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WISCONSIN’S RESOURCE FOR ALL ANIMALS Lakeshore Region

September 2011

FREE

Volume 2, Issue 8

Bart’s Little Sister



by Colleen Bertram, Pet Journal Staff Writer In last month’s issue you read the story about the Big yellow lab named Bart who survived Hurricane Katrina. This is another story about Doug and Karen Weiss and their love for animals in need of love, patience, and a lot of tender loving care. After Doug and Karen adopted Bart, Karen told Doug, “No more dogs for a while”. I laugh as I write this because over the short periods of time I’ve spent with Doug and Karen, Doug has a very magical, infectious and mischievous grin. Knowing Karen said,” No more dogs for a while,” Doug set out for the Tri-county humane society in Green Lake, Wisconsin. I’m sure Doug would agree that he was just in the neighborhood. Later on that day, Karen came home from work, walked in the door and found Doug at the top of the stairs holding a ball of fur. Karen said,” I thought I said no more dogs?” Doug held up the dog and said,” I didn’t bring home another dog; I brought home three quarters of a dog!” The little red Pomeranian had only three legs. They named her TriPod. Doug began to tell Karen what had happened to Tri-Pod in the first five years of her life.

In This Issue Top 10 Household Dangers to Pet Birds - page 4

Eco News: Aliens in Wisconsin - page 5

Incredible Journeys by Incredible Cats - page 7

Thundershirts to Calm Anxiety - page 8

Angel Wing’s Story - page 9

Welcome Home Furry Baby - page 13

Tri Pod had been severely abused by her previous owners. Tri-Pod was in the humane society for quite some time, she was hard to adopt out because of her condition and she was not potty trained. Doug handed Tri-Pod to Karen and an instant bond of love and trust began. Karen fixed her new little love up with diapers that are taken off when they go outside. It is so cute because when it is time to go outside, Tri-Pod rolls over on her back and waits to have her diaper taken off. Tri-Pod loves her big brother Bart but she does rule the house. Karen and TriPod are bonded with a powerful bond of trust and unconditional love. Tri-Pod has no problem keeping up with everyone when out for a walk, but Tri-Pod also loves to be carried in a back pack on Karen’s back.

see

Tri-Pod on page 9.


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September 2011

Contact: Linda Ledbeter (920) 892-6180 energeticconnections@gmail.com

PET JOURNAL

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PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

ABOUT

OUR

COVER MODEL

Our September cover model is Buford, a Double Yellow head Parrot who is in his late teens. He is a rescue from CARE (www.centerforavianrehab.org) in Hubertus, WI. His human companion is Mary Z of Sheboygan. Photo courtesy of Legacy Studios, Sheboygan, WI in 2010.

September 2011

Editors Notes

Dear Readers,

ness for you staff or clients please email our distribution department at distribuThank you for reading the September tion@petjournalmidwest.com issue of Pet Journal. Next month, OctoBecome a friend of Pet Journal on ber, will mark the first Anniversary of the Facebook! Join the growing group of Lakeshore Edition. Pet Journal readers following us, and The staff of Pet Journal would like to upload a picture of your pets, it could welcome our three new columnists! Dr. be featured as our pet of the week! Karen Strickfaden of the Country Care Would you like to see your pets in Pet Animal Complex in Green Bay is replacing Dr. Dell on our “Ask the Vet” column Journal? Email a picture of your pet(s) which appears on page 10 this month. to petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com Cheryl Larson of Down to Earth in Green and we will feature them in our Pet Bay is replacing Shellie Jarquart on the Pictures Page. No email? No problem. “Holistic & Natural” column which is Mail a copy of the picture to the Pet on page 4. And last but not least, Di- Journal mailbox, listed below. All picana Schmidt of Happy Tails Grooming in tures received by mail will be returned Howards Grove is replacing Dede on the after scanning. “Grooming your Pet” column which apHave you seen the updated events pears on page 15. All of our columnist would like to answer your questions, page on the Pet Journal website yet? you can find their email address with It now features an interactive calendar by goggle, as well as, the event posters their columns. and event listings it had before. To acAre you interested in Advertising in cess the events page go to the Pet JourPet Journal? For more information on nal home page and click on the events advertising in this edition of Pet Journal page link at the top of the page. email lakeshoreadvertising@petjournalmidwest.com. If you would like to , Editor have pet journal delivered to your busi-

Lee J Schneider

Table of Contents 1 - Bart’s Little Sister by C. Bertram

3 - About our Cover Model Publishers Notes 4 - Top 10 Household Dangers to Pet Birds by L. Drew

Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets Hosted C. Larson

5 - Ask Scrappy Q & A

Hosted by Scrappy the Pit Bull

Eco News: Aliens in Wisconsin - part 3 by R. Barton

6 - Calendar of Events 7 - Incredible Journeys by Incredible Cats

If you have a questions for a specific columnist please use the email at the end of their respective columns. If you have a questions for a specific department, please contact them via their email address listed below. General Information................... petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com Advertising Department............. advertising@petjournalmidwest.com Distribution Location Requests... distribution@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Journal Archives...................... archives@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Photo Submissions................. petphoto@petjournalmidwest.com Our Website........................................ www.petjournalmidwest.com

9 - Angel Wing’s Story by L. Ledbeter

9 - Pet Adoption Section 10 - Ask the Vet Hosted by Dr. K. Strickfaden

12 - Photos of your Pets 13 - Welcome Home Furry Baby

from CatsInternational.org

Pets and Ticks by S. Minaker

14 - Find Pet Journal 15 - Grooming your Pet Hosted by D. Schmidtl

Coming in October 16 - Classified Ads

from CatsInternational.org

17 - Event Posters

Ask the Alpha Dog

18 - Pet Journal Word Search

Hosted by T. Pool Pet Journal newspaper is published by LSRB Media, LLC, on a monthly basis and is available free of charge to readers at various locations in the region that it is printed. Questions or comments regarding content in this edition can be made to lakeshore@petjournalmidwest.com or by calling our offices at: (920) 393-4818. Pet Journal is always on the lookout for new advertiser’s if you are interested in advertising with us please contact the Lakeshore Region advertising department at lakeshoreadvertising@petjournalmidwest.com. To contact Pet Journal by mail please send all correspondence to our mailbox at: Pet Journal attn: Lakeshore Region Advertising 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524.

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8 - Thundershirts to Calm Anxiety by V. Rabe


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PET JOURNAL

September 2011

Top 10 Household Dangers to Pet Birds from Lori Drew, Center for Avian Rehabilitation & Education (C.A.R.E.) When you are a pet owner, you are 4. Inappropriate Foods. These constantly looking for things in your range from those that are just unhome that could be toxic or harmful to healthy to those that might kill pet your pets. Birds are even more suscepbirds. Anything high in sugar or tible to certain toxins and odors than are salt is inappropriate, as are fatty dogs and cats. Here is what we think foods. More serious are things are the Top 10 Household Dangers to such as chocolate, which is toxic to Pet Birds: many pets. Caffeinated or alcoholic beverages are also dangerous. 1. Poisoning. Birds are susceptible Avocado should also be avoided. to a wide range of toxins which can injure or kill them either by inges- 5. Electrical Cords. Birds explore tion or inhalation. One of the most with their beaks, and exposed common toxicities in pet birds is electrical cords pose a danger if insecticides sprayed in the home. bitten. Keep cords and appliancOthers include ammonia, bleach, es away from the bird cage, and pine quat (example Pine-Sol), oven conceal cords as much as possible. cleaner, glues, nail polish remover, Covering exposed cords with corpaint, perfumes, heavy metals (i.e., rugated plastic tubing (available at lead and zinc). Poisonous plants hardware stores) may help reduce are also a danger. the danger. 2. Non Stick Coatings (when overheated). This technically falls under poisoning but warrants a special mention because use of these products is very common. When overheated, the non-stick coating emits fumes that are very toxic and will kill birds. You’ve probably heard of Teflon being toxic, but it’s not just Teflon, it’s anything with non-stick coatings. This coating is found on non-stick cookware but also waffle irons, bread machines, irons, ironing board covers, curling irons, space heaters, blow dryers and more. 3. Open Water. Toilets are the most common source of open water in the house, and it is all too easy for your pet bird to fall in and drown. Other water sources to watch for are sinks, bathtubs, buckets and water bowls of dogs/cats. The kitchen can also be a dangerous place if there are hot pots of water on the stove.

6. Poorly Made Toys. Even toys designed for parrots may not be safe for them. Make sure your parrots (especially larger ones) are not able to break off or remove any parts and swallow them. Rope toys can also be dangerous if they are long enough to get tangled up in, and there have been cases of parrots separating the strands on braided ropes, inserting their heads, and strangling as a result. 7. Ceiling Fans. Ceiling fans are a real danger to flighted birds – serious injuries and death has occurred when birds fly into them. Birds tend to be nervous with things moving above them, so may be stressed out by a ceiling fan running near their cage.

see

CARE on page 8.

Breakfast with the Bison

Sunday, September 18th ‡ 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

LINCOLN PARK ZOO

1215 N 8th St, Manitowoc ‡ (920) 683-4685 ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡ ‡

Everyone Welcome Children’s games All You Can Eat Animal education PANCAKE BUFFET Door Prizes Members $4.00 Raffles Non-Members $6.00 Behind-the-Scenes Tours Children 3 & under Free

FREE ADMISSION to the ZOO www.Manitowoc.org/lincolnparkzoo Sponsored by: Lincoln Park Zoological Society

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Holistic & Natural Options for Your Pets by Cheryl Larson, Down to Earth Nutrition

“Monotony is not only boring it is also dangerous. Cats that eat only tuna and dogs that eat only one kind of meat eventually suffer serious health problems. So do pets that eat the same processed food at every meal.” — “The Encyclopedia of Natural Pet Care” by CJ Puotinen Our pets need a variety of highquality meat, bones, vegetables, fruits, seeds, nuts and legumes or grains. The most important component of the diet is variety. Each species has evolved on a constantly changing assortment of foods. Protein and bone sources include beef, lamb, chicken, turkey, duck, pheasant, quail, venison, beaver, fish and shellfish. Some food brands offer varieties containing kangaroo and summer brushtail. Simply, each protein source has a different nutrient profile and over your pet’s lifetime you will be ensuring that they receive these different nutrients. Pets that eat only one food are far more likely to become intolerant of that food. I have witnessed many pets that cannot tolerate chicken or lamb or whatever they have been eating day after day. Allergies, irritable bowel syndrome, vomiting, diarrhea, and ear problems are all associated with food intolerance. More serious health problems can develop if we ignore our pet being “finicky” and not wanting to eat their regular food. That food may be causing problems that we aren’t aware of yet (like stomachaches). Animals have been known to notice if their food is moldy, rancid or toxic in some way. Many pets were being picky at the time of the last major pet food recall. Often we are tempted to put good food on top to encourage them not to be picky. That ‘good’ food should, however, be their actual meal. When our pets are eating a variety of healthy great-tasting foods, and they stop eating or turn their noses up at a certain food, we are able to identify and eliminate the problem more easily. For example, if fish is always rejected, then you can eliminate that one protein and rotate through the many other options. If your pet turns down other healthy options, then it may be time for a trip to the vet. Healthy adult animals only fast themselves for a few days. Some pets become so accustomed to the one food we are feeding that they don’t like change. This can cause trouble when health issues require a diet modification. Animals raised on variety enjoy many foods and adjust to diet or medication requirements more readily.

Richard Pitcairn, DVM, Ph.D., points out that the environment affects the food value of your protein sources as well. Soil, harvesting methods and storage all affect the nutrients of your food choices. The most important way to compensate for this is to aim for a wide variety of foods. Another important consideration is to consider rotating through four to five different brands of food. Many food companies now offer different proteins or grains, but all of the other ingredients are the same across the product line. Each company has a philosophy about what ingredients make the best dog food and how much of each vitamin to use. By rotating between four to five different manufacturers, you will minimize the risk of exposing too much or too little of a nutrient over a lifetime. In the case of a possible food recall, you will have minimized your pet’s exposure by choosing foods not all processed in the same plant.

see

FOOD on page 8.


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

5

ECO NEWS

ASK SCRAPPY! by Scrappy, the Lovable Pit Bull askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com

Greetings, one and all! Scrappy here and I’m hoping you’re getting out and enjoying what’s left of summer. Autumn is coming and it’s my favorite time of the year, not too hot…not too cold. Unfortunately, it’s soon followed by the horrors of... WINTER!!! Frozen paws, frozen nose, frozen tail, and a snowy yard covered in bunny tracks. I know I complain about the bunnies allot, but I don’t trust them. They used to be afraid of me, but their fear is gone and on some dark night they’ll make their move, I just know it. On to happier thoughts, over the past weekend I was able to get out and go for a truck ride with a couple of my human friends. They opened all the windows and the sunroof for me, though they seemed disappointed that I didn’t go completely nuts over this and rip out mouthfuls of upholstery. I imagine if I had tried to claw my way past them to jump out the window, they wouldn’t have cared for that much either. Besides, the crazy dog routine is soooo two years ago. I’ve given up trying to figure them out. I asked my kitty friend Misty what her thoughts are on why humans act so crazy, she told me not to worry about and just enjoy the ride. I can’t stand it when she’s right, which according to her is always. Cats are so rational and logical. So, we’re on this pilgrimage to look at trucks. I don’t understand why, they already have a truck and it seems to work fine. It’s not like I need a new toy to chew on all the time. Heck, they get better with age and take on that extra yummy flavor. Don’t wrinkle your nose and say “yuck”, you just can’t appreciate the finer things in life. Besides, it’s a dog thing. So we drive, drive, drive, stop and look at trucks, and repeat several more times. I’m bored out of my fur, but I can’t let them know that cause that would could mean no more truck rides. We eventually return home and I’m exhausted. All I care about right now is food, water, a trip to the local tree, and flopping onto my bed for sleep. I don’t even bother to give a condescending glare to one of the crazy bunnies running around my yard. That should let you know how tired I was. Hmmm, let me see what’s new. Labor Day is upon us and that means food, food, alcohol, and more yummy food. Though I shouldn’t have to remind, I suppose I will. As with any holiday involving your four legged buddies, you have to take special care what we have access to. Though small amounts of room temperature meats are fine, and when I say small, I mean small. Sweets, spicy foods, and alcohol are strictly a no no. Es-

September 2011

Aliens in Wisconsin Part 2

pecially alcohol. I know some of my lesser brethren will do a back flip and bite their own tails for a brat, but as cute as we may act, you have to say no. The alternative could mean an expensive trip the emergency vet or worse. Fall is also the time of the year when some people decide to change their engine coolant. If you’re not aware ethylene glycol based coolants are extremely toxic to animals. Many animals can’t resist its sweet taste and will lick up spills they find available. Here is a very simple two-step process to follow and you won’t even break a sweat doing it. First, switch to propylene glycol based coolants. They may cost a little more, but our lives are worth a little extra money. Second, clean up any spills or messes you may make. Just remember what mom told you, “you made the mess, you clean it up”. Now, don’t make me have to get your mom after you. Well, I hope you all have (or had, if you’re reading this late) a great Labor Day and enjoyed the rest of your summer. Take care and I’ll see you next month. Take Care

Scrappy Editors Note: Scrappy love to get mail and questions from his readers; please email him at askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail: Pet Journal, Attn: Ask Scrappy! 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Misty, Assistant writer of Ask Scrappy!

by Rick Barton, Pet Journal Staff Writer rbarton@petjournalmidwest.coml This month’s first invasive species is the Spotted Knapweed. Originally from Europe and Asia, this plant is believed to have first shown up on our shores in the 1890’s. Spotted Knapweed is a biennial, which means it lives two years and flowers in its second year. It produces a bloom which can be white, pink, or purple. The bloom measures nearly 1” across with thin petals. The plant grows between 3’ to 4’ in height, with leaves up to 6” long at the base which gradually shortens toward the top. Knapweed blooms from July to August. Normally found on road sides and at the edges of fields, it has invaded many of Wisconsin’s prairies and grasslands. The plant produces roughly 1,000 to 25,000 seeds per year. Seeds can remain viable for 5 or more years and can germinate in a variety of environmental conditions. When knapweed invades an area, much of the native plant life begins to die away. Knapweed produces a substance which it secretes into the soil killing neighboring plants. Biologists from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources are concerned that many of the plants killed by knapweed are essential for nesting cover for native birds and wildlife who are found in the grasslands and prairies of the state. Prevention of infestations is essential. When leaving an infected area always check clothing, vehicles, machinery, and animals for seeds. Seeds are roughly ¼” in length, brownish in color, with a notch on the side of the base and short bristles on the tip. There are a number of options available to states for controlling this invasive plant. Biological control uses various species of insects to reduce seed production by weakening the plant or eating the seeds. Chemical control uses herbicides over a length of time for knapweed control. Before using any kind of herbicide yourself, consult the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture for recommendations regarding your specific situation and safety requirements. Controlled fire, though useful in other situations, has given mixed results in suppressing knapweed. Though herbicides used on new growth following a fire has proven to be more effective than herbicides alone. If your infestation is small enough, you may wish to hand-pull the plant when the soil is damp. Like most weeds, knapweed has a hardy taproot which can burrow very deep into the ground. Be certain to remove the entire root to prevent regrowth. When handling knapweed it is important to always wear gloves. It has been found that knapweed contains carcinogens, always avoid direct skin contact. Knapweed is also toxic to horses that may graze on it, though it can be safely grazed on by cattle and sheep. The next alien invader is well known to many, the Gypsy Moth. Originally from Europe and Asia, it is also known as the European or Asian Gypsy moth.

see

Eco on page 11.


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PET JOURNAL

September 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

SEPTEMBER 2011 SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

1 Lincoln Park Zoo Open Manitowoc, WI Monday - Sunday 7:00 am - 7:00 pm Until Friday, Sept. 2

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Labor Day

6

7

Patriot Day

SATURDAY

3 Two Left Paws at Pet Supply PLUS, 1817 N 8th St, Sheb. 11 AM – 3 PM. Two Left Paws at Feed Bag, 10900 N Port Washington Rd, Mequon 11 AM – 3 PM.

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10 See pg 17 for more

9

events!

Furry Bottoms Rescue Sheb. Co. Humane at Pet Smart, 4013 Hwy Society at Pet Smart National Adopt-A-Thon 28 at Deer Trace, Sheboygan 9:30 AM – 11:30 AM. Two Left Paws at Pet Smart National Dog Fest, Pet Supply Adopt-A-Thon Port, 620 E Green Bay

Lincoln Park Zoo Open Manitowoc, WI Sundays 11:00 am - 3:00 pm For September & October

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All Events that appear on this page are also available for viewing on the Events page of the Pet Journal website, www. petjournalmidwest.com. Events will be posted to our website first and then added to the Print Edition as space allows. If you have a smart phone with a barcode reading program you can scan the code on the facing page to right to go to the events page.

Lincoln Park Zoo Open Manitowoc, WI Monday - Saturday 7:00 am - 3:00 pm Starting Sat., Sept. 3

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FRIDAY

12

13

14

15

For dates and times please Rd, Saukville see the Pet Journal Website 10 AM - 3 PM events page for more infor- See ad on page 11. mation.. Two Left Paws at Pet

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Supply Port, Dog Fest event 10 AM - 3 PM

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Furry Bottoms Rescue 2nd Annual Brat Fry & Poker Run at Vibez 2513 S 8th St, Sheboygan 10 AM - ?? 920 458-9965

Responsible Dog Ownership Day, by HTAC Sheb. Falls Dog Park 635 Old Cty Rd PP 9 AM – 5 PM.

See ad on page 19.

See the Pet Journal Website events page for more information.

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Breakfast with the Bison at Lincoln Park Zoo, 1215 N 8th St, Manitowoc 10 AM – 1 PM 920 683-4685

First Day of Autumn

Two Left Paws at Responsible Dog Ownership Day 11 AM - 3 PM

See ad on page 4.

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Two Left Paws at PETCO, 4144 Harbor Town Ln, Manitowoc 11 AM - 3 PM

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Furry Bottoms Rescue at Random Lake Family Fun Fest Day 11 AM – 4 PM Sheb. Co. Humane Society at Memorial Mall 3347 Kohler Memorial Dr., Sheb. 11 AM - 3 PM Two Left Paws at Grafton PetSmart, 1030 N Port Washington Rd., Grafton 11 AM - 3 PM

Pet Journal provides this calendar as a service to the local community. If you have an event that you would like listed please email us at: petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com, with the following information: date(s) and time(s) of event, your contact information, a short description of what will be happening, if it is a fundraiser please list who the proceeds are going to, and please list the subject as “PJ Calendar Submission.” Please send this to us no later than the 23rd of the month for inclusion into the next months issue. Thank you.

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PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

September 2011

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Ask the Alpha Dog by Alpha Dog - Tamara Pool, 4-Paws Private Training, Sheboygan, WI alpha-dog@petjournalmidwest.com Welcome to Potty Training 101. Potty training is the biggest problem people have when they adopt or buy a dog. The first thing to remember is to not get frustrated. Keep calm and understand that there will be accidents and there will be setbacks. Just remember to stay calm and collected. And NEVER SHOVE THEIR NOSE IN THEIR ACCIDENTS!!! Once they finish messing... they have forgotten what they did and all you are showing them is that they should fear you. Step one is to be patient and set a schedule like the following: 6 am – wake up and take dog out 6:30 am – feed dog 7 am – take dog out 9 am – take dog out 11 am – take dog out 1 pm – take dog out …you get the picture. The new puppy needs to be taken out every hour until their bladder matures. At 5 months old you should be able wait up to 3 hours between potty breaks. Times to take the dog out include 15 minutes after eating or drinking, 15 minutes after any extensive play, and right away when they wake up. Just like people, when a dog wakes up they have to go potty right away. Even older dogs that are adopted could benefit from this schedule

Incredible Journeys by Incredible Cats from CatsInternational.org There are two types of homing journey made by cats. The first type occurs after a pet has been stolen, given away to another owner, moves with the family to another house, or gets lost a long way from home. Here the challenge is to return to a familiar home base after starting out in unfamiliar surroundings. Although this may sound difficult, there are many authenticated cases where this has been accomplished with apparent ease and in a very short space of time. The explanations for this ability center around the cat’s sensitivity to the earth’s magnetic forces. More difficult to explain is the second type of homing journey made by cats which occurs when the cat’s owners have moved away and left the cat behind. To reunite with the owners the cat must travel through unfamiliar territory to a destination previously unknown to the cat. Dr. Joseph Rhine of Duke University coined the term “psitrailing” for this behavior. Because of the possibility of confusing a similarly marked cat with the owner’s pet left behind, researchers have insisted that there be incontestable distinguishing marks, physical abnormalities, specific previous injuries or specific behavior patterns that would rule out it simply being a case of mistaken identity. Among the cases authenticated by Drs Joseph Rhine and Sara Feather of

Duke University, is that of Beau Cat, a pet in Louisiana who was reported to be missing while the family was looking for a house in Texas. The father stayed in Texas and the family came home but there was still no sign of Beau Cat. Five months later, when the family was settled in Texas, the cat appeared in the schoolyard where the mother taught and her son, was a pupil. Another cat that was left behind in California, appeared 14 months later in Oklahoma. And still another, journeyed 2300 miles during five months, from New York to California, to join its owner.

These phenomenal treks are not limited to American cats. One account involves a French cat which left home and succeeded in finding a young man who had left for military service.

see

Journey on page 19.

It is very common for dogs to be surrendered because people won’t take the time to potty train. Therefore, a lot of dogs in shelters are not properly potty trained. It doesn’t take any more effort to potty train a 2 year old dog than it does to train a puppy. It can also help with developing a set of boundaries your dog must live by. Giving a small treat or biscuit after they’ve “done their duty” will help to reinforce the behavior of going outside to eliminate. Keep things very consistent. Always go out the same door, to the same spot, along the same route. You may find this boring, but they will learn very quickly this way. It also limits the areas of the yard affected by the ammonia in the urine. If you take your dog out and they don’t “go,” just bring them back in, keep them on leash, and in a couple

minutes, take them back out. This turn around will teach that when they go out, they must go. When he ends up having an accident, DON’T GET MAD!!! I can’t stress this enough. You must remove him from the situation and clean it up without him seeing you. If he sees you cleaning up, he will view you as the “mom” of the den. When a puppy is with his litter, the mom cleans up after the litter. Don’t let yourself be in that position. It will only teach them that they can eliminate in the house and you will keep the den clean. Never use the kennel as punishment for messing on the floor. This can turn what should be safe haven for them into a “cage.” And even though it is, technically, a cage, they must view the kennel as their house or bed. One final tip… if you limit what goes in… that will limit what comes out. Give your dog ice cubes instead of water during the day. This will provide hydration without causing more accidents. Give water with food and 2-3 other times throughout the day. While you are potty training your dog, remember this: Humans take years to potty train, most dogs are potty trained within a couple months. Have fun with your new dog, and remember to be the alpha dog! I always welcome questions from readers. If you wonder why your dog is doing something or you need a little guidance with training, please email me at alphadog@petjournalmidwest.com.

Editors Note: Alpha Dog, Tamara welcomes your questions on pet training, please email her at the email above or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Alpha Dog 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524


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PET JOURNAL

September 2011

Thunder Shirts to calm Anxiety by Vicki Rabe Harrison, Victoria’s Pet Nutrition Center Thunder Shirts for dogs are so pop- torso straps. The Velcro fasteners make ular with dog owners because they’re Thundershirt very adjustable to many easy to use and they bring immediate different body shapes. For best results, and lasting comfort to both dog and dog offer your dog a treat when introducing owner. Nobody likes to see their dog her to Thundershirt. That way she will suffering from being nervous or afraid. associate the Thundershirt with reward Thundershirt gives natural, comforting, and positivity and welcome its use. immediate relief. Over 80%* of dogs show significant improvement with COST EFFECTIVE: The ThunderThundershirt and in most cases there is shirt is reusable and washable and for no need for training. many pets eliminates costs associated with anxiety such as drug therapies or Works for: nutritional supplements. • Separation anxiety • Noise Anxiety (Fireworks, WASHABLE: Thundershirts are thunderstorms) made from a durable, washable fabric • Barking Anxiety that can be washed when necessary in • Travel Anxiety a regular cycle using regular laundry de• Anxiety from Crates tergent and warm water. Hang to dry. Thundershirt uses touch therapy similar to that used in other therapies. Its calming effects can greatly reduce issues related to walking on leash, reactivity, or just general hyperactivity and excitability. Some customers use Thundershirt before expecting guests to help the dog stay calm when visitors arrive.

Thundershirt comes in seven different sizes... XXS, XS, S, M, L, XL, and XXL. See the table below to find the right size for your dog. Like people, dogs come in many different shapes and sizes, so if your dog has unusual proportions, you may need to go up or down a size versus the “standard” measurements. But the Thundershirt is deThundershirt can also be used to signed to be very adjustable to accomcalm dogs on leashes and allow the dog modate different dog shapes and still be to be more focused on owner instruc- easy to put on. tions or commands. Very excited dogs have trouble paying attention during Size Chest Size Weight training. Thundershirt calms your dog XXS 9” - 13.5” < 12 lbs. down so he or she can physically and mentally participate in training. XS 13” - 18” 10 - 18 lbs. Does touch work? This pressure wrap technique for treating anxiety is already used in various therapies: • Touch dog trainers use pressure to address a wide variety of anxieties. • Veterinarians use pressure to relax cattle when they are administering vaccinations. • People with autism use pressure to relieve their persistent anxiety. • Children with certain behavioral problems use pressure shirts and weighted vests to relax and focus. • Parents use swaddling to calm an inconsolable newborn infant. TO USE: Thundershirt is easy to use and begins to help your dog almost immediately. Simply lay the Thundershirt vest over your dog’s back and secure with the adjustable Velcro chest and

S

16” - 23”

15 - 25 lbs.

M

18” - 26”

20 - 50 lbs.

L

24” - 32”

40 - 70 lbs.

XL

31” - 40”

60 - 110 lbs.

XXL

38” - 50”

> 110 lbs.

see

Thunder on page 18.

www.petjournalmidwest.com

CARE from page 4.

Food from page 4.

8. Windows, Doors and Mirrors. Windows and mirrors pose a danger to birds that might fly into them. Even birds with clipped wings can fly into a window, door or mirror. Of course, open windows and doors are a means for escape. Interior doors can be risky if the bird likes to sit on the top of an open door – the bird could be injured or killed if the door is closed.

I understand the temptation to stick with a food that is working, especially if you solved some health problems with that food, but there is so much evidence that eating only one kind of food will lead to eventual problems that I strongly encourage you to seek out the minimum of four to five foods. But, in doing so, do not compromise your standards about the sources and quality of food. You can find a variety in raw frozen food, freeze-dried and dehydrated foods and freeze-dried minimally processed kibble. Your confidence will grow as you see your vibrant pet respond enthusiastically to new tastes and textures.

9. Other Pets. While birds often live happily with other household pets, owners should always be careful when other pets are near the birds. The motion of birds can set off the prey instinct of cats or dogs, and an infected bite or scratch can quickly be fatal to a bird. 10. Air Quality. Birds are especially sensitive to contaminants in the air. Aerosol products of any kind should not be used around your bird. Cigarette smoking has been implicated in respiratory disease in pet birds. Carbon monoxide is also dangerous, so use a carbon monoxide detector in your home, and be careful not to run your car in an attached garage. C.A.R.E. 3053 Beechwood Ind. Ct., Ste 1 Hubertus, WI 53033 262 628-3719 cntrforavianrehab@sbcglobal.net www.centerforavianrehab.org

Cheryl Larson has been raising and training Giant Schnauzers for 22 years. Twelve of those years have been focused on feeding a raw biologically appropriate diet to her dogs and cats. Some of the courses and seminars Cheryl has taken include Positive Behavior Training, Aggressive Dog Training, Natural Nutrition for Companion Animals, and aromatherapy & Bach Flower Essentials.


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

Pictured Karen and Doug Weiss with Bart, photo courtesy of Colleen Bertram.

by Linda Ledbeter, Animal Connections We all have a story that often defines who we are in the present day. For people we hold onto our unpleasant stories as if it were a badge of honor, giving credence to our current behaviors. I am a foster mom for Furry Bottoms Rescue, a Healing Touch For Animals Practitioner, Healing Touch for people Practitioner, Minister, Reiki Practitioner, along with being a wife, grandmother and a basketful of other skills and responsibilities, it is not uncommon for me to come home with a dog or child in tow. When I received an email requesting that I take in a four year old Pit Bull mix with separation anxiety and other small behavioral issues by the name of Angel, I instantly thought to myself, NO WAY! We had a new teenager living with us and my husband was gone 10-12 hours every day, not to mention fostering for Furry Bottoms Rescue. After several email correspondences it became clear why this dog began developing these behaviors. Angel was adopted from a shelter in Naperville, Illinois at the age 7 months, this was her second adoption. Life with her new family was secure until unemployment and loss of the family’s home became too much for her to handle. The high stress and chaos with the given circumstances and her empathic tendency the only intervention would be to relinquish to a shelter or we take her. In a shelter setting she certainly would have died, with us she had a chance. We agreed to take her until the family regained their footing, found employment and a secure place to live. A week before Halloween, Angel Wings joined our household. She weighed about thirty pounds, every vertebrae and rib visible from across the room. Head held low, stress lines surrounded the dark sad sunken eyes,

PETS AVAILABLE

FOR

ADOPTION

Looking for a girl who enjoys the simple things in life? Meet Emma, a quiet and gentle female 9-year-old Domestic Shorthair cat. This sweet feline enjoys nothing more than a quiet evening with you being brushed, or relaxing in front of your window on her kitty condo. Once she is comfortable with you, she will easily come back for lots of petting and head rubs. For more information on Emma, or any of our other feline companions available at the Wisconsin Humane Society Ozaukee Campus, please visit www.ozaukeehumane.org, or call (262)377-7580

The Pet Journal Adoption Section Brought to by these sponsors: To find out how to have your business listed here call our offices at: (920) 393-4818

9

Angel Wing’s Story

Tri-Pod from page 1. Thank you again Doug and Karen for having hearts of gold, filled with unconditional love for animals that may not have had a chance in the world of making it out alive. I again have been blessed to bring this story and look forward to bringing our readers yet another story of the blessings from Doug and Karen Weiss.

September 2011

a questioning look penetrated into the depths of my heart. Her life had fallen apart, and this was just another traumatic event, separation from family. For the next week we began adjusting to addressing two dogs with the name Angel, our eleven year old husky was also Angel. Angel Blue and Angel Wings quickly adapted to the additional name and quickly became friends. A new diet, patience, loves and Healing Touch for Animals therapy, Angel Wings settled into her new surroundings. By Christmas she had gained nearly eight pounds, the profound sadness still lingered in her big brown eyes. I was a little concerned that she was not responding as quickly as the other dogs coming in with similar backgrounds.

Early January Angel took her first fall late evening and within a few hours she was unable to walk without toppling over. When lying down, she spread her front legs apart to keep from falling onto her side, Angel was declining quickly. In the next two days we had consulted with two veterinarians and

AT

AREA RESCUES

AND

without an MRI (neither the family nor we had the funds for) to confirm a diagnosis of either brain tumor or a lesion, both of which is fatal, it was suggested we euthanize her. Angel’s family was devastated, lost in their own struggles, asked if I could I handle the arrangements. Several days had past, my heart heavy with grief and frustration. My logical mind said to accept it as it is, the heart felt otherwise. Sitting at the table I said a simple prayer, “God, what am I missing, is there anything I can do?” I instantly heard, “You have the tools.” I shot out of my chair, laughing and crying as I ran for my red-light unit. I began directing the cold red laser light into the area of the brain I knew was affected, with one minute intervals for five minutes, waited for thirty minutes and repeated a second session. The following morning, Angel was walking without falling! Weak and unsteady on her feet, hope was restored and I knew she was going to live. Next step was to locate a holistic veterinarian who would work with me in her recovery. A friend suggested Dr. Karen Strickfaden from the Country Care Animal Clinic just south of Green Bay. Together Dr. Karen Strickfaden and I saved Angel’s life and set her on the road to a full recovery. The severe tilting of the head was in part when she ran into a tree, and from an old injury. Whatever was happening within the brain is also believed to be a result of an old injury received as a puppy. Within two months of Bio Com treatments, chiropractic care, Healing Touch for Animals therapy, she was back to enjoying her favorite game, Frisbee. The sadness in her eyes was nearly gone, and all that remained was slight personality change.

see

Angel on page 10.

SHELTERS

Fonz was transferred to The Washington County Humane Society back in April of this year. He was extremely emaciated and had a serious infection. After months of antibiotics, he’s been given the go-ahead for adoption by his veterinarian. Full of energy, Fonz would love to be your running, walking, or jogging partner and would likely excel in agility and obedience training. He is a very intelligent boy with the drive and willingness to learn. He is good with other dogs, cats (although he may chase a running kitty), and children 6 years old and up. Please stop in to WCHS to meet the Fonz! Contact The Washington County Humane Society 262-677-4388 (Inspected & licensed by the Dept. of Animal Health – DATCP License #266935-DS)

Help Sponsor the Pet Journal Adoption Section!

Help Sponsor the Pet Journal Adoption Section!

Help Sponsor the Pet Journal Adoption Section!

To find out how to have your business listed here call our office at: (920) 393-4818

To find out how to have your business listed here call our office at: (920) 393-4818

To find out how to have your business listed here call our office at: (920) 393-4818


10

September 2011

Angel from page 9. A week prior to the physical symptoms, we had noticed a lower tolerance level with the other dogs; she began to growl and then snap if they did not respond to her verbal warning. At first I thought she was simply being a brat, but as they say, hind sight is 20/20, I remember clearly my personality had changed drastically from a whiplash received from a car accident years before, thus it was for her as well. Other symptoms I missed were the squinting of the right eye, slight tilt of the head and sleeping more.

PET JOURNAL

www.petjournalmidwest.com

as we buried her. Another young dog by the name of BoBo arrived as a foster, helping Angel Wings further in her recovery. He has found his permanent home with us as well. Rescues and shelters have seen a dramatic rise in abandoned or relinquished pets the past years with the increase of unemployment and foreclosures; everyone suffers including the pets. If you want to help and don’t know how, consider fostering for a reputable rescue, volunteer at your local shelter, adopt or support these organizations with your donations. We thank you, the animal’s thank you and their future families thank you. If you are experiencing changes in your life and have noticed

Ask the Vet by Dr. Karen M. Strickfaden, Countrycare Animal Complex, Green Bay, WI ask-the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com • The correct nutrition and suppleAs animals move through life, they ments are especially important as go through many of the same aging the body ages and cannot assimiprocesses that humans do. Their hair late nutrients as well as when he/ may turn gray, their body seems to wear she was younger. out and their senses dim. Diseases that are commonly known to afflict humans • Exercise is important to keep their also affect our pets: kidney, heart, and bodies from deteriorating physically. liver disease, tumors, cancer, diabetes, (Use common sense for the approdepression, “Alzheimer’s”, etc. priate type & amount of exercise.) We need to consider the typical • Watch for any (even subtle) physilifespan for a pet and realize that they cal or behavioral changes so that age much quicker than humans do. As they can be addressed as soon as a rule of thumb, smaller breeds of dogs possible. live longer than larger breeds of dogs, & cats tend to live longer than dogs. Different breeds and lifestyles can also afAge Comparison Chart fect the aging process. For pets that are younger than 5 The old saying was seven dog years years old, you can approximate as folfor every ‘human’ year. See the table lows: for a more accurate comparison of your pet’s age to “human years”. For examDog/Cat Age Human Age ple, if your dog is 75 lbs. and is 8 years 3 months 5 years old...it would be equivalent to a 55 year old human. 6 months 10 years

Five months after her arrival, the family relinquished Angel Wings into our care permanently. This furthered Angel Wing’s stability and security and assisted in the recovery process. Knowing she was safe, loved and a permanent family member, she learned the art of not taking on the humans’ problems, and chose to live with joy; something we humans should be doing as well. The sadness dissipated and all that remains is warm, knowing, brown eager eyes, and a heart that will warm the coldest of hearts. Residual symptoms that I watch for is the squinting of the right eye and a slight swelling over the right temple region indicating a headache and the tightening of neck muscles. During these few days, she is less tolerant of other dogs, especially those who have not learned Doggie Etiquette. As time passes, the headaches are fewer and her patience level has increased. It has been nearly three years since her arrival, our lives forever changed. My husband who made it quite clear a Pit Bull would not be allowed in our household, moved past his fear, accepted a Pit Bull mix in need and now allows her to sleep with him; first dog ever to sleep in our bed! (This is not a practice I recommend.) Angel Blue passed at the age of 13 ½, Angel Wings watched

behavioral changes, ask for help, your pet is stressing out. Together everyone can move into a greater tomorrow. Photos: Page 9: Angle Wings Page 10: Angel Wings and Linda Ledbeter

Aging is a Process Aging is not a disease, but rather a manifestation of the body’s diminished repair response. In animals, ‘old age’ is generally referred to as the last 25% of their lifespan. In addition to the number of years lived, aging is affected by such important factors as genetics, nutrition and environment.

Have you adopted a pet from a rescue?

While dogs and cats begin to undergo aging changes starting at about age 5-7 years, different pets will show the various signs of growing ‘old’ at different rates. The best time to recognize your pet’s “senior” status and need for extra TLC is long before advanced problems are apparent.

Send us a picture of them along with a short description for a special photo section in November!

There are many things that you can do to increase your pet’s quality and quantity of life. “Getting old” is not a disease! First, it i s important to 1) realize the speed of the aging process and 2) take preventative steps to manage risk factors related to your pet’s health.

Both photos by Legacy Studios used with permission.

Email your pictures to: rescuephotos@petjournalmidwest.com

or mail them to: Pet Journal 3120 S Business Dr. Suite 270 Attn: Rescue Pets Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 by October 15, 2011.

Important Steps Have regular wellness check-ups by your veterinarian. Every 3-6 months is appropriate for seniors. If you only have your pet examined once every calendar year, your pet has actually aged 4-8 years!!!! Lots of changes can occur in that time.

1 year

15 years

2 years

24 years

3 years

28 years

4 years

32 years

For pet that are 5 years and older, you can approximate as the chart on page 14 shows. Dr Karen Strickfaden is a staff veterinarian at Countrycare Animal Complex in Green Bay. Her practice emphasis is on holistic medicine including acupuncture and animal chiropractic care. Countrycare is a full service veterinary hospital providing medical, surgical and holistic services for dogs, cats and horses in Northeastern Wisconsin. www.countrycareac.com


Lakeshore Region

Eco from page 5. The gypsy moth was first introduced to the U.S. in 1868 by French scientist, Professor Leopold Trouvelot who was attempting to breed a hardier silk spinning caterpillar who could resist diseases the native caterpillars were susceptible to. Sometime between 1868 and 1869 some of the gypsy moths escaped the Professor’s lab and began breeding in the vicinity of his home in Medford, Massachusetts. As their population increased, they began to spread across the U.S. where they eventually arrived in Wisconsin in the 1990s. Like all moths and butterflies, the gypsy moth has four distinct life stages. This begins when the female lays 500 to 1,000 eggs in a mass in late summer. This mass is covered in soft tan colored hair taken from the female’s body. They begin to develop during the last days of summer, but as winter approaches the larva become dormant and remain this way until spring when they finish developing. In late spring they eventually hatch. The next stage of the gypsy’s life is the larval or caterpillar form. When young, they are covered in long hairs and are black in color. As they mature, they develop pairs of bumps that run along the center of their back. These bumps are red on the rear half of the body and blue on the front part. This is the stage when the gypsy is its most destructive. The young caterpillars quickly spread through the forest by climbing to the top of a tree, spinning a thread from which they hang until breeze carries them to the next group trees or much further depending on the

PET JOURNAL strength of the breeze. As the caterpillars grow, they shed their skin up to 5 times. During these growth spurts, the caterpillars can defoliate many trees. A tree can be completely defoliated in less than a week. Though this defoliation is only temporary, it can be very stressful for the tree and leave it weak and vulnerable to disease and parasites that wouldn’t normally harm a healthy tree. A weakened tree can stop making nuts, a vital food source for many animals. Growth can slow down for several years after defoliation. Lack of shade from a defoliated tree can cause water temperatures to rise, which can lower the amount of oxygen in the water harming aquatic plants and animals, and without the leafy canopy heavy rainfall can erode the soil and runoff can lower water quality. The next stage is the pupa. This is the last stage before becoming an adult gypsy moth. The pupal shell is reddish brown in color and is usually found attached to a tree trunk. The last stage is adulthood. The male gypsy is about 1” long with brown wings and wavy black markings. The larger female is about 1½” long with white wings and black markings and is incapable of flight. The gypsy moths antennae are large and feather shaped. The gypsy moths mate and lay eggs between July and August. Soon after mating the adults die. One of the most successful methods for suppressing the gypsy moth is by the use of the bacterial insecticide, or Bt for short. Bt is naturally occurring in soil and quickly degrades in sunlight.

Photos This Page: Various Images of Knapweed Photo Credits: Goggle Search

September 2011 11

Bt is harmless to people, animals, bird and fish, but kills caterpillars within a week of ingestion. Spraying will often continue for one to three years or until the gypsy moth outbreak is contained or collapsed.

see

Eco on page 18.


12

September 2011

PET JOURNAL

PHOTO GALLERY

OF

www.petjournalmidwest.com

READERS PETS

Diesel and niece Makeda, Best Friends Lorie T, Egg Harbor

Calie, with her Blankie Kathleen S, Fredonia

Casey, looking good for the camera, Kathleen S., Fredonia

Yukon, Longtime friend and companion Robert S., Sheboygan

If you would like to see your pet(s) on this page, please email them to us at petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com with a short description including: your pets name, your name, city, and a little statement about what they are doing in the photo. If you do not have email and would like to mail a glossy photo, please mail it to our mailing address: Pet Journal, attn: Pet Photos, 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 (all photos received by mail will be returned after they have been scanned for print.) All photos received will also be posted in our online photo gallery at http://images.petjournalmidwest.com/gallery.html, due to space limitationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s some submissions may not be printed in Pet Journal the same month they are received.

PHOTOS OF OUR FRIENDS WHO ARE GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

Austin, Friend of Scrappy & Misty who pased away in February Susan L., Sheboygan


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

September 2011

13

Welcome Home Furry Baby from Cats International.org So you’ve picked out your kitten (preferably two), now what? ... Let the training begin! Soon after the kitten arrives in your home, take him to the veterinarian for an exam, feeding recommendations, and the necessary vaccinations. Use a cat carrier for transporting him, both for his safety and for his sense of security. The carrier should become “standard operating procedure” during any trips away from home.

ones. When the youngster is under three months of age, supervised play is best in areas where he could get hurt or damage something of value to you.

Boarding * Day Care * Training Hydrotherapy Pool * Massage * Retail Full Grooming * Self Wash and more . . .

The more you involve your kitten in activities and interactions with others, the more likely he will respond without fear or defensiveness as he grows older. Always treat him with kindness and respect for his “cat-ness”.

Veterinary Spinal Manipulative Therapy Hunting Retrieving Training Animal Communication Sessions

Remember that kittens grow up very fast and that patience during these early months will pay off later. And... have fun... it’s what kittens do best!

And so much more...

Phone 262-268-8000 580 N. Dekora Woods Blvd., Saukville, WI 53080

www.dawgsinmotion.com Fax 262-268-8001

Pets and Ticks by Seth Minaker, Pet Journal Staff Writer SMinaker@petjournalmidwest.com Set up a nursery for the baby (or babies if you have adopted two). This should ideally be a small room with an easily cleaned floor. Provide a bed, a litterbox, food and water (not near the litterbox), items to scratch on, and safe toys.

Editors Note: Cats International was founded by Betsy Libscomb, a cat Initiate a schedule of feeding, play- behavioral expert. If you would like ing, and handling to provide the kitten more information on Cats International with the structure of regular activities. or for cat behavioral assistance, please Turning on a small nightlight will be his visit the Cats International website, cue that it is “time for bed” and will also www.catsinternational.org. help him navigate in the room during Reprinted with permission. the night. Be sensitive to the kitten’s

need for sleep and watch that children let the baby sleep undisturbed when he is tired out. Handle your kitten gently and frequently for short periods of time. During these sessions slowly incorporate touching around the eyes, ears, paws, etc. as if doing a veterinary exam. This will be good practice for the future. Work with the kitten in his nursery until he is regularly using his litterbox. Gradually expand his territory by letting him explore adjoining rooms under your watchful eye. Be prepared for your kitten’s sense of adventure and curiosity. Secure dangerous areas like the dryer and washing machine for his safety. Direct the kitten to acceptable play and scratch items and away from unacceptable

With summer almost over, many people stop worrying about ticks. But in reality, September is one of their peak seasons, more animals/people getting ticks than any other month, and with that, more diseases like Lyme disease, being spread. Often, pet owners turn to Frontline, or another type of chemical killer. These work great for animals that are highly exposed to ticks, or dogs and cats with very long fur. The problem with these chemical killers is that they can take hours to kill the tick, AFTER the tick bites, and when they do die, they fall off in your house. Some people report finding dead ticks in their carpets and beds. Chemicals can also cause allergic reactions in some pets, causing itching, sores, vomiting, welts, and all sorts of unique complications. So naturally, people who have dogs or cats that aren’t normally exposed to ticks, decide they will just find the ticks, and take them off with tweezers. But anybody who has had a tick on their dog, cat or themselves, know they bore in, and can be very hard to get out. Looking for

a solution, our family came across TicOff. (www.tic-off.com) Tic-Off is a nonallergenic, pesticide free, environmentally friendly, non-toxic, FDA registered medical spray. When used correctly, it immobilizes the tick instantly, allowing for easy removal and prevents the transmission of any on board diseases.

Methods like cigarettes, nail polish, rubbing alcohol, etc. cause the tick to “spit” back the blood and infectious diseases into it’s host. Our own experiences with Tic-Off have been great, we’ve used it on our dog, ourselves, friend’s pets, and have had wonderful results. The ticks just lift off with tweezers. Every 1.5 oz bottle sprays many, many times. Tic-Off can also be used on leeches, great gift for hunters, hikers, and outdoors-men. Tic-Off includes a special tweezers, and retails for $12.95 + $4.95 for shipping and handling on www.Tic-Off.com. Visit their site to learn more about ticks, the tick bite, and to order Tic-Off. Have a great end of summer!

Editors Note: Have a product you would like reviewed? Email Seth at: sminaker@petjournalmidwest.com


14

PET JOURNAL

September 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

FIND PET JOURNAL

Ask the Vet by Dr. Karen Strickfaden For pet that are 5 years and older, you can approximate as follows:

Age

0 - 20 lbs

21 - 50 lbs

51 - 90 lbs

> 90 lbs

5

36

38

40

42

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

40

42

45

49

44

47

50

56

48

51

55

64

52

56

61

71

56

60

66

78

60

65

72

86

64

69

77

93

68

74

82

101

72

78

88

108

76

83

93

115

80

87

99

123

84

92

104

88

96

109

92

101

115

96

105

120

Background Color code Adult

Senior

Geriatric

AT THESE

LOCATIONS

Vicki’s Pet Parlor 120 S Webster St Port Washington, WI 262 284-1010

Cedarburg Veterinary Clinic N144 W5660 Pioneer Rd Cedarburg, WI 262-377-2460

Chelstar’s Bed & Biscuit N4890 US Hwy 45 Fond Du Lac, WI 920-921-9024

Joys of Grooming 1706 N Main St West Bend, WI 262 338-2506

Doggie Do’s by Lou 311 E Main St Chilton, WI

Lincoln Tropical Fish & Pets 10 S Main St Hartford, WI 262 673-7470

The UPS Store - Sheboygan 3120 S Business Dr Sheboygan, WI 920 453-5934

Pet Central 302 Prospect Ave. North Fond Du Lac, WI 920 929-6508

Fringe Benefits Thrift Store 725 S. Taylor Dr., Sheboygan & 223 N. Seymour St., Fond Du Lac

Talk to the Paw 1011 Washington St Manitowoc, WI 920 684-9663

Sud-Z-Paws 2525 S. Business Dr. Sheboygan, WI 920 457-7297 Walgreen’s Drugstores Chilton, Fond Du Lac, Manitowoc, Plymouth, Sheboygan, & Two Rivers, WI Walgreen’s Drugstores Cedarburg, Grafton, Hartford, Jackson, Saukville, &West Bend, WI

For more locations please visit our website at: www.petjournalmidwest.com and click on the link “Where can I find Pet Journal..”


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region Grooming your Pet

by Diana Schmidt, Happy Tails Pet Grooming and Boarding groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com This year seems to be an excepIf possible, consult your vet about tionally bad one for fleas. In my groom- the health and skin condition of your ing shop I have had as many as three pet prior to treatment. You can either dogs in one day come in with fleas. use a flea shampoo or a flea dip. These pests cause a lot of grief to the pet and the owner. Some dogs are alOnce you have a flea problem you lergic and one single bite can send them will need to frequently dust, sweep, into a scratching frenzy. Here is some vacuum, and mop all surfaces where information that hopefully will help. pets or you have been. Your house will need to be sprayed to kill fleas, and all The best time to start a flea control animals and humans will need to leave program is in the late spring, prior to for 4 to 6 hours. You can also use a flea an infestation. There are many options control powder on carpeted areas and available. Whatever you use, when it work it into the nap. comes to flea control, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. When it comes to exterior flea control, you have two choices, granules Fleas are parasites, feeding directly or liquid concentrates. Liquid concenon humans or other warm blooded ani- trates work faster but require frequent mals. Usually you or your pet serve as treatments (once a month). Granules their hosts. A skin reaction to a flea work long term, but the results are bite appears as a slightly raised and red slower, and should be repeated every itchy spot. Fleas usually require warm 2-3 months during flea season. If this and humid conditions to develop. Due entire task of removing the fleas seems to the flea cycle and weather condi- too daunting, you can also call a profestions, many people don’t realize they sional pest control company. have a flea problem until they return Editors note: If you have any queshome from vacation or after a move to new premises and are confronted by tions on what products to use please hungry fleas. There are several types see your vet, or if you would like to have of fleas, but the most common is the cat a different prospective please see a hoflea, even on dogs. Fleas are attracted listic practitioner. to body heat, movement, and exhaled Diana welcomes your questions on carbon dioxide. grooming; please email her at groomFleas go through a complete meta- ingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com or morphosis. There are four distinct stag- by mail at: Pet Journal es: eggs, larvae, pupae, and adult. A Attn: Grooming your Pet female flea will lay a few eggs every day 3120 S Business Dr Ste 270 until she has yielded up to 200 to 400 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 eggs. These eggs will develop into flea larvae within 2 days to several weeks, depending on the temperature and humidity. Whenever you see adult fleas crawling on your pet, it is only a symptom of a much larger problem. The various life cycle stages will be found anywhere in the pet’s environment, but will be most concentrated in the areas that the pet spends most of its time, like the pet’s bed area. When the adult flea lays an egg on the pet, it will fall off the hairs in just a few minutes, similar to sowing seeds. What this means is that environmental flea control must be spread over the pet’s entire environment, focusing on the areas the pet spends the majority of its time: the sleeping areas and the walking paths.

September 2011

15

Coming in October With Labor Day and a new school years has started and fall is coming and Halloween is only a few weeks away. Look for the September issue of Pet Journal at one of our many distribution locations. Coming in the October issue we will be bringing to you the following:

Hidden Gems in Wisconsin - Part 5 of 6 A Look at Wisconsin’s Community Zoo’s Marshfield’s Wildwood Zoo Uromastix Eco News: Wisconsin’s Unknown Animals & more articles of Pet/Animal interest. More from our columnists: Ask the Alpha Dog, Alpha Dog Ask Scrappy!, Scrappy Grooming your Pet, Diana Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets, Cheryl Ask the Vet, Dr. Strickfaden Pet Journal Word Search Pictures of your Pets and more!

A u g u s t Wo r d S e a r c h A n s w e r s


16

PET JOURNAL

September 2011

N143 W6475 Pioneer Road Cedarburg, WI 53012 (262) 377-2460 www.cedarburgvet.com

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Services provided: Small Animal & Food Animal Producing Veterinarian Serices Penn Hip Food Animal Nutrition Therapeutic Laser Dental Sercives Surgical Services Food Animal Emergency Services

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

Scott Brewer Thomas Schmacher Craig Heyman Joe Scoby Jeff Halverson Eric Weinhold Anne Love

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIED’S Pet Journal classifieds are a free service for our readers. Classifieds are for free or paid services offered by individuals or families, such as a teenager looking for a dog walking job over the summer. Classifieds are also available for our Local Humane Societies/Shelters and Animal Rescues to post their needs lists. Please contact the respective Humane Society/ Shelter/Rescue if you have questions or would like to donate an item or two. Events from our advertisers and readers will also be printed as space allows. To place your classified ad please email Pet Journal at: petjournal@petjournalmidwest. com. Please include the following when submitting your classified: Name, Phone, email, best time to call (in case there is a problem with your classified ad), what text you would like in your ad. Please limit to 25 words and keep your wording clean. Remember this is a family paper. How many months you would like the listing to be available for, and list in the subject of your email “PJ Classified”. If you would prefer to mail it to us, you may do so, with the same items as requested above. Mail it to: Pet Journal attn: PJ Classified’s 3120 S. Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 Please submit your classified no later than the 20th of the month to make the next edition.

Section 1: Individual/Family Classifieds Section 1.1: Puppies for Sale

HavaMalt Pups non shed darlings ready for forever homes. Vet checked, shots, both parents on site, $600. Call 262.424.3238

Section 2: Humane Societies & Animal Rescues/Shelters Needs Lists Section 2.1: Humane Societies Eastshore Humane Association of Chilton, WI is looking for: • Non-scoopable Cat Litter • Purina Cat Chow -or• Purina Complete • Purina Dog Chow • Laundry Detergent To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Eastshore Humane Association at: 920.849.2390, by email at: ehashelter@gmail.com or you may visit their website: www.eastshoreha.org.

EASTSHORE HUMANE ASSOCIATION COLLECTS WEIGHT CIRCLES FROM PURINA CAT AND DOG FOOD PRODUCTS Please help out by sending us the weight circles. The Purina products include: Purina dog and cat food products such as Pro Plan, Purina One, Purina Cat Chow & Kitten Chow, Kit ‘N Kaboodle, Happy Cat, Purina Veterinary Diets. These weight circles enable Eastshore to earn points toward the purchase of Purina products for the shelter animals. As an added bonus, the weight circles from Purina dog food products can also be used to help Eastshore Humane pay the veterinarian bills!

Fond Du Lac Humane Society of Fond Du Lac, WI is looking for: • Dog Needs • Kong’s and kong rubber balls • Dog toys • Peanut butter • Cheese whiz • Plain yogurt • Dog Treats • Easy-walk Harnesses (all sizes) • Durable Leashes • Kuranda dog beds (check our website) • Any dog related items • new or used • Cat Needs • Kitty Litter (non-clumping) • Purina Cat and Kitten Chow • Chicken or Turkey baby food (human) • Toys and Cat trees • Kitten milk replacer • Any cat or kitten related items - new or used • Small Animal Needs • Pellet rabbit food • Timothy Hay • Bedding & Litter (no pine or cedar please) • Any small animal related items - new or used • Other Needs • Bleach • Q-tips • Band-aids • First Aid & Medical supplies • Rubbing Alcohol • Laundry Detergent • Garbage Bags (20 gal or larger) • Dawn dish soap • Mop heads (heavy duty) • Paper towels • Sandwich Bags (Ziploc or fold top) • Small paper plates & paper cups • Copy paper - white or color • Stamps To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Fond Du Lac Humane Society at: 920.922.8873 or visit their website: www.fonddulachumanesociety.org. Ozaukee Humane Society of Saukville, WI is looking for: • Digital Camera with rechargeable battery, at least 7 megapixel preferred • Dish Soap • Small Dog Training Treats • Laundry Detergent (for High Efficiency Washers) • Postage stamps • Kongs • Fabric - large, colorful solid material • 8 oz. - 12 oz. disposable cups • 45-gallon garbage bags • Aspen Bedding • Bleach • Bottle Brushes • Cardstock paper • Cat-nail clippers (scissor type) • Cat toys • Copy paper, white & color, 8.5” x 11” • Dog toys (Nylabones, squeaky toys, ropes, hard rubber balls, ect.) • Hand Sanitizer • Highlighters • Kitchen scrub brushes with handles • LaserJet mailing labels (Avery 5160) • Lingerie bags (for washing small toys) • Mailing envelopes, 9 x 12 or 10 x 13 • Manila folders (letter size only) • Paper towels • Peanut butter • Pens • Post-it-notes • Printer ink cartridges ◊ Canon (5PGBK, 8C, 8M, 8Y) ◊ HP (23, 45, 92, 94, 95) • Rabbit pellets (no fruit or seed mix) • Rechargeable AA batteries, with charger • Scissors • Soft Dog Toys

• • • • • • • •

Staples Steno notepads Stretch & “Scratch” cardboard scratching pads Swiffer Dusters Timothy hay Toilet paper Vinyl (non-latex) gloves Wild birdseed

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Ozaukee Humane Society at: 262.377.7580, by email at: info@ozaukeehumane.org or you may visit their website: www.ozaukeehumane.org. The Sheboygan County Humane Society of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Monetary donations • Gift cards for gas • Gift cards for pet supplies • Gift cards from retail stores • Cat toys • Canned cat food • Kitty litter (non-clumping) • Litter pans • Litter scoops • Laundry soap • Non-clorox bleach • Dish detergent • Paper towel • Scotch scrubbing pads • Rawhide chews for dogs • Dog toys and tennis balls • Science diet pet foods • Copy paper • Office supplies • Foster Homes • Volunteers To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Sheboygan County Humane Society at: 920.458.2012 or visit their website at: www.mySCHS.com. Washington County Humane Society of Slinger, WI is looking for: Items marked with a * are priority needs. • Animal Needs ◊ Dog Needs ● “Natures Variety Instinct” or Grain free Dog Food* (for dogs with special dietary needs) ● Purina Puppy chow ● Liver Sausage (to hide medication for dogs) ◊ Cat Needs ● Non-scoopable cat litter* (we always need litter) ● “Before Grain” dry food* (for cats with special dietary needs) ● Septic Swaps* (can get at Walgreens) ● Baby Food* ● Feliway Spray ◊ Small Animal Needs ● Hamster/Gerbil food* ● Aspen bedding* (can get at Fleet Farm - called Horse Cubes) ● Timothy Hay* ● Carefresh pet bedding* (any color) ● Vita drops* ● Ferret Vite* ● Guinea Pig food ● Toys/Treats ● Plastic Slinkys ● Rat pellets ● Ferret food • Shelter Needs ◊ Nurtical* ◊ Paper plates ◊ Toilet Paper ◊ Oster shaver blades - #40 ◊ Fabuloso floor cleaner ◊ Plastic clipboards - 9” x 12” ◊ 75 to 100 ft. Industrial strength hoses ◊ New or working Dehumidifiers

◊ ◊ ◊

New or working Chest Freezers Postage stamps Thick “Welding” leather gloves (should go to the elbow) ◊ Eraser board markers ◊ Heating Pads with temp adjustment ◊ Gift Cards (Walmart, Office Max, Fleet Farm, Menards, Gas Cards) ◊ Toner for printers: ● HP DeskJet 990cse #78 - color ● HP DeskJet 990cse #45 - black ● HP #28 - Tricolor ● HP #27 - Black ● HP LaserJet 2200d #96A - black To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Washington County Humane Society at: 262.677.0388, by email at: wchs@washingtoncountyhumane. org or visit there website at: www.washingtoncountyhumane.org.

Section 2.2: Animal Rescues & Shelters Furry Bottoms Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • 4 - 4-shelve storage units on wheels To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Furry Bottoms Rescue at: 920.449.5084, by email at: info@furrybottomsrescue.com or visit their website: www.furrybottomsrescue.com. Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Paper towels • Lysol Spray • Dog toys • Puppy food - moist and dry • Bowls • Leashes • Collars • Volunteers • Wisconsin Foster Homes To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue at: 920.627.6727, by email at: mecca@meccapitbullrescue.com or visit there website at: www.meccapitbullrescue.com. Two Left Paws of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Dog/Cat food (Evo, Fromm, Wellnes, Feliade, Canide) • Canned wet food (any kind) • Clumping litter (any kind, non-sented) • Litter scoops • Puppy pads • Dog/Cat treats • Dog/Cat toys • Dog/Cat beds • Towels • Paper towels • Disposable gloves • Kennels • Cages • Live traps for Small Animals • Fleet Farm gift cards To donate any items on this list or if yoou have any questions, please contact Two Left Paws Animal Sanctuary at: 920.331.0100 or via their website at: www.twoleftpaws.org.


Lakeshore Region

PET JOURNAL

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIED’S Section 3: Event Posters

September 2011

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PET JOURNAL

September 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Thunder from page 8.

Journey from page 7.

For many anxieties, put a Thundershirt on your dog and observe the results. In most cases you may see significant improvement for noise, crate, travel, barking and others anxieties with absolutely no training. For more complicated anxiety cases, use Thundershirt as part of a behavior modification program which can also include nutritional supplementation and/or training.

The cat traveled 75 miles through the Vosges mountains before he reached his owner’s barracks 11 days later.

For a very large percentage of dogs, Thundershirt’s gentle, constant pressure has a very good calming effect. This has obvious benefits for most types of anxiety. But Thundershirt is also a very useful tool for managing excitability or hyperactivity with strangers, on the leash, or in a training environment. Thundershirt’s calming effect helps a dog to focus (or refocus) her energies in a more constructive direction, allowing training to be more effective.

Article submitted by Victoria’s Pet Nutrition Center, which offers a wide selection of natural health supplements, natural foods, treats and supplies that pamper pate and improve their quality of life. Victoria’s Pet Nutrition Center 14 N Main St, Fond du Lac, WI. 920-923-1991 fdlpets@sbcglobal.net www.allnaturalpethealth.com Young Living # 951619

Consider the remarks of the leading animal ethologist and Nobel Prizewinner, the late Nikko Tinbergen, who declared of extrasensory perception, “if one applies the term to perception by processes not yet known to us, extrasensory perception among living creatures may well apply widely.” What may be even more impressive than the physical feats and perceptual abilities involved in these incredible journeys, is the motivational drive required to impel the cat to initiate the quest in the first place and to sustain him until he successfully finishes it. Love is a powerful force.

Note: If you would like to read more detailed reports of the abovementioned accounts, you will find them in David Greene’s book, Your Incredible Cat. Editors Note: Cats International was founded by Betsy Libscomb, a cat behavioral expert. If you would like more information on Cats International or for cat behavioral assistance, please visit the Cats International website, www.catsinternational.org. Reprinted with permission.

PET JOURNAL WORD SEARCH B H J Z U K W D O A X H F V R H K Z X J N B D F H

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ADOPTATHON ANGELWINGS BISON BUFORD CALIE CASEY COUNTRYCARE DIESEL DOGFEST DOGGUARD DOWNTOEARTH EMMA FONZ GROOMING HAPPYTAILS HOLISTIC HOUNDSANDSOUNDS HOUSEHOLDDANGERS JOURNEYS KITTENS MAKEDA PUPPIES PUPPYABCS SPOTTEDKNAPWEED THUNDERSHIRT TICOFF TRAINING TRIPOD VIBES YUKON

Words to find, they can go across, up or down, diagonally. Answers will appear in next months issue or on the Pet Journal website about the 20th of the month, on the Lakeshore Region page.


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

Eco from page 11. At this point spraying can cease for several years.

When leaving on vacation or returning, be sure to check your vehicles and equipment for egg masses. Check trees, outdoor furniture, and buildings for egg masses in the fall. Allow state and federal officials access to your property to place and monitor gypsy moth collection traps. Call the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture if you find gypsy moths in any of their life stages at 1-800-642MOTH (6684). Photos: Upper Left: Gypsy Moth Larva.

What can you do to help? Much like the seeds of the Spotted Knapweed, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important not to assist gypsy moths in their migration by transporting them.

Lower Left: Female Gypsy Moth and Egg Masses on tree Upper Right: Life Stages of Gypsy Moth Lower Right: Wisconsin counties under Gypsy Moth Quarantine (showen in Red) Photo Credits: Goggle Search

September 2011 19


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September 2011

PET JOURNAL

www.petjournalmidwest.com

/HJDF\6WXGLRV We Specialize in Capturing you Pets Personality! Now is the time to schedule you stores Holiday Pet Special with Legacy Studios t For the convenience of your clients, we come to your store to photograph. t We offer several different background choices for you the store owner to choose from their pet special (see below and left for examples). Trish Bruner t We supply posters and postcards to help pomote the event in your store. Master Photographer t Many different packages are available for your clients to choose from starting at just $29.99. 1402 South 12th St t Holiday Cards are available with your customers pets on them. Sheboygan, WI t We have a wide variety of photographic gifts and accessories for your customers to choose from. 920.803.8880

There are a limited number of dates available for Christmas Special so please call now to reserve your date.

1.866.751.8880

www.legacystudios.net

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