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VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2

FEBRUARY 2012

PET JOURNAL FREE

WISCONSIN’S RESOURCE FOR ALL ANIMALS www.petjournalmidwest.com

DOG SELLERS LAW (ACT 90) PART 2 OF 3 Lee J Schneider, Pet Journal Editor lschneider@petjournalmidwest.com Last month in Pet Journal we brought you some background on the new Dog Sellers Law (Act 90) written by Kathy Pobloskie of Wisconsin Voters for Companion Animals. This month we have two Rescues and two Humane Societies giving their comments on Act 90 both good and bad, as well as some pointers on what could be changed to make the law better. Next month we will hear from several breeders and veterinarian’s regarding the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI). As mentioned in last month’s article, our Facebook group has, for some time been engaged in a lively discusion regarding Act 90. After publishing last months article, a question was raised by several group members regarding Mrs. Pobloskie credentials. What follows is an excerpt from her bio on the WI Voters for Companion Animals website: “Kathy has a diploma in forest technology as well as a background in newspaper management. She has owned, raised, and trained horses for almost 25 years. She is currently a full time animal welfare advocate, volunteering for national and local organizations. This experience has led her to believe that true change for the animals will come from better legislation and stricter enforcement of existing laws. She feels that providing voters with credible data will help them make informed decisions at election time. This will speed the passage of better animal laws and convince our politicians that humane legislation is an important, bi-partisan issue for Wisconsin citizens.”

Photo Courtesy of Legacy Studios

For our first statement, we hear from Cheryl Rosenthal of the Oshkosh Area Humane Society. The passing of Act 90 has been a winwin-win for the Oshkosh Area Humane Society, the dogs in our care, and the community.

see ACT 90 on page 14.

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FEBRUARY 2012

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ET JOURNAL OURNAL PET

EBRUARY 2012 2012 FFEBRUARY

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EDITORS NOTES

ABOUT OUR COVER MODEL

Dear Readers, Thank you for reading the February issue of Pet Journal. You may have noticed a change in this months issue, we have redesigned Pet Journal and combined our two editions (Lakeshore and the Green Bay/Fox Cities) into one publication. It means more news coverage for our readers. This also allows greater copverage for our advertisers and our shelters and rescues looking for homes for their pets. Also, this month Pet Journal will once again be available at the Great Lakes Pet Expo in the Wisconsin Exposition Center at the Wisconsin State Fair Park in West Allis, WI.

Our February cover model is Rufus who is looking for his Valentines date. Rufus is a 3 and a half year old, half Siamese and half American Shorthair who was rescued at 6 months old after being abandoned. Rufus’s human companion is Tammy B. of Sheboygan, WI. Photo courtesy of Legacy Studios, Sheboygan, WI.

Due to an error in our Green Bay/Fox Cities edition last month, Cheryl Larson’s column was mistakenly attrbuted to one of our other Holistic and Natural Columists. We would like to thank Cheryl for her understanding.

Become a friend of Pet Journal on Facebook! Join our growing group of Pet Journal readers following us, and upload a picture of your pet(s) to the group and it could be featured as our pet of the week!

Lee J Schneider

by L. Schneider

5 - About our Cover Model Editors Notes 6 - Holistic & Natural Options for You & Your Pets hosted by K. Hoelzel hosted by C. Larson hosted by V. Rabe

7 - Stocking your Freshwater Aquarium by M. Verner

Aquarium Maintenance Schedule by M. Verner

8 - Calendar of Events 9 - Ask Scrappy!

hosted by Scrappy the Pit Bull

A Senior Moment by J. Gallhart

10 - Everyday is Valentines Day when you have a Ferret

If you have any questions for a specific columnist, please contact them via the email at the end of their respective columns. If you have a questions for a specific department, please contact them via their email address list below. Main Email ............................... petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com Distribution Location Requests ... distribution@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Journal Archives .................. archives@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Photo Submissions .............. petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com

Are you intrested in Advertising in Pet Journal? For more information on advertising in Pet Journal or on our website please email us at advertising@petjournalmidwest.com. If you are intrested in having Pet Journal delivered to your business for your clients or staff, please email us at distrbution@petjournalmidwest.com. We are sorry, but we do not offer home delivery at this time.

Would you like to see your pets in Pet Journal? Email a picture of your pet(s) to petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com and we will feature them in our Reader Pet Page. No email? No problem! Mail a copy of the picture to the Pet JourOur columists would love to hear your nal mailbox, listed below. All pictures questions. Contact information is found received by mail will be returned after at the end of their respective columns! scanning. Please feel free to send us your story , Editor ideas and photos.

TABLE OF 1 - Dog Sellers Law (Act 90) Part 2 of 3

Pet Journal newspaper is publish by LSRB Media, LLC, on a monthly basis and is available free of charge to readers at various locations in the region that it is printed. The views represented by Columnists or Contributors in Pet Journal do not necessarily represent the views of Pet Journal or its parent company LSRB Media, LLC. Questions or comments regarding content can be made to information@petjournalmidwest.com or by calling our offices at: (920) 393-4818. Pet Journal is always on the lookout for new advertiser’s if you are interested in advertising with us please contact our advertising department at advertising@ petjournalmidwest.com. To contact Pet Journal by mail, please send all correspondence to our mailbox at: Pet Journal, Attn: Advertising Department 3120 S. Business Dr., Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524.

We want to be the publication you look forward to reading each month.

by S. Holme

Alpha Dog

hosted by T. Pool

11 - Pet Adoption Section 12 - Eco News A State for Sturgeon by L. Gaumnitz

13 - Where are the Elephants? by A. Kawski

Avani the New Sancutary Cougar by K. Diedrich

14 - Chilli Cook Off at Harley Davidson by L. Ledbeter

CONTENTS

14 -Fix a Leak

by S. Pfeiffer

16 - Photos of your Pets 17 - Ask the Vet

hosted by Dr. K. Strickfaden

A Happy Ending for a Blind Dog from The Practical Pet Vet

Sleeps and Naps: Feline Style from catsinternational.org

18 - Coming in March Crazy Rabbit Myths by K. Ahrens

Honoring the Human Animal Bond Through End of Life Support for Companion Animals by V. Hajek Adams

19 - Word Search Answers Find Pet Journal 20 - Grooming your Pets hosted by D. Schmidt

Pet Product Reviews by S. Minaker

What is Healing Touch for Animals and why it may be the Missing Link by L. Ledbeter

21 - Pet Journal Word Search 22 - Pet Journal Classified Ads 24 - Event Posters


PET JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2012

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HOLISTIC AND NATURAL OPTIONS FOR YOU AND YOUR PETS DOG TREAT DISASTERS

IT’S STARTING ALREADY...

by Victoria Rabe, Holistic & Natural Columnist h&n-vrabe@petjournalmidwest.com

by Karey Hoelzel, PTT, Holistic & Natural Columnist h&n-khoezel@petjournalmidwest.com

So, I’m walking down the aisles of a local big box department store and pass the pet food aisle. Of course, since everything in my shop is all natural, without any chemicals, artificial color, or preservatives, I just have to take a peek at the items on the shelf. I already know that all the dog and cat foods are using meat-by-product as their main meat source, which is downed, sick and dying cows, euthanized animals from vet clinics, and of course can be road kill. Not to mention the left over meats and Styrofoam containers that go to the rendering plant from the grocery stores. I already know this much, including the fact that they are filled with corn, wheat and soy that are huge offenders for dogs allergies, and, that they are filled with chemicals to preserve them. Yes, I already know that, but now is the time to check out the bags of treats. Oh my goodness, how can they sell things like this? I won’t name names, but please check your bags of treats at home. Here is a bag with soft and chewy red colored things that smell like bacon. Here are a few things to look for: ground corn, corn gluten, (did you know that all those dogs that died three years ago were eating food and treats that had gluten in them? And, most gluten doesn’t come from the USA). Next, I see wheat flour, ground yellow corn, water, sugar, glycerin, soybeans, and bacon preserved with sodium nitrite. Again, more chemicals. Please remember that dogs really are meat eaters. Not too many dogs are running through fields eating all the corn and wheat they can find. When you see

Outside playtime is at the mercy of the mercury and limited to the tolerance for cold by both man and beast.

see TREATS on page 7.

My Boston Terrier (puppy mill rescue), Pfill-up, has set a new land speed record for “outside potty” time, breaking his big brother, Wilson’s, previous record of 5.7 seconds by almost a second and a half! The winter ho-hums have set in. The main topic of conversation in my shop has shifted from the cold temps, to family pets not being interested in their usual menus. The high point of our pets’ days has changed from outside playing to inside eating. Unfortunately, for many of our pets, we humans don’t have stellar imaginations when it comes to their meals, and being “food bored” becomes the new topic of interest we need to address. We humans have it made in the food variety department. Our diets change daily with every meal because we get to choose whatever it is we feel like eating. Most pets aren’t so lucky. They’re stuck eating from what must seem like a bottomless forty pound bag of whatever one-note food we brought home, dry kibble. No wonder they’re turning up-their noses at what’s offered, wouldn’t you? Imagine having to eat nothing but grape-nuts cereal, dry, no milk, just cereal for every meal – day after day after day – OUCH – boring!

COCONUT OIL FOR PETS AND PEOPLE TOO!

by Cheryl Larson, Holistic & Natural Columnist Let’s shake things up a bit. Consider h&n-clarson@petjournalmidwest.com rotating your pet’s food. Adding some The hot new health food is coconut oil. canned meats, grain free is a good Avoided for years after developing a bad choice, along with some steamed vegereputation as a saturated fat, the health tables. Dr. Harvey’s has pre-done vegies benefits have now been discovered. A in a bag – all you do is add warm was a staple of tropical cuisines, Pacific Ister to re-hydrate – so simple. Top that landers do not have heart disease, canoff with a little fat free organic yogurt... cer, diabetes, and other illnesses that yummy. modern American people and pets have. Coconut oil improves digestion and nuIn small amounts, adding in some trient absorption, healing Crohn’s disdifferent proteins and vegies can help ease, irritable bowel, ulcers and colitis. a dis-interested food bored dog or cat start to enjoy meal time again. For our pets with skin issues, coconut oil reduces allergic reactions, rejuvenates You can change foods often. The only the skin, age spots, acne and yeast. It one who has a vested interest in you not also provides protection against skin, changing your dog or cats food is the breast, colon and other cancers. Apcompany you are buying from. plied topically it will speed the healing of wounds, hot spots and insect bites. Flea I tell my customers that I do care allergies and itchy skin will be relieved. what they feed. I don’t care what they Coats will become sleek and glossy, and buy. I’ve had to pay for all the proddoggy odor is reduced. In people, cocoucts I’ve chosen to carry, and feel that I nut oil may also prevent heart disease, have a dog selection of high quality grain atherosclerosis, and stroke. free natural and raw foods for them to choose from. Normal thyroid function is maintained and balanced insulin levels may be The more often you change or rotate achieved with coconut oil, preventing or your pet’s food, choosing different procontrolling diabetes. The medium-chain teins each time, the less likely your pet fatty acids are efficiently metabolized to is to develop an allergy or immunity to provide fuel and energy, enhancing perwhatever it is they are eating. formance and promoting weight loss. The lauric acid in coconut oil is antiIf you haven’t offered much variety bacterial, anti-viral, anti-fungal and antito your pet’s diet, start slow in small parasitic. Lauric acid is found in breast amounts. Some animals readily adjust milk and is important for immune proto changes in their diets and some need tection. Mix with honey to cure trachea to switch around slowly. bronchitis, and sore throats. Additionally, coconut oil gently elevates the metabDogs by trade are opportunistic feedolism providing a higher level of energy ers and scavengers. Our feline friends and vitality. Athletes find it can enhance tend to be less adventuresome, but athletic performance and endurance. many will appreciate you efforts. Coconut oil was the solution for my Trying new foods should be enjoyable dog’s skin issues. Your pet may have – not scary. allergies, yeast, bacteria or contact dermatitis. With any of these issues cocoI invite you to play with their food – nut oil may be a great help. Best of all it’s cold outside – what else is there to dogs love it! Mine lick it off of the spoon do. It just might be satisfying for all inas a treat, but you can add it directly to volved! their food. For humans, I love it on toast with peanut butter and honey, cooked Gain knowledge – pass it forward with fish, used as the oil when making popcorn, or in smoothies for the kids. Editor’s Note: Kerey Hoelzel owns Critters Pet Nutrition, 2593 Fairview Rd, Cocotherapy, the makers of organic, Neenah, WI. Her shop caters to those virgin coconut oil for pets also provides who prefer natural and holistic free coconut chips. With all of the properties range foods for dogs and cats, offering of fresh, raw coconut, they are high in grain free, raw frozen and freeze dried fiber. foods and treats, natural supplements and Young Living Essential Oils. see OCONUT on page 7. Copyright 2012 Karey Hoelzel.

C


ET JOURNAL OURNAL PET

EBRUARY 2012 2012 FFEBRUARY

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TREAT from page 6.

COCONUT from page 6.

grains in food and treats, it’s just filler, and do we really want to be feeding our dogs sugar? Did you notice where in the list the meat actually was? Like number 9. Your heaviest ingredients are in the first 5 ingredients. So “Where’s the Beef”. Oh, I forgot to say that the bacon is also preserved with BHA. Last time I checked that can cause kidney and liver damage. OK, we’re getting close to the end of this bag. Red # 40, yellow #6 and blue #1. These colors can be cancer causing agents. Do they really have to color it so it looks pretty for “us”? My dog can’t see color. Would he really eat it if it wasn’t bright red? Let’s just throw that bag right into the cart!

Unlike grocery store coconut that often contains preservatives, chemicals and sugar, coconut chips are clean. The recommended daily maintenance dose is 1 teaspoon per 10 lbs. of body weight given in divided doses. Start with a small amount and increase gradually. If your pet has been exposed to an infection, the dose may be doubled. For people, use a 1 tablespoon dosage 3 to 4 times a day, or apply topically as needed.

Editors Note: Cheryl Lasron is the holistic Pet Care Consultant at Down To Earth Nutrition located in Howard which has a wide variety of coconut and coconut oil products. Stop in and check out Here’s another favorite bag shaped our large assortment of supplements, like little T-bone steaks. You know which organic grocery and pet supplies. ones I mean. Mainly the same ingredients except I find a few extra offenders. Natural porterhouse steak “flavor”? What the heck is that? Think about it. If it were natural they wouldn’t have to add it. One of my favorite worst ingredients is in the little sticks that look like sausage links. It’s called Propylene Glycol. Did you know that’s in anti-freeze? Yes, anti-freeze! It is a carrier that makes things moist and pliable. Oh ya, onion extract is also in this one. Weren’t we all told by our vet to never give onion to a dog? Bottom line is that these companies aren’t in the business of caring about your animal’s health. Their only concern is the almighty dollar. Please learn to know ingredients. If in doubt you can always Google an ingredient or Google side effects of an ingredient. Some of these ingredients may cause seizures if you have an animal prone to that. Buy treats that are whole meats, pretty much corn, wheat and soy free, and preserved with Vitamin C (ascorbic acid), mixed tocopherols (vitamin E), and rosemary.

AQUARIUM MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE

STOCKING YOUR FRESHWATER AQUARIUM by Melissa Verner, The Betta Boutique, Appleton Pet Journal Contributor First and foremost, resist fully stocking your aquarium in one trip. Even if your tank has completed its nitrogen cycle and the beneficial bacteria in the aquarium has been established. Only add a maximum of two to three fish per week until your tank is stocked. Also keep in mind that the tank’s ecosystem will need to adjust to the increased waste produced by the new inhabitants and it is advisable to check your water a week after adding your new fish. Wondering how many fish to stock in your aquarium. A general rule is one inch of fish per gallon but you need to consider the adult size of the fish when stocking your aquarium. Making a list of all the fish that you have or want and looking, as well as, writing down there adult size will help you to not overstock your tank. Don’t forget that ornaments, gravel, equipment and plants you will be adding to the tank, will reduce the water volume. Also, keep in mind that fewer fish are always better than too many as overstocking can cause fish to turn hostile and aggressive toward each other. Fish can also have a tendency to overeat if competition for food is perceived. Overeating leads to an increase in waste that could become too much for even an efficient filter to process. A polluted environment causes damage to the fish’s gills and as a result, impairs its ability to breathe. This type of damage is irreversible. Illness and disease inevitably follows and may well result in death.

by Melissa Verner, Now you can freak out and clean out The Betta Boutique, Appleton your cupboard and get rid of all the chemical treats and start over. Happy Week 1: Ten percent water change, wipe down inside of tank with soft hunting. cloth Week 2: Gravel vac while doing a ten percent water change, it is okay Editors Note: Victoria Rabe is the if you do a little more. Rememowner of Victoria’s Pet Nutrition Center ber to take out all of your decoraand Boutique in downtown Fond Du Lac. tions before gravel vacuuming and Her store specializes in all natural foods, clean them as well. treats and supplements. Week 3: Ten percent water change, wipe down inside of thank with If you have a question for any of our soft cloth Holistic and Natural Columnists, please Week 4: Replace filter cartridge as well use the email address at the top of their as a ten percent water change When stocking your aquarium you respective columns or you can mail your need to keep fish compatibility in mind. letter to the Pet Journal mailbox (please By doing the four week schedule that Every fish has different characters and list an Attn: line with the columnist that we have laid out for you, will help you temperaments. The diverse characters you would like to answer your message: have a healthy clean tank. and temperaments of fish result in some species getting along well with certain Pet Journal types of fish and not at all with others. Attn: <insert columnists name> You need to do some research on the 3120 S Business Dr. compatibility of fish before stocking your Suite 270 aquarium. Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Did you know that there are three levels in the aquarium and by stocking all the levels your fish won’t need to compete for space. Plus, you’ll also enjoy the end result which is a visually appealing aquarium that is evenly filled with all sorts of different fish. Fish that live at the top level of the aquarium will add interest to an otherwise undecorated, bare space in the tank. Top dwelling fish generally have upturned mouths, designed for feeding at the water’s surface. When stocking the middle level, stock a mixture of schooling fish and larger colorful fish. The middle level is the most striking part of the aquarium. Bottom dwelling fish have down-turned mouths, enabling them to feed on those morsels of food that fall to the bottom of the tank. Bottom level fish help keep the substrate clean as they scour the bottom for food. Offer fast-sinking foods like shrimp pellets 3 times a week to ensure that these fish get enough to eat. Examples for each level are below: Top Level: Killie Fish, Gouramis, Bettas Middle Level: Silver Dollars, Neons, Rummy-nose tetras, Rainbow fish Bottom Level: Cory cats, Clown loaches, Shrimp, Crayfish, Frogs A successful freshwater aquarium is a properly planned aquarium. Consider the time you spend calculating, resolving compatibility issues and researching, an investment. Planning saves you money and effort in the long term, and ensures the lasting enjoyment you initially set out to achieve. HAPPY FISH KEEPING, Melissa

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PET JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2012

www.petjournalmidwest.com

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F EBRUARY 2012 SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY 1

THURSDAY 2 GROUNDHOG DAY Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, 4 pm - 7 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

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Open House and Meet and Greet at Amazing Grace Equine Sanctuary, 2 pm - 4 pm. W4985 County Rd FF, Elkhart Lake, WI. Just west of Hwy 57 on County Rd FF in northern Sheboygan Co. Two Left Paws at PetSmart, 4013 Hwy 28, Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm.

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Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, 4 pm - 7 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, 4 pm - 7 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

14 VALENTINES DAY 15

16

Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, 4 pm - 7 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, 4 pm - 7 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

20 PRESIDENTS DAY 21 MARDI GRAS

22 ASH WEDNESDAY 23

Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, 4 pm - 7 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

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FRIDAY 3 4 cont.

SATURDAY 4 Two Left Paws at Pet Supplies Plus, 1817 N 8th St., Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm.

Great Lakes Pet Expo, WisconsinExposition Center at State Fair Park, West Allis, 10 am - 5 pm. See ad on page 27.

Two Left Paws at Feed Bag, 10900 N Port Washington Rd., Mequon, 11 am - 3 pm.

10

11 Two Left Paws at PetSmart, 4013 Hwy 28, Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm. Two Left Paws at Memorial Mall, 3347 Kohler Memorial Dr., Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm.

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18 Two Left Paws at PetSmart, 4013 Hwy 28, Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm. Two Left Paws at PetCo, 4144 Harbor Town Ln., Manitowoc, 11 am - 3 pm.

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Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, 4 pm - 7 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

25 Sheboygan Co. Humane Society at Memorial Mall, 3347 Kohler Memorial Dr., Sheboygan, 11 am - 3 pm. 8th Annual Mardi Paws, 6 pm - 10:30 pm. See poster on page 24.

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27

28 Paws Awhile Boutique, 123 N Millitary Ave, Green Bay, 4 pm - 7 pm. Proceeds benefit the GB Animal Rescue.

29 LEAP DAY

March 4 Pins for Pups benefiting Furry Bottoms Rescue in Plymouth at Maple Lanes Bowling Alley in Sheboygan, 1:15 pm - ???. See ad on page 4.

Pet Journal provides this calendar as a service to the local community. If you have an event that you would like listed please email us at: events@petjournalmidwest.com, with the following information: date(s) and time(s) of event, your contact information, a short description of what will be happening, if it is a fundraiser please list who the proceeds are going to and please enter the subject as “PJ Calendar Submission.” Please send this to us no later than the 20th of the month for inclusion into the next months issue. All Events that appear on this page also appear on the Pet Journal website’s Events page, www.petjournalmidwest.com. Events will most likely be posted on the website before going into the printed edition. Thank you.


ET JOURNAL OURNAL PET

EBRUARY 2012 2012 FFEBRUARY

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ASK SCRAPPY! by Scrappy, the Lovable Pit Bull Pet Journal Columnist and Mascot askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com

Center for Avian Rehabilitation & Education, Inc. A 501 (c)(3) Non-Profit Exotic-Bird Organization

CARE’s mission is to provide for the needs of all exotic birds. This is done through advocacy, activism, educating the public about the needs of exotic birds, providing permanent housing for any exotic birds not able to live in a typical home enviroment (excluding birds with contagious diseases), and finding a loving, responsible, and permanent home for adoptable birds.

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MISTY, ASSISTANT WRITER OF ASK SCRAPPY!

SCRAPPY, PHOTO BY LEGACY STUDIOS

Hello everyone! It’s February and that means Valentine’s Day, the month of love and weird little flying humanoids with weapons. What is with people? They think it’s strange we sniff each other’s butts and they have this. Unbelievable! Well, I hope everyone enjoys this strange custom. As for me, I’ll just stick with the sniffing deal. The only aspect I really care for is the assortment of yummy treats that accompany this particular holiday. The candy, flower, and greeting card cartel must wield a vast amount of power since humans are obligated to buy from at least one of the categories, if not all three. That’s why dogs are superior to humans. We see a dog we like, we give them a “howdy”, sniff their butt, and it’s see ya’ later. Quick, sorta clean, and efficient. No exchange of dog bones, no “bark at ya’ later”, no “honey, I was hoping for a diamond, dinner out, and a pound of flesh”, no nothing. Though, the pound of flesh sounds kinda yummy.

I just like to keep them on edge and let them know who’s the boss of the yard. If I didn’t, they would take over and I’d end up having to pay them “insurance” so prevent any “accidents” when I’m out playing in the yard. The other problem is, I love to chase them. I really don’t intend on catching them, mostly because they’re so darn small and fast. I look at it as a form of exercise for myself and the bunnies. Lee, on the other hand, sees it another way. Especially, when I decide to chase them around the garage. When I’m outa sight, he goes outa his mind. The yelling and chasing me around the yard goes into full swing. Actually, watching Lee run around is kinda funny. Lee simply isn’t a track star. Though for this small bit of humor, I lose my delicious treat when I return to the house.

I FINALLY received my Christmas present. Yes, the long bemoaned bed. It’s not just any bed though, it’s hand-made by local Wisconsin artisans and of a color that blends well with its surroundings. It came from Furry Bottoms Rescue, so the money went to a great cause. Apparently, there was some debate over color. Lee was happy with the color selection, but my ghost writer was upset because he wanted military camo. He just has to remember, not everyone was in the army, though it comes to mind that, I am currently at war with the bunnies. Hmmm, now that I think about it, with the camo I could sleep outside near some bushes and not be seen by their recon and then when they least expect it, ATTACK! Actually, I wouldn’t hurt a hair on their sneaky little bunny heads,

It was suggested that Misty, Queen of Darkness, may receive a laser pointer for Christmas. This is an extremely bad idea. What the heck is my family thinking! They actually believe she’ll run around chasing a little red dot? Well, she may for a few minutes, for their benefit, and then when they’re asleep she’ll begin the modifications. Ever seen phasers on Star Trek? Do you really want that on your conscience? I know I sound a tad bit paranoid, but her favorite character on Family Guy is Stewie. Worse, she takes notes when the show is on. Her gifts should stay in the vein of squeaky mice or little sparkle balls. At least nothing that can be modified into a weapon of terror.

3053 Beechwood Industrial Ct. Suite 1 Hubertus, WI 53033

by Jessica Hagedorn, 10% of the proceeds go to CARE cntrforavianrehab@sbcglobal.net

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It’s in the contract my family received when they adopted me. According to my binding contractual agreement, I have to complain, bark at strange times (preferably when everyone is asleep. It’s a preventative measure for burglars to stay away.) , eat like a full grown pig, destroy toys, generally refuse any direct order (I’ve had training, that doesn’t mean I have to listen all the time), and be an absolutely terrific friend and companion. I think I’ve followed my rules pretty well. Well, that’s about it for this issue. With no questions to answer, I have to blather on like an idiot to fill space and complete my other contractual agreement. Wow, it seems like, for a dog, I have way too many contractual agreements. I need a lawyer to find some kind of loophole. I kinda tired of hearing “Scrappy, you put your paw mark on the contract, now get to work on your column or else”. The “or else” usually elicits a snicker from Misty. This makes me think she has something to do with it and that’s the most frightening of all.

www.centerforavianrehab.org

A SENIOR MOMENT... by Joel Gollhart, Furry Bottoms Rescue Pet Journal Contributor

I stood with my 9 year old trying to decide if I was doing the right thing. She was a sweet girl, but my life had changed and I really didn’t have time for her anymore. I have two younger kids at home now that take up a lot of my time. I figure there must be another family who will adopt her. After all, there really isn’t anything wrong with her, she’s just old… While the above story may be a work of fiction, it speaks to an issue I see all too often. Most parents would be disgusted to think of someone getting rid of their child because they “don’t have time” or are “too old.” Yet, as a rescuer, I see and hear of families relinquishing their pets all the time for those very reasons. It is not my intention to judge anyone who relinquishes a pet. There are many legitimate and understandable reasons to do so. That is why rescues like Furry Bottoms Rescue, which I volunteer for, exist; to help homeless animals find the homes they deserve. That said; I would love nothing more than to not have to be needed in the first place.

Hope all my friends have a safe and fun February and Valentine’s Day. Enjoy all your yummy treats and candy. Always remember, as mentioned so many times in Pet Journal, the treats and candy (especially chocolate!) are for my two legged friends only. The last thing we I know that making the decision to reneed is chocolate and sugar, we already linquish a dog is not an easy one. I’ve get enough in some of our food. Oww, been there when it is done and it is not Enough of my mental breakdown and burn! something I wish on anyone. It is the on to happier things. I hope everyone senior dogs that frustrate me the most, Until next month, is looking forward to spring as much as though. I am. It’s only February, but a dog can dream. I know this will mean more bunsee REATS on page 7. nies, but it’s a small price to pay for all that green grass to play on and longer walks. I always get depressed when I Editor Note: Scrappy loves to get mail hear the weather report. It seems like the weather people like to make every- and questions from his readers, please thing sound like we’re expecting a level email him at askscrappy@petjournalmid10 kill storm. Then everyone flips out, west.com or by mail: Pet Journal buys enough bread, water, and toilet paAttn: Ask Scrappy! per to last a decade. With those sup3120 S Business Dr. plies, it’s like their setting up a Russian Suite 270 gulag or something. Who could live on Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 that, certainly not this dog. As expected, the next day, nothing. Maybe a little snow, and that’s it. Then people around the house act as though they missed certain death and we have more bottled water than an emaciated starlet or Misty. Considering the look and attitude, it’s the same thing. I do understand that we will have more snow and general horrible weather before it’s finally over, I just want it to be over now. Besides, I have to complain.

Scrappy

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PET JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2012

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EVERYDAY IS A VALENTINES DAY WHEN YOU HAVE FERRETS by Sue Holme, Ferret Underground and Ferradise, Madison Pet Journal Contributor If you share your home with one or multiple ferrets, you have witnessed ferret love. Usually, single ferrets bond with their human companion, and those that live in a bonded group, have each other for companionship. As a family group that eats sleeps and plays together, significant relationships are created and built. Ferret groups, like our own families, are made up of similar dynamics. There are the alpha people and those that follow the alpha. Mom and Pop, hopefully are the alphas, and the children form the followers. Each group will have a male or female that tends to rule the roost, so to speak.

Yes, they were all Hostess products. Each was really friendly and eager to be out of their cage. As the shelter director told me about them, he mentioned that the group was initially six. The other portion of the group, SuzyQ, Snoball and Zinger were also available for adoption. The first group had a couple ferrets with health issues and they were of concern to me. The director and I made a deal, if I took the first group, and if the second group was still at the shelter in a month, they would also come home with me. I thought sure that Suzy and her buddies would be gone in a flash. They were absolutely beautiful ferrets.

We have shared our home with ferrets for the past 15 years and we have seen the gamut of ferret love. The friendships can be formed from the first play session or the initial contact can end in a knock out, drag out, altercation. As with an early friendship, there can be some rough times. Patience is the rule with ferret introductions. Small doses of each other is a good start. With most ferret squabbles, the rule is “no blood – no foul”. Be careful if one of the play sessions gets out of control.

Time passed and we were not able to get our group together to make the Chicago trip for almost two months. When we got to the shelter, the director was meeting us at the door with the Suzy and her friends. A promise is a promise and they came home with me that day. I honestly couldn’t believe that they would be passed up.

Don’t put your hands in between two fighting ferrets. Usually, an added distraction will move their attention from WWF Smackdown, to something a little calmer. The distraction can be as simple as a spray bottle with water, a blanket tossed over them, a loud clap of the hands, or just tossing a rattling toy. Once you get past the “getting to know each other squabbles” things will level out. They might not be sleeping together for a while, but coexisting is a step in the right direction. They just need time to figure out who is the alpha and who will follow.

When I brought the three other Snackcake kids into the ferret room, Twinkie, Cupcake and Dingdong immediately went on high alert. All three of them were biting at the bars to be let out. It was amazing and so touching for me to see their leaps of joy and the absolute happiness at the reunion. Each remembered the others and it was a scene that I will always remember fondly. Bonds and ties are not easily broken. I think that another of our most beautiful examples of ferret love came in the form of grief at the passing of a dear partner.

Roosevelt and Carter were two very bonded buddies that were relinquished to our shelter due to a health problem. Carter had an abscess on the side of his Quite a few years ago, before our shel- face and the previous owner wasn’t fiter formed, several of my friends and I nancially able to handle the care necesvolunteered with one of the Chicago sary. ferret rescues. We would gather much needed supplies, cage bedding and drive The abscess on Carter’s cheek was down for the day. It was on one of those very troublesome and despite all the trips that this story began. As we were antibiotics, surgeries and flushing, the going through the cages at the shelter, a infection traveled into Carter’s jawbone. group of ferrets caught my eye. There were three little bedraggled ferrets with see ERRET on page 21. the names of Cupcake, Twinkie and Dingdong.

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ASK THE ALPHA DOG by Tamara Pool, 4-Paws Private Training, Sheboygan Pet Journal Columnist alpha-dog@petjournalmidwest.com Did you ever wonder what a dog was thinking when you approached to say “hello”? This is something that most people who greet a dog on the street or in someone’s home never think about. Although, not thinking about it could prove to be dangerous. A student of mine approached me with this question this week and I felt the need to address it here.

They are only thinking of you and keeping your dog from feeding on their unsteady emotions. On to the question for the month: Dear Alpha Dog, I adopted a 6 year old Shorkie in May 2011. I was told she wasn’t housebroken but she’s only had a couple accidents in the house. She goes for walks and does her business, however I can’t just put her out and have her potty. With the weather the way it is, I can’t get out to walk her very often. How do I get her to do her business outside without the walk?

If you are walking up to dogs and greeting without knowing the dog or the owner or both, you should first stop and think about what this dog may be like. Ask the owner first before initiating any greeting. Just simply ask if you can say hi. Most dog owners would be happy to have you greet their dog. If they give Sincerely, you a set of rules to follow while greetGeraldine, Fond Du Lac ing, listen and follow those rules verbatim. They aren’t in place to make you Dear Geraldine, afraid of the dog; they are simply there Trying to get a dog to do their business because something happened to this outside can be tricky. Especially because dog in the past that made them neces- this is a small dog and the weather is sary. cold. First, you’ll have to accompany her out in your yard on a shorter leash (not Whenever you are greeting a dog… the tie out). You have to catch her goANY DOG…you need to be aware of your ing potty and say “potty,” then say “good hands. Some owners will request that girl” and give a small treat. When she you leave your hands at your sides while poo’s, you should say “poo,” then say the dog sniffs you. In this case it is bet- “good girl” and give a small treat. Make ter to not look at the dog while they are sure you are catching her in the act. If sniffing. If you reach your hand out for the cue word comes after she is done, it a dog to sniff it, always have your PALM won’t be effective. Eventually, she will DOWN. The dog should smell the back realize that when you say the cue words, of your hand. This is a widely miss com- she should do her business. Make sure municated gesture. From what I hear, you are very consistent with the use of even our own Humane Society teaches the cues and the rewards. kids to put their hands out palm up. If a What we are doing is creating a pairdog has ever been frightened by someone hitting them, they could revert back ing between the words and the actions. to self-preservation mode and nip at Consider Pavlov’s dog for example. your hand to fend you off if your hand is When you notice that she is going on palm up. In addition, remove your hood cue, you can start putting her on the tie or hat if you are in the house of the dog. out and saying the cues from the doorThis way the dog can see your features way. Be sure to continue with the “good and get a better understanding of who girl” and treats when she complies with you are. Some dogs view a hood as a your wishes. I wish there was a quick way to do this, however, this isn’t the threat. type of command that you can use a Once a dog has sniffed the back of lure, like “sit” or “down.” It’s just a matyour hand, you can slowly put your hand ter of catching her in the act. Don’t let up around the side of the dog’s face. her walk all over you. Even though it’s Never reach over the top of the dog’s cold out, she should stay out until she’s head. Many dogs are fearful of hands done her duty. And remember…Be the going over the top of their heads. Be Alpha Dog. aware that if a dog sniffs you and backs Sincerely, away afterward, don’t reach out for Alpha Dog them. Once a dog is comfortable with you, Editors Note: Alpha Dog, Tamara welyou can just enjoy your new friend. But please remember that if you’re at all comes your questions on pet training, uneasy around a dog don’t be afraid to please email her at the email above or cross the street, or simply ask the own- by mail: Pet Journal er to remove the dog to another room Attn: Alpha Dog while you’re there. And…to all you dog 3120 S Business Dr. owners out there…don’t be offended if Suite 270 a guest asks you to remove your furry Sheboygan, WI 53081-4818 family member.


PET JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2012 11

PETS AVAILABLE FOR ADOPTION AT AREA RESCUES AND SHELTERS

Meet Milo a Large sweet male cat. Vaccinated & neutered. He tested positive for feline leukemia but is in excellent health otherwise, he just needs to go to a home without other cats or with another feline leukemia positive cat. Please consider opening your home to this darling boy, he needs a gentle home and will make a wonderful companion. Milo is with the Green Bay Animal Rescue. Rescued animals need loving homes. Call 920-544-1141 http:// greenbayanimalrescue.weebly.com/

Kringle “ain’t nothing but a hound dog” looking for some love and FUN! This 5-year-old boy has quickly wriggled his way into all our hearts here with his charm, good-nature, and silly antics! He is a typical “nose-to-the-ground” hound dog and can not be let off leash at his new home as he will go exploring. He sure loves walks and romps in fenced in areas or on leash though!! Kringle’s new home could include children of all ages and cats. No dogs in his new home please. Come is Kringle at the Washington County Humane Society in Slinger, WI.

This is Mikey, he is a Sudan Plated Lizard. In May, Mikey was rescued from living in a cat carrier inside a vehicle. He was underweight and cold. Now, he is healthy, strong, has a great appetite and charming. He does well in a variety of settings and in currently in a foster home. He is under UVA/UVB lighting during the day and also basks in the sunlight coming through the window. While not accustomed to being held, on occasions that he is, he tolerates it well. For example, when he is removed so that we can clean his cage. Can you find a spot in your home and heart for Mikey? Contact Deb @ EWHSR for details on adopting. EWHSR, PO Box 245, Plymouth, WI 53073, (920) 207-5642, deb@easternwiherps.com.

Meet Bandit! Chained outside by himself for nearly the full 6 years of his life, he is now available to be adopted into a loving indoor home. Lab/Rottweiler mix. Fully vetted to include neuter& vaccinations. We can’t say enough about how wonderful this boy’s temperament is. Bandit is with the Green Bay Animal Rescue. Rescued animals need loving homes. Call 920-544-1141 http:// greenbayanimalrescue.weebly.com/

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Violet is a beautiful female 1-yr-old lab/ border collie mix. She loves to run, play and explore. She is also a snuggler. Violet knows how to sit and is ready to learn more commands and tricks. This fun-loving dog will fit perfectly into your active lifestyle. She is spayed and up to date with routine shots. Meet Violet at the Neenah Animal Shelter, 951 County Road G, Neenah. 920-722-9544 www. neenahanimalshelter.com

Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue PO Box 245 Plymouth, WI 53073 920 207-5642 easternwiherps.com

This sweet girl is Kanga. She came to Saving Paws Animal Rescue because her family was in a fire and lost their home. Completely unrelated to the fire, she has no tail. Her balance is just fine though. She is a big fan of love from people, being pampered, and napping in the sunshine. Come and meet Kanga and let her te ll you all about her day! If you are interested in meeting Kanga, please contact us at (920) 830-2392 or email info@ savingpaws.com.

Meet Rymes, he is a lab mix that is around 9 years old. Rymes came to Saving Paws because he was left at his owner’s friend’s house and never picked up after their vacation. He is very friendly, obedient, and likes to go for car rides and walks! Rymes is housetrained and knows his basic commands. He is wonderful with cats, dogs and children and does very well being home alone loose in the house. He is really hoping to find his forever home, don’t let his age discourage you to giving him his dream. If you are interested in meeting Rymes, please contact us at (920)470-PAWS (7297) or email dogs@savingpaws.com.

Ready to relax with Ronald? This sweet and gentle 5-year-old male Domestic Shorthair cat is ready to make your home his for the holidays! Looking for a steady companion through life? Ronald enjoys a quiet and relaxed life where you and he can enjoy the finer things in life. He loves to sit on his kitty condo, or watch the snow fall out the window. His beautiful red coat and loving personality are sure to capture your heart! For more information on Ronald, or any of our other feline companions available for adoption at the Wisconsin Humane Society Ozaukee Campus, please visit www.ozaukeehumane.org, or call (262)377-7580.

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FEBRUARY 2012

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ECO NEWS A STATE FOR STURGEON RESTORING AN ANCIENT FISH SPECIES TO ITS ANCESTRAL WATERS. Care is taken to protect lake sturgeon during their spring spawning season. © Wisconsin DNR

by Lisa Gaumnitz Reprint from Wisconsin Natural Resources Magazine

Harvesting just 5 percent of an adult Radio transmitters surgically implanted population is regarded as safe, com- into hundreds of fish revealed that fish SUPERIOR – The inch-long lake stur- pared to the 35 percent typical for wall- move out of Lake Winnebago in the fall geon are not much to look at – all head eye and other shorter-lived species. and into the rivers where they’ll make and bulbous eyes – but they are small their spawning runs the next spring. wonders. “It’s a good time to be a sturgeon in Those findings helped propel a 60-inch Wisconsin,” says Ron Bruch, a DNR fish minimum length limit for the hook-and Scooped up in a fine mesh net in July supervisor, lead sturgeon scientist on the line-season statewide and a shortened 2011 on the St. Louis River forming the Winnebago system for the last 20 years, season to protect potential spawners. Wisconsin-Minnesota border, the fish and co-leader of the agency’s sturgeon are the first documented offspring of team. New techniques of aging fish revealed lake sturgeon stocked in the 1980s and that the longtime practice of count1990s by the two states. “We have the information, the pub- ing rings on fish fin bones consistently lic interest and understanding, and the underestimated true age by as much The four sturgeon followed nature’s agency commitment to managing resto- as 10 to 30 years. So now DNR bioloclock and beat cruel odds to wind up in ration but also maintaining local fisheries gists apply a correction factor in their the net. Female sturgeon don’t repro- to keep public interest and support high. calculations, allowing them to continue duce until they are in their 20s or 30s, That’s what’s needed to see the fruition using fin bones to age fish and to draw spawn only every three to five years, 30 years down the road of efforts to re- on older information gleaned that way. and lay up to 500,000 eggs at a time, store the population and allow local fish- That’s particularly important because only eight to 12 of which will make it eries to develop.” the newer technique, counting rings in through their first growing season. the fish’s ear bone, or otolith, requires killing the fish. It’s good to be a sturgeon “There are many more years ahead in Wisconsin before we know if these young sturgeon can survive, reproduce and help build a The state has long been regarded as self-sustaining population,” says Peter a national and international leader in Stevens, Wisconsin DNR’s fish supervi- sturgeon protection, restoration and resor in Bayfield. “But this is a monumen- search, a reputation built since Wiscontal first step. So many people worked so sin started regulating sturgeon harvest hard a long time to get us to this day.” on the Winnebago system in 1903.

A young sturgeon that was previously injected with a PIT, is scanned to determine its ID number. © Wisconsin DNR

count in waters where sturgeon populations are low. “Males make a sound when they spawn to attract females that sounds like a grouse drumming,” Bruch says. University of Wisconsin – Madison audiotechnicians have analyzed that sound and the Department of Natural Resources hopes to be able to use acoustic equipment to listen for spawning fish and document spawning activity without seeing the fish. This technology would have widespread application for documenting successful spawning activity, especially in small recovering populations. That recent research is now driving efforts to update Wisconsin’s statewide sturgeon management plan, says Karl Scheidegger, who co-leads DNR’s sturgeonT team with Bruch. “It’s a total overhaul (of the previous plan) because the information we gained in the last 10 years is so amazing.”

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“Where the old plan was a bit of pie in the sky – this is what we’d like to do – the new plan is more practical. This will give our biologists and other states a lot of good information on the best stockA fish manager inject a PIT id tag into a It’s hard not to get excited about this ing, assessment, evaluation and other “You ladies and gents have done such young sturgeon. discovery, or about efforts elsewhere in a good job that you’re helping other methods to use.” © Wisconsin DNR Wisconsin to restore this ancient species states restore their populations,” says to its ancestral waters. The Department of Natural Resources Individual electronic microchips called Ed Scott, a volunteer from the Tenneshas made other changes that are benPIT tags are injected with a needle into see Valley Authority who came to Lake While other states’ sturgeon stocks Winnebago last spring as part of a multi- fish DNR collects during surveys, a pro- efitting sturgeon, and ultimately andwindle, the state supports in Lake Win- state and federal effort to collect eggs to cess that eliminates the loss of tags that glers. The statewide 60-inch minimum nebago the world’s largest self-sustaining jump start their reintroduction programs. used to occur with traditional external limit and shorter hook-and-line season population of lake sturgeon and a unique “It wouldn’t be possible otherwise.” tags. These tags, the same microchip has helped protect potential spawning winter spear fishery; offers a hook-andtechnology people now use to perma- adults. Harvest has dropped from about line season on major inland waters with The research and leadership coming nently mark their dogs and cats, carry 225 fish statewide every year to onesmall but stable populations; and, as on out of Wisconsin has only grown in the individual numbers, and when the fish tenth that level. the St. Louis River, works to rebuild stur- last decade as the Winnebago system are subsequently caught during DNR geon populations from scratch on other gained a dedicated and growing funding surveys, staff can run a scanner over The Wild Rose State Fish Hatchery waters. renovations have greatly increased the the fi sh to detect its number. The inforsource. State law now directs sturgeon mation gathered through this modern capacity for restoration through stocking spearing license fees back to the WinSeveral factors mesh to make the 21st nebago system. Conservation groups tagging technique allows DNR to more using artificial propagation techniques century one of the most promising for like Sturgeon for Tomorrow and Shad- easily and accurately track individual fish developed in the late 1970s in Wisconsin a species that’s been cruising Wiscon- ows on the Wolf have also poured in and their age, key information to calcu- by the Department of Natural Resources sin waters for tens of millions of years money and labor, leading to an informa- late growth, mortality and exploitation and Fred Binkowski of the University of and whose continued existence depends tion explosion. rates, and other vital information for Wisconsin-Milwaukee WATER Institute. on humans successfully managing their sound management. Streamside rearing facilities along the populations within razor thin margins. Kewaunee and Milwaukee rivers are “Although the sturgeon research we helping supply sturgeon for those areas do on Winnebago addresses an impor- and, biologists hope, will help the fish tant management question in the sys- imprint to their native waters so they will tem, we try to design our studies to give one day return to spawn there. insight into sturgeon population dynamics in fisheries elsewhere in the state,” Plans are underway to help sturgeon Bruch says. get over dams on the Lower Wisconsin River and the Menominee River to allow A new project with a University of Wis- sturgeon to reach potential spawning Keeping pets at home by providing food assistance for animals. consin- Milwaukee Freshwater Institute grounds. geneticist seeks to develop a test that will determine sturgeon sex and age by “Ultimately, the goal of all the sturlooking for DNA protein sequences in fl ugeon restoration work in Wisconsin and We are here to help those who may of lost ids in the fi sh. Now, it’s very diffi cult to the Great Lakes is to produce viable their job, have poor health, or are shut-in. determine that information except when fi sheries,” Bruch says. “We’re very posiOur economy has forced many to surrender the fi sh are spawning or after they’ve tive that will happen. We just have to their companions because they can’t afford been harvested and cut to have their inhave the commitment and patience over to feed or get them proper health care. ternal organs examined. time.” Bus: 920-428-PETS (7387) Toll Free: 888-924-2333 E-mail: petsathome@yahoo.com

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Another new project seeks to use the sound male sturgeon make during spawning season to get a more accurate

see STURGEON on page 15.


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WHERE ARE THE ELEPHANTS? by Angela Kawski, Education Coordinator, NEW Zoo Pet Journal Contributor I often hear people visiting the NEW NEW Zoo have the necessary resources Zoo ask about “new” animals. Will we to support and provide for the profesever have tigers on display? Will the sional care and management of the spezoo ever have elephants? But, the real cies, so that the physical, social, and answer to these questions lies in the psychological needs of the individual answer to another very important ques- animal and the species are met?” It tion: “How does the zoo choose to add is imperative that the NEW Zoo is able animals to the collection?” You might to give the animal the care and quality not realize it, but the truth is that there of life that it deserves. When we can’t is a lot of thought and time that goes meet the animal’s basic needs, then we into what we call the “Animal Acquisi- must pass on adding that individual to tion” process. Allow me to explain… our collection. For example, while an elephant would Firstly, all animal acquisitions must certainly bring people to the zoo and promeet the requirements of all applicable vide us with numerous opportunities for local, state, federal, and international education, conservation, and research, regulations and laws. The zoo only ac- it would not be a good idea to house quires new animals when it is fully legal an elephant here. Not only do they refor us to do so; if a new permit needs to quire a LOT of space, but they must live be secured, for example, before a par- in groups to meet their social needs – ticular animal can be housed with us, which means you can’t just bring in one then that is definitely something that is elephant. You would need to add two taken into consideration. It’s important or more to the collection, which would to point out that we also take into con- require even more than “a lot” of space. sideration the legality of the source (i.e. Elephants also often have a hard time other zoo, breeding facility, etc.) from living in cold climates with harsh winters, which a particular animal might come. so Wisconsin is not ideal for them. Not The zoo only accepts animals that come only would they need a large amount of from organizations that operate legally outdoor space, but the zoo would also and in a manner that reflects the intent have to provide a very large indoor facilof the Association of Zoos and Aquari- ity for them to spend their winters. Eleums (AZA) Code of Professional Ethics. phants are also extremely intelligent and In other words, the NEW Zoo only works potentially dangerous animals. They rewith reputable organizations that breed, quire a great deal of attention and trainraise, and maintain their own animal col- ing, which means that additional staff lections very responsibly. would need to be hired to help care for them.

It seemed pretty obvious to us that Buster was happy to know Tammi, thanks to his SSP. Once we are certain it is legal for the zoo to have a new individual or species, we consider whether or not the animal in question would help to support the NEW Zoo’s goals of exhibition, education, conservation, and research. We ask ourselves a few questions. Will the animal bring people to the zoo to see it? Will the animal provide us with teaching and education opportunities to share with the public? Is the animal threatened or endangered, and can we work to somehow help protect the species? Animals with Species Survival Plans, or SSP’s, are given priority. We work with SSP coordinators and propagation groups in efforts to acquire these species when we know we can do beneficial work with them. For example, Tammi the snow leopard was brought to the NEW Zoo because the Snow Leopard SSP recommended that she breed and produce young with our resident male snow leopard, Buster. It is considered a violation in the AZA Code of Professional Ethics to circumvent AZA conservation programs in the acquisition of SSP animals, so we are very careful to abide by all of the correct policies and procedures regarding these species. If an animal meets all of those requirements, then we ask what is perhaps the most important question: “Does the

You can probably see how the “benefits” of having elephants at the NEW Zoo do not outweigh the “costs.” That is why elephants are not a part of the NEW Zoo’s proposed “Master Plan,” which outlines the intended animal acquisitions the zoo hopes to make over the next 10 to 15 years or so. You can view the plan yourself next time you visit the zoo. It is outlined on a large billboard display near the Japanese Macaque exhibit. Keep in mind, though, that before many of the new animals included in the plan can be brought to the zoo, funds will have to be raised, exhibits will have to be built, and quite a few other things will have to happen. The Master Plan does change, and updates are made to it as time goes on. But taking a look at the plan will still give you an idea of what the NEW Zoo may be like in the future. While you won’t find elephants on the list, you might just be pleasantly surprised – and excited! – by some of the other species that will hopefully one day be a part of our collection.

AVANI THE NEW SANCTUARY COUGAR by Kim Diedrich, Chief Naturalist, Bay Beach Wildlife Sancutary Pet Journal Contributor In July of 2010, the Wildlife Sanctuary said good-bye to one of our dear friends, “Dago” our exhibit cougar. Dago had been an illegal pet, who was then confiscated and came to live at the Sanctuary in 1992. Thousands of visitors loved to see him lying in his hammock, playing with his boat buoys and watching him from his stately, heated rock. He lived a great life until his passing at the elderly age of 18. It was hard to see him go, as it is with any of our sanctuary animal family. We knew we would eventually like to help another non-releasable cougar by providing them a home.

Dago in his hammock. Our cougar exhibit had been missing a cat from July 2010 until December of 2011. In September 2011 an orphaned, 6 month old female cougar kitten arrived. In a lot of respects, working with “wild” animal babies is a lot like working with domestic animal babies; they all need food, a safe place to be and lots of patience! It was also decided that we would have a “Name the Cougar” contest. (Calling an animal by name is nicer for training purposes, instead of always saying “good kitty”). The name “Avani” was chosen from over 300 entries.

Ok, we have a new cougar, with a name, and the vet check is done; now it was time for the fun to begin! And fun it was. Being that Avani and her 2 siblings were wild raised by their mom until they became orphaned at 6 months presented a few challenges that we hadn’t experienced with Dago. Dago was front declawed, younger and had already heavily imprinted on humans before arriving at the Sanctuary. Avani is fully clawed, still leery of people and very stubborn. When acclimating an animal to new surroundings, you never know what is going to happen. A lot of time is spent behind the scenes helping the animal adjust and learn new routines. Staff spends time talking to Avani and doing some target training with her – things that will be useful as she continues to grow. And grow she does! She is now over 9 months old and weighs over 60 pounds! Avani has been moved up to our Woodland building and has spent some limited time out in her exhibit. Her behind the scenes training continues and we invite you all to come visit and see her out in her permanent exhibit in a few weeks.

Avani looking out of the cave in her exhibit.


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CHILLI COOK-OFF AT ROUTE 43 HARLEY DAVIDSON OF SHEBOYGAN HONORS FURRY BOTTOMS RESCUE by Linda Ledbeter, Furry Bottoms Rescue Pet Journal Contributor January 14, 2012 the 8th annual Chili Cook Off at Route 43 Harley-Davidson was a huge success. Eighteen different chilis were entered ranging from the traditional to the exotic. The Tai Chili was to die for! Local businesses helped supply large raffle baskets filled to capacity that covered two 6 foot long tables. Several of the Furry Bottoms Rescue alumni names were drawn as winners.

Chili Cook Off Winners: First place, Mike Schroeder of Sheboygan Second place, Roman Draughon of Sheboygan. People from surrounding counties came out not only to taste the amazing chefs creations, but also to meet dogs who need homes. Adults joined the children on the floor enjoying the company of the dogs who came out to play and interact with animal lovers. Samm (not yet on the website) a 2 year old female hound mix, stole the hearts of many with her story but most of all her gentle personality. As much as Samm enjoys the company of people she is especially gentle with children even with a broken tail.

With the help of Route 43 Harley-Davidson and their supporters, last week Samm underwent surgery to remove her severely broken tail. She is recovering and expected to fully enjoy life.

EVERY DROP COUNTS. by Shaili Pfeiffer Reprint from Wisconsin Natural Resources Magazine

Celebrate Fix a Leak Week by checking your home fixtures for leaks.

With the passing of Act 90 in the Wisconsin Puppy Mill Bill, which took effect June 1, 2011, animal shelters must provide a certificate of inspection verifying every dog being adopted has received a medical examination from a licensed veterinarian. The exam must be repeated every 30 days if the dog remains at the facility longer. Costs for an initial exam can run upwards of $30 per dog at offsite clinics. In addition to the cost for CVI’s, there is the added cost of additional staff and time to make sure all information is recorded properly. Despite the added expenses, the required exam offers peace of mind to both staff and potential adopters that the pets are healthy.

In a recent poll taken by AP-Petside. com, conducted Oct. 13-17, thirty-six percent of those polled said if they were to adopt an animal from a shelter, they would be extremely or very concerned that the pet might have hidden medical problems. By being able to give adopters a certificate showing pets have been examined by a licensed veterinarian and have been deemed healthy, the Oshkosh Area Humane Society hopes it will change the negative perception Photos: Left: Route 43 Harley Davidson store some people have about the health and well-being of shelter pets. Hopefully, front the overall effect of having Certificates Above: James Patt with Samm of Veterinarian Inspection for every dog Below: Max will help to increase adoptions from shelters. Act 90 is all about doing what is in the best interest of dogs and puts their needs and health first. After all, isn’t that how it should be? We at FBR, want to thank everyone at Route 43 Harley-Davidson of Sheboygan for your support and huge hearts. With the support of local business, and community such as yourselves, we can continue in our endeavors helping “One dog at a time.” We felt you had laid out a Red Carpet for us, and so, we salute you for a top notch fundraiser.

FIX A LEAK WEEK

Check. Twist. Replace.

ACT 90 from page 1.

Twist and tighten pipe connections.

To save more water without a noticeable difference in flow, twist on a WaterWinter months are the prime time to SenseSM-labeled faucet aerator. check water use and see if you may have a leak in your home plumbing system. Replace the fixture if necessary. If a family of four exceeds 12,000 gallons per month in the winter, you Look for WaterSenseSM-labeled modprobably have leaks! Those leaks are els, which are independently tested and costing you money and wasting water certified to use 20 percent less water resources. and perform as well as or better than standard models. To help save water for future generations, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is asking consumers © 2011, Wisconsin Natural Resources to check, twist and replace: magazine, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 7921, Madison, Check for leaks. WI 53707. Reprinted with permission. Become part of the Wisconsin Natural Look for dripping faucets, shower- Resources family of readers and receive heads and fixture connections. Also six beautiful issues for only $8.97 a year. check for toilets with silent leaks by put- Call 1-800-678-9472 toll free ting a few drops of food coloring into the tank and seeing if it appears in the bowl Photo: Mostl leakly showerheads can before you flush. Don’t forget to check be fixed using pipe tape and a wrench. irrigation systems and spigots, too. © Thomas Senatori

Formerly, Furry Bottoms Rescue operated out of the homes of its Officers of the Board. Records were housed with individuals based on the duties they performed for the organization. In preparation for the enactment of the new law, Furry Bottoms now rents a business office at 435 East Mill Street in Plymouth. This allowed for the consolidation of records needed to meet the ease of access requirement of the new law. There are other additional costs associated with law, as well. The license itself requires a fee based upon the type of facility and the number of dogs it harbors on a yearly basis. The fee ranges from $125 to $1000, but since Furry Bottoms Rescue is a non-profit organization, it is charged a flat fee of $125. The biggest expense to the organization is that each dog adopted for a fee now needs to have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) prior to adoption. Since its creation, Furry Bottoms Rescue had established high standards of care for the dogs in its program. All dogs received veterinary checks, vaccinations, spays or neuters and any other medical care needed to give them the best life possible. Prior to the law, CVIs were required only when dogs crossed state lines. Now, they are also required every time a dog is sold.

The CVIs add anywhere from 15 to 60 dollars, depending on the vet utilized. In many cases, it also means an extra trip to the vet, leading to additional travel expenses and time for the foster homes and transporters. To compensate for the additional cost, Furry Bottoms Rescue chose to adjust its adoption fees so that it may continue to rescue, rehabilitate Next we hear from Joel Gallhart of and re-home dogs. Furry Bottoms Rescue in Plymouth, WI. Despite the additional costs, Furry Bottoms Rescue remains committed to Act 90: The Impact on One giving dogs a second chance. Like many Local Rescue reputable rescue organizations, it strives Eight months since June 2011, when to give each animal the best care posthe administrative rules went into effect sible. The standards of care outlined for Wisconsin Act 90, the new law con- by Act 90 establish a baseline that was tinues to cause controversy. Wisconsin already well-exceeded by the organizaAct 90, often referred to as “The Puppy tion. Mill Law,” is enforced by the Wisconsin Some organizations chose to reduce Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP.) It was the number of dogs or shut down comestablished as a means to assure that pletely in order to avoid the need for a dogs are treated humanely and consum- license. Since Furry Bottoms Rescue has its 501c3 status, allowing contributions ers receive healthy animals. to the organization to be tax deductible As a non-profit Rescue that cares for for the donor, the generosity of donors at least 25 dogs a year, Furry Bottoms and adopters have kept the organization Rescue, based in Plymouth, meets the in strong financial standing. As a 100% criteria as one of the organizations that volunteer organization with no paid emmust be licensed. Currently, Furry Bot- ployees, all funds go directly to support toms Rescue has a conditional license the program. This, in addition to the and is still awaiting inspection. A count dedication of its volunteers, allows them on the DATCP website shows over 320 to continue to operate. breeders, dealers, shelters, rescues and While controversy may remain, Furry animal control facilities have acquired licenses. Nearly forty percent still need to Bottoms Rescue, and many organizations like it, adapt to the new laws to be inspected. continue with their mission. At the heart Since Furry Bottoms Rescue uses a of it, little has changed. There are still network of foster homes to care for the dogs in need of homes and homes in dogs it takes in, it does not have a shel- search of dogs. For Furry Bottoms Rester facility that will need to be inspected. cue, they will continue to save as many Foster homes are considered home cus- dogs as they can and give them a chance tody providers under the new law, and at a life of love and happiness… one dog will not need to be licensed, but may be at a time. subject to inspection. Without a facility For more information regarding Act to inspect, the initial inspection of Furry 90, check out the “Animals” tab at: Bottoms Rescue will be focused on the http://datcp.wi.gov. dog records.

see DOG SELLER on page 24.


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and fish as large as 59 inches, Schram In 2005, anglers harvested 75 stursays. Until this year, however, no off- geon below the dam – 26 percent of the estimated population, and well over Three waters – the St. Louis River, the spring were found there. the safe level. Since the 60-inch miniLower Wisconsin River, and the WinBiologists with the Fond du Lac Band mum length limit and the shorter season nebago system – represent the different status of sturgeon populations in the of Lake Superior Chippewa found the started in 2006, harvest of large fish has state, how the Department of Natural four inch-long survivors while sampling dropped to just under eight sturgeon, for a 4.8 percent harvest rate. Resources and partners are using the for such tiny, larval fish. new information to maintain or build Wisconsin and Minnesota will continue They set four gill nets below the Prairie populations, and some of their key chalmonitoring in the river and Lake Supe- du Sac dam and, 90 minutes later, check lenges. rior to follow abundance of naturally them with Kate Strom Hiorns, a fisheries produced fish. Schram says that the cur- analyst from Madison recruited to help Starting from scratch on the St. rent no-kill regulation on the St. Louis out that day. Hand over hand they haul Louis River will likely remain in effect until successful in the nets, carefully remove fish caught Lake sturgeon originally inhabited the reproduction by parents produced natu- in the widely spaced mesh and place them in an aerated tank until they can St. Louis River in western Lake Superior, rally is documented. reset the nets and motor back to shore but the population disappeared, along Schram calls the discovery of the to process the fish. with other species, during the early 1900s due to overharvest, water pol- young sturgeon “wonderful news” but There, they lift a sturgeon out of the lution and habitat changes, says Steve cautions against declaring victory. “We Schram, a retired DNR fisheries super- need to keep in mind it’s just another tank, hold it down along a measuring visor stationed in Bayfield and a driving step in the long process of rehabilitating board on the floor to check its length, force behind restoring lake sturgeon to a degraded river system and managing a run a microchip reader over the fish to long-lived species,” he says. “So we need detect an electronic tag, and then put the St. Louis River. to keep the Clean Water Act intact and the fish in a net. Rennicke hoists it onto Starting in the 1970s, federal Clean continue to educate the public about the a hanging scale and Fuller records the Water Act regulations forced wastewater value of clean water and the value of a information. Rennicke gently returns the sturgeon to the water. dischargers to meet tougher standards healthy St. Louis River ecosystem.” and poured money into upgrading mu“One of the biggest challenges is trying nicipal treatment plants. The Western to define what the entire Lower WisconLake Superior Sanitary District went onsin River population is,” says Rennicke. line in 1979 and water quality improved “It’s a continuous process of building up significantly in the St. Louis River. the database and getting more confident in the numbers.” “After water quality improved, fish could stay in the estuary year around Getting solid numbers is literally a instead of being forced out to Lake Sumoving target. Fish move into and out of perior just to stay alive,” Schram says. “I the Lower Wisconsin from the Mississippi have always felt the real credit for the River; Wisconsin research shows some success of this program belongs to the people that pushed for passage of the Lake Sturgeon in a shallow, rocky areas sturgeon swimming up to 30 miles a day 1972 Clean Water Act and the people along river banks, which they use for on the river. that were instrumental in establishing spawning. © Wisconsin DNR So every fall they capture more fish the Western Lake Superior Sanitary DisSustaining fishing on the Lower and conduct other research to better trict.” Wisconsin River understand this population. In recent years, Rennicke and others have imWith the water quality improving so On the Lower Wisconsin River, the in- planted 16 adult sturgeon with radio tags much, Schram and colleagues knew the time was right to begin a long-term proj- land water with the highest hook-and- to help them understand fish movement, ect to re-establish native species such line fishing pressure and harvests, the critical spawning habitat and other imas lake sturgeon in the St. Louis River. challenge is to keep the population sta- portant information. They’ve also done From 1983 through 2000, the Wisconsin ble while continuing to allow fishing for spine age estimates for nearly 200 fish, and last spring started surveys to detect and Minnesota DNRs stocked 762,000 sturgeon. larval fish, evidence of natural reproducfry, 143,000 fingerlings and 500 yearling That’s why DNR Fish Supervisor Dave tion. lake sturgeon into the St. Louis River and set no-kill regulations to prevent anglers Rowe and technicians Mike Rennicke and Dan Fuller from the Poynette office One of the biggest questions is whethfrom harvesting the stocked fish. launch their boats on the river below er natural reproduction is occurring beThe Wisconsin Department of Natural the Prairie du Sac dam on a crisp, sun- low the dam, Rowe says. We know that Resources has been monitoring adult ny October day. They’re here to collect fish come over the dam from Lake Wisabundance below the Fond du Lac dam information to estimate the number of consin when water levels are high. Are (Minn.) on the St. Louis River during sturgeon in the 92-mile river stretch so they the source of fish that is keeping spawning time since the early 2000s. they can understand next fall if the fish the population stable, or are the fish that They have documented good numbers harvested during the hook-and-line sea- live below the dam naturally reproducing, or both? of fish, an increase in spawning numbers son are under the safe 5 percent limit.

STURGEON from page 12.

river to spawn to be able to do so while keeping invasives out.” Maintaining enthusiasm on the Winnebago system On a cold, windy April day, a crowd gathers at Bamboo Bend on the Wolf River near Shiocton. Men, women and children, many of them with cameras, a local TV crew, and a Discovery Channel TV crew swarm as DNR staff carry a writhing sturgeon up from the rocks in a big net. “Somebody, get the head,” Bruch yells as he helps wrestle the fish out of the net and onto the measuring board on the ground below him. “Oh, is he huge! Look at that guy. It’s a nice big male. He’s bigger than you, Jack (Bruch says to one of the fisheries technicians at his side) 71.8 (inches).” Though the crowds can slow the work, Bruch is glad to see them. Later he says, “Key to our success is not only effective control of harvest, but also proactively involving the public in our sturgeon management program – the public has great ownership and pride in this

program.”

Regulation changes developed since 1993 through a joint Department of Natural Resources and Winnebago Citizens Sturgeon Advisory Committee effort have led to an increase in the Winnebago lake sturgeon stock and the number of trophy-size fish in the population. Trophy lake sturgeon are typically considered to be any fish 100 pounds or larger, and historically fish this size have made up less than 1 percent of the total annual harvest. In the last decade, the percentage of trophy fish has gradually increased to 6 percent in 2011. License sales for the 2012 season set a new record at 12,860, up 48 percent since 2007, reflecting the growing interest in recent years by a wider range of people attracted by the big fish, the growing success of spearers and the Winnebago sturgeon program. Despite this growing popularity, Bruch considers one of the biggest challenges to be “maintaining the enthusiasm for the fishery that results in the license sales that keep the whole thing running,” he says.

“If you look at the trends in outdoors activity, the proportion of people who fish has stayed steady or gone down a The answer won’t matter as much in little in Wisconsin. We’re always aware coming years when Alliant Energy is re- we’re not just in this business for the quired to build a fish passage at their fish. Prairie du Sac dam. The design calls for an elevator to lift fish that migrate up“Whenever I give a sturgeon presentastream to get over the dam. Biologists tion, the last slide I show stresses the will raise the tank to the top of the dam two things we’re trying to do on the and sort through the fish, sending any Winnebago system,” he says. “One is to native fish on their way upstream. A keep the sturgeon population healthy downstream passage is also being built and flourishing. The second is to keep to make sure the fish can pass safely Winnebago sturgeon spearing a vibrant back to the lower river as well. part of our Wisconsin outdoor culture.” “You have these systems that over time developed to be a connected thread so the organisms evolved to utilize the best spawning habitat at one time of the year and feeding and resting habitat at other times of the year,” Rowe says. “The whole point of the elevator is we want fish interested in swimming up the

© 2011, Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 7921, Madison, WI 53707. Reprinted with permission. Become part of the Wisconsin Natural Resources family of readers and receive six beautiful issues for only $8.97 a year. Call 1-800-678-9472 toll free


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FEBRUARY 2012

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PHOTO GALLERY OF READERS PETS

Murphy, a Husky/Terrier Mix, having fun in the yard, Julie H., Appleton, Wis.

Moka (l), a Border Collie and friend Jazmine, a Corgi/Beagle mix, resting after playing, Judy L., Green Bay, WI

Woody, a Tri-Collie, at the beach, Tammy, B., Sheboygan, Wis.

Tehya, a Australian Shephard/Blue Merle, with her raindeer antlers, Deb B., Sheboygan, Wis.

Momo, Amer. Shorthair, looking down on his domain, Tammy B., Sheb., Wis.

Buddy, a Red-Dragon Flower-horn, swimming in his tank at The Betta Boutique, LLC, Melisa V., Appleton

If you would like to see your pet(s) on this page, please email them to us at petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com with a short description including: your pets name, your name, city, and a little statement about what they are doing in the photo. If you do not have email and would like to mail a glossy photo, please mail it to our mailing address: Pet Journal, attn: Pet Photos, 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 (all photos received by mail will be returned after they have been scanned for print.) All photos received will also be posted in our online photo gallery at http://images.petjournalmidwest.com/ gallery.html, due to space limitationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some submissions may not be printed in Pet Journal the same month they are received.

Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanning program to go to the Pet Journal gallery section.

PHOTOS OF OUR FRIENDS WHO ARE GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

Dallas, a Chow Chow, out enjoying the yard, Lisa D., Green Bay, WI

Maddie. a Bichon Frise, playing dominos, Judy L., Green Bay, Wis.


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FEBRUARY 2012 17

ASK THE VET by Dr. Karen M. Strickfaden, Countrycare Animal Complex, Green Bay Ask the Vet Columnist ask-the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com Q. The chronic problem that I’m strugMake sure you are feeding them a gling with is that my cat is a compulsive high quality diet. licker of himself and also pulls out his hair. He is overweight and I think he 5. Emotional causes: boredom, anximay have the beginning of arthritis beety, or a compulsive disorder. Comcause he walks a bit stiffly. Do you have pulsive cat chewing, scratching, or any suggestions for me? --- Claire K. licking behaviors often develop in cats who are bored, stressed, or anxious. A. Most cats1 are meticulous groomThese mental disorders are more likely to occur in indoor cats, which may be ers, but sometime the behavior goes due to the fact that they receive less into overdrive. For a variety of reasons, exercise and excitement than outdoor some licking and chewing behaviors becats. Compulsive disorders often become compulsive. If your cat is scratchgin when there are changes in a cat’s ing, licking, or chewing himself compulenvironment, including a new animal sively, you may see them doing it or you or baby in the house or a move to a may notice the disappearance of your new location. Also, behaviors that cat’s fur, often in strips along her back started in response to a medical probor stomach. lem sometimes persist as compulsions after the condition is resolved. Because there are a number of medical problems that may result in scratching Treatment Options and licking behaviors, be sure to consult with a veterinarian to help determine the Treatment will be more effective if the cause and the best course of action. underlying cause (from the list above) can be determined and/or removed from Why Do Cats Compulsively the environment. Remove fleas or allerScratch, Lick, or Chew? gens from the environment or add es1. Pain: If you notice your cat licking sential fatty acids for healthy skin. The or biting at the same spot over and veterinarian may prescribe steroids, anover again, it could be that he is ex- tihistamines or antibiotics4 if there is an periencing pain or discomfort in that allergy or infection. Additionally, some area. Back pain or arthritis can cause compulsive cat behaviors caused by psya tingling sensation that stimulates the chological factors can be addressed with cat to lick a specific area of the body. anti-anxiety medications, pheromones or natural calming products. 2. Allergies2: Just as some people develop skin irritations in response to At Countrycare Animal Complex we certain foods or environmental trig- have several natural treatment options gers, cats may have itchy, irritated available to address these concerns and skin if they are allergic to something in sort out the root cause of the licking or their environment. Cats can be sensi- hair pulling. tive to household chemicals and manmade products such as scotchgard. Editors Notes: For more information on the underlined notes: 3. Parasites: Fleas3 are often the cul- 1: pets.webmd.com/cats/default.htm prits behind compulsive cat scratching 2: pets.webmd.com/cats/common-alor cat licking behaviors. Because cats lergies-cats 3: pets.webmd.com/cats/ are excellent groomers, they may ac- guide/ticks-and-fleas-on-cats 4: pets. tually remove all traces of fleas. If you webmd.com/cats/antibiotics-for-cats notice your cat licking his lower back obsessively, with or without scabs on Dr. Strickfaden welcomes your questhe neck, it is a sign that fleas might be tions on general pet health topics, please causing the problem. Other parasites, email using the email address above or including ticks, mites, and ringworm, by mail: can also prompt scratching, licking, or Pet Journal chewing. Attn: Ask the Vet 3120 S Business Dr. 4. Dry skin. Dry winter air or nutritionSuite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 al inadequacies can contribute to dry, flaky skin that gets your cat started licking or scratching in search of relief.

A HAPPY ENDING FOR A BLIND DOG from The Practical Pet Vet blog This past winter I had Lasik eye surgery to correct my terrible vision. Without glasses or contacts I was legally blind. Swimming and sports were a hassle. Staying up too late made my eyeballs scratchy. Since the surgery I have enjoyed the freedom of perfect vision. Because we humans are so dependent on our sense of sight, we often forget that other animals are not as reliant on it and therefore do not miss it much when it is gone. I recently had the honor of examining a sweet blind Golden/Lab mix named Nellie.* Nellie has Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA), a genetic form of progressive blindness that can affect a number of breeds, including Labrador Retrievers. Although only 3 years old, Nellie was nearly euthanized because she could no longer be a decent hunting dog. Fortunately Nellie was sent to a blind dog rescue group and was recently adopted by some dear clients.

I have no doubt Nellie will adapt to her new home and be a fine companion for her human family. The real tragedy in this story is that PRA and many other hereditary diseases can be avoided with careful breeding programs. There is a DNA blood test available to determine if potential doggie parents carry the genes for PRA. Most dogs should also undergo Canine Eye Registration Foundation (CERF) examination by a certified veterinary ophthalmologist prior to breeding.

This recommendation comes from personal experience. I nearly made the mistake of breeding our English Springer Spaniel GrrrD. She was a lovely hunting dog, free of obvious defect, and it seemed like a good idea to allow her to procreate! During my veterinary school training, my faithful “guinea pig” GrrrD was diagnosed with retinal dysplasia. Even though GrrrD had adequate vision, any future pups could have been blind. With that knowledge in hand, it was an Although Nellie is completely blind, easy decision to spay her. she is attentive, obedient and gentle. In Hereditary blindness is dramatic, but a strange place, she gingerly picks her way around the room and occasionally thankfully not that common. There are bumps into objects. Once she has set- many other more painful and difficult tled in, though, Nellie (like many other conditions that can be avoided through blind dogs and cats) will easily maneu- informed decision making at the time of ver through familiar surroundings as breeding. Ask your veterinarian for inconfidently as a seeing animal. When formation before breeding. Future pet explaining a diagnosis of blindness I of- owners will thank you for your diligence. ten reassure clients that their pet will * Name changed to protect privacy. adapt quite well “as long as you don’t move the furniture around.” Compared to humans, dogs have poor vision at the Editors Note: The Practical Pet Vet is best of times. They use their heightened senses of smell and hearing to under- a blog written by Dr. Kim Everson of St. stand and respond to their environment. Bernard’s Animal Medical Center, Van Therefore, blindness to a dog is not a Dyne, WI. Reprinted with permission. complete tragedy.

SLEEPS AND NAPS: FELINE STYLE from catsinternational.org bed, keep in mind the feline need for warmth and security (high and protected). It has been observed that the temperature of the room is a determining factor in the sleeping cat’s body position. At less than 55 degrees F., the cat is curled up with his head tucked into his body. As the temperature increases, the cat’s sleeping position opens up. At over 70 degrees F., the cat is uncurled with paws out in front. Upon waking, the supple cat usually takes a few minutes to stretch and restore his circulation. A yawn or two later, a quick face wash, There are three types of adult feline and watch out!--he’s ready for action. sleep: the brief nap, the longer light sleep, and the deep sleep. A napping cat Editors Note: Cats International was is on “radar patrol”, scanning the envi- founded by Betsy Liscomb, a cat beronment for any small sound. The peri- havioral expert. If you would like more ods of light sleep and deep sleep alter- information on Cats International or for nate. When Kitty settles down for more cat behavioral assistance, please visit than a brief nap, the phase of light sleep the Cats International website, www. lasts for about a half hour. Then, for six catsinternational.org. to seven minutes, he experiences deep Reprinted with permission. sleep. At this point the cat’s body relaxes and he appears to be dreaming (twitching and quivering). After the deep sleep, the adult cat then returns to another bout of thirty minutes of light sleep until he eventually wakes up. Cats are the world’s best sleepers. They slumber away about 60% of their lives--16 hours out of 24. At this rate a nine-year old cat has been awake for only about three years! Since cats are so efficient at obtaining their protein-rich food, they have plenty of time to rest up for the next hunting trip (or visit to the kitchen). A typical feline day includes over fifteen hours of sleeping, and dozing, four to six hours of grooming and playing, with hunting, eating and exploring making up the rest of the day.

When choosing a site for your cat’s


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CRAZY RABBIT MYTHS by Kristin Ahrens, K & R Small Animal Sanctuary Pet Journal Contributor

With Valentines Day behind us, spring is just around the corner and St. Patrick’s Day is coming up. Look for the March issue of Pet This month I wanted to clear up some Journal at one of our many distribution locations. Coming in the common misconceptions about rabbits. The following are some myths regarding March issue we will be bringing to you the following:

Final Installment on Act 90: Input from Breeders and Veterinarians on the Impact of the Law Eco News & more articles of Pet/Animal interest. More from our columnists: Ask the Alpha Dog Ask Scrappy! Grooming your Pet

They can be easily litter trained, so if there is an odor, the human has forgotten to clean the litter box!

rabbits as well as the reality of each situation. 5. Young rabbits are great for kids so they can grow up together. 1. Rabbits only live a year or two so no Reality: Young rabbits are less predictlong term commitment is necessary. able and more active. They may Reality: When well cared for, indoor scratch accidentally or bite if they rabbits can live 7-12 years. They reare unhappy. Rabbits are delicate quire the same type of commitment and may be injured if handled imas a dog! properly. An adult rabbit has a set personality and is more stable. This 2. Rabbits are happiest outdoors in a makes adults a better choice for backyard hutch. young children. Reality: Rabbits kept outside are usually forgotten and neglected after the 6. Rabbits, especially dwarf breeds, do initial excitement wears off. Outside not need much living space. rabbits are exposed to weather ex- Reality: Rabbits were designed for runtremes, disease, and stress. Rabbits ning and jumping. They need lots of are social creatures that enjoy daily space to stretch their legs. Rabbits human contact. When kept outshould have the largest cage you can doors rabbits have a much shorter afford, or better yet have free-range lifespan. of your home! They enjoy free time and need at least five hours of free3. Baby bunnies love to be carried dom from their cage each day. around and cuddled. see ABBIT on page 21. Reality: Most young bunnies are too busy. They love to run around the house, chew everything in sight, and squeeze into nooks and crannies. Is your cat driving you crazy? They rarely sit still for long!

R

Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets Ask the Vet Pet Journal Word Search Pictures of your Pets

4. Rabbits are dirty, messy, and have a strong odor. Reality: Rabbits are very clean and go to great lengths to keep their living space clean. Spaying and neutering helps reduce the strength of the urine’s odor. Helping you understand why your Cat behaves the way it does and how to change problem behaviors ...

and more!

HONORING THE HUMAN ANIMAL BOND THROUGH END OF LIFE SUPPORT FOR COMPANION ANIMALS

call or email for an appointment Vonnie Keebaugh, CVT (920) 720-0678 catsense2me@aol.com www.catsense2me.com

by Valarie Hajek Adams, Healing Hearts Foundation Pet Journal Contributor Imagine a time when the best a person could hope for their sick pet was to have their veterinarian try an antibiotic or steroid or maybe something over the counter, to try and resolve the illness. Imagine a time when diagnostics were minimal, specialists in veterinary medicine could only be found at universities and pharmaceuticals were very basic. There was no variety in pet foods and it was believed that animals did not feel pain like we do. Well, enough of a walk back in time and fast forward to the present. And, the present has the pet industry exploding with choices! Today’s pet parent (that wasn’t a term used years ago) has more choices than could ever be imagined to deliver the best care possible. Premium foods, raw diets, wardrobes, daycares and communicators are just a few of the choices people now have for their pets. Additionally, our pets are living longer than ever and staying healthier throughout that time. And, all of this is just fine with those of us that have wrapped our hearts and souls around these little and not so little bundles of joys!

To name all the advances in veterinary medicine in the last 30 to 40 years would take much more space than we have. So, lets just say that we are treating cancers and putting many of them in remission with regularity. And, specialists in veterinary medicine are quite commonly found in most moderately sized cities. Much more is understood about nutrition and immune systems and there are now veterinarians who specialize in methods of pain control through drugs, rehabilitation and alternative therapies. The veterinary industry has honored all the life stages of a companion animal: Babyhood, Adult, Senior, Geriatric and has finally gotten on the fast train of the last stage of care that being End of Life. That’s right. We, in the veterinary field, have “come a long way baby” in understanding that we can advance our care for life limited pets and their families with options such as Hospice Care. The Healing Heart Pet Hospice, a program of Healing Heart Foundation, Inc., is doing just that in Northeast Wisconsin. From all accounts, the first of its kind in Wisconsin, HHPH is modeled after the human hospice model of care and provides a ‘circle of care’ team approach for the patient – the pet. Families in the HHPH

2008. This year, HHFI plans on launching their next 2 programs. Pet loss and bereavement support will be started this year to answer the needs of people who are grieving the loss of a pet and who need to share their stories with others in a supportive environment. The third program starting this year will be for financial support for people experiencing financial hardship and needing medical treatment for a pet. “There are folks out there on fixed incomes who sometimes have no relation except for their dog or cat. We honor that special bond and would like to preserve that bond by assisting where we can”, says president of HHFI, Valarie Adams, CVT. Healing Heart Foundation, Inc. and its programs have many exciting plans for ways to help pet parents in Northeast Wisconsin. They have a brand new website with a brand new look. If you would like to learn more about what they offer, or, perhaps would like to make a donation, take a look at their website at www.hhfiThe Healing Heart Foundation, Inc. is a pethospice.org They’d love to hear from 501c3 non-profit based out of Appleton, you! WI and sponsors programs which honor the spirit of the Human Animal Bond. It receives no state or federal funding. HHPH is the first program, launched in program have access to Caregivers 24/7 and have the option to euthanize their pet at home if they wish. HHFI team members are humbled every time they are able to assist a family and their pet at this most sacred time. Members of the HHPH team are regularly sought after to lecture at veterinary conferences as well as speaking to the public in an effort to broaden the awareness of this option to both pet families as well as their veterinary colleagues. Hospice care is somewhat of a paradigm shift for veterinary medicine having euthanasia as an option. What Hospice Care provides is a bridge in the gap between life and end of life with an emphasis on Quality of Life and palliative care and is much more about LIVING than dying! Hospice is Hope for a family not ready to say ‘goodbye’ and wanting the guidance of a comprehensive circle of care from a veterinary team approach until it is time to say that last ‘goodbye’.


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SENIOR from page 9. For example, I was visiting a shelter the other day and met a wonderful ten year old who had been relinquished by his family. There was nothing physically wrong with the dog. He had done nothing wrong – he was just old. The family had him since he was a puppy. He had given them ten years of love and devotion, only to be dropped off because they were too busy now.

So I offer this plea: Please, before you adopt or purchase a canine companion; remember that this is a lifetime commitment. There is no nursing home for dogs to retire in. They give you everything they have to give in this world, so when they age, let them know how much that means to you. Allow them to live out their life with the only thing that truly matters to them - You. When the time comes, don’t make their passing I won’t sugar-coat it: I know from become someone else’s responsibility. experience that finding adopters for senior dogs can be a challenge. Those in If you are considering adopting anothRescue and no-kill shelters have a good er dog; don’t pass by the old soul with chance, but not all of them are so lucky. the grey muzzle in favor of the playful Many that are relinquished to shelters young puppy. I promise you that dogs that don’t have a no-kill policy because do understand the concept of quality they will be “better off” in a home with versus quantity. Whether they are with more time – are euthanized because you one day, one year or one lifetime; their time runs out. when they give you their heart, it is for all eternity. Those that do make it to organizations with the ability to wait the extra time it takes to place them have another set of challenges. The dogs often present with abandonment issues, like depression and anxiety. It is heart-breaking to see.

J A N U A RY W O R D S E A R C H A N S W E R S

FIND PET JOURNAL AT THESE LOCATIONS Central Bark Doggy Daycare 3513 S 32nd St Sheboygan, WI 920-451-9663

PJ’s Collectables 817 S Military Ave Green Bay, WI 920 321-1030

Chelstar’s Bed & Biscuit N4890 US Hwy 45 Fond Du Lac, WI 920-921-9024

Joys of Grooming 1706 N Main St West Bend, WI 262 338-2506

Cedarburg Veterinary Clinic N144 W5660 Pioneer Rd Cedarburg, WI 262-377-2460

Lincoln Tropical Fish & Pets 10 S Main St Hartford, WI 262 673-7470

The UPS Store - Sheboygan 3120 S Business Dr Sheboygan, WI 920 453-5934

Falls Salon & Spa 1017 Fond Du Lac Ave. Sheboygan Falls, WI 920 467-8610

Liberty K9 Lodge 1550 Cornell Rd. Green Bay, WI 920 661-0867

Serve’s Countryside Store W4037 State Hwy 23 Fond Du Lac WI 920 921-4042

Two Paws Up Bakery 305 E. College Ave. Appleton, WI 920 954-1420

Bohn’s Town & Country 2283 Hwy 44 Oshkosh, WI 920 233-2066

Jill’s Pet Shoppe 712B E. Green Bay St. Shawano, WI 715 524-2272

Sud-Z-Paws 2525 S. Business Dr. Sheboygan, WI 920 457-7297

A Touch of Class Pet Resort 2275 Omro Rd. Oshkosh, WI 920 267-3333

Critters Pet Nutrition 2593 Fairview Rd. Neenah, WI 920 725-9434

V.I.P. Lube Inc. 2451 Velp Ave. Howard, WI 920 434-LUBE (5823)

Paws Awhile Boutique 123 N. Military Ave. Green Bay, WI

Doggie Do’s By Lou 311 E. Main St. Chilton, WI

Pulaski Warehouse 5665 Quarry Dr. Pulaski, WI 920 822-3536

Marshals Convenience Stores Sheboygan, Plymouth, Glenbulah, Kewauskum, Elkhart Lake and Cascade

Starbucks Coffee Appleton, Ashwaubenon, De Pere, Fox Cities, Green Bay, Neenah, & Oshkosh, WI

Walgreen’s Drugstores Chilton, Manitowoc, Plymouth, Saukville, Sheboygan, Sturgeon Bay, & Two Rivers, WI

Starbucks Coffee Cedarburg, Fond Du Lac, Grafton, Sheboygan, &West Bend, WI

Walgreen’s Drugstores Cedarburg, Grafton, Fond Du Lac, Hartford, Jackson, Oshkosh, &West Bend, WI Walgreen’s Drugstores Appleton, Clintonville, De Pere, Fox Cities, Green Bay, New London, & Shawano, WI

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PET PRODUCT REVIEWS by Seth Minaker Pet Journal Columnist sminaker@petjournalmidwest.com With any dog, trimming his nails is frustrating, not only for you, but for him. Trimming dog’s nails is especially challenging, as you don’t want to cut his quick. The quick is the nerve and blood inside the nail, if cut, it will not only be extremely painful, but will leave a bloody mess. Most dogs have black or dark nails that make the quick very hard to see. One way to see the quick on a dark nailed dog, is to look at the underside of the nail, you should see a faint impression, where that ends, his quick ends. This may sound like a simple solution, but in reality, it isn’t satisfactory. Holding your dog’s paw up, taking a look at where the quick ends and then trying ROOMING OUR ET to trim just doesn’t work. Most owners resort to filing, or getting their vet to do by Diana Schmidt, Happy Tails Pet Grooming and Boarding, Howards Grove it. The first, filing, doesn’t work well, Grooming Your Pet Columnist especially on small dogs. Their paws groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com rattle, it is very timely, and it can leaves nails jagged. Taking your dogs to the Many pet owners wonder what they Start at 12 to 16 weeks old, depending vet, is not only a hassle, but costly. But should be doing for their puppy when it on the breed. Small breeds like Yorkies (as you probably guessed) there is a betis very young, here’s a few tips. may be too small at 12 weeks. The first ter solution! grooming session for a puppy is usually Grooming your puppy is very impor- nail clipping, cleaning the ears, edging tant and can start right away. Many the feet (only if necessary), trimming puppies will come from the breeders the sanitary area, a light trim around the or animal shelter with a dirty or smelly eyes, and a brushing of the coat. The coat. These dogs need to be bathed, next groom can include a bath and clipit will do no harm to your puppy, and ping the coat if necessary. can be done at home. There are many shampoos designed to be gentle on a Our hope is to make the grooming sespuppy’s skin and coat. The more time sion a pleasant, stress free time for your Quickfinder for Sm Dogs and Cats. you spend taking care of your puppy, the puppy. If he learns early that grooming happier, healthier, and hopefully longer is just a normal part of his life and that life he will have. It will also help you and nothing bad will happen, he will not get your puppy create a bond that will last stressed out going to the groomer. his lifetime. You may look at your puppy and think that you don’t have to worry about most of the grooming chores until Editors Notes: Diana welcomes your he’s older. Not true, especially if your questions on general on grooming, puppy is a double-coated or long-haired, please email using the email address these dogs need lots of attention. above or by mail: Pet Journal The younger your puppy is when he Attn: Grooming You Pet goes to a groomer for the 1st time, the 3120 S Business Dr. Suite 270 more likely he or she is to adapt easily to Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 the process.

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WHAT IS HEALING TOUCH FOR ANIMALS AND WHY IT MAY BE THE MISSING LINK by Linda Ledbeter, Animal Connections Pet Columnist Contributor I receive calls from desperate pet owners with concerns ranging from aggressive behaviors to marking inside the house and everything in between. Today I want to talk about the rescued animals: from the exotic, large and small indoor to outdoor pets, displaying behaviors that love alone has not resolved.

Helping animals move past these fears, more times than not, are not resolved with love alone. The memory of the past resides within the cells, and until this is addressed, the results your have patiently waited for may be far into the future. Love, training, kindness and patience is only one of the puzzle pieces you have. Healing Touch for Animals may be your missing link. Healing Touch for Animals works with the bio-energy field allowing the animal to move into a relaxed state, releasing endorphins thus allowing muscles to relax. Circulation increases, allowing oxygen to flow into the cell. The cells are now able to absorb nutrients, build the enzymes and regulate hormones. Toxins are now able to be released from the body which then promotes healing, both in the mind and body.

Unlike the wild animals who instinctively shake off the adrenalin rush from the near collision with a car, or becoming the meal for another, our domestic pets have taken on their human’s traits and stuffs it. The adrenalin remains locked in the body’s cell structure blocking the natural ability of the fight or flight mechanisms proper function. When an animal remains in a survival mode attempting to “please” the human without success, the behavior becomes one of fear. Fearful behaviors are displayed in two categories, fight or flight. All of us can relate to Healing Touch for Animals Practioners this common trait. have studied many techniques to help

you and your loved one obtain harmony. Where others may focus on behavior or health separately, HTA focusing on the whole picture. Healing Touch for Animals practioners are not veterinarians thus we do not diagnose or perform as veterinarian medicine

Quickfinder deluxe for Large Dogs. The folks at MiracleCorp™ have invented an outstanding new product, the QuickFinder®. QuickFinder works by sending out frequencies, and detecting the changes over nail, nail/quick, or quick. In doing so, it alerts whether it is safe to cut or not, via 3 LED lights. Green – safe to cut, Yellow - caution, or Red - do not cut. Simple, but a revolutionary new product. QuickFinder (for small dogs and cats) and QuickFinder Deluxe (for large dogs) sell for around $15.99-$34.99 each, depending on place of purchase. QuickFinder can be purchased at PetSmart, and some PETCO’s, calling ahead is advised. For more information, where to buy, and customer testimonials, visit www.quickfinderclipper.com Hope you, and your pets, are enjoying the snow.

Editors Notes: Haw a product you would like reviewed? Email Seth at the address above or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Pet Product Reviews 3120 S Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524


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RABBIT from page 18.

FERRET from page 10.

Generally the small rabbits are more energetic, requiring more space/exercise than medium-sized or larger rabbits.

Even with all the interventions, unfortunately after eight months of constant treatment, the infection won and a decision was made to have Carter euthanized. Through all the treatment, he was the best little man ever and he deserved a dignified passing. I brought Carter home for Roosevelt to see and to allow him to realize that Carter was gone. Roosevelt crawled into the sleep sack with Carter’s body and a sound came from Roosevelt that I have never heard coming from a ferret. This was a sound of anguish at the loss of his best friend. The tears were streaming down my face as I was witness to this most heartfelt display of genuine loss.

7. Rabbits do fine with a bowl of pellets and a couple carrots each day. Reality: The most important part of a rabbit’s diet is grass hay. Carrots are high in sugar and should only be given as a treat. Leafy greens are a better choice for veggies! Pellets should be given in limited quantities as they can contribute to obesity. 8. A baby/juvenile rabbit is easier to litter train. Reality: An adult (spayed/neutered) rabbit almost litter trains itself! Young rabbits, much like puppies have accidents. Juvenile rabbits (at sexually maturity) lose all interest in good litter habits and may even spray!! 9. Rabbits make terrible pets and have no personality. Reality: Each rabbit has a distinct personality much like a dog or cat! They make wonderful pets. They enjoy the company of others, especially their people! Like all other pets they do need some training and guidance to be the perfect pet. Hopefully this has cleared up some things for you and you will some day adopt a house rabbit or recommend one for a friend or family member! As always, thanks for thinking adoption!

One of the strange phenomena that surrounds a pair of ferrets that share this intense bond is the possibility that a healthy ferret will follow a partner in death. I have experienced this with a couple of bonded pairs, and I am always so saddened by that loss. With the passing of Carter, we showered Roosevelt with extra attention and TLC to help him get through this period of grief. Over the course of a few weeks, we introduced Roosevelt to a couple females who had lost their male buddy a two months prior. Roosevelt accepted them and they are all doing well in their new family. Ferrets love to be loved and they display the ultimate affection to their human playmates and to their ferret families. They enjoy being with you, spending time in play or snuggles. Add in a good ferret food, plenty of fresh water and you and your Ferret’s life is complete.

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ADOPTION BUNNIES COCONUTOIL COMPULSIVE DOGBED ECOLOGY FERRETS GROUNDHOG HEALINGTOUCH MARDIPAWS NATURE PETEXPO RUFUS STURGEON VALENTINES

AQUARIUM CHILICOOKOFF COMPANIONSHIP COUGAR DONATION ELEPHANT FOSTER HABITAT MARDIGRAS NAILTRIMMING NUTRITION PLATEDLIZARD SHELTER TREATS VOLUNTEER

Words to find, they can go across, up or down, diagonally. Answers will appear in next months issue or on the Pet Journal website about the 20th of the month, in the Regions section on the Wordsearch page.


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Tender Care In Home Pet Sitting Where your pet is treated like it’s one of our own Serving the entire Fox Valley area

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References available upon request

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PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS Pet Journal classifieds are a free service for our readers. Classifieds are for free or paid services offered by individuals or families, such as a teenager looking for a dog walking job over the summer. Classifieds are also available for our Local Humane Societies/ Shelters and Animal Rescues to post their needs lists. Please contact the respective Humane Society/Shelter/Rescue if you have questions or would like to donate an item or two. Events from our advertisers and readers will also be printed as space allows. To place your classified ad please email Pet Journal at: classifieds@petjournalmidwest. com. Please include the following when submitting your classified: Name, Phone, email, best time to call (in case there is a problem with your classified ad), what text you would like in your ad. Please limit to 25 words and keep your wording clean. Remember this is a family paper. How many months you would like the listing to be available for, and list in the subject of your email “PJ Classified”. If you would prefer to mail it to us, you may do so, with the same items as requested above. Mail it to: Pet Journal attn: PJ Classified’s 3120 S. Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 Please submit your classified no later than the 20th of the month to make the next edition.

Section 1: Individual/Family Classifieds Section 1.1: Puppies for Sale

Section 2: Humane Societies & Animal Rescues/Shelters Needs Lists Section 2.1: Humane Societies Bay is • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Area Humane Society of Green Bay, WI looking for: Bleach Paper Towels Clay Cat Litter (non-clumping) Rawhides Kongs Dog Toys Canned Cat Food Small Litter Boxes Cat Toys Chew Blocks & Treats for Small Animals Carefresh Bedding (no pine or cedar) Liquid Laundry Detergent Powder-free Exam Gloves Scratching Posts, Towers or Cat Trees or consider these as a way to recycle: Blankets Bath Towels Leashes

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Bay Area Humane Society at: 920.469.3110 or visit their website: www.bayareahumanesociety.com. Door County Humane Society of Sturgeon Bay, WI is looking for: • Animal Supplies • Purina Pro Plan Adult Chicken and Rice Formula • Purina Pro Plan Kitten Chicken and Rice Formula • Purina Dog Chow (green bag) • Purina Beneful • Dog Toys • Rawhide bones • Cat Litter (scoopable, any brand) • Office Supplies • Copy Paper • Postage Stamps • HP Ink Cartridge #60 for HP printer model# F4280

• • • • • •

Cleaning Supplies Bleach Paper Towels Towels Blankets Toilet Tissue High Efficiency Laundry Detergent

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Door County Humane Society at: 920.746.1111, by email at: nail@dooranimals.com or you may visit their website: www.doorcountyhumanesociety.org. Eastshore Humane Association of Chilton, WI is looking for: • Non-scoopable Cat Litter • Purina Cat Chow -or• Purina Complete • Purina Dog Chow • Laundry Detergent To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Eastshore Humane Association at: 920.849.2390, by email at: ehashelter@gmail.com or you may visit their website: www.eastshoreha.org.

EASTSHORE HUMANE ASSOCIATION COLLECTS WEIGHT CIRCLES FROM PURINA CAT AND DOG FOOD PRODUCTS Please help out by sending us the weight circles. The Purina products include: Purina dog and cat food products such as Pro Plan, Purina One, Purina Cat Chow & Kitten Chow, Kit ‘N Kaboodle, Happy Cat, Purina Veterinary Diets. These weight circles enable Eastshore to earn points toward the purchase of Purina products for the shelter animals. As an added bonus, the weight circles from Purina dog food products can also be used to help Eastshore Humane pay the veterinarian bills! Fond Du Lac Humane Society of Fond Du Lac, WI is looking for: • Dog Needs • Kong’s and kong rubber balls • Dog toys • Peanut butter • Cheese whiz • Plain yogurt • Dog Treats • Easy-walk Harnesses (all sizes) • Durable Leashes • Kuranda dog beds (check our website) • Any dog related items • new or used • Cat Needs • Kitty Litter (non-clumping) • Purina Cat and Kitten Chow • Chicken or Turkey baby food (human) • Toys and Cat trees • Kitten milk replacer • Any cat or kitten related items - new or used • Small Animal Needs • Pellet rabbit food • Timothy Hay • Bedding & Litter (no pine or cedar please) • Any small animal related items - new or used • Other Needs • Bleach • Q-tips • Band-aids • First Aid & Medical supplies • Rubbing Alcohol • Laundry Detergent • Garbage Bags (20 gal or larger) • Dawn dish soap • Mop heads (heavy duty) • Paper towels

• • • •

Sandwich Bags (Ziploc or fold top) Small paper plates & paper cups Copy paper - white or color Stamps

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Fond Du Lac Humane Society at: 920.922.8873 or visit their website: www.fonddulachumanesociety.org. Fox Valley Humane Association of Appleton, WI is looking for: • Pet Supplies • Purina or Iams cat food and dog food • Purina Kitten Chow • Purina Puppy Chow • Canned cat, kitten and dog food • Pine or aspen shavings • Timothy hay • Cleaning Supplies • Lemon Pine-sol • Dish Soap • Tall Kitchen Garbage bags • Febreeze air freshener • Bleach • Liquid laundry detergent • Garbage bags (33-gallon) • Miscellaneous • Gas gift cards to local gas stations • X-large wire and plastic crates • Cash sponsorships • One months’s supply of pain medication for cats and kittens after surgery - $40/ per mo. • One month’s supply of pain medication for dog s and puppies after surgery - $75/per mo. • Surgical packs, 12 needed - $850 each • Sponsorship to spay or neuter a cat, 800 needed - $18.50 each • Sponsorship to spay or neuter a dog, 650 needed - $30.50 each To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Fox Valley Humane Association at: 920.733.1717, by email at: shelter@foxvalleypets.org or visit their website: www.foxvalleypets.org. Lakeshore Humane Society of Manitowoc, WI is looking for: • Purina Dry Dog and Cat Food • Dog and Cat Treats (especially dog biscuits) • Clay Cat Litter • Hard to destroy Dog Toys • Cat Toys • Creamy Peanut Butter • Small Animal Bedding • Small Animal Water Bottles • Small Animal Supplies (Hay, Feed, Treats and Toys) • 8.5” x 11” Copy Paper • Post-It-Notes • Stamps (First Class and Pst Card) • Bleach • Tall Kitchen Bags & 39 Gallon Garbage Bags • Hand Sanitizer • Paper Towels • Toilet Paper • Dawn Dishwashing Soap To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Lakeshore Humane Society at: 920.684.5401 or visit their website at: www.lakeshorehumae.com. Neenah Animal Shelter of Neenah, WI is looking for: Most Needed items: • Pig Ears/Rawhides • Dog Treats/Biscuits • Stamps • Dry Kitten Food • Wand Type Cat Toys • Pet Same Ice Melt • Pooper Scooper with Rake Always Needed items: • Scoopable Unscented Litter such as: Tidy Cat, PetCo Brand, ScoopAway or Fresh Step • Purina Original Dry Cat Food • Degreaser (Jungle Jake or Simple Green ect.) • Small Paper Plates

• • • • •

Printer Cartridges (HP Office Jet 6110 & L7590) Foster Homes Cat Scratchers (www.stretchandscrach.com) Empty Water Bottles (example Gatorade and Powerade bottles) Most Needed items: Resurfacing of our Parking lot

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Neenah Animal Shelter, 951 Country Rd G, Neenah, WI. Oshkosh Area Humane Society of Oshkosh, WI is looking for: • Purina Kitten Chow • Purina Cat Chow • Purina Puppy Chow - regular flavor • Purina Dog Chow • Caned Cat Food - pate type only (please no shredded or sliced in gravy) • Canned dog food • Canned kitten food • Romaine Lettuce (for rabbits) • Rolled Raw Hide Chews - Larger sizes only, please • Soft Dog Treats • Scoopable cat litter • Bleach • Tall Kitchen garbage bags • Dryer Sheets • Paper Toweling • Swiffer Dry Mops • Small paper plates • Degreaser - like Jungle Jake • Micro Fiber Cloths • Cotton Swabs & Cotton Balls • Copy Paper To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Oshkosh Area Humane Society at: 920.424.2128 or visit their website: www.oahs.org. Ozaukee Humane Society of Saukville, WI is looking for: • Digital Camera with rechargeable battery, at least 7 megapixel preferred • Dish Soap • Small Dog Training Treats • Laundry Detergent (for High Efficiency Washers) • Postage stamps • Kongs • Fabric - large, colorful solid material • 8 oz. - 12 oz. disposable cups • 45-gallon garbage bags • Aspen Bedding • Bleach • Bottle Brushes • Cardstock paper • Cat-nail clippers (scissor type) • Cat toys • Copy paper, white & color, 8.5” x 11” • Dog toys (Nylabones, squeaky toys, ropes, hard rubber balls, ect.) • Hand Sanitizer • Highlighters • Kitchen scrub brushes with handles • LaserJet mailing labels (Avery 5160) • Lingerie bags (for washing small toys) • Mailing envelopes, 9 x 12 or 10 x 13 • Manila folders (letter size only) • Paper towels • Peanut butter • Pens • Post-it-notes • Printer ink cartridges ◊ Canon (5PGBK, 8C, 8M, 8Y) ◊ HP (23, 45, 92, 94, 95) • Rabbit pellets (no fruit or seed mix) • Rechargeable AA batteries, with charger • Scissors • Soft Dog Toys • Staples • Steno notepads • Stretch & “Scratch” cardboard scratching pads • Swiffer Dusters • Timothy hay • Toilet paper


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PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS • •

Vinyl (non-latex) gloves Wild birdseed

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Ozaukee Humane Society at: 262.377.7580, by email at: info@ozaukeehumane.org or you may visit their website: www.ozaukeehumane.org. The Sheboygan County Humane Society of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Monetary donations • Gift cards for gas • Gift cards for pet supplies • Gift cards from retail stores • Cat toys • Canned cat food • Kitty litter (non-clumping) • Litter pans • Litter scoops • Laundry soap • Non-clorox bleach • Dish detergent • Paper towel • Scotch scrubbing pads • Rawhide chews for dogs • Dog toys and tennis balls • Science diet pet foods • Copy paper • Office supplies • Foster Homes • Volunteers To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Sheboygan County Humane Society at: 920.458.2012 or visit their website at: www.mySCHS.com. Washington County Humane Society of Slinger, WI is looking for: Items marked with a * are priority needs. • Animal Needs ◊ Dog Needs ● “Natures Variety Instinct” or Grain free Dog Food* (for dogs with special dietary needs) ● Purina Puppy chow ● Liver Sausage (to hide medication for dogs) ◊ Cat Needs ● Non-scoopable cat litter* (we always need litter) ● “Before Grain” dry food* (for cats with special dietary needs) ● Septic Swaps* (can get at Walgreens) ● Baby Food* ● Feliway Spray ◊ Small Animal Needs ● Hamster/Gerbil food* ● Aspen bedding* (can get at Fleet Farm - called Horse Cubes) ● Timothy Hay* ● Carefresh pet bedding* (any color) ● Vita drops* ● Ferret Vite* ● Guinea Pig food ● Toys/Treats ● Plastic Slinkys ● Rat pellets ● Ferret food • Shelter Needs ◊ Nurtical* ◊ Paper plates ◊ Toilet Paper ◊ Oster shaver blades - #40 ◊ Fabuloso floor cleaner ◊ Plastic clipboards - 9” x 12” ◊ 75 to 100 ft. Industrial strength hoses ◊ New or working Dehumidifiers ◊ New or working Chest Freezers ◊ Postage stamps ◊ Thick “Welding” leather gloves (should go to the elbow) ◊ Eraser board markers ◊ Heating Pads with temp adjustment ◊ Gift Cards (Walmart, Office Max, Fleet Farm, Menards, Gas Cards) ◊ Toner for printers:

● ● ● ● ●

HP DeskJet 990cse #78 - color HP DeskJet 990cse #45 - black HP #28 - Tricolor HP #27 - Black HP LaserJet 2200d #96A - black To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Washington County Humane Society at: 262.677.0388, by email at: wchs@washingtoncountyhumane.org or visit there website at: www.washingtoncountyhumane.org.

Section 2.2: Animal Rescues & Shelters All Animal Rescue Center project of the Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • Reptile Cage Thermostats • Storage Space • Cargo Tailers • Livestock Trailers • Tow behind RV • Mini Van or Full Size Van • Kennel Fencing • Commercial/Large Capacity Washers/Dryers • Chest Freezers/Walk-in Coolers • Animal Control Equipment • Office Furniture • Gift Cards for Hardware or Home Improvment Stores • Lumber and 3/4” Plywood • Cash Donations To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the EWHSR at: 920.207.5642, by email at: info@allanimalresourcecenter.com or visit their website: www.allanimalrescuecenter.com. Care (Center for Avian Rehabilitation & Education) of Hubertus, WI is looking for: • 1/2” or 3/4” Plexiglass (10 4’ x 8’ panels) • First Class Postage Stamps • Hefty 39 Gallon Garbage Bags • Tall Kitchen Garbage Bags • Gloves for cleaning, doing dishes, ect. • Large Rubbermaid or equivalent containers • Used towels, hand towels and wash cloths in good condition • 1cc syringes, vet wrap, 2x2’s, 4x4’s (veterinary supplies) • Cheerios, especially Honey Nut • Fresh Fruits and Veggies (no Avocados) • Frozen Mixed Vegetables • Mixed Nuts (Unsalted in Shells) • Ground Walnuts (found in the bakers section of your local grocery store) • Paper Towels, Kleenex, Toilet Paper • Laundry Detergent (free and clear of dyes and smells) • No. 10 Grip-seal Security Envelopes • Printer Paper • Gasoline Cards • Lexmark Pro901 ink cartridges ° 105 (Black Ink) ° 1000 (Yellow, Cyan, and Magenta Ink) • Van (Now or Used - needs to be reliable) • 100% Cotton Material and/or 100% Fleece Material • Gift Cards for WE Energy, Piggly Wiggly, Pick ‘N Save, Walmart, Menards, Home Depot, Sendiks, and Woodman’s • Cash Donations • Cash Donations for Vet bills - made payable to Brook-Falls Veterinary Hospital • Volunteers to help with cleaning and feeding - more than 5 hours a month, mornings, afternoons and weekends • Pressure Washer Volunteer - to pressure wash cages in the Summer • Handyman Volunteer - for Maintenance projects at the Shelter, preferably Weekends To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact CARE at: 262.628.3719 or by email at: cntrforavianrehab@ sbcglobal.net.

Store Hours: Tue - Thrs 10am - 6pm Fri & Sat 10am - 7pm Sunday 10am - 3pm 2525 S Business Dr Sheboygan, WI 53081

Find us on Facebook

Furry Bottoms Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • 4 - 4-shelve storage units on wheels To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Furry Bottoms Rescue at: 920.449.5084, by email at: info@ furrybottomsrescue.com or visit their website: www.furrybottomsrescue.com. Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary, Inc. of Marion and Green Bay is looking for: • Liquid Laundry Detergent • Anti-bacterial Liquid Dish Soap • Garbage Bags • Bleach • Anti-bacterial Hand Soap • Blankets (new or used) • Sheets (used) • Bath Towels (new or used) • White Multipurpose Printer Paper (8.5 x 11) • Purina Kitten Chow • Caned Cat Food (Friskie’s Plate) • Purina Cat Chow Original • Rubbermaid Pets High Sided Litter Pan (can be found at PetSmart) • Metal Litter Scoops (Durascoop Large Cat Litter Scoop, found at PetSmart) • Large Ceramic Dog Food Dishes • The Loops 2 Leashes (can be found at Fleetfarm or PetSmart) • Canned Dog Food (Lamb and Rice, cans with pop tops only, please) • Dog Treats (Snausages, Liver Treats, Beggiin’ Strips, T’ Bonz, ect.) • Dog Chewies (Rawhides, Dingo Bones, Pressed Bones, ect.) • Dog Toys • Tuffies Ultimate Dog Toys • The Almost Indestructible Ball • Air Kong Squeeker Dog Toys • Jolly Pets Tug and Toss Ball • JW Pet Good Cuz/Bad Cuz Dog Toys • Kong Wubba Dog Toys • Kong Rubber Balls • Kongs • Gift Cards to PetSmart, PetCo, Fleet Farm, Menards • Energy Star Washer and Dryer • Large Van • Cash Donation To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary, Inc. at: 920634-9701 or visit their website: www.happilyeverafterinfo.org. K&R • • • • • • • • • • • •

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue at: 920.627.6727, by email at: mecca@ meccapitbullrescue.com or visit there website at: www.meccapitbullrescue.com. Saving Paws Animal Rescue, Inc. of Appleton is looking for: • Cat Litter • Dry Cat Food (Please no Ol’Roy) • Dry Kitten Food (Please no Ol’Roy) • Canned Cat and Kitten Food • Dog Toys • Dog Rawhides/Chews/Bones • Bleach • Laundry Detergent • Paper Towels • Fly Traps • Any Cleaning Supplies • Bug Spay • Metal or Ceramic Bowls • Styrofoam Bowls • Folders (Red and Blue) • Any Pet Supplies To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Saving Paws Animal Rescue, Inc. at: (920) 209-PAWS (7297) or visit their website at: www.savingpaws. com. Two Left Paws of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Dog/Cat food (Evo, Fromm, Wellnes, Feliade, Canide) • Canned wet food (any kind) • Clumping litter (any kind, non-sented) • Litter scoops • Puppy pads • Dog/Cat treats • Dog/Cat toys • Dog/Cat beds • Towels • Paper towels • Disposable gloves • Kennels • Cages • Live traps for Small Animals • Fleet Farm gift cards To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Two Left Paws Animal Sanctuary at: 920.331.0100 or via their website at: www.twoleftpaws.org.

Small Animal Sanctuary is looking for: Baby Blankets Fleece Blankets Stuffed Animals Hard Plastic Baby Toys or Rattles Bunny/Guinea Pig Toys Natural Small & Large Wicker Baskets Natural Wicker Craft Wreaths PLAIN Rabbit Pellets (no seeds or treats mixed in!) Bagged Hay 16oz or 32oz Water Bottles Ceramic Dishes Treats

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the K&R Animal Sanctuary by email: kr_small_animal_sanctuary@yahoo.com or visit their website at: www.krsmallanimalsanctuary.vpweb.com. Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Paper towels • Lysol Spray • Dog toys • Puppy food - moist and dry • Bowls • Leashes • Collars • Volunteers • Wisconsin Foster Homes

Free Nail Trim with proof of puchase of 2012 Sheb. Co. Dog/Cat License. thanks you for being a responsible pet owner. Only one nail trim per license, can not be combined with any other offer.

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www.sud-z-paws.com


FEBRUARY 2012

PET JOURNAL

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DOG SELLER from page 14. Third, we hear from Monica Gardner of the Humane Society of Waupaca County. The Good, the Bad, and the Ambiguous

See members of the War Dogs group at the Great Lakes Pet Expo on February 4th. 2011. See the Great Lakes Pet Expo ad on page 27.

There is a great article on the No Wisconsin Puppymills site: http://nowisconsinpuppymills.com/goodbreeders. html that outlines what to look for in a quality breeder. Many of those points also apply to a quality shelter or rescue. While you’re on that website, take a look around at some of the photos and stories- you will see why it’s SO important not to support the puppymill industry! Thank goodness for Act 90

I’ve heard some of the whining about Act 90 and the worry about how it was going to affect shelters and rescues. Frankly, I don’t see what the big deal is. I filed our application, printed off a copy of the rules and walked through our And lastly we hear from Danielle Whitshelter with a critical eye. We made a man of Saving Paws Rescue in Appleton. few simple corrections, and waited excitedly to meet our inspector. This new law is groundbreaking and will hopefully stop the exploitation of On the day she arrived, she had an- dogs in puppy mills, auctions, flea marother inspector in tow who was in the kets and hoarding operations disguised final stages of her training. Both were as rescues and shelters. You may be courteous and pleasant, and able to wondering how this affects “real” animal answer our questions. We were found shelters, Saving Paws Animal Rescue has to have one small violation, which was some feedback to share. easily corrected, and not at all a burden on the organization. We already had We find this new law to be great, and a vet at the facility regularly, and that are hopeful this will really make an imhas been increased a bit to keep up with pact on Puppy Mills around the area. the Certificates of Veterinary Inspection We will state that those dogs that come (CVI’s), but that’s certainly not a bad from puppy mills are, most times, in thing, either! We’ve found our adopt- rough shape when they come to us and ers to be happy a CVI accompanies each thankfully for our wonderful fosters and adoption. It gives them piece of mind. volunteer’s patience and kindness we can turn them around. The only inconI personally think the greatest thing venient impact it has had on us has to about this law is that it gives the con- do with the CVI (certified veterinarian sumer a way to sort the good from the inspection) and the reason is because bad. That’s not to say that all who are it puts a little delay on getting the dog not licensed are bad- but at least they to their new home as fast as we used can be pretty well-assured that if they to be able to. It is one more step prior ARE licensed, they’re good. If there’s to the adoption we now have to take, any doubt in their mind, all they have but the positive spin on this is that the to do at a licensed facility is ask to see new home is given past medical records a copy of the latest inspection report. along with this certificate and I am sure Consumers can look that over for viola- it’s reassuring to them to know their tions and decide for themselves. There new family member had just been to are some facilities operating on a condi- the vet and is safe to come home with tional license, meaning they’re awaiting them. We have not had problems with their initial inspection, or they’ve been any sick dogs being sent home before inspected, but had violations that need- but have spoke to a lot of other adopted to be addressed. They may not be ers who have brought dogs home from “up to par” by a consumer’s standpoint, other shelters who have passed away do so it’s important to know whether the fa- to contagious diseases and now are uncility has had it’s final clearance or is still able to have a young pup in their home in the process of compliance. without fear this dog will catch the same disease. So, overall I find this law to be As always, it behooves the consumer a step in the right direction. to be educated and know what questions to ask. Sure, there will be small legitimate shelters, rescues and good This concludes part two of the three breeders who don’t require licensing be- month series on Act 90. Please join cause they don’t handle enough animals us again next month when we will in a year. hear from breeders and veterinarians regarding Act 90.


PET JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2012 25

Trish Bruner

Whats is Trish’s secret for photographing pets? It’s no secret... She just loves pets. She considers it an honor to work with your pets. The end result is a portrait that will help the memory of your pet live forever.

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PET JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2012

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PET JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2012 27


PET JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 2012

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