you are going, why he can’t Eliminate the distress caused by getbe with you and if you will be coming back to him. When you are separated, ting ready to leave the house. Write a all he wants is to be reunited with his list of all the triggers that start the anxipack - which is you. ety. Then set about desensitizing them to these triggers. Put your shoes on, Keep in mind that punishment is never and don’t go anywhere. Put your coat the answer to treating dog separation on, and then sit down to read the paper. Pick up your car keys and just carry anxiety! them around with you, jingling them as Why Do Dogs Suffer From Separation you go about your business. After a few Anxiety? There are many theories on weeks, they will start seeing these trigthis one. In some cases, the cause or gers as normal occurrences. In additrigger can be pinpointed to a particular tion, never say hello or goodbye to your event, but often there appears to be no dog. Coming and going should be totally explanation for the Separation Anxiety to boring happenings not an event to get commence. What I can say is that Sepa- worked up over. ration Anxiety in dogs regularly occurs Step 4 after a change in routine. Such as your work hours changing or a family member When they are calm with every trigger leaves home, if you have been on vacation or unemployed for some time and you have found from step 3, it’s time to have been spending heaps of time with leave the house. At first, just step outyour dog, or after your dog experiences side, shut the door and came back inside within 20 seconds - before they make a a traumatic event while on his own. sound. Again this is a slow process, simHere are a few steps to get you back ilar to step 2. Very gradually extend the on track with your dog. However, don’t time until he doesn’t even know you’re forget regular exercise and daily train- gone. ing. Whichever method you choose to treat dog separation anxiety, be sure to stick Step 1 with it and don’t expect any immediate Slowly teach them that they don’t results. This process will take about a always need to be close to you. Start month to 5 weeks when done correctly. out by ignoring the attention seeking Be patient and calm and remember that behavior (jumping up, barking etc.) and there is a light at the end of the tunnel. then do some solid practice of the down Sincerely, Alpha Dog stay. Little by little extend the time and distance you spend apart, until they are happy to be alone for up to 30 minutes. Editors Note: Alpha Dog, Tamara welcomes your questions on pet training, please email her at the email above or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Alpha Dog 3120 S Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-4818


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012 11

PETS AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION AT AREA RESCUES AND SHELTERS

From Amazing Grace Equine Sanctuary is Abby, a 14.1hh 12 year old sorrel mare. She has had several years of ground training. She lunges, has had work with natural horsemanship training and been ground driven in a saddle and surcingle. While she is extremely intelligent, beautiful and bold - she at times can exhibit irrational fears. Abby may have had some kind of abuse as a yearling - but that’s only speculative. She is currently in training to be ridden which will continue, until she is able to find her permanent and forever partner! She is sweet, kind, loving and compassionate and just needs to find her place in the sun. She deserves to fulfill her very own purpose in life if someone could make the commitment to her that she so very much needs! Only a permanent, stable and committed applicant will be lucky enough to adopt Abby! Her adoption fee is $350 www. rescuehorses.org

MEOW! I’m Ellie. I was surrendered to Happily Ever After in the spring of 2012, when I was 12 years old. I miss having a home of my own terribly! I enjoy sitting in the sunshine, having “conversations” with visitors, and making myself cozy in baskets for a cat nap! I would really like to find a forever home of my own! You can visit me at HEA’s Green Bay Adoption Center, 2065 Holmgren Way. See you soon, Ellie. www.happilyeverafterinfo.org

The Pet Journal Adoption Section Brought to by these sponsors: To find out how to have your business listed here call our offices at: (920) 393-4818

This handsome, older cat deserves nothing but the best! Tom is full of love and he would be happiest in a quieter home with older kids who would like a sweet companion. Although on the older side and missing all of his teeth, Tom still has so much to offer. Fun-loving and playful, this orange tabby is a laid back cat who has a happy outlook on life. He enjoys all the attention when being pet and groomed, but doesn’t like to be picked up. Tom is good with dogs but may be picky about his feline friends. Tom is ready to greet you at the door when you come home from a long day and shower you with affection! Washington County Humane Society, 3650 State Rd 60, Slinger, WI, 262.677.4388, www. washingtoncountyhumane.org.

Pipsqueak is a tiny companion ready for her big break on finding a forever home. Friendly and playful, Pipsqueak is a white terrier, cairn mix who loves showing affection and going on walks. She came to WCHS as a surrender when her previous owner was moved to a new place that didn’t allow animals. Although active, Pipsqueak does have a quiet side and enjoys mid-afternoon naps and lazy days from time to time. Infants and toddlers are a bit to much for this girl, but she gets along well with children of all other ages. Sweet natured, she is good with other dogs and cats. Pipsqueak may enjoy an animal roommate who can keep her company during loud thunderstorms as they scare her. Her happy demeanor makes her a perfect buddy for a quiet household or an active home. Washington County Humane Society, 3650 State Rd 60, Slinger, WI, 262.677.4388, www. washingtoncountyhumane.org.

Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue

Home Decor & Hand Made Crafts 1197 W. Winneconne Ave. Neenah, WI 54956

PO Box 245 Plymouth, WI 53073 920 207-5642 easternwiherps.com

920 722-9600

HI! I’m Daisy. They told me to smile for the camera – do you think I did a good job? I am a sweet, gentle girl who really would love to find that “forever home” where I can be loved. I am housebroken, and know many commands. I would really like to live with another dog that can keep me company when my humans can’t be around. I love to investigate things and play ball or have a romp around the dog park. Even though I am an older girl of 10 years, I still enjoy quality exercise - I am a German Shorthair, after all! I’d do best in a quiet home with older children since loud noises can scare me sometimes. If you have space in your heart and home for a truly wonderful, sweet older dog (and you have a buddy for me to live with) please come and meet me at the Oshkosh Area Humane Society.

We have many tame AND untame cockatiels at C.A.R.E. right now. The untame ones would make good pets to be let out of the cage to play on top but not handled. Untame cockatiels are $20 each and tame tiels are $50 each. We have plenty of used cages for sale at VERY reasonable prices. CARE, 262628-3719, www.centerforavianrehab. org.

For The Life of Charlie 1509 N 13th St t Sheboygan

920 451 9999 sheboyganchiropractic.com

Charlie Wery Farms 1748 Lenwood Ave. Green Bay

(920) 467-8610 1017 Fond Du Lac Ave, Sheboygan Falls

www.sheboyganfallsbeautysalon.com

Hi there, I’m Justin! I was a stray who began calling Happily Ever After home in July, 2010, when I was about 3 years old. I’m one big, talkative guy, and I’ll follow you around and meow softly at you until you sit down and let me lay in your lap! I’m a very low-maintenance gentleman, and I’ll be happy as long as I have a window to lounge in front of and a nice lap to lay in! I hope to meet you soon at HEA’s Green Bay Adoption Center, 2065 Holmgren Way! Meows, Justin www.happilyeverafterinfo.org

Don’t Shop, Opt to Adopt! 2451 Velp Ave. Howard (920) 434-LUBE

Give Chance a second chance! Meet Chance, a 5-year-old female Treeing Walker Coonhound with an outgoing personality, and the perfect match for someone with the same zest for life! As much as she loves to play, she will also eagerly cuddle by your side for lots of snuggles and attention. In addition to taking home this affectionate and happy little girl, Chance’s adopter will get to take home a basket of her favorite enrichment toys, as well receive 25% off of one of our Adult Dog Manners Classes! For more information on Chance, or any of our other canine companions available at the Wisconsin Humane Society Ozaukee Campus, please visit www.ozaukeehumane.org, or call (262)377-7580.

Help Sponsor the Pet Journal Adoption Section! To find out how to have your business listed here call our office at: (920) 393-4818


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

12

ECO NEWS DESPITE DROUGHT, KERNER BLUE BUTTERFLIES RECOVERY MAKING PROGRESS Reprint from Wisconsin Natural Resources Website, dnr.wi.gov BLACK RIVER FALLS, Wis. -- The drought has been challenging for the federally endangered Karner blue butterflies in Wisconsin, but recent surveys are showing they’ve weathered it well so far and are showing signs of the recovery making progress in some sites.

“The trend on the population counts from the past four years leads me to believe that we are moving closer to recovery. Although overall numbers may not be increasing dramatically, certain key sites are getting closer to their recovery goals.”

They also are benefitting from an expanded group of allies – 25 volunteers trained this summer under a new program to help look for the butterflies and assess their habitat – and from other work to help protect and restore the butterfly, the leader of the recovery effort says.

In addition to conducting surveys, the recovery program is also working to restore Karner blue habitat on state lands. Recent habitat restoration efforts took place at the Fish Lake State Wildlife Area, the Greenwood State Wildlife Area, at Hartman Creek State Park and on the Black River State Forest to thin out closed-canopy mixed hardwood and pine forests adjacent to known Karner blue sites. On the Emmons Creek Fishery area, fields of invasive spotted knapweed were eradicated, to be followed by planting of prairie grasses and wildflowers this fall. At the White River Wildlife area, summer mowing of brush was done to prepare sites for prairie restoration. In most cases Karner populations have increased within a few years of these kinds of barrens restoration activities.

The Karner blue butterfly was listed in 1992 as a federally endangered species. It’s relatively common in Wisconsin, which has the largest population of these diminutive blue butterflies in the world. The Karner blue butterfly range in Wisconsin runs from Waupaca and Waushara counties west to the Black River Falls area, and then northwest to Grantsburg. Since 1999, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Division of Forestry and 40 other partners have implemented a statewide Habitat Conservation Plan that allows certain activities – such as roadside maintenance and timber harvests in Karner habitat – but makes sure those activities are carried out in ways that conserve and restore the butterfly and its habitat. The DNR Bureau of Endangered Resources initiated a Karner blue butterfly recovery effort in 2007 that is working to restore Karner habitat and populations in five areas of the state. The goal of the recovery program is to establish 11 independent Karner populations of 3,000 to 6,000 butterflies each, on different state-owned properties that include wildlife areas, fishery areas, state natural areas, state parks, and state forests. There is also one cooperating private landowner involved in the effort and two others considering becoming involved in the recovery program. This is the fifth year of official Karner population surveys, but the first year of a citizen scientist volunteer program. Thanks to a Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grant, the program was able to recruit and train 25 volunteers to do Karner abundance surveys and vegetation surveys on new and developing Karner sites. “We are almost at the end of the second of two flights of the butterflies,” says Bob Hess, DNR Karner recovery coordinator. “It’s a bit early to predict results for this year, but in spite of the intense heat, field data suggest that numbers are up on the south and east edges of the range, but somewhat down everywhere else.

“In the end,” says Hess, “recovery of the Karner blue butterfly depends on habitat restoration and maintenance. Populations fluctuate from year to year depending weather, but the availability of lupine for the larvae and wild flowers for the adults is really the key to success,”

SOME BURNING RESTRICTIONS LIFTED, DROUGHT CONTINUES Reprint from Wisconsin Natural Resources Website, dnr.wi.gov MADISON – Emphasizing that the A revised emergency burn restriction drought is not over, state fire control map will be posted at 12:01 a.m. July officials at the Department of Natural 28 at dnr.wi.gov search for the keywords Resources will lift Emergency burning “fire danger.” restrictions effective at 12:01 a.m. Saturday July 28 in all or those parts of “Recent rains have lowered the fire Dane, Crawford, Grant, Iowa, Richland risks enough in some areas to relax and Sauk counties that are within De- burning restrictions,” said Trent Marty, partment of Natural Resources protec- chief of DNR’s Bureau of Forest Protection areas. tion. “The rain has been spotty however and we will keep restrictions in place in Campfire bans will also be lifted at the remaining areas until we can safely 12:01 a.m. Saturday July 28 in the fol- lift them.” lowing state parks properties: Big Foot Beach, Lapham Peak, Richard Bong “There has been tremendous coopState Recreation Area, Southern Unit of eration by the public during this period the Kettle Moraine State Forest and the of high fire danger,” added Marty, “folks Elroy-Sparta State Trail. have really taken our messages to heart and we greatly appreciate their effort.” Emergency burning restrictions remain in place in all or parts of 11 coun“We are happy to be able to allow ties including: Adams, Columbia, Green campfires in all state park properties Lake, Marquette, Portage, Waupaca again,” said Kimberly Currie, acting diand Waushara counties, and portions rector of Wisconsin State Parks and of Jackson, Juneau, Monroe and Wood Trails. “Sitting around the campfire with counties. family and friends is a special part of a state park experience visit but visitor Campfires are allowed but some burn- safety is our top priority.” ing restrictions remain in place the following state park properties, Buckhorn, Contact(s): Robert Manwell (608) 264Hartman Creek, Mill Bluff, and Roche-A- 9248; Kimberly Currie (608) 516-4740 Cri. Please check with parks staff if you plan to visit one of these properties.

DNR PARK OFFERS LEARNING AND FUN AT W S F

More information can be found on a ISCONSIN TATE AIR new Karner blue butterfly feature page of the DNR website that is part of a year- Reprint from Wisconsin Natural Resources Website, dnr.wi.gov long celebration of the Wisconsin endanWEST ALLIS —I f it’s August in West Kids and adults of all ages and physical gered species law. Allis that means it’s time for the Wiscon- abilities will use state-of-the-art equipFOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: sin State Fair, and for more than 60 years ment to learn about the sport of targetBob Hess, Karner Blue Butterfly Recov- the Natural Resources Park has provided style archery. fair visitors a bit of respite from the husery Coordinator – 715-451-0149 tle and bustle of the Midway, cream puff A traditional State Fair activity for lines, animal barns and exposition hall many families is T-shirt printing at the hawkers. Natural Resources Park activities tent. Coordinated by the Retired Seniors VolLocated on the southwest corner of unteer Program, each day from 10 a.m. the fairgrounds, the Natural Resources to 2 p.m. Artists of all ages can decorate Park offers fair visitors a mix of family- a T-shirt or other piece of material. The friendly activities where they can learn printing is free. T-shirts and reusable more about Wisconsin’s fish, forests and tote bags are available for $5 or you can other natural resources through live dis- bring your own. plays, and participate in hands-on activities that are fun for all ages. In the south building, a variety of Wisconsin fish species will be on display “We really love having people visit at the aquarium exhibit. Fisheries staff us in the Natural Resources Park. Our will be available to answer questions staff looks forward to it all year and is and provide information on Wisconsin’s eager to talk about our resources and premier fishery and offer casting lessons our work. We especially hope to interest each day from 3 to 5 p.m. kids in Wisconsin’s wonderful outdoors, a great place for fun year around,” said People wondering what it would be Department of Natural Resources Secre- like to work for a nationally recognized tary Cathy Stepp. “Visit our state park at environmental and natural resources the fair! We’re looking forward to seeing agency can stop by the career booth in you!” the North Building and talk with staff about careers with the DNR. Again this year, the department will focus on youth with the National Archery see on page 18 in the Schools program activity area.

FAIR


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BREEDING WATERFOUL NUMBERS “ABOUT AVERAGE” IN AN UNUSUAL SPRING

GB Pets & Supplies

Reprint from Wisconsin Natural Resources Website, dnr.wi.gov

Early spring creates staggered duck In Wisconsin, despite overall dry conVariation from year to year in wetland breeding and migration schedule conditions and breeding ducks is part of ditions in late April and early May and the natural cycle in the world of wetland wildlife. Wetlands need dry periods to maintain long-term productivity and ducks are able to adapt to changing wetland conditions among years and across the continent. Conservation dollars and efforts of waterfowl hunters over the decades have protected and managed wetland and upland habitats important to breeding ducks. Protection of these “Overall, wetland numbers this spring areas even in dry years provides the setwere down but in Wisconsin our abun- ting for good duck responses when the dant permanent water contained in rainfall increases during wet years. 15,000 lakes reduces the impact of dry conditions on the ducks,” said Kent Van Annual surveys lead to season Horn, Department of Natural Resources structure migratory waterfowl biologist. “Some Three primary sources of information areas have good wetland conditions on annual waterfowl breeding conditions while other areas are still very dry. But are used to determine the fall hunting despite those dry conditions across im- season structure for Wisconsin, accordportant duck breeding areas in Wiscon- ing to Van Horn. sin, this spring, the total breeding duck numbers in Wisconsin appear to be near “We’ve completed the annual Wisconthe average of the last 10 years. 2012 sin Breeding Waterfowl Survey, which is should provide fair to good duck produc- very important since a large proportion tion across Wisconsin. Summer rains of the ducks harvested in Wisconsin will be particularly important this year to are raised in Wisconsin,” Van Horn said. maintain brood rearing habitat.” “The full version of the report is available on the waterfowl page of the DNR webWisconsin’s warm weather in March site, under the Management Information triggered an early duck migration and tab.” breeding activity among mallards and Canada geese. However, in April a return A cooperative survey of Canada of cold temperatures stalled the breed- geese, the Mississippi Valley Population ing activity of blue-winged teal and the (MVP) Breeding Survey, organized by migration of other duck species through the Ontario Ministry of Natural ResourcWisconsin. As a result, the spring wa- es has also been completed. terfowl survey was initiated earlier than The final piece is the U.S. Fish and normal on April 23 in order to have the best count of breeding mallards; blue- Wildlife Service breeding waterfowl winged teal that were still in migration survey for the northern United States, Canada and Alaska. That information through the state were counted. is expected in the next few weeks and Wisconsin had a dry, mild winter and will form the framework for the 2012 fall entered a March where temperatures hunting seasons. Only preliminary wetwere 14 to 16 degrees above normal. land data is available at this time. Winter precipitation was 25 percent beDucks low normal which provided fewer tempoWaterfowl breeding areas in parkland rary and seasonal wetlands when ducks arrived in Wisconsin this spring. How- and prairie Canada for spring 2012 were ever, rain did come in some northern drastically different from the widespread and central state areas and the spring excellent conditions in 2011. Most areas (March - May) rainfall was 15 percent were in fair to good condition with only above normal statewide, which filled a small area in southeast Saskatchewan rated as excellent. Spring habitat conseasonal wetlands in some regions. ditions for the Dakotas and Minnesota were also drier than the wet conditions of last year. In North Dakota, the 2012 wetland count was 57 percent below 2011 and 6 percent below the long term mean.

MADISON – The spring 2012 waterfowl breeding picture was marked by an early spring, unusual weather, and dry conditions, which state wildlife officials say, created a challenge to survey breeding ducks in 2012. Despite that difficulty they say breeding waterfowl numbers appear to be “about average.”

However, following the excellent duck production of 2012 there were still abundant ducks on the landscape. The 2012 total breeding duck estimate of 4.8 million for North Dakota was 16 percent higher than 2011 and 112 percent above the long term mean. Minnesota had a very dry early spring and survey numbers showed a 37 percent decrease in wetland numbers from 2011, but spring rains following the survey filled many wetlands and created flooding in some areas. The Minnesota total duck estimate of 479,000 was 32 percent lower than 2011 and 33 percent below the state’s long term mean.

challenges related to survey timing, the total estimated breeding ducks were similar to last year and the average for the last 10 years. The total breeding duck population estimate for 2012 was 521,079, which was similar to the 2011 estimate of 513,746 and the average of the last 10 years at 545,240.

Specializing in Hand-Fed Birds, Saltwater Fish 2315 University Ave, Green Bay

The four most abundant ducks in Wisconsin’s fall hunting harvest are mallards, wood ducks, green-winged teal, and blue-winged teal. Van Horn notes that many of the ducks harvested in Wisconsin come from birds that breed in bag limit),” says Van Horn. Wisconsin, in contrast to other states in the flyway, which rely more heavily on “There are two different populations birds raised in the prairies or boreal for- of Canada geese that represent most of ests of Canada. the geese in Wisconsin during the regular fall hunting season. The average The 2012 total mallard population es- over the last several years has shown timate of 196,950 is similar to the 2011 the hunting harvest split roughly 50:50 estimate of 187,862 mallards and 8 per- between these two populations during cent above the long-term average (39 the regular hunting seasons,” Van Horn year). Mallards contribute to nearly 40 said. percent of the state duck harvest in Wisconsin. Overall the breeding population One population, called resident giant of mallards in Wisconsin has leveled off Canada geese, nests in Wisconsin. The near 200,000 in recent years depending 2012 Wisconsin breeding Canada goose on annual wetland conditions. For 2012 population estimate of 145,386 is down hunters should expect average produc- 17 percent from 2011 and is 62 percent tion and fall mallard numbers. above the long-term (25 year) average. The 2012 data on resident breeding The second most abundant duck in Canada geese, however, should be inthe fall harvest is the wood duck and terpreted with caution because we know breeding wood duck populations con- they were well into their nesting period tinue to provide an encouraging outlook by the time of the survey which may for ducks in Wisconsin. In 2012, the have reduced their detectability. The population estimate for wood ducks of early and warm spring generally results 106,626 is 36 percent above the long- in better Canada goose production and term average. field reports indicate that goose broods are 1-2 weeks older than normal at this The 2012 blue-winged teal breeding time of year and survival looks good. population estimate of 105,791 is near the long term average for breeding blueBy federal rule, the Early September winged teal in Wisconsin. However, the Canada goose season harvest must re2012 blue-winged teal estimates should main more than 90 percent giant Canabe interpreted with caution since the da geese that nest in Wisconsin or adteal arrived early in March but then their jacent states. The season is scheduled migration and breeding activity stalled early to target this population. when cooler temperatures returned in April. The 2012 teal numbers likely inThe second Canada goose populaclude a higher than normal proportion tion is the Mississippi Valley Population, of migrating teal which were passing which is made up of slightly smaller through Wisconsin to more northern birds that nest along the coast of Hudbreeding areas. son Bay in northern Ontario and migrate through Wisconsin and other MidwestWhile blue-winged teal populations ern states. The 2012 breeding populahave recently been at some of the high- tion estimate is 268,891 is similar to the est continental population levels in more 2011 estimate of 269,840. This would than 50 years of surveys, their breeding suggest that the MVP breeding populapopulation in Wisconsin is much lower tion remains about 25 percent below than during the early 1970s. A contin- the long term average. The total MVP ued commitment to grassland conserva- population estimate, which includes tion which is important for blue-winged non-breeding birds, is up slightly from teal nesting habitat is important to the 2011 at 402,844. Spring phenology and future of blue-winged teal in Wisconsin. habitat suggest that Canada goose proBased on the 2012 wetland habitat con- duction in northern Ontario should be ditions and estimated breeding popula- about average. tion we expect fair to good blue-winged teal production this year but it will deOverall, 2012 appears to be a genpend on June-July rainfall to continue to erally average year for duck and Canprovide adequate brood habitat. ada goose populations, Van Horn says. However, this is one of the most diffiCanada geese cult years to interpret the survey results “We expect good Canada goose hunt- because of the unusual weather condiing opportunities this fall, particularly for tions this spring. the Early September Canada goose season (September 1-15 with a 5 bird daily see OOSE on page 17 (920) - 465- PETS (7387) Mon, Tue, Thrs, Fri - 12pm - 7pm Saturday - 11am - 4pm Closed Sundays & Wednesdays

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AUGUST 2012

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THE HEALING POWER OF HORSES by Linda Ledbeter, Pet Journal Columnist lledbeter@petjournalmidwest.com In the June issue I shared a piece of my childhood and how a cat filled the void in my life, a memory triggered during my interview with Pam Kachelmeier of CoachHorse Counseling and Learning Services in Kiel, Wisconsin. This was not my first visit to CoachHorse so I wasn’t surprised by the sense of calming I felt when turning the car into her driveway. The long gravel driveway is first graced with large trees on both sides and acts a like dust cloth washing the day away. Passing through the cleansing process you take in the full view of open pastures on both sides, and a feeling of expansion begins to settle in. Just ahead, a large white archway greets each visitor with a warm welcome; I feel “home”. Her office is located in a remodeled stable just off the arena. Like everything else around me, it has a welcoming warmth; this is a safe place for everyone. The weather was beautiful and we decided to walk down to her Tepee that is nestled amongst the trees away from view of the human world. Nature is another aspect in the healing process that Pam has tapped into. We step into the comfort of the Tepee settling into what was sure to be a special time for both of us. Like a lighted billboard, Pam’s love and passion for her horses and her work was evident in every breath she took and with each word spoken. Question: “When did you first discover the healing power of the horse?” The memories flooded back, memories that brought her to her life’s passionate work. Pam shared candidly how after going through a difficult divorce she bought a horse to help her heal. She knew without question she needed to return to what helped her through her childhood years, a horse. She describes her junior high school years much like most of us can relate to easily, difficult and a lonely place in an adult world. As adults we sometimes forget what it truly was like and only wish to leave the adult world to return to what we want to believe as carefree. Coming home after school she and her sisters played with their horses. This was long before any formal training in horse care and handling was available and that learning from the horses directly was by trial and error. The horses simply didn’t care what clothing you wore, or if you belonged in a “clique”. The stress of having to look over her shoulder throughout the day was not so when around her horse. The mask worn that concealed the soft venerable aspect for self preservation could not be worn, for the horse calls for the authentic self to be present. The simple act of touching and brushing the horses as a little girl strengthened the bond between them and over time was accepted into the herd. Pam admits it is difficult to put into words the relationship between them, she knew she felt the worries slip away and a sense of freedom developed. Spending time with the horses she felt the “sting” of the day soften and all the feelings of not belonging slipped away.

She explains that a horse is a prey animal and that their fight or flight centers need to be in a comfort zone before a heart to heart connection can be made. Forcing your will on them or bringing in the day’s negativity simply doesn’t work. The horse teaches us how to soften ourselves, to breath and relax, allowing ourselves to step out of the day like an old pair of uncomfortable worn shoes. Stepping away from the day and into mindfulness, being in the present moment is when the mask begins the process of shedding. Your horse will tell you with their resistance when you are not being authentic and mindful. Question: “When did you decide to expand your life to include therapy with horses?” Again Pam’s eyes light up, when she begins to share her love of research and that she began listening to the Inner Voice, “There has got to be more than this, more than working in the corporate world.” She felt she was not living her life to the fullest. During her internet surfing (if you believe in accidents) she accidentally found a school in Prescott, Arizona offering a degree in Counseling Psychology with a concentration in Equine Assisted Mental Health. It didn’t take her long before she was enrolled in the Master’s Program at Prescott College and on her way to an expanded life. Question: “Do you find it easier in your practice for people to find resolution through the horse? And do you find there is a difference between boys and girls?” Through reading the horse’s body language and response to the energies of the client, clients understand how their built up stress and unresolved issues affect them. Some activities bring out the need to control or passivity when working with a horse which is then looked at and how it affects their daily life situations. Mindfulness is also used through breath work and being present. The horse’s reaction alerts you to when you are authentic or when you are only pretending. Unlike the dog and cat, the horse will not allow you to be in their space if they are feeling unsafe. In the Midwest it appears that in general girls express more love and affection for a horse. Boys who live in the west have grown up with the love of a horse through rodeo games and ranch work, although the Midwest is beginning to catch up to its value. The girls, Pam explains are more verbally gentle than the boys; where the boys are more task oriented. Either way, a relationship with a horse is established through the girl’s or boy’s body language and authenticity which results in the horse’s response that speaks the unspoken word. Stereotyping is easy and we need to avoid this pitfall.

During her internship Pam recalls a little boy about 6 yrs old who kept running away from home and school; his mother was distraught in how to help her son. The child seldom spoke, keeping everyPam says she learned in childhood and thing locked inside until it became too again as an adult going through her di- much to handle then began to run. vorce that her horse called her to a task, to heal one needs to be authentic with self first.

Question: “If you could sum up the healing power of the horse in one word what would it be?” Pam could not come up with one word to express the magnitude of the healing power; she did say One afternoon during a group session “It opens you to another world.” with children, the little boy sat crossed Pam’s commitment to her family, their legged, head hung low to his chest, away from the group, alone in his own animals and to her clientele was clearly world. A small horse walked over and felt and that CoachHorse is a soft place stood in front of him, placing her muzzle for children and adults alike to fall. Those on his nose. The horse simply held the who are active members of her Animal space for the little boy, giving him un- Healing Team are Barney the Lap Cat, conditional love, needing nothing only Milo the Golden Retriever is the official giving from the heart. The mother and greeter, Ollie Pop also known as Spirit Pam watched the unspoken word pass Horse, Shadow, the rescued miniature between a little boy and a horse. From horse, Danny Boy, Quill, and Pokey Pony that day on, the child stopped running. all hold an important job in the healing of the human Spirit. CoachHorse provides individual and group counseling, a variety of workshops, celebrating the changing seasons, even private weddings. Check them out at www.coachhorse.com. In upcoming articles, I will cover the healing affects that all animals have on us. If you would like to share your story, contact me all lledbeter@petjournalmidwest.com. Young girl nose to nose with one of the horses at CoachHorse. Photo by L. Ledbeter.

C OMING

IN

S EPTEMBER

With the majority of Summer behind us, the State Fair and County Fairs are here and Labor Day and the start of a new school year is coming up fast. Look for the September issue of Pet Journal at one of our many distribution locations. Coming in the September issue we will be bringing to you the following:

Eco News Zoo News Farm News (Coming Soon!) & more articles of Pet/Animal interest. More from our columnists: Ask the Alpha Dog Ask Scrappy! Grooming your Pet Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets Ask the Vet Pet Journal Word Search Pictures of your Pets and more!


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AUGUST 2012 15

PICTURES

FROM

MANITOWOCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LINCOLN PARK ZOO

Pictures of the animals and zoo features at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Manitowoc, including the new Prairie Dogs and farm animals in the Big Red Barn. Photos by L. Schneider, Pet Journal.


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PHOTO GALLERY OF READERS PETS

Samm, watching his new pack, Linda L., Plymouth, Wis.

Maggie Mae, the playful puppy, Kathey B., Sheboygan, Wis.

If you would like to see your pet(s) on this page, please email them to us at petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com with a short description including: your pets name, your name, city, and a little statement about what they are doing in the photo. If you do not have email and would like to mail a glossy photo, please mail it to our mailing address: Pet Journal, attn: Pet Photos, 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 (all photos received by mail will be returned after they have been scanned for print.) All photos received will also be posted in our online photo gallery at http://images.petjournalmidwest.com/ gallery.html, due to space limitationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some submissions may not be printed in Pet Journal the same month they are received.

Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanning program to go to the Pet Journal gallery section.

PHOTOS OF OUR FRIENDS WHO ARE GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN Cecil, a rescue and lontime companion of Diana and Randy S., of Howards Grove, WI passed away on July 6th after being diagnosed with and suffering from a cancerous tumor. Adopted in 2005 from the Sheboygan County Humane Society. He will be missed by his family.


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AUGUST 2012 17

GEESE from page 13 Of course, each hunter’s waterfowl hunting success in the fall depends more on their scouting and fall water and weather conditions than it does on the spring breeding numbers. Final continental numbers will not be available from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service until mid-July. Once these data are available, Wisconsin DNR staff will meet with other state, federal and provincial agencies at the Mississippi Flyway Council meeting at the end of July. After this series of meetings, state biologists will have a clearer picture of how the population data will impact the 2012 waterfowl hunting regulations.

The Mississippi Flyway Council

The Mississippi Flyway Council, which is made up of waterfowl specialists and wildlife directors from the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Tennessee, and Wisconsin and the Canadian provinces of Manitoba, Ontario, and Saskatchewan will meet later this summer to analyze survey data and make recommendation to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on waterfowl hunting regulations before the federal agency establishes a framework under which states and provinces can set waterfowl hunting seasons. Following the flyway council meeting and after the USFWS sets a season framework, public hearings on Wisconsin’s proposed waterfowl seasons will be held in late July and early August. The final Wisconsin seasons will be set by the state Natural Resource Board at its Aug. 8 meeting in Germantown. “As we do each year, the public will have opportunities to provide input on waterfowl hunting season during our meetings and hearings,” said Van Horn. “These public meetings are also a great opportunity to hear the latest on waterfowl management and population status. We’ll take the public input to the Natural Resources Board along with a season structure proposal for approval.”

AQUARIUM MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE by Melissa Verner, Pet Journal Columnist Week 1: Ten percent water change, wipe down inside of tank with soft cloth Week 2: Gravel vac while doing a ten percent water change, it is okay if you do a little more. Remember to take out all of your decorations before gravel vacuuming and clean them as well. Week 3: Ten percent water change, wipe down inside of thank with soft cloth Week 4: Replace filter cartridge as well as a ten percent water change By doing the four week schedule that we have laid out for you, will help you have a healthy clean tank.

DNR’s proposed waterfowl seasons will be available at the end of July. They will be available by searching for waterfowl on the DNR website. The public can send comments on the proposal to the Assistant Migratory Game Bird Ecologist before midnight on Thursday, August 2. Comments on the seasons should be sent to James Christopoulos, DNR Bureau of Wildlife Management, PO Box 7921, Madison, WI 53707-7921 or by email to: james.christopoulos@wisconsin.gov The following meetings on the status of waterfowl populations and possible season structures will be held: Pre-Flyway Meeting • Friday July 13, Horicon – 7 p.m. at the Horicon Marsh International Education Center, N7725 Hwy 28, Horicon Post-Flyway Meetings • Saturday July 28, Rothschild - Public Meeting at 1 p.m. at the Holiday Inn, 1000 Imperial Ave. There will be a Conservation Congress migratory committee meeting at 9 a.m. at the same location. Public Hearing Locations • Monday July 30, La Crosse – 7 p.m. at the State Office Bldg, Rooms B-19 and B-20, 3550 Mormon Coulee Road . • Tuesday July 31, Spooner – 7 p.m. at the Spooner High School choir room, 801 County Highway A. • Wednesday August 1, Appleton – 7 p.m. at the Agricultural Services Center, Main conference room, 3369 West Brewster St. • Thursday August 2, Pewaukee - 7 p.m. at the Wildwood Lodge (formerly Comfort Suites Lake Country), N14 W24121 Tower Place. FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Kent Van Horn - (608) 266-8841

Puppy Recommended

TOP KNOT TAIL WAGGERS Pet Salon

ASK THE VET INTRODUCING YOUR DOG TO A DOG PARK by Jacob Guell, CDPT-KA, Ask the Vet Guest Columnist ask-the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com Do you have concerns and questions about taking your dog to the community dog park? Dog parks can be a great place for your dog to socialize and play with other canine companions. However, dog owners may not know the best method for introducing a dog to the dog park. Introducing a dog incorrectly can lead to future socialization problems. The best time to introduce a dog to the dog park is during puppyhood. Introduction should be done with extreme caution. If poorly behaved dogs are present during a puppy’s first visit to the park, the puppy might have a negative experience resulting in behavior problems. Many dog parks have separate smaller areas designated for small breeds and puppies which are ideal for introduction to the dog park. This allows a puppy to observe other dogs at play without feeling overwhelmed or threatened. As the puppy grows, has positive experiences, and displays more confidence, puppy may be introduced to the large dog area. It is important to make sure the park is not busy the first time the puppy is introduced. Adjustment will be easier when there are only a few dogs playing in the park. These same guide lines should be used for all dogs when introducing them to the dog park for the first time. The first experience can have a lasting impact on your dog and how he/she interacts with other dogs for the rest of their life.

When entering the dog park, always set your dog up to succeed. Observe the energy level in the dog park before entering. Watch the dogs for a couple of minutes to see if they are playing politely or inappropriately. One poorly socialized dog can change the attitude of the entire dog park. If any dog at the park appears unfriendly, come back on a different day or at a different time. Keep your dog on-leash and under control while entering the dog park. A very excited dog rushing into the dog park could disrupt the atmosphere of the whole park. Dogs entering a dog park calmly cause less of a disturbance. Dog parks are convenient places for your dog to exercise and socialize with other dogs. However, they should never be used as your dog’s only source of exercise. Pent up energy and frustration may cause confrontations at the dog park. If your dog is especially excitable, taking them for a long walk or run before the dog park may be advisable. Dog parks are meant for dogs and not as a play ground for young children. Children could potentially be injured by other dogs playing at the park. If you take your children to the dog park they should be with in arms length of you to help prevent any accidents.

With a little planning and proper training, your first visit to the dog park will be a positive experience creating years of Before considering going to a dog park opportunity for fun and socializing. your dog should have mastered basic If you have any concerns about your obedience skills. Your dog should consistently obey stay and have a very reli- companion’s behavior and/or dog park able recall, especially in emergency situ- questions contact our behavior team at ations. Therefore, if a fight breaks out Companion Animal Care, 920-921-5199. you will be able to immediately call your dog back to you. If your dog has any Editors Note: Our vet columnist, Dr. behavior problems the dog park should never be a place to work out those is- Strickfaden welcomes your questions on sues. If your dog lacks a good under- general pet health topics, please email standing of basic obedience and/or has using the email address above or by a behavior problem you should seek an mail: Pet Journal experienced professional for help before Attn: Ask the Vet visiting the dog park. 3120 S Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

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ZOO NEWS LOVE OF COMPOST by Adam Pankratz and Angela Kawski, NEW Zoo At the NEW Zoo, we love composting! In fact, every single possible type of waste that can be composted at the zoo IS composted. We have a HUGE compost pile, hidden behind the scenes, that zookeepers and other staff take trips to throughout the day. So we think it’s about time for us to dish out a little knowledge about this great “going green” activity that can be done in any home. Composting is easy, and it makes you feel good, knowing you’re doing something that really makes a difference and helps the environment. As more and more people around the world are making environment-friendly decisions, composting has grown increasingly popular. The many benefits and low costs of maintaining a compost heap make composting a “no-brainer” for gardeners and non-gardeners alike!

What is Composting?

Composting is the process that takes organic waste and turns it into a natural fertilizer. Any non-meat and non-dairy food waste can be composted. This can include fruit and vegetable waste, leaf and grass trimmings, clean paper products, breads and pasta, tea and coffee, and even egg shells. With a little moisture, a pile of this organic material can turn into a nutrient-rich pile of humus in a matter of weeks. This humus is useful not only in gardening, but in landscaping and horticulture as well. Composting can be a very low-maintenance, high reward system for helping both your own garden and the environment!

How is Composting done?

There are several ways to compost organic waste, with some methods being more labor-intensive than others. At its simplest, composting can be done by merely piling organic waste in a spot where it is able to retain some moisture. In some of the more advanced methods, the pile is frequently turned, and nitrogen and carbon-rich materials, worms, or fungi can be added. Many home and garden stores sell special composting bins that retain moisture, while also allowing for air flow.

Why Compost?

Composting is a wonderful way to simultaneously help the environment, while also helping out yourself and your family! By not throwing organic waste in the garbage, this waste never contributes to growing landfills. Organic material that accumulates in landfills, in addition to taking up space, also produces methane gas (a greenhouse gas). The humus that results from the composting process is also a very nutrient-rich fertilizer for the home garden, at no cost to you! In the end, with the help of a compost heap, a gardener is able to grow better crops for less money, all while making the world a cleaner place. For more information on composting, or to learn how to start your own compost bin, visit one of these helpful webpages: www.composting101.com/ http://eartheasy.com/grow_compost. html

WALK FOR WILDLIFE AT THE BAY BEACH WILDLIFE SANCTUARY COMING UP ON SEPTEMBER 15TH! Thinking of a fun event where you can get out on the nature trails, see some amazing animals, and help orphaned and injured wildlife along the way, right in Green Bay? Then come out to Walk for Wildlife on Saturday, September 15, 2012. This walk benefits our R-PAWS program. The R-PAWS program takes care of wildlife that is brought into the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary from the general public. These animals can be young animals whose mother was hit by a car, young songbirds that were blown out of a tree, injured hawks found on the ground, or ill waterbirds found along the shore of the bay. In 2011, we admitted nearly 5,000 orphaned, ill, and injured wildlife from the general public with the goal of helping each animal get back healthy into the wild where they belong. We have 2 trails—a paved ¼ mile trail and a 2.5 mile nature trail that you can venture on. Along the way, Animal Ambassadors will greet you! You can get upclose with a bald eagle, learn about turtles, and pet a skunk, among many other critters! You can come out anytime between 8am and noon. Mayor Jim Schmitt will help kick off the walk at 8:15am. We will also be releasing an animal back into the wild that has been help by R-PAWS.

A SKUNKY FAMILY THAT DOESN’T STINK! by Lori Bankson, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary Our oldest skunk is King Louie. He is 10 years old and is a brown color, not the common black. He was named for the character from the Jungle Book. We also have 2 girls: Delilah who is 3 and Jazz who is 5. Delilah’s mother was hit by a car and someone found Delilah very ill and starving walking around her. Jazz was raised illegally by someone. Jazz received her name because she was holding a soda bottle named “Jazz” when she As with all of our Animal Ambassa- was brought in as a youngster. dors, these skunks are kept at the Bay Skunks in the wild are opportunistic Beach Wildlife Sanctuary through permits and licensing in conjunction with eaters and omnivores, so we feed our the Wisconsin Department of Natural skunks a variety of meats, fruits, and Resources, United States Department of vegetables, along with a few pieces of Agriculture, and the United States Fish dry food so they get their vitamins evand Wildlife Service. It is illegal to keep eryday! Along with all captive animals, wildlife in your possession without the we watch the weight of our Animal Amproper permits. If you do find orphaned bassadors carefully since they are not or injured wildlife, especially skunks, foraging most of the day like their wild please do not approach the animal and counterparts. Our skunks receive a vacontact a local animal control officer or riety of daily exercises, including going licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Skunks for walks with staff, swimming, running can spray at 5 days old and are consid- in their exercise wheel, experiencing obstacle courses and enrichment in their ered a rabies vector species. exercise room, and just good old fashion So, with all of that said—why do we play time together through the day. have skunks, and more importantly, why We hope you can come out and visit do we allow the public to interact with them? Our Animal Ambassador skunks the skunks of the Bay Beach Wildlife have had their scent glands removed and Sanctuary soon and get outside to enjoy have specific veterinarian care to keep nature all around you! A visit with our themselves and the public safe. We Animal Ambassadors will turn a “stinky” present skunks to the public to help visi- day into a delightful one! tors learn more about the wild counterparts and nature that is all around them and right in their backyard. Skunks can be very useful to a property owner: they have long claws for digging, which aerates the soil. They are very good rodent hunters — there to help clean your area from destructive rodents. Here at the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary, we have a special family of critters that seem pretty uncommon to be favorites among visitors—but they are! Our Striped Skunks (Mephitis mephitis) are always popular Animal Ambassadors at the Wildlife Sanctuary, whether they are on program, hanging out in Critter Counter, or just out for a walk for the public to visit with!

At the Wildlife Sanctuary, we have 3 skunks that rotate between our exhibit area at the Woodland Building, where they get a rest from their Animal Ambassador work, to the Observation Building where they hang out when on programs and meeting the public.

FAIR from page 13

Havenwoods State Forest will transport some of their resident reptiles and amphibians to the fair. Visitors can spin the Wondrous Wildlife Wheel and answer questions on Wisconsin’s wildlife and learn about places to go to observe and appreciate the diversity of life.

These are just a few of the highlights Registration for the walk is $10 for adults (13 and up), $5 for kids (6-12), and free that you will find at the Natural Resourcfor kids 5 and under. If you would like to also purchase a long sleeve Walk for Wildes Park at the 2012 Wisconsin State life Shirt, registration is then only $15 for adults (13 and up) and $7 for kids (12 and Fair. The fair opens Thursday, August under). You can also raise pledges for amazing local prizes, including 2 through Monday, August 13. More inYou can check out our website at BayBeachWildlife.com or call (920) 391-3683 for formation is available on the Wisconsin more details. You can pre-register online or mail in or drop off your brochure to State Fair website www.wistatefair.com. the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary. You can also register at the event from 8am until FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: 11am. We’ll have lots of prizes, a fun raffle, local treats, and great entertainment Marcus Smith, DNR Southeast Region from Randy Peterson at 11am! public affairs – 414-263-8516 or Paul We hope to see you at Walk for Wildlife… and thank you for helping the or- Heinen, DNR state fair coordinator 608-266-2120 phaned, ill, and injured wildlife of Northeast Wisconsin!


PET JOURNAL

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AUGUST 2012 FEBRUARY 19

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ICKS from page 10 As for Liddy, the owners are applying a MYTH: I only have cats. All this talk topical antibiotic/anti-inflammatory and about ticks doesn’t apply to my kitties. we will follow up with additional testing if the bump does not resolve on its own. FACT: Ticks can and do feed on cats. Scientists believe that cats can get some of the same tick diseases people and Editors Note: The Practical Pet Vet is dogs get. Use of an appropriate flea and a blog written by Dr. Kim Everson of St. tick preventative on cats that spend time Bernard’s Animal Medical Center, Van outdoors is a good idea. NOTE: Be- Dyne, WI. fore applying any over-the-counter flea and tick preventative to your cat, please Reprinted with permission. check with your veterinarian to make sure it is safe for cats. The best protection against tick diseases is achieved by using a combination of tactics. Inspect your pet carefully after being in grassy or wooded areas. Removing a tick within the first 48 hours of attachment drastically reduces transmission of disease. (Wash your hands thoroughly after removing a tick from your pet.) Ask your veterinarian if vaccination against Lyme disease is recomf mended for your dog. Topical flea and tick preventative should be used during the spring, summer and fall at a minimum.

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PJ’s Collectables 817 S Military Ave Green Bay, WI 920 321-1030

Chelstar’s Bed & Biscuit N4890 US Hwy 45 Fond Du Lac, WI 920-921-9024

Joys of Grooming 1706 N Main St West Bend, WI 262 338-2506

Cedarburg Veterinary Clinic N144 W5660 Pioneer Rd Cedarburg, WI 262-377-2460

Lincoln Tropical Fish & Pets 10 S Main St Hartford, WI 262 673-7470

The UPS Store - Sheboygan 3120 S Business Dr Sheboygan, WI 920 453-5934

Aurora Kennel & Pet Shoppe 1832 Minerva St. Oshkosh, WI 920 235-7758

Liberty K9 Lodge 1550 Cornell Rd. Green Bay, WI 920 661-0867

Critters Pet Nutrition 2593 Fairview Rd. Neenah, WI 920 725-9434

Two Paws Up Bakery 305 E. College Ave. Appleton, WI 920 954-1420

Bohn’s Town & Country 2283 Hwy 44 Oshkosh, WI 920 233-2066

Jill’s Pet Shoppe 712B E. Green Bay St. Shawano, WI 715 524-2272

Animart 4303 East Towne Way Madison, WI 608 242-4140

A Touch of Class Pet Resort 2275 Omro Rd. Oshkosh, WI 920 267-3333

Animart 1600 North Spring St. Beaver Dam, WI 920 885-2814

V.I.P. Lube Inc. 2451 Velp Ave. Howard, WI 920 434-LUBE (5823)

Paws Awhile Boutique 123 N. Military Ave. Green Bay, WI

Doggie Do’s By Lou 311 E. Main St. Chilton, WI

Traxler’s Kennel Pet Shop 5954 State Rd 21 Omro, WI 920 685-5547 (OMRO)

Marshals Convenience Stores Sheboygan, Plymouth, Glenbulah, Kewauskum, Elkhart Lake and Cascade

Starbucks Coffee Appleton, Ashwaubenon, De Pere, Fox Cities, Green Bay, Neenah, & Oshkosh, WI

Walgreen’s Drugstores Chilton, Manitowoc, Plymouth, Saukville, Sheboygan, Sturgeon Bay, & Two Rivers, WI

Starbucks Coffee Cedarburg, Fond Du Lac, Grafton, Sheboygan, &West Bend, WI

Walgreen’s Drugstores Cedarburg, Grafton, Fond Du Lac, Hartford, Jackson, Oshkosh, &West Bend, WI Walgreen’s Drugstores Appleton, Clintonville, De Pere, Fox Cities, Green Bay, New London, & Shawano, WI

For more locations please visit our website at: www.petjournalmidwest.com and click on the link “Where can I find Pet Journal..”


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AUGUST 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

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GROOMING YOUR PET

PET PRODUCT REVIEWS

by Diana Schmidt, Grooming Your Pet Columnist, groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com

by Seth Minaker, Pet Journal Columnist, sminaker@petjournalmidwest.com

If you or your groomer suspect that your dog has an “ear problem,” your dog should be taken to your veterinarian as soon as possible. Ear disorders in dogs are extremely common and can become very serious if left untreated. The goals of treating ear infections and inflammation are to prevent the development of irreversible changes to the ear and to restore comfort to the affected animal. So, pay attention to your dogs’ ears, and don’t take any problem with them lightly

Dog Ear Infections

When your dog is at the groomers, his ears will be checked and cleaned and your groomer will report any irregularities that are found. Hearing is one of the keenest senses in dogs, together with smell. Most dogs rely on hearing and scent much more than they do upon eyesight, to navigate their way through the world. The canine ear is made up of the external or outer ear, the middle ear and the internal or inner ear. Each of these parts can become inflamed, irritated and/or infected. Ear problems are Editors Note: Diana welcomes your some of the most common reasons why questions on general on grooming, owners take their dogs to the veterinar- please email using the email address ian. above or by mail: Pet Journal The most common ear disorders are Attn: Grooming You Pet caused by parasites, foreign bodies, 3120 S Business Dr. Suite 270 weather conditions, and allergies. Many Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 ear conditions begin with few or no noticeable symptoms, but left untreated they can quickly become quite severe.

SHARING THE TURF from catsinternational.org The wild counterpart of the domestic cat has a large territory, with males patrolling about 150 acres and females, about 15 acres. With the provision of food by humans and the elimination of the mating behavior (by spaying and neutering), the territory of our house cats can shrink to a fraction of the space utilized by their country cousins. The wide variation in the size of feline territories is a tribute to just how flexible the cat can be. There is a limit, however, to what even the most adaptable cat can handle, especially when the already restrictive environment is diminished further by the addition of multiple feline companions. (An average-sized home with three indoor cats has a feline density of about 30,000 individuals per square mile.)

Do you think that this situation would make you frustrated and irritable, stressed to the point that even your friends might want to avoid you? It’s no surprise that tensions occasionally erupt in multicat households. Cats adapt to living with one another to varying degrees. In some cases intercat aggression can escalate to the point where certain cats become social outcasts, or “pariahs”. These frightened felines may be so intimidated that they won’t leave their hiding places to eat or use the litterbox. Even a cat that tolerates several housemates may become aggressive with the addition of one more cat.

If you have given careful consideration to the effect of the addition of a newcomer to your cat family and you feel It’s hard to see life from the cat’s point that they can handle one more, then of view, but try to imagine yourself living here are some suggestions to make the in a society where there were no proper- turf more “cat friendly”: ty rights. Anyone could move into your home at any time without your permis- • The first step in eliminating the sion. The first new residents might be stress of group living is to make sure kind of fun to have around as company. all of your cats are spayed and neuAs the population increased, you found tered. that you were in competition to use the bathroom, someone was always eating • Introductions are very important. the food you had saved for your supper, and even your bed was occasionally see URF on page 21 claimed by a newcomer.

With your dog enjoying himself outside on these nice summer days, most likely he’ll need a bath more often them normal. Rolling on the grass, swimming, and staying outside will leave him with that dirty dog smell, and you saying he needs a bath. On that note, one question a lot of owners ask is, “How often should I bathe my dog?” Well, that depends. First, determine what type of skin your dog has, by spreading his fur out and observing his skin. If it feels dry, flaky, or he itches frequently, he almost assuredly has dry skin. If your hands feel oily after petting him, or he has a naturally “musty” smell all the time, he most likely has oily skin. Dogs in between are considered normal. Dogs with dry skin should get bathed the least, or use a specific shampoo for dry skin. For dogs with oily skin, owners should use a “degreasing” shampoo, and bathe more often, but not more than once a week as it will deplete their healthy oils. Normal dogs will fare well with regular dog shampoo, and baths when needed. You should never use human shampoo on dogs, as the PH is too low for dogs. That would leave dog’s coats dull, complicate dry skin, and leave their hair scraggly. Dogs with skin allergies should always be bathed with a hypoallergenic shampoo. Diet is also a major factor in your dog’s skin and coat, and can sometimes solve dry or oily skin. I’ve compiled a list of the best rated shampoos for the three main conditions, dry, oily, and sensitive skin. I’ve tried to look at natural for this article, as almost all synthetic chemicals/ scents are harsh on dogs’ skin and coat.

For oily skin: I had a no luck finding a natural “degreasing” shampoo. However, the most recommended ingredient for stripping grease and oils from dogs is benzoyl peroxide. It is also anti-bacterial, anti-itch, and removes dead skin cells. Benzoyl-Plus® shampoo is the leading medicated shampoo with that ingredient. Lather your dog and wait 10-15 minutes, then rinse well. The waiting time will allow the formula to penetrate the skin and fur follicles, stripping the grease effectively. Talk to your veterinarian before using, and he will prescribe frequency of use. There are many different varieties for treatment, so it would be hard to give you a definitive price range. For hypoallergenic: Vets Best® Hypoallergenic shampoo. This gentle tearless formula cleanses your pooch without soap, leaving sensitive skin unharmed. It is also great for dogs with extremely dry skin, as this shampoo with soothe rough, scaly, and itchy skin. For unscented, 16oz costs $9.99 For spray/conditioner: an outstanding “no bath” spray is the FURminator® waterless deshedding conditioner. Loaded with a fresh scent and natural essential oils, it keeps our dog’s fur slick and shiny, and smelling great all the time. It also reduces shedding, and when paired with a FURminator® comb, practically eliminates it. An 8oz bottle costs $8.99. There are many other categories of shampoos, like deshedding, odor control, or conditioners for glossy fur, so take a look around. Remember, if your dog has extremely dry or sensitive skin, its best to let your vet give him a checkup, or recommend a proper shampoo. Simple natural routes tend to be easier and safer though. For example, we live in the woods and our dog was getting more than 3-4 ticks a week. We added a few drops of bug repelling eucalyptus oil to his shampoo, and not only does it keep his odor down, but he now rarely gets ticks. Consider your dogs shampoo, it may make him AND you happier.

For normal/slightly dry skin: Hydraplex® plus Original Aloe-vera Oatmeal shampoo and spray. This is currently one of the top rated shampoos for dogs. It is formulated with essential omega-3 oils, and amino acids to create the perfect PH balance. In addition, it contains Zinc-PCA; with 90% of dogs lacking zinc in their coats, it rejuvenates and revives their skin and hair, for a beautiful shine, healthy glow, and soft feel. This shampoo is also top rated for slightly dry skinned dogs, with the aloe and oatmeal moisturizing and protecting. Their That’s all for this month, goodbye! leave-in spray is usually packaged with their shampoo. Quick and effective, loaded with the same essentials as the Editors Note: Have a product you shampoo, it cleanses your dog in seconds. Both shampoo and spray are all would like reviewed? Email Seth at the natural, and in three scents, peppermint, address above or by mail: Pet Journal spearmint, and lavender. 9oz shampoo Attn: Pet Product Reviews and 8oz spray both cost $21.99. 3120 S Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

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PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012 21

TURF from page 20 Follow our suggestions for a systematic and gradual introduction utilizing the principles of desensitization and counterconditioning.

• Remember that you are a very important part of your cats’ territory (or turf) and every day give each of your cats some time alone with you for cuddling and loving attention.

• Create feline hide-outs--special places where cats can go to be alone. It Editors Note: Cats International was can be as simple as a cardboard box founded by Betsy Liscomb, a cat bewith a hole cut into it and soft bed- havioral expert. If you would like more ding on the bottom. information on Cats International or for cat behavioral assistance, please visit • Make use of the vertical space in the Cats International website, www. your home by adding floor-to-ceiling catsinternational.org. cat trees, window perches, and kitty condos. It has been observed that Reprinted with permission. cats living in groups are more comfortable if they can “layer” themselves. • Provide one litterbox per cat plus one and place them in widely separated sites. Some cats will not use a litterbox if other cats are nearby.

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• Reduce competition at mealtimes by providing several feeding stations. A more dominant cat can keep a shy cat from the food bowl if there is only one location.

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AQUARIUM BISON CAMPING COMPANION ECOLOGICAL FRIENDSHIP GOATS HORSES MEMORIAL PETLIMITS SANCTUARY SHAMPOO STATEFAIR TICKS WATERFOWL

BEACH BUTTERFLIES COCKATIEL COMPOST FARM GIZMO GUERNSEY LOPEARED PETEXPO PRAIRIEDOG SEPERATION SKUNKS SUMMER VOLUNTEER ZOOLOGICAL

Words to find, they can go across, up or down, diagonally. Answers will appear in next months issue or on the Pet Journal website about the 20th of the month, in the Regions section on the Wordsearch page.


AUGUST 2012

PET JOURNAL

www.petjournalmidwest.com

22

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS Pet Journal classifieds are a free service for our readers. Classifieds are for free or paid services offered by individuals or families, such as a teenager looking for a dog walking job over the summer. Classifieds are also available for our Local Humane Societies/ Shelters and Animal Rescues to post their needs lists. Please contact the respective Humane Society/Shelter/Rescue if you have questions or would like to donate an item or two. Events from our advertisers and readers will also be printed as space allows. To place your classified ad please email Pet Journal at: classifieds@petjournalmidwest. com. Please include the following when submitting your classified: Name, Phone, email, best time to call (in case there is a problem with your classified ad), what text you would like in your ad. Please limit to 25 words and keep your wording clean. Remember this is a family paper. How many months you would like the listing to be available for, and list in the subject of your email “PJ Classified”. If you would prefer to mail it to us, you may do so, with the same items as requested above. Mail it to: Pet Journal attn: PJ Classified’s 3120 S. Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 Please submit your classified no later than the 20th of the month to make the next edition.

Section 1: Individual/Family Classifieds Section 1.1: Puppies for Sale

Section 1.2: Young Adult Job Posting Ellen’s Pet Sitting Need someone to walk your dog or feed your horses while you’re away? Just give Ellen a call at 685-2094 or E-mail her at murktheratty@gmail.com Experienced High School Dog Walker I have references if needed please call Justin at 920-207-5561 for more information.

Section 2: Humane Societies & Animal Rescues/Shelters Needs Lists Section 2.1: Humane Societies Bay is • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Area Humane Society of Green Bay, WI looking for: Bleach Paper Towels Clay Cat Litter (non-clumping) Rawhides Kongs Dog Toys Canned Cat Food Small Litter Boxes Cat Toys Chew Blocks & Treats for Small Animals Carefresh Bedding (no pine or cedar) Liquid Laundry Detergent Powder-free Exam Gloves Scratching Posts, Towers or Cat Trees or consider these as a way to recycle: Blankets Bath Towels Leashes

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Bay Area Humane Society at: 920.469.3110 or visit their website: www.bayareahumanesociety.com.

Door County Humane Society of Sturgeon Bay, WI is looking for: • Animal Supplies • Purina Pro Plan Adult Chicken and Rice Formula • Purina Pro Plan Kitten Chicken and Rice Formula • Purina Dog Chow (green bag) • Purina Beneful • Dog Toys • Rawhide bones • Cat Litter (scoopable, any brand) • Office Supplies • Copy Paper • Postage Stamps • HP Ink Cartridge #60 for HP printer model# F4280 • Cleaning Supplies • Bleach • Paper Towels • Towels • Blankets • Toilet Tissue • High Efficiency Laundry Detergent To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Door County Humane Society at: 920.746.1111, by email at: nail@dooranimals.com or you may visit their website: www.doorcountyhumanesociety.org. Eastshore Humane Association of Chilton, WI is looking for: • Non-scoopable Cat Litter • Purina Cat Chow -or• Purina Complete • Purina Dog Chow • Laundry Detergent To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Eastshore Humane Association at: 920.849.2390, by email at: ehashelter@gmail.com or you may visit their website: www.eastshoreha.org. Fond Du Lac Humane Society of Fond Du Lac, WI is looking for: • Dog Needs • Kong’s and kong rubber balls • Dog toys • Peanut butter • Cheese whiz • Plain yogurt • Dog Treats • Easy-walk Harnesses (all sizes) • Durable Leashes • Kuranda dog beds (check our website) • Any dog related items - new or used • Cat Needs • Kitty Litter (non-clumping) • Purina Cat and Kitten Chow • Chicken or Turkey baby food (human) • Toys and Cat trees • Kitten milk replacer • Any cat or kitten related items - new or used • Small Animal Needs • Pellet rabbit food • Timothy Hay • Bedding & Litter (no pine or cedar please) • Any small animal related items - new or used • Other Needs • Bleach • Q-tips • Band-aids • First Aid & Medical supplies • Rubbing Alcohol • Laundry Detergent • Garbage Bags (20 gal or larger) • Dawn dish soap • Mop heads (heavy duty) • Paper towels • Sandwich Bags (Ziploc or fold top) • Small paper plates & paper cups • Copy paper - white or color • Stamps To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Fond Du Lac Humane Society at: 920.922.8873 or visit their website: www.fonddulachumanesociety.org.

Fox Valley Humane Association of Appleton, WI is looking for: • Pet Supplies • Purina or Iams cat food and dog food • Purina Kitten Chow • Purina Puppy Chow • Canned cat, kitten and dog food • Pine or aspen shavings • Timothy hay • Cleaning Supplies • Lemon Pine-sol • Dish Soap • Tall Kitchen Garbage bags • Febreeze air freshener • Bleach • Liquid laundry detergent • Garbage bags (33-gallon) • Miscellaneous • Gas gift cards to local gas stations • X-large wire and plastic crates • Cash sponsorships • One months’s supply of pain medication for cats and kittens after surgery - $40/ per mo. • One month’s supply of pain medication for dog s and puppies after surgery - $75/per mo. • Surgical packs, 12 needed - $850 each • Sponsorship to spay or neuter a cat, 800 needed - $18.50 each • Sponsorship to spay or neuter a dog, 650 needed - $30.50 each To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Fox Valley Humane Association at: 920.733.1717, by email at: shelter@foxvalleypets.org or visit their website: www.foxvalleypets.org. Green Lake Area Animal Shelter of Green Lake, WI is looking for: • Cat Litter, any type • Dog and Cat treats • Disinfecting Wipes, any brand • Large Garbage Bags • White Copy Paper • HP-60 Black Ink To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Green Lake Area Animal Shelter at: 920.2943042, by email at: adopt@glass.org or visit their website: www.glaas.org. Lakeshore Humane Society of Manitowoc, WI is looking for: • Purina Dry Dog and Cat Food • Dog and Cat Treats (especially dog biscuits) • Clay Cat Litter • Hard to destroy Dog Toys • Cat Toys • Creamy Peanut Butter • Small Animal Bedding • Small Animal Water Bottles • Small Animal Supplies (Hay, Feed, Treats and Toys) • 8.5” x 11” Copy Paper • Post-It-Notes • Stamps (First Class and Pst Card) • Bleach • Tall Kitchen Bags & 39 Gallon Garbage Bags • Hand Sanitizer • Paper Towels • Toilet Paper • Dawn Dishwashing Soap To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Lakeshore Humane Society at: 920.684.5401 or visit their website at: www.lakeshorehumae.com. Neenah Animal Shelter of Neenah, WI is looking for: Most Needed items: • Pig Ears/Rawhides • Dog Treats/Biscuits • Stamps • Dry Kitten Food

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Wand Type Cat Toys Pet Same Ice Melt Pooper Scooper with Rake Resurfacing of our Parking lot Always Needed items: Scoopable Unscented Litter such as: Tidy Cat, PetCo Brand, ScoopAway or Fresh Step Purina Original Dry Cat Food Degreaser (Jungle Jake or Simple Green ect.) Small Paper Plates Printer Cartridges (HP Office Jet 6110 & L7590) Foster Homes Cat Scratchers (www.stretchandscrach.com) Empty Water Bottles (example Gatorade and Powerade bottles)

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Neenah Animal Shelter, 951 Country Rd G, Neenah, WI. Oshkosh Area Humane Society of Oshkosh, WI is looking for: • Purina Kitten Chow • Purina Cat Chow • Purina Puppy Chow - regular flavor • Purina Dog Chow • Caned Cat Food - pate type only (please no shredded or sliced in gravy) • Canned dog food • Canned kitten food • Romaine Lettuce (for rabbits) • Rolled Raw Hide Chews - Larger sizes only, please • Soft Dog Treats • Scoopable cat litter • Bleach • Tall Kitchen garbage bags • Dryer Sheets • Paper Toweling • Swiffer Dry Mops • Small paper plates • Degreaser - like Jungle Jake • Micro Fiber Cloths • Cotton Swabs & Cotton Balls • Copy Paper To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Oshkosh Area Humane Society at: 920.424.2128 or visit their website: www.oahs.org. Ozaukee Humane Society of Saukville, WI is looking for: • Digital Camera with rechargeable battery, at least 7 megapixel preferred • Dish Soap • Small Dog Training Treats • Laundry Detergent (for High Efficiency Washers) • Postage stamps • Kongs • Fabric - large, colorful solid material • 8 oz. - 12 oz. disposable cups • 45-gallon garbage bags • Aspen Bedding • Bleach • Bottle Brushes • Cardstock paper • Cat-nail clippers (scissor type) • Cat toys • Copy paper, white & color, 8.5” x 11” • Dog toys (Nylabones, squeaky toys, ropes, hard rubber balls, ect.) • Hand Sanitizer • Highlighters • Kitchen scrub brushes with handles • LaserJet mailing labels (Avery 5160) • Lingerie bags (for washing small toys) • Mailing envelopes, 9 x 12 or 10 x 13 • Manila folders (letter size only) • Paper towels • Peanut butter • Pens • Post-it-notes • Printer ink cartridges ◊ Canon (5PGBK, 8C, 8M, 8Y) ◊ HP (23, 45, 92, 94, 95) • Rabbit pellets (no fruit or seed mix)


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012 23

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS • • • • • • • • • • •

Rechargeable AA batteries, with charger Scissors Soft Dog Toys Staples Steno notepads Stretch & “Scratch” cardboard scratching pads Swiffer Dusters Timothy hay Toilet paper Vinyl (non-latex) gloves Wild birdseed

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Ozaukee Humane Society at: 262.377.7580, by email at: info@ozaukeehumane.org or you may visit their website: www.ozaukeehumane.org. The Sheboygan County Humane Society of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Monetary donations • Gift cards for gas • Gift cards for pet supplies • Gift cards from retail stores Cat toys &• • Canned cat food • Kitty litter (non-clumping) • Litter pans • Litter scoops • Laundry soap • Non-clorox bleach • Dish detergent • Paper towel • Scotch scrubbing pads • Rawhide chews for dogs • Dog toys and tennis balls • Science diet pet foods • Copy paper • Office supplies • Foster Homes • Volunteers To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Sheboygan County Humane Society at: 920.458.2012 or visit their website at: www.mySCHS.com. Washington County Humane Society of Slinger, WI is looking for: Items marked with a * are priority needs. • Animal Needs ◊ Dog Needs ● Empty Unwashed Peanut Butter Jars ● Large Rawhides ● Small Bites Food ● Easy Cheese * ● Hot Dogs ● Dog Leashes (non-retractable) ● Pig Ears ● Kuranda Pet Beds ● Puppy Pads * ◊ Cat Needs ● Non-scoopable cat litter * ● Grain Free Dry Cat Food * ● Caned Cat Food (loaf style only) ● Urinary Tract Prescription Cat Food ● Purina Cat Chow ● Tuna * ● Meat Flavored Baby Food ● Liquid Fish Oil ● Pate Canned Cat Food * ● EVO - 95% Beef or Lamb canned food * ● Nature’s Variety Instinct (Grain Free) - Lamb, Rabbit canned food * ● Disposable Litterboxes * ◊ Small Animal Needs ● Rat Blocks ● Reptile Sand * ● Lovebird Food * ● Spray Millet (for Birds) ● Vita drops* ◊ Shelter Needs ● Water Softener Salt * ● Plastic Watering Cans * ● Colored Paper - Astro Brights ● Latex Gloves (S, M, L sizes) * ● Mop Heads * ● Zzzero Cleaning Supplies

DOG BOARDING $

15 plus tax

per night for 1st Dog Second Dog at discount rate

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Saline Eyewash for Emergencies Postage Stamps Fans White Copy Paper - Letter Size White Cardstock - Letter Size - 65lb * Toilet Bowl Cleaner * Toilet Paper * Heavy Duty Plastic Spray Bottles Laundry Detergent * Tall Kitchen Garbage Bags * 33 Gallon Garbage Bags * Paper Plates * Feliway Spay (not diffusers) * 75 to 100 ft. hoses (not black) Gift Cards (Walmart, Office Max, Fleet Farm, Menards, Gas Cards) ● Toner for printers: ● HP28 - Tricolor ● HP27 - Black ● HP LaserJet 2200d #96A - black ● HP22 - Tricolor ● HP21 - Black ● HP61XL Black ● HP61XL Color To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Washington County Humane Society at: 262.677.0388, by email at: wchs@washingtoncountyhumane.org or visit there website at: www.washingtoncountyhumane.org.

Section 2.2: Animal Rescues & Shelters All Animal Rescue Center project of the Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • Reptile Cage Thermostats • Storage Space • Cargo Tailers • Livestock Trailers • Tow behind RV • Mini Van or Full Size Van • Kennel Fencing • Commercial/Large Capacity Washers/Dryers • Chest Freezers/Walk-in Coolers • Animal Control Equipment • Office Furniture • Gift Cards for Hardware or Home Improvment Stores • Lumber and 3/4” Plywood • Cash Donations To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the EWHSR at: 920.207.5642, by email at: info@allanimalresourcecenter.com or visit their website: www.allanimalrescuecenter.com. Amazing Grace Equine Sanctuary of Elkhart Lake, WI is looking for: • Good used skid-steer for snow/manure removal and moving large hay bales. • Hay nets. • Large size halters. • Fleet Farm gift cards. • Bags of cracked corn. • Grocery store expired bags of apples or carrots • Wood shavings/wood pellet bedding or cross-cut only shredded paper. • Horse trailer - 3 or 4 horse with ramp load and preferably one that works with the pickup. • Bags of Senior feed • MSM w/glucosomine and/or similar supplements • Wormers • Quest/Quest plus/Strongid/Safeguard • Bales of hay - large or small or round • Bags of bedding • Electric fencers • Electric water trough de-icers • Bags of salt • Loads of limestone screenings and/or gravel for paddocks • Stall mats

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Amazing Grace Equine Sanctuary at: 262.627.0582, or visit their website: www.rescuehorses.com. Care (Center for Avian Rehabilitation & Education) of Hubertus, WI is looking for: • Suede lacing for toy makeing (found at Michaels) 1/8”, beige or medium brown only • Zupreem or Lafeber pellets - all sizes • Gift Certificates to Michaels • 1/2” or 3/4” Plexiglass (10 4’ x 8’ panels) • First Class Postage Stamps • Hefty 39 Gallon Garbage Bags • Tall Kitchen Garbage Bags • Gloves for cleaning, doing dishes, ect. • Large Rubbermaid or equivalent containers • Used towels, hand towels and wash cloths in good condition • 1cc syringes, vet wrap, 2x2’s, 4x4’s (veterinary supplies) • Cheerios, especially Honey Nut • Fresh Fruits and Veggies (no Avocados) • Frozen Mixed Vegetables • Mixed Nuts (Unsalted in Shells) • Ground Walnuts (found in the bakers section of your local grocery store) • Paper Towels, Kleenex, Toilet Paper • Laundry Detergent (free and clear of dyes and smells) • No. 10 Grip-seal Security Envelopes • Printer Paper • Gasoline Cards • Lexmark Pro901 ink cartridges ° 105 (Black Ink) ° 100 (Yellow, Cyan, and Magenta Ink) • Van (New or Used - needs to be reliable) • 100% Cotton Material and/or 100% Fleece Material • Gift Cards for WE Energy, Piggly Wiggly, Pick ‘N Save, Walmart, Menards, Home Depot, Sendiks, and Woodman’s • Cash Donations • Cash Donations for Vet bills - made payable to Brook-Falls Veterinary Hospital • Volunteers to help with cleaning and feeding - at least than 5 hours a month, mornings, afternoons and weekends • Pressure Washer Volunteer - to pressure wash cages in the Summer • Handyman Volunteer - for Maintenance projects at the Shelter, preferably Weekends To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact CARE at: 262.628.3719 or by email at: cntrforavianrehab@ sbcglobal.net. Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary, Inc. of Marion and Green Bay is looking for: • Liquid Laundry Detergent • Anti-bacterial Liquid Dish Soap • Garbage Bags • Bleach • Anti-bacterial Hand Soap • Blankets (new or used) • Sheets (used) • Bath Towels (new or used) • White Multipurpose Printer Paper (8.5 x 11) • Purina Kitten Chow • Caned Cat Food (Friskie’s Plate) • Purina Cat Chow Original • Rubbermaid Pets High Sided Litter Pan (can be found at PetSmart) • Metal Litter Scoops (Durascoop Large Cat Litter Scoop, found at PetSmart) • Large Ceramic Dog Food Dishes • The Loops 2 Leashes (can be found at Fleetfarm or PetSmart) • Canned Dog Food (Lamb and Rice, cans with pop tops only, please) • Dog Treats (Snausages, Liver Treats, Beggiin’ Strips, T’ Bonz, ect.) • Dog Chewies (Rawhides, Dingo Bones, Pressed Bones, ect.) • Dog Toys • Tuffies Ultimate Dog Toys • The Almost Indestructible Ball • Air Kong Squeeker Dog Toys

Now Under NEW OWNERSHIP: Minna Nousiainen-Becher All breed dog & cat grooming Lowest prices in the valley! Over 20 years of professional experience in handling dogs and lots of TLC for your beloved pets! Early Drop-Off & Pick-Up Available

Boarding and Grooming 1158 Appleton Rd Menasha, WI 54952

920 725-7421

• • • •

• Jolly Pets Tug and Toss Ball • JW Pet Good Cuz/Bad Cuz Dog Toys • Kong Wubba Dog Toys • Kong Rubber Balls • Kongs Gift Cards to PetSmart, PetCo, Fleet Farm, Menards Energy Star Washer and Dryer Large Van Cash Donation

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary, Inc. at: 920634-9701 or visit their website: www.happilyeverafterinfo.org. Iveloharele Horse Retirement Sanctuary is looking for: • Hay, Grains, and Treats • Paint - White • Water hoses • Water and Grain Buckets • Bedding - Eqine - Fresh • Mats - for horse stalls • Box fans • Grooming Supplies • Round Pen • Gates 14 - 16 ft • Supplements - MSM, Glucosumine, and UGuard • Fly Spray, Fly Masks, and Fly Strips • Cash donation To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Iveloharele Hourse Sanctuary by email: iveloharele@ frontier.com. K&R • • • • • • • • • • • •

Small Animal Sanctuary is looking for: Baby Blankets Fleece Blankets Stuffed Animals Hard Plastic Baby Toys or Rattles Bunny/Guinea Pig Toys Natural Small & Large Wicker Baskets Natural Wicker Craft Wreaths PLAIN Rabbit Pellets (no seeds or treats mixed in!) Bagged Hay 16oz or 32oz Water Bottles Ceramic Dishes Treats

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the K&R Animal Sanctuary by email: kr_small_animal_sanctuary@yahoo.com or visit their website at: www.krsmallanimalsanctuary.vpweb.com. Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Paper towels • Lysol Spray • Dog toys • Puppy food - moist and dry • Bowls • Leashes • Collars • Volunteers • Wisconsin Foster Homes To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue at: 920.627.6727, by email at: mecca@ meccapitbullrescue.com or visit there website at: www.meccapitbullrescue.com. Saving Paws Animal Rescue, Inc. of Appleton is looking for: • Cat Litter • Dry Cat Food (Please no Ol’Roy) • Dry Kitten Food (Please no Ol’Roy) • Canned Cat and Kitten Food • Dog Toys • Dog Rawhides/Chews/Bones • Bleach • Laundry Detergent • Paper Towels

Hours: Groomers are Proud Members of: Mon - Fri 8 am - 5 pm Saturday 8 am - 10 pm Sun & Holidays 4 pm - 6pm American Natural Premium Dog Food & FIDO-Vite Suppliments Sold here! Also, Wisconsin and America made Natural Treats and Chews Pets are spreading the rumor that we have great groomers


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

24

Tender Care In Home Pet Sitting Where your pet is treated like it’s one of our own Serving the entire Fox Valley area from Neenah to Kaukauna, including the Greenville area

‡ Resonable rates, insured, bonded

‡ References available upon request

920-729-6377

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS • • • • • • •

Fly Traps Any Cleaning Supplies Bug Spay Metal or Ceramic Bowls Styrofoam Bowls Folders (Red and Blue) Any Pet Supplies

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Saving Paws Animal Rescue, Inc. at: (920) 209-PAWS (7297) or visit their website at: www.savingpaws. com. Two Left Paws of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Dog/Cat food (Evo, Fromm, Wellnes, Feliade, Canide) • Canned wet food (any kind) • Clumping litter (any kind, non-sented) • Litter scoops • Puppy pads • Dog/Cat treats • Dog/Cat toys • Dog/Cat beds • Towels • Paper towels • Disposable gloves • Kennels • Cages • Live traps for Small Animals • Fleet Farm gift cards To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Two Left Paws Animal Sanctuary at: 920.331.0100 or via their website at: www.twoleftpaws.org.

Section 3: Event Posters

www.tndrcare.com


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012 25

PRESS RELEASES TRAP-NEUTER-RETURN SUCCESS IN HOWARD AND SUAMICO Green Bay, WI – Cats Anonymous, Inc. helped the Villages of Howard and Suamico be more animal-friendly communities thanks to a grant from PetSmart Charities®. The grant was made to provide residents of Howard and Suamico choices when it comes to cats living outside. The goals include reducing the overall population of feral cats and decreasing the numbers of kittens and feral adults being turned into local shelters. The grant funds covered the costs of rabies vaccines and surgical supplies for 300 cats. The program only applies to unsocialized cats living outdoors, not to pet cats. Also, 25 live traps were purchased to help ensure the group could capture entire colonies to reach 100% sterilization rates. Cats Anonymous continues to monitor the populations involved, and reports the total number of cats has decreased from 512 at the start in 2009 to just 330 cats as of August 2011. The organization cites cooperation from area municipalities as a significant step forward in meeting the challenges associated with feral cats in a manner that not only is well-received by residents as a humane choice, but also actually works in the long term. The community saves an estimated $50 - $100 per cat by using TrapNeuter-Return instead of traditional removal.

INTRODUCTION TO REIKI FOR ANIMALS AT IVELOLHARELE RETIREMENT SANCTUARY, INC Have you ever wanted to learn more about Reiki? Are you interested in complementary ways to support the well-being of your animals? We invite you to join us for an Introduction to Reiki for Animals, sponsored by Ivelolharele Retirement Sanctuary, Inc. The class will be held at Ivelolharele Retirement Sanctuary, W2317 E. Jefferson Rd., Chilton, WI on Sunday, September 9, 2012 from 1:00-3:00 p.m. The class will be taught by Ann Noyce, Reiki Master Teacher and owner of Animal Hearts® Wellness Center, and Two Paws Up Bakery LLC. The cost is $25 with proceeds going to support the horses and donkeys at Ivelolharele Retirement Sanctuary. This introductory class is for anyone interested in learning about the system of Reiki and how it can not only help deepen your relationship with the animals in your lives, but also support healing on physical and emotional levels. What will you learn? • The basic elements of Reiki • Why Reiki is ideal for animals (including the benefits of Reiki) • The differences between Reiki for people and Reiki for animals • How you can become a Reiki practitioner (for both people and animals) • Stories of experiences with animals will be shared, including how Reiki has helped the horses at Ivelolharele Retirement Sanctuary. • An Introduction to Animal Reiki handout, the Animal Reiki Code of Ethics and a recommended reading and Reiki resource list will be provided

Monica Hoff, Animal Control officer for the villages said “TNR is not only more effective in controlling the feral cat population, but many people will not call animal For more information, contact Ann or Alan Noyce at Two Paws Up Bakery LLC, 920control if the cat is going to be destroyed. More cats seem to be reported when 954-1420, or Jody at Ivelolharele Retirement Sanctuary, 920-418-0755. Please register for the class by September 4, using the registration form on the class page TNR is an option.” at www.twopawsupbakery.com. Cats Anonymous, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose sole purpose is to better the lives and reduce the number of stray and feral cats in Northeastern Wisconsin. They promote, educate and advocate the non-lethal reduction of the feral cat population utilizing the Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) method in a safe and humane manner. For more information, visit www.CatsAnonymous.org


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012 26

$1,0$/&211(&7,216 Benefiting all animals whether it walks, crawls or flys.

Linda Ledbeter CHTP, HTAP. O.M.C. 920-892-6180 animal.connections@hotmail.com www.healingtouchforanimals.com

5HVWRULQJ7KH1DWXUDO%DODQFH LQ/LIHE\8WLOL]LQJ Healing Touch for Animals速 Behavior Modification Young Living Essential Oils Tuning Forks and

Photonic Acu-Light

What Can HEALING TOUCH for ANIMALS速 help? Abandonment & Abuse Separation Anxiety Illness & Injuries Socialization Behavioral Issues Bonding with Family Preventive Health Care Birthing to End of Life Process Training & Competition

www.petjournalmidwest.com


PET JOURNAL

AUGUST 2012 27

SILDE KENNELS & GROOMING DORRIT E. DIEHL GROOMING & BOARDING SERVICES

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Pet breaks every 2 hours

22 kennels

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Indoor and Outdoor play areas

Local vet on call 24/7

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Tamara Pool Pet Trainer

920-254-2620 www.4paws-training.com tamara@4paws-training.com

Learn how dogs communicate and how to communicate with them.


AUGUST 2012 28

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