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www.petjournalmidwest.com

WISCONSIN’S RESOURCE FOR ALL ANIMALS Lakeshore Region

February 2011

Volume 2, Issue 2

Snakes, A Part of the Family by Lynneha Sheman, Pet Journal Staff Writer lsherman@petjournalmidwest.com

Is a snake a good family pet to have? How big do they get? What do I need to get in order to provide a fulfilling environment for a snake? Well as the owner of a beautiful ball python, I figured I’d give you the inside scoop on owning a pet snake, and taking care of him or her, and what it’s like to be an owner. First, I would definitely recommend having a pet if you are a person that loves animals. It may sound silly, but a snake is a great pet, and a good friend. My snake, his name is Cash, is a big part of our family. If you have kids, I would wait until your kids are eleven or up. A snake is a great way to teach your kids responsibility also. Cash is about three and a half to four feet long, and about two and a half inches around.

 In This Issue FEATURE STORIES

COLUMNS

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

The Gladdest Goodbye: A Look at Fostering

Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets

Pros and Cons of Dog Parks

Horse Therapy for Troubled Teens

Ask Scrappy!

by J. McClain - page 4

by R. Barton - page 5

The Misunderstood “Pit Bull”

by M. Stanley - page 7

Snakes as Pets 101

by J. Gollhart - page 9

by P. Kachelmeier - page 10

by Shellie L. Jarquart - page 4

by Scrappy - page 5

Ask the Alpha Dog Alpha Dog - page 7

Bats: The Importance of Bats and why they are Threatened

Ask the Vet

by Dr. Dell & Staff - page 8

by K. Schema - page 11

by D Enockson - page 8

Grooming your Pet

His home is a forty gallon breeder tank. For the bedding we use Aspen, and he has a water dish, a large branch, a big rock, and a half log for his shade. Underneath the tank, under his log, there is a heating pad. All of which are necessary for him to flourish. The lighting we use are 75 watts. The one during the day is a regular 75 watt light bulb, and at night we switch to an infrared light. As far as food goes, Cash likes to eat a medium live rat, once a month. Some snakes you can feed smaller rats, or mice, and feed them once a week. Being the owner of this gorgeous animal, is truly a wonderful gift. Cash is definitely a sweetheart of a snake. He likes to give kisses, all you have to say is “Come here baby, give me kiss” and he’ll turn his head and give you a kiss. It is absolutely adorable.

Snakes see page 8.

by Dede - page 15

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PET JOURNAL

February 2011

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PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

ABOUT

OUR

February 2011

COVER MODEL

Publishers Notes Dear Readers, The month of February marks our fifth issue. For many readers this month will be the first time seeing Pet Journal at the Milwaukee Pet Expo. We appreciate the advetisers, writers, and/or distrbution points that have extended to us space on their tables. We are always looking pictures of your pets to have printed on our Pet Pictures Page (page 12) and they will also appear on our Gallery of Pet Pictures on the Pet Journal website at images.petjournalmidwest.com/gallery.html. We also are looking for submissions of your pets to appear on our cover. To submit your pictures either for the pet pictures page or the cover please email them to petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com.

Our February issue cover model is Noel a Maltese puppy. Noel’s human companion is G. Albrect of Grafton, WI. Photo of courtesy of Legacy Studios, Sheboygan, WI.

Also, our columnist would love to hear from you with your questions. You will find contact information at the ends of their columns. As a reminder to those of you who park outside in the winter, tap your horn a few time before starting your car and driving off. Small animals sometimes use wheel wells and engine compartments as a haven from the cold. Sincerely,

Lee J Schneider, Publisher

Table of Contents 1 - Snakes, A part of the Family

5 - Ask Scrappy Q & A

Hosted by Scrappy the Pit Bull

Pros and Cons of Dog Parks by R. Barton

6 - Calendar of Events 7 - The Misunderstood “Pit Bull” by M. Stanley

Ask the Alpha Dog

Hosted by T. Pool

8 - Snakes as Pets by D. Enockson

If you have a questions for a specific columnist please use the email at the end of their respective columns. If you have a questions for a specific department, please contact them via their email address listed below. General Information.......... petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com Advertising Department.... advertising@petjournalmidwest.com Current Issue Question............ issues@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Journal Archives............. archives@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Photo Submissions........ petphoto@petjournalmidwest.com Our Website............................... www.petjournalmidwest.com

Pet Adoption Section

4 - Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets Q & A by J. McClaine

Pet Journal newspaper is published by LSRB Media, LLC, on a monthly basis and is available free of charge to readers at various locations in the region that it is printed. Questions or comments regarding content can be made to petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com or by calling our offices at: (920) 785-3048. Pet Journal is always on the lookout for new advertiser’s if you are interested in advertising with us please contact the advertising department at advertising@petjournalmidwest.com. To contact Pet Journal by mail please send all correspondence to our mailbox at: Pet Journal attn: advertising 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524.

by J. Gollhardt

3 - About our Cover Model Publishers Notes

Feline Leukemia

Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanning program to go to the Pet Journal home page.

9 - The Gladdest Goodbye: A Look at Fostering

by L. Sherman

Hosted by S. Jacuart

PJ

an ‘attn:’ line to direct your submission to the correct department. All photos sent via mail will be returned after they are scanned for print and the website.

You may also submit your questions and photos via the Pet Journal mailbox, listed below, we ask that you please add

If you would like to see your companion pet pictured on the cover of Pet Journal, please send a good quality digital picture to petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com with a short description of the pet you would like considered and if your pet is selected we will contact you before publication to get more information for their bio. We will also set-up your pet with a professional photo courtesy of Legacy Studios of Sheboygan to appear on the cover.

3

Ask the Vet

Hosted by Dr. Dell and Staff

10 - Horse Therapy for Troubled Teens by P. Kachelmier

11 - Bats: The Importance of Bats and why they are Threatened by K. Schema

12 - Photos of your Pets 13 - Two Hearts Rescued by B. Techel

14 - Prong Collar vs. Choke Collar Myths by L. Ledbeter

15 - Grooming your Pet hosted by D. Diel

Coming in January 16 - Classified Ads 18 - Pet Journal Word Search

Pet Journal is produced on at least 50% Post-consumer Recycled paper.

Please, be kind to the Environment! After reading please Recycle. Thank you.


4

PET JOURNAL

February 2011

Holistic and Natural Options for your Pets by Shellie L. Jarqart of Bark, Bath & Beyond, Two Rivers, WI holistic-and-natural@petjournalmidwest.com Raw hide chews are manufactured from by-products from the slaughterhouse industry, usually from cows and horses. Every hide has an inner and outer layer, and chews are typically made by processing the tissue from the inner layer. Beef hide is the more appetizing name given to chews made from cattle. The quality of these chews varies slightly, but those made from corn-fed cows are considered a premium product and are usually higher priced. When an animal hide is processed, the fleshier inner layer is reserved for making raw hide chews. Excess fat and tissue is scraped away from the hide before it can be formed and dried for dog chews. Manufacturers outside of the USA soak the hides in a solution of commercial lime and water for several days before scraping. Once the hide is soaked and scraped, it is usually rinsed in bleach water to remove traces of the lime and sanitize the hide before shaping and drying. In the USA, hides are tumbled in a hydrogen peroxide solution, and then rinsed with plain water. Once this process is completed, they run the product through a commercial dryer giving it a rough texture. Before they are dried, some raw hide chews are basted with flavor made from beef, chicken or liver broth to make them tastier. Brown basted rawhides have a tendency to stain a dog’s fur as well as carpet and upholstery. Clear basted bones still provide the taste, but are usually a better choice if you are worried about color run from your dog’s saliva. Raw hide/beef hide chews come in three main types: • Pressed raw hide chews are made from folded layers of hide to create long lasting chew toys. • Granulated raw hide chews are made from ground raw hide that has been compressed into formation. These bones normally pose the least choking hazard. • Flat raw hide chews are made from a single layer of hide, and are far easier to chew than pressed raw hide. Raw hide and beef hide chews can present a choking hazard if they’re not used under your watchful eye. As your dog chews and slobbers on his treat,

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) by Judi McClain, Eastshore Humane Association

the hide becomes rehydrated, soft and gooey. When it reaches this point, your dog is able to tear away sections from the main bone. In some cases your dog can have the following problems with rawhide: • The hide can actually become lodged in a dog’s teeth, requiring your assistance to remove it. • Larger chunks may be too big to swallow, causing a dog to choke. • Intestinal blockage can also occur if the chunk of hide becomes lodged somewhere along the intestinal tract, and may require surgery to remove. The reason for this is because as your dog chews and digests it the raw hide rehydrates increasing its size.

Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is in the same family as the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.) It attacks the immune system and as a result the cat is unable to fight off various infections and cancers. These viruses are called “retroviruses.” Retroviruses are speciesspecific. There is no evidence FIV can be transmitted to mammals other than cats. FIV is found worldwide in domestic and wild cats. It is not transmitted by close contact but is shed in the saliva and is usually transmitted by bite wounds.

If you choose to use rawhides here are a few safety tips: • Make sure the chew is large enough that your dog can’t fit it completely into his mouth. • Only give your dog a beef hide chew when you can be around to keep an eye on him. • Keep two chews on hand and trade them when one becomes too soft. The hide will harden as it dries, and you can give it to your dog again when the other chew becomes soft. • Replace your dog’s chew when he has whittled it down far enough to fit in his mouth. • Purchase rawhides that are made in the USA

Phase 1) An infected cat often has a fever and enlarged lymph nodes within a month or two of infection. These symptoms disappear and the cat is then considered in Phase 2.

There are benefits to chewing. It provides dental health, stress relief, and exercise for your dog. So it’s important to supply your dog with safe chew toys and bones. Some safe alternative can be had by switching you dog to tendons, antlers or bones that do not splinter. A less expensive alternative is at your grocery store. The bones you buy for soup bases make a great treat and provide marrow. But, with anything you give your pet to chew, you always want to supervise their use.

Editors Note: Shellie welcomes your questions on Holistic and Natural options please email her at holistic-andnatural@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Holistic and Natural 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

When visiting or calling our advertisers about their services, please mention you saw their ad in Pet Journal.

es:

FIV infection in cats has three phas-

Phase 2) The infected cat is a dormant carrier of the virus. During this stage there are no signs of disease. This stage can last for many years. It is during this stage that the immune system may be gradually destroyed.

stages of this disease, the life expectancy is one year or less. If your cat has been diagnosed as FIV-positive, you will want to work with your veterinarian to provide the best care for your cat. A vaccine, which does not give total protection, is available but there is no cure for FIV. With good care, a FIV-positive cat can live a near normal lifespan with no signs of sickness for years. Sources: • Encyclopedia of Cats – Parragon Books, Ltd. 2008 • Feline Immunodeficiency Virus – Not an Automatic Death Sentence – Franny Syufy, About.com Guide • Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) in Cats – Drs. Foster & Smith Educational Staff • Cat Watch, Volume 14, No. 1, January 2010 – Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine/ Feline Health Center • Infectious Disease Management in Animal Shelters – Lila Miller and Kate Hurley – 2009 Wiley-Blackwell

Editors Note: Eastshore Humane Association currently has three cats with Phase 3) Occurs most commonly in FIV looking for loving familys. They cats that are 5 – 12 years old. During are listed this month in our Adoption this final stage, the cat’s immune sys- Section on page 9. tem does not function properly. The cat becomes prone to infections which are usually chronic. Once a cat is in the late

Find Pet Journal at these Local Business N

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Sud-Z-Paws 2525 S. Business Dr. Sheboygan, WI 920 457-7297

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Talk to the Paw 811 Franklin St. Manitowoc, WI 920 684-9663

Fringe Benefits Thrift Store 725 S. Taylor Dr., Sheboygan & 223 N. Seymour St., Fond Du Lac

Pet Central 302 Prospect Ave. North Fond Du Lac, WI 920 929-6508

Central Bark Doggy Day Care 1910 Mirro Dr. Manitowoc, WI 920 652-9663

Dawgs in Motion 580 N. Decora Woods Blvd. Saukville, WI 262 268-8000

Central Bark Doggy Day Care 3513 S. 32nd St. Sheboygan, WI 920 457-9663

Furry Bottoms Rescue 435 Mill St. (Upper Level) Plymouth, WI 920 892-4416

Happy Tails Grooming N7894 Hwy. 42 Howards Grove, WI 920 912-6066

For more locations see page 14 or visit our website at www.petjournalmidwest.com and click on the link “Where can I find Pet Journal.”


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

by Scrappy, the Lovable Pit Bull askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com

Join the Pet Journal group on Facebook!

On a health note, I want to mention how well my glucosamine and olive oil have worked for me. My hips no longer give me any issue, which I believe is due to my daily dosage of glucosamine. I run around the yard like my tail is on fire and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no more yelping because my hips and

5

Pros and Cons of Dog Parks

ASK SCRAPPY!

Hello again to all my friends and their two legged buddies they care for (how would they survive without us?). This month I want to cover the extremely cold weather weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re being cursed with and how it relates to us. First off, I want to let it be known that I really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care for the weather or the fact that my human friends seem to believe I love it and want me to stay out in it as long as possible. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t imagine they would care for it too much if they were forced to run around in freezing cold sans all those warm clothes and shoes. Ekk, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an image I really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even want to think about. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough to put anyone off their feed. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just they have to remember that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not all Huskies and not bred for the extreme cold weather. It can bother us as much as it does our humans. When I go outside I just wanna do my business and get back inside into my warm (and old... hint hint!) bed as soon as possible. I will, if Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in the mood, stay outside for a bit and let them toss snow at me and run around like theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re nuts, but at the first feeling of cold, I will mysteriously disappear and reappear at the back door waiting to go in. I can be very tricky like that. When the weather is so cold that frost bite can occur within minutes to exposed skin, you have to remember that we also have exposed or sensitive areas. Our feet, ears, nose, mouth area, and other extremities can be susceptible to frost bite. It would also be nice to have our pads cleaned of ice and snow when we come in. I know it can be a chore, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll appreciate it and we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t track water everywhere you walk so you can step in it. Also, when your out cleaning off the walk be sure to use pet friendly salt for ice removal on drives and walks. Oh yeah, my kitty buddies want you to remember not to put them outside on especially cold nights. Some will crawl into potentially dangerous areas on vehicles such as wheel wells and engine compartments for warmth. To put it simply, if it hurts you...it will hurt us too. So, the next time I just do one lap around the yard and high tail it to the door, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wonder why...just let me in the house. I just have to remind myself that spring is coming and I wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t listen to otherwise. Winter wonderland, HA!

February 2011

Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanner on the code to the left to go to the Pet Journal facebook group page.

legs hurt. Okay, the freezing temperatures are a great motivator to keep moving, but at least I can do it without pain. The olive oil suggested by Shellie, our holistic columnist, has done wonders for my skin and coat. Many thanks to Shellie from me and my two kittie buddies! Now if I can get the workout routine going, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll look incredible for summer, which Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure is just around the corner. Hey, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a dog! Who wears a watch or pays any attention to the calendar? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping all my buddies and their humans are making it through the post holiday blahs. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m keeping myself busy obliterating my new toys. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kinda become a hobby for me. They buy me toys, I chew them til they no more fun, and they buy me new toys. Kinda like Pavlovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Us! I know, I took a risk with a little obscure physiologist humor. Sorry, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a bad dog. Though it is true. I know for a fact that my human, Lee, bought me another toy. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be good and act like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lost my mind when I see, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be happy, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll stay in his good graces. The things we have to go through to keep the peace around the house.

Everyone Take Care and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll See You Next Month

Scrappy Editors Note:

Scrappy love to get mail and questions from his readers; please email him at askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail at: Pet Journal Attn: Ask Scrappy! 3120 S Business Dr. Ste. 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Well, this about wraps up another month in my life. Remember, if thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s any subject youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like me to cover in a column, just send me a note. Believe it or not, I can cover a story pretty well. I was a lead reporter for a major newspaper, in a major city in an undisclosed location. Alright, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just a dog who lives in Sheboygan, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do my best on any subject you wanna toss at me.

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by Rick Barton, Pet Journal Staff Writer rbarton@petjournalmidwest.com Dog parks seem to be showing up everywhere and the numbers continue to grow since the first park was opened in Berkley California in 1979. Dog parks are great for many who either donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a yard or adequate area for their dogs to play and exercise in. It is also a great way to meet fellow animal lovers in your area. Though, like many things, there are advantages and disadvantages. While researching this article, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve talked to a number of people who viewed them as either the best thing to happen for dogs to those who felt they were accidents waiting to happen and owners were irresponsible for taking their dogs there. Love â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em or hate â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em, everybody has an opinion regarding them. The Pros: â&#x20AC;˘ A great exercise opportunity for dogs. Many dogs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get enough daily exercise and with all this unspent energy, even the best behaved dog can become destructive. The mental and physical activity, as well as, the ability to run free of a leash makes for a happy healthy dog. If your buddy enjoys playing with a special dog, you can make regular play dates for them to get together. â&#x20AC;˘ A chance to interact with other dogs and people to develop their social skills. Not to forget, this can allow you to meet other dog enthusiasts , make new friends, and discuss news from your community. â&#x20AC;˘ It can be a good place to train your dog to listen and pay attention to you with all of the distractions going on around you. You can also to ask questions and learn tips from more experienced dogs owners regarding training and care. â&#x20AC;˘ Since dog parks are fenced, it can be a safe environment for dogs to run and play off leash without the worry of cars, bikes, or them running off. Some parks even have community dog events. â&#x20AC;˘ One of the biggest pros is being able to see your dog playing happily with other dogs. Knowing your allowing him to use up some of the pent up energy he has and lowering his stress level dramatically. Just like in people, stress can be very harmful and can manifest itself in all manner of aliments in your dog. It can also relieve boredom and depression. The Cons: â&#x20AC;˘ There is the potential danger of physical injury from aggressive dogs for both you and your friend. When you put a group of dogs together and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing and wrestling around, there arises a potential lack of impulse control and over excitement. This can lead to a dangerous situation. Not everyone who visits a dog park has a gentle and properly socialized dog. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really hard to determine whether a dog is aggressive from just looking at them, unless you well versed in animal body language. It is a good bet though, that if you put a small dog in with a

See Park on page 11.


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PET JOURNAL

February 2011

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FEBRUARY 2011 SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

1

WEDNESDAY

2

Groundhog Day

THURSDAY

3

Chinese New Year

FRIDAY

4

SATURDAY

5 Great Lakes Pet Expo WI Expo Center State Fair Park Milwaukee, WI See Event Poster on page 17 for more information

6

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13

14

8

Valentine’s Day 15

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Presidents Day 22

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26 Eastshore Humane Association’s 7th Annual Mardi Paws Casino Night Neenah, WI See Event Poster on page 17 for more information

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TBD

Coming Soon

March 13

Lakeshore Bully Club Kick-off Event Location TBD

Mascot Race & 3rd Anniversery Open House Central Bark for more information go to Manitowoc, WI the Lakeshore Bully Club website LakeshoreBullyClub.org

for more information see the Events page at www. petjournalmidwest.com

March 26

A

June 14

Opening of the NEW WHS Ozaukee Campus: Victoria Wellens Center Saukville, WI for more information go

A Day in the Country Mother, Daughter, Sister Mini-Retreat CoachHorse Welness Center, Kiel, WI

to the Ozaukee Humane Society website www.ozaukeehumane.org

See Event Lising on page 17 for more information

A Pet Journal provides this calendar as a service to the local community. If you have an event that you would like listed please email us at: petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com, with the following information: date(s) and time(s) of event, your contact information, a short description of what will be happening, if it is a fundraiser please list who the proceeds are going to, and please list the subject as “PJ Calendar Submission.” Please send this to us no later than the 23rd of the month for inclusion into the next months issue. Thank you.


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

Furry Bottoms is a Plymouth, WI based 501(c)(3) charitable organization dedicated to the rehabilitation and re-homing of displaced dogs. Join us by fostering, volunteering, or adopting your new best friend... Furry Bottoms Rescue, Inc. 435 East Mill St, Plymouth, WI 53073 920-449-5084 furrybottomsrescue@yahoo.com www.furrybottomsrescue.com

February 2011 Buy one item, get a second of equal or lesser value at 50% Off (Excludes dog food..)

Please, be kind to the Environment! Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanning program to go to the Pet Journal events page.

After reading please Recycle. Thank you.

The Misunderstood “Pit-Bull” by Mecca Stanley, Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue The “Pit Bull” type dogs are very misunderstood and until a person has met one they will never understand. There is no such thing as a “Pit Bull“. It is a generic term used to describe several breeds of dogs, and any breed of dog that has a wide chest and square head. Now does that make you think? The AKC, American Kennel Club recognizes Bull Terriers (all varieties), American Staffordshire Terriers (Am Staffs) and Staffordshire Bull Terriers (Staffy Bulls). The United Kennel Club recognizes the American Pit Bull Terriers. Most of the so called “pit bulls” out there are a mixed breed. That is also why bite statistics are often wrong. Dogs such as Mastiffs, American Bull dogs, Dog De Bordeaux and many more are often labeled at “Pit Bulls”. The bully breeds traditionally pass temperament testing with very high scores, much higher than breeds such as cocker spaniels, dachshund, and collies. Because of all of the negative PR about pits, Pit Bull owners must be held to a higher standard. APBT’s actually have among the highest success rates of passing the American Temperament Test passing 86.00% of the time. Compare this total to the Golden Retriever which passes at 84.6% and you can see that sound temperament is not what the press is made of. Breed Specific Legislation has become a nightmare for the dogs, and the

responsible owners. While BSL is aimed at targeting the bad, the reality is the only impacted are law abiding citizens. It has been proven repeatedly not to work. It targets many breeds of dogs and relies on guesswork often times when one specific breed is targeted. That is why Breed Specific Legislation is WRONG! They are full of life and love to be with their humans. Be ready to cuddle and play with them. They want to be a part of family activities. They enjoy playing Frisbee, ball and taking long walks. Be prepared to spend time with this type of dog. They will need your attention every day, as with any other breed of dog. Known as the clowns of the dog world, many of them tend to be goofy reveling in your laughter. They toss and tumble with children and love to roughhouse. It is important with all breeds of dogs, but somewhat more with the larger breeds like the American Pit Bull Terrier, to keep all children under supervision. In England, Staffordshire Bull Terriers are referred to as “The nanny dog” due to their love of children. By nature the breed is very loving and friendly, tenacious, and extremely intelligent. They are very eager to please and their loving and playful nature makes them an ideal family dog. However, due to this wonderful breed of dog often falling into the wrong hands, misinformation and a see

Pit Bull on page 13.

February 2011

7

Ask the Alpha Dog

by Alpha Dog - Tamara Pool, 4-Paws Private Training, Sheboygan, WI alpha-dog@petjournalmidwest.com This month we’re doing something a little different. I talk all the time about “speaking dog” when communicating with your four legged friends. “Be the Alpha Dog!” Recently, a lot of my students have asked me what, exactly, I mean by that. So here it is. This is your guide to canine communication. Communicating with people is, for the most part, verbal communication. There is very little non-verbal communicating going on. There are body signals you can interpret, of course. However, even these change from person to person, so you never really know what is going on in a person’s head. Communicating with dogs is entirely non-verbal. Contrary to popular belief, when dogs bark, they are not talking to you. Barking is an attention-getter. Dogs bark at things to get them to come to them or to get them to go away. Commands are, of course, verbal expressions of what you are telling them to do, but this is a small fraction of the communication that takes place between dogs and their leaders. Think of commands as the outward expression of what your body language is telling them. Hand signals are very important when teaching your dog. Dogs are very visual learners. I have known many dogs who would follow the hand signal command 100% of the time and only followed the verbal command 25% of the time. Personally, my dogs are hand signal only. There have

even been times where I didn’t even have to give a command or hand signal and they’ve done what I wanted them to do. This is an example of the body language and emotional communication with dogs. The bulk of communication is body language. This body language includes the stance and position of your arms, shoulders, legs and back. Facial expressions, such as eye and mouth positions, are included in this communication, but dogs have a very limited capability for facial expressions. The position of ears and tail also come into play here. It is quite simple to understand what your dog is trying to say if you know what to look for. For example, if the ears are pressed back, the head is down and the tail is tucked, this means that your dog is fearful. If the ears are straight forward and the tail is straight up, this means that your dog is alert and, depending on how ridged the muscles are, they could be in an aggressive mindset. If the ears are in a relaxed position and the tail is hanging nicely, this is a friendly dog that is ready to be greeted. When dogs have cropped ears it’s a little tougher to distinguish between moods. You have to watch for the other signals they are sending out. The communication that sets dogs apart from humans is the emotional

See Alpha on page 11.

Tamara Pool Pet Trainer

920-254-2620 www.4paws-training.com tamara@4paws-training.com

Learn how dogs communicate and how to communicate with them.


8

February 2011

Ask the Vet

PET JOURNAL Snakes from page 1.

www.petjournalmidwest.com

these snakes. Also, besure to read Sakes as Pets 101 by Deb Enockson by Dr. Carolyn Dell & Staff, Sheboygan Falls Veterinary Service Showing him off is one of the best of the Eastern Wisconsin Hepetoask-the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com logical Society and Rescue based in things about him. Plymouth for more information on Welcome to our new Question & Yes, they do make toothbrushes Answer Column. First, a little about and fingerbrushes for cats and dogs. When it comes down to it, my snakes us. Sheboygan Falls Veterinary Service There are excellent toothpastes availboyfriend and I love having Cash in started seeing patients over 35 years able that contain enzymes to help preour family, and I would recommend ago. We help people take good care of vent tartar from forming. Please do not a ball python any day of the week for their animal family members. We see ever use human toothpaste – it may you and your family. small companion animals, meaning cats and dogs. Our emphasis is on Well Pet Care and prevention by helping to educate pet owners. When needed, we can provide diagnostics for those times when your pet is not feeling well. Our emphasis is on preventative care and we strive to follow the latest research concerning use of required and necessary vaccinations. One area of great concern is dental care. As a matter of fact, February is Veterinary Dental Health Month! As we learn more and more, it is now known that there is a direct link between your pet’s mouth and their overall health, particularly affecting the kidneys and even the heart. Bad breath can be an indication of something more serious than just “stinky food”. Gum disease can certainly lead to infections which can abscess. This allows bacteria to get into the bloodstream and can lead to an overall infection of the blood, called bacteremia, which can affect your pet’s heart, liver and kidneys. A pet that stops eating, seems tired or listless could be having dental problems. Take a look in your dog or cat’s mouth and check for bad breath. Red and/or swollen gums, a yellow or brown crust of tartar at the gum line, and pain or bleeding when the gums are touched are indications that your pet should be taken to your veterinarian as soon as possible. Symptoms such as the above will probably need a dental under anesthetic. We encourage preventative dental care on a regular basis. We will probably even discuss this with you at your very first visit with your new puppy or kitten. We strongly believe in starting this early as it is a matter of training from early on so they will allow you to provide oral care for the rest of their lives.

contain ingredients that are harmful to your pet, such as xylitol (which we will discuss in a future column).

Editors Note: We were not able to get a picture of Cash in time for the February issue of Pet Journal. We have found this technique effective and fairly easy to implement. Cash will appear on our cover in an You may need to do some training if upcoming issue. Ball Pythons come your pet is not used to you going into in many different colors, on the next their mouth. Try taking a dry cottonball page you will find some pictures on and wiping off the teeth, taking care to get along the back molars as well. You may need one for each side or even several cotton balls for a larger mouth. This also gives you an excellent opportunity to get an up-close look (and sniff) at your pet’s teeth and gums. After you have wiped them off, apply some cat and dog toothpaste along the teeth – this method does not involve mechanical brushing with a toothbrush, as many dogs will just want to chew on it or play with it. Applying the toothpaste, which is somewhat sticky, allows the enzymes to do some of the work. And, yes this can be done with your fingers which helps you get the paste right where it is needed. Just wash your hands when you are done! This should be done every day and yes, for cats, too. The toothpastes come in several different flavors so you can probably find one your pet will like. Our favorite is Vanilla Mint. So, let’s say it together – No More Stinky Breath!

Editors Note: Dr. Dell and her staff welcomes your questions on general pet topics; please email them at askthe-vet@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail at: Pet Journal Attn: Ask the Vet 3120 S Business Dr. Ste. 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Snakes as Pets 101 by Deb Enockson, Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue, Inc. Snakes as pets offer some advantages over your mammalian caged pets, such as they are low maintenance, hypoallergenic and have a greater life span. The life span of the particular species of snake you choose should also be a consideration.

portant in determining how positive your first experience with snake keeping will be. The animal you choose should be alert, its skin should be tight (not dehydrated), it should respond to touch and movement, bones should not be visible and there should be no blemishes on its skin or mouth (which can indicate health First, in selecting a species, keep issues such as scale rot or mouth rot) in mind that this is probably the single or any other health condition indicators. most important decision you will make. For the beginner, the Corn Snake, Ball When you get your snake home, apPython or Columbian/Common Boa are propriate housing is necessary. Different probably the best species to choose species have different climatic, feeding from. Corn Snakes are the least expen- and housing needs. It is important to sive, are easiest to handle, stay small, thoroughly research the species you are eat extremely well and very rarely bite. considering and be sure you can meet The next choice would be the Ball Py- all the necessary requirement throughthon. They are a thicker bodied, stron- out its life. Inadequate husbandry will ger snake, are easy to handle, stay result in health complications and/or the small, but do not have a voracious ap- death of the animal. The average habipetite like the Corn Snake, and can be tat setup for a hatchling/neonate snake picky eaters. If your heart is set on a can easily exceed $200. large snake, then the Columbian/Common Boa Constrictor would be a good Do not rely solely on the informachoice. Getting a young one will allow tion provided by the person or place you your knowledge and abilities to grow purchase your animal from! Many times along with your snake. The Columbian/ the sales person does not have an inCommon Boa Constrictor does get large, depth knowledge of what they are sellaveraging 7-10 feet in length and 30-50 ing or will tell you what will make you pounds, and needs an appropriately buy that animal. sized habitat, so keep space requirements in mind also when choosing a For more information visit: www. snake species. easternwiherps.com. Once you have decided on a species, picking out the right one is very im-

SHEBOYGAN FALLS VETERINARY SERVICE (920) 467-3114 224 Monroe St., Sheboygan Falls, WI Lawrence E. Dell, D.V.M. Carolyn G. Dell, D.V.M.

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PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

Pictures of Various Ball Pythons

February 2011

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SHELTERS

Find me at the Washington County Humane Society.

Hello! My name is Anne, and I’m a beautiful 1-year-old blue and white female Domestic Longhair cat. I am a quiet and gentle girl who will happily spend hours curled up on your lap, or cuddled next to you in front of a warm fire. Not only will you fall in love with my long, silky coat, and beautiful golden eyes, but you will find I am the perfect reading companion! I have been neutered, microchipped, and vaccinated. Visit me at 2073 Highway W in Grafton, or visit ozaukeehumane.org, which updates adoptable animals every 30 minutes.

Jersey Girl is an American Pit Bull Terrier,

She is spayed and fully vetted. She loves to play frisbee and ball. She will be two years old on February 14, 2011. She is looking for a responsible owner who will protect her. Jersey Girl is a high energy dog that loves to take rides and be with her humans. She knows high five, down, off and sit. If you are interested in the lovely girl. Please contact Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue at www.meccapitbullrescue. com or call (920) 627-6727

Baja. I am a Friendly, Lovable kittie that needs a home. As an FIV POSITIVE cat I would do well by my self or with another FIV POSITIVE felines. I would like to find a home with my good buddy Friedman! I am UP-TO-DATE on all my shots and I have been neutered. Come see me and my friends at Eastshore Humane Association in Chilton, WI.

Ruger is a 4-year-old American Pitbull Terrier mix with a contagious smile. He is an energetic boy with great manners. Ever the gentleman, Ruger keeps all four paws on the floor when greeting visitors, choosing to give tail-wags and kisses instead of jumping. Looking for a wide receiver? Ruger enjoys chasing his toys around the yard and hurtling those objects like Aaron Rodgers will surely test your upper-body strength, too! Like all the dogs and cats at WHS, Ruger has been neutered, microchipped and vaccinated. Check him out at www.wihumane.org.

Cleo is a beautiful green eyed cat who will steal your heart ! She is a 3 year old spayed female cat who has a friendly personality and we can’t understand why she hasn’t gotten adopted in the last 11 months! Cleo enjoys watching the birds outside and taking long, lazy sunbaths by the window. She has made lots of friends at WCHS & the volunteers think she is a great catch. She is a one of a kind cat looking for a one of a kind home and family. Kids over 12 are best for Cleo.

Spirit. I am Playful, Friendly as well as Lovable. However, I am FIV POSITIVE. I would love to share youre home with other FIV POSITIVE kitties or I would be very content to be your “ONE AND ONLY” Feline. I am UP-TO-DATE on Shots and have been Neutered. I am waiting for you come visit me at Eastshore Humane Association in Chilton, WI.

Friedman. I came to the shelter as a stray. I really want a home with someone who will be patient with me because I am shy. Like Spirit and Baja, I am FIV POSITIVE and would have to be the “ONLY” kittie or share your home with other FIV POSITIVE kitties. HINT, HINT - Baja is my best buddy and we wiuld do very well if adopted together. Please consider adopting both of us. I am UP-TO-DATE on all my shots and have been Neutered. Come see me at Eastshore Humane Association in Chilton, WI.

Pet Journal provides this section as a benefit to both our readers and to the shelters/rescues in our area to help find homes for pets. This section will feature pets with special needs or those who have been have trouble finding a home on their own. Please contact the respective shelter or rescue listed, if you need contact info, please go to the Pet Journal website or check the Need Lists on page 16.

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10

PET JOURNAL

February 2011

The Gladdest Goodbye: A look at Fostering

by Joel Gollart, Furry Bottoms Rescue can say, though, is that it is the happiest “goodbye” you will ever experience.

This question deters many people from fostering. It’s not a stretch to see why – dogs have so much love to give and ask so little in return; it is hard not to let them into your heart. For a few weeks or months you are making this animal a part of your family. When you get up in the morning it is their happy face that greets you. When you return home it is their warm kisses that welcome you.

Then you get the first update for the dog. You find out how thankful the family is to have added a new family member and how grateful they are in the role you played. You realize that you haven’t said goodbye, only see you later. For no matter what happens, a part of you will remains with the dog – and a part of that dog forever remains with you.

There is joy in finding the right forever family for your foster dog. So many times, it is the dog that makes the choice – intrinsically knowing that they have found their true home. They may grace you with a wag of the tail or the My work with Furry Bottoms Rescue kiss of a tongue before trotting off to has taught me that we are not the only their future. family to have a hard time with goodYou might cry. You might wish you’d bye. One of the first questions I get when people find out I foster dogs is never done it. You may curse the name of the rescue or shelter you work with. “How do you let them go?”

Alpha from page 7. communication. Dogs can smell all of your emotions because every emotional change is a change in your body chemistry. So they know how you are feeling at all times. Unfortunately, there are human emotions that dogs don’t understand, such as hate and guilt. These emotions are interpreted by dogs to the best of their experience. This is where miscommunication comes into play. If you are feeling worried or scared because of what your dog might do, they may think this feeling is caused by something else and react to the thing that they think is causing this anxiety from you.

Horse Therapy for Troubled Teens by Pam Kachelmeyer, Coach Horse Counseling and Learning Center

My mother taught me to never say goodbye. Over time, the word has become nearly stricken from our family vocabulary. Goodbye has a finality to it that we can’t stand, so instead, we say “See you later” and part ways with the comfort of knowing that no matter what, we will meet again.

Some of these dogs have had troubled lives and need a little extra loving care. In giving them what they need, you get to watch them learn to trust. They learn to accept love and return it tenfold right before your eyes. We become vested in the relationship – in a way, implanting a part of ourselves into them as we guide them on a journey of recovery. I won’t lie – it isn’t easy to say goodbye when the time comes for a forever family to adopt your foster dog. What I

www.petjournalmidwest.com

This is why it is the gladdest of goodbyes.

Many teenage girls face emotional, behavioral, or social difficulties. Many of these girls are looking for a friend to help alleviate the anxiety, depression, and family problems that affect their daily lives. A therapy horse could be just the answer. CoachHorse Counseling Services, just a few miles from the hustle and bustle of local cites incorporates horses into sessions helping troubled, abused, defiant or rebellious girls cultivate alternative, appropriate, and effective ways of dealing with life’s challenges.

Incorporating horses into sessions can be inviting, less intimidating, more fun and creative in treating at-risk teenagers. The therapeutic process includes developing a relationship with a horse, allowing the girl to feel empowered by her own strengths while earning the trust of a horse. To earn this trust, teens must learn to authentically and effectively relate with the horse while responding to his body language. Learning to watch the non-verbal communication of the horse translates to similar language among their peers, parents, and Jennifer, a struggling teen states, families. Teens gain awareness of their I’m 17 years old, since grade school emotions and behaviors and establish bully problems arose; I had self-esteem personal boundaries as well as receive and self-confidence problems. Over the unconditional attention. These skills years I have done things to try and stop provide tools for building and sustaining my depression. I cut for many years. accountability, self-control and healthy I overate, and I even thought about relationships. suicide one year. I was a wreck, coming home from school in tears and then Each girl’s experience begins in a having to deal with a great family prob- peaceful, safe and serene setting, with a lem; my parent’s separation which led program of cognitive behavior therapy, to divorce. For many years, I’ve lived art therapy, and experiential learning. life thinking I was only on this planet to No horse experience is required; 90% be tortured, but one great furry friend of interacting with the horses is done on

Please consider becoming a foster home today. If you would like more information regarding fostering; feel free to contact Furry Bottoms Rescue at 920-449-5084 or email furrybottomsrescue@yahoo.com. Whether you decide to foster for Furry Bottoms, another organization or decide it isn’t for you; the volunteers at Furry Bottoms will be happy to provide you with information to help you make your decision!

The mind is a powerful tool to overcoming this lack of communication. If you think to yourself, “I am strong…I am in charge,” it will go a long way to creating that atmosphere among your pack. It’s amazing how connected a dog can be to their Alpha Dog. It takes time and practice to build this connection, but when it’s there, it’s worth all the hard work.

Editors Note: Alpha Dog welcomes

your questions on animal training; please email her at alphadog@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail at: Pet Journal Attn: Ask the Alpha Dog 3120 S Business Dr. Ste. 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

helped me see the light.” Jennifer found a horse friend named Dan and after a few sessions said, “He has not only given me confidence, but also some of the best memories in life. I knew he was the horse when we were doing trust exercises. I was to lead him over swimming noodles which were levitated among various objects. My counselor was unsure of whether or not Dan would attempt walking over the noodle levitated by two cardboard boxes. After numerous attempts and patient persistence Dan actually attempted! I felt like I was in the movie, when the unbelievable happened and a magical light feeling began to glow inside me, a flame lit. That flame was the bond between Dan and I, he had trusted me! Not one of the popular kids at school, or one of the kids who had bullied me believed in me. What happened was the most magical thing ever.”

the ground, little riding. Horse therapy is not for everyone; however a specific group of clients benefit and the program shortens the length of therapy for many young people. Pam Kachelmeier is a professional counselor and received her Counseling Psychology degree with a concentration in Equine Assisted Mental Health and Learning from Prescott College. She interned at Chaps Academy in Appleton, WI and is certified through the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association. She practices in Kiel, WI and focuses on Equine Assisted Mental Health with children, adolescents and young women. To learn more about CoachHorse Counseling Services and its summer workshops and mini-retreats visit www.coachhorse.com or call 920 980 5326.


Lakeshore Region

Park from page 5. group of large dogs, your asking for trouble. Some dogs may view your little buddy as prey and attack them with little provocation. Sadly, some dogs behave much the same way bullies do with smaller children. For this reason, one should never take a small puppy to a dog park.

• On a similar note, there are those that feel a dog park is free day care center for their dogs. They drop them off in the morning and leave them there for hours. It may start out fine but, after an hour or more, the dog may become tired. Like people, too much of a good thing can put you on edge. An edgy, over tired dog can become aggressive towards others when they want to play and he doesn’t. The dog may also become aggressive if he feels he’s been abandoned there by his parent. Taking your dog, dropping them off in a public place, and hoping for the best is just being irresponsible. • If your dog is intact or in heat, taking them to a park area filled with other dogs is opening up a potentially disastrous situation. It could also end you up with a lot of extra mouths to feed. It doesn’t mean you can’t take your dog to a park, just keep a close eye on them while they are there. • Some believe dog parks can also be a vector for parasites. The last thing you want is to bring you dog home with a few little friends that came along for the ride. Though, this can happen anywhere. My dog came in contact with fleas when a rabbit decided to take up residence in my yard and gave birth to baby bunnies. Unfortunately, my dog felt the mother needed help and would

The map to the right show the spead of WHS from when it was fist detectied in 2006 up to last fall. Areas are maped by county, with the first occurence circled in red.

PET JOURNAL check on the bunnies anytime he went outside. Through this attentiveness, he came in contact with fleas. • There is also the issue of fights that occur between owners resulting from the actions of their dogs. No one wants to believe their dog may have started a fight or got a little to friendly with another dog. Blaming everyone else does nothing, but make a bad situation worse. You should look at it as a learning opportunity and begin training to correct it. • Responsibility or lack there of, is a major issue with dog parks. You must pay attention to whats happening within the play area and be ready to defuse any potential problems. This can be sometimes as easy as giving you dog a “time out” and allowing them time to calm down. If another dog is the issue, simply take your dog home and return later after the dog has left the park. Sadly, the majority of the problems mentioned above fall squarely in the laps of the owners. Many of the negative issues can be resolved with common sense, being able to read yours and other dogs body language and training. All it takes is keeping an eye on the situation, taking responsibility for your dog and most of the problems would disappear. Yes, there are incidents that occur because dogs are animals and can be unpredictable at times, but I believe the benefits of a dog park outweigh the detriments. It is one of the few places a dog can run free, play with other dogs, and not have to fear cars or other dangers of urban life. Again, (I know I’ve beat this to death) all it takes is responsibility on the part of the owners. Many parks have list of rules they post. They are there to keep the park clean and safe for everyone and they are pretty east to live by. Working together with others in the pet community, most of the cons can be removed and we can give our best friends a safe and healthy place to play.

February 2011

11

Bats:

The Importance of bats and why they are threatened by Kathy Schema, Lincoln Park Zoo, Manitowoc, WI When one thinks of pollinators what pops in their mind first are bees and birds. But there is a third pollinator that is also very important in nature. Nature’s pollinator of the night. The bat. Nectar-feeding bats are found around the world from deserts to tropics. In the desert such plants as the giant cacti and agave depend on these bats for survival. In the tropics a wide variety of plants also rely on the bat for pollination; a few of these are bananas, avocado, dates, figs, peaches, mangoes, durian, cloves, cashews, carob, and balsa wood. Besides the nectar-feeding bats there are also the fruit-feeding bats. As these bats ingest the fruit, they will disperse seeds throughout the rainforests in their guano or bat droppings. The guano is a very valuable substance that is high in nutrients and is nature’s own fertilizer. Then there are the bats in our own back yards. The insect-feeding bats. These bats are the predators of the night that consume many types of insects that include those that damage crops. Insect-feeding bats, such as the little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus), are known to consume 1,000 mosquito size insects in one night. In some species, pregnant or nursing females are capable of consuming their body weight in insects each night. Bigger bats, such as the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), with larger teeth and strong jaws are known to eat the harder insects such as beetles. While smaller bats, such as the little brown myotis (Mycosis lucifugus), with small teeth and jaws will consume the smaller softer insects. The number of insects consumed annually by one million bats is equivalent to 694 tons. Nationally this would cost farmers and foresters billions of dollars a year in pest control.

WNS is a new disease that is caused by a cold loving white fungus (Geomyces destructans) that has killed more than one million bats in the past four years. G. destructans grows on the nose and sometimes on the wings, ears, and tails of cave bats. WNS was first discovered in the winter of 2006 in a New York cave. It has killed over a million hibernating bats in fourteen states and two Canadian provinces. It has been reported that currently the fungus is 200 to 300 miles away from Wisconsin borders; well within the 280 mile migration range of bats. Professionals believe the fungus will be seen in Wisconsin caves this winter. See map below and left to see the current spead of WHS. It is believed that the primary transmission of WNS is bat to bat, but there is some evidence that point towards humans unknowingly carrying WNS from one infected site to another. G. destructans irritates the bats skin and causes them to wake up during hibernation. Bats have enough fat deposits to last them throughout their entire hibernation. But the more frequent they wake up the faster they us this fat storage; which eventually leads to starvation. WNS also compromises the bat’s immune response during hibernation, damages or scars the bat’s wings, and causes abnormal bat behavior, such as causing them to leave their hibernaculum (location where an animal hibernates) midwinter where they are found dead from freezing or starving to death. WNS kills 75% of the bats the first year and 90-100% the second year.

Currently there are six bat species in the northeast United States that are affected by WNS: little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), tri-colored bats (PerimyAs one can see the importance of otis subflavus), northern myotis (Myotis having bats not only helps protect crops septentrionalis), eastern small-footed by controlling insect populations, but myotis (Myotis leibii), and Indiana myoalso helps pollinate vegetation, helps tis (Myotis sodalist), which is federally disperse seeds, and creates a natural endangered. Along with these species fertilizer. Unfortunately, bats are be- there are three other bat species that coming threatened in the United States have been detected with G. destructans from White-nose Syndrome (WNS). and they are the gray bats (Myotis grisescens), southeastern bats (Myotis austroriparius), and cave bat myotis (Myotis velifer). These three species have not yet been diagnosed with WNS. If the current mortality rate continues, 25 species of hibernating bats will decline and some of these species could be threatened with extinction. It is unlikely that these species will bounce back because bats are long lived with low reproductive rates. Most bat species have an average lifespan of more than 20 years and give birth to only one young per year. Wisconsin has seven native bats; three are migratory bats: eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis), hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivigans). The other four are cave bats: little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus), big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus), northern myotis (Myotis septentrionalis), and tri-colored bat

See Bats on page 18.


12

PET JOURNAL

February 2011

PHOTO GALLERY

OF

www.petjournalmidwest.com

READERS PETS

Portia, with a toy, Jelaine M., Green Bay

Jackson, looking for attention or a walk, Erick N., Sheboygan

Frankie the “Walk ‘n Roll” Dog, Barb T., Elkhart Lake

Schmitty, posing for the camera, Courtney, Sheboygan

Ace (top) and Zuma, “Best Buddies”, Lori L., Sheboygan Falls

“Brothers” (from right) Jazz, Gizmo, & Tiny, Cory B., Sheboygan

If you would like to see your pet(s) on this page, please email them to us at petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com with a short description including: your pets name, your name, city, and a little statement about what they are doing in the photo. If you do not have email and would like to mail a glossy photo, please mail it to our mailing address: Pet Journal, attn: Pet Photos, 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 (all photos received by mail will be returned after they have been scanned for print.) All photos received will also be posted in our online photo gallery at http://images.petjournalmidwest.com/gallery.html, due to space limitation’s some submissions may not be printed in Pet Journal the same month they are received.

PHOTO

OF OUR BUT

Martin, a former TDI Therapy Dog “Minsiter of Furry Love” passed away December 25, 2010, Mary S., Sheboygan Falls

FRIENDS WHO ARE GONE, NOT FORGOTTEN

Butch, Curtis W., Sheboygan Falls

Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanning program to go to the Pet Journal gallery section.


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region Cats International

Lakeshore Bully Club

Fringe Benefits Thrift Stores

Pet Journal Supports and Thanks the Following Animal Service and Support Groups in the Lakeshore Region area These groups are just a sampling of those that go “Above and Beyond” when it comes to helping pets, providing service animals, and by helping those with disability’s. This list is just a few of the groups in the area if you know of one that is not listed, please let us know.

Two Hearts Rescued by Barbara Techel, joyfulpaws.com Penny, Keno, Fritz, Bearlington Barron, Ashes in the Wind and last, but not least, Abby, are Dalmatians that were lucky enough to have Laverne care for them. Dalmatians have been a part of Laverne’s life for over 50 years. Abby passed away in February of 2006 leaving Laverne feeling sad and lonely. She really wanted to love another Dalmatian, but realized that might be a challenge with her age. Laverne was very cautious and took her time thinking everything through. With encouragement from her friends she decided to look for an older Dalmatian. Her friends stepped in with that effort and one thing lead to another to bring her in contact with Save Our Spots Dalmatian Rescue with just the right dog. When Laverne heard the news she did not hesitate one moment and prepared her home by placing a doggie bed in the living room, dining room and bedroom. She bought dog food and treats and set out water and kibble dishes. Dog toys were abundant for Suzie as she arrived to Laverne’s home in early October. Five year old Suzie met Laverne and wiggled her way into Laverne’s heart within minutes. Suzie helped Laverne feel alive again. Laverne is a perfect example of the positive effect a dog can have on your life. She is in her early eighties, and a gracious, big-hearted lady who knows how good it feels to be needed and loved. As she awakes each morning, she glances at the closet mirror opposite her bed. The reflection looking back at her gives her purpose to rise for the day. That purpose is Suzie, who wags her tail and smiles only as a dog can do.

• Seniors with pets have high optimism and better psychological well-being. • Animals help to promote social interaction and decrease isolation and loneliness. • Pets are experts at encouraging laughter, playfulness and exercise. • The need for touch, warmth and affection is satisfied with a pet. It really is simple. We all want to be needed and loved. These feelings are especially true for the elderly. Laverne takes great delight in caring for Suzie. She visits the local senior center often and has gotten the go-ahead to bring Suzie in for a visit. Not only is Suzie providing love for Laverne, but she will also share her love with Laverne’s friend who is in the nursing home. One dog can provide so much affection and warmth. It is hard to put that feeling into words, as it can only be felt with the heart. Visiting with Laverne and Suzie on a December afternoon two years ago was an experience that will stay with me always. The special bond between Laverne and Suzie is what being loved and needed is all about. Suzie lay at Laverne’s feet as we talked, snoring to the rhythm of our conversation. As Laverne got up to show me around her home, Suzie did not miss a beat, and followed lovingly beside us. Laverne shared with me the story of how Suzie brings her shoe to her each morning and places it next to her bed. It is Suzie’s way of saying it is time to get up and moving for the day. As Laverne sits on the edge of the bed, Suzie walks over to her and places her head adoringly on her knee. To witness such a sweet act is to know without a doubt that two hearts were rescued. Barbara Techel is a local resident of Elkhart Lake and is an award winning author of Frankie the Walk ‘N Roll Dog book series. To learn more about Barbara visit www.joyfulpaws.com.

Pets can provide love and many other benefits to the elderly. Studies are expanding our knowledge by leaps and bounds on this subject. The following are some of the benefits an animal can provide to a senior (www.deltasociety. com): • Dogs are therapeutic and can help alleviate against everyday stress. • Seniors that have dogs tend to go to the doctor less. • Cholesterol levels can be lower when an animal is part of a senior’s life.

February 2011

13

Blue Heron Wildlife Sanctuary Wisconsin Society For the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Rein’s, Inc.

EAGLE POINT SHARPENING ‡ Mobile Scissor Sharpening ‡ Clipper Blade Sharpening is done in my shop ‡ Please call for prices and appointment April Stanley 262 673-7976 cell 262 389-5612 aprils215@charter.net

Pit Bull from page 7. hysterical press, the American Pit Bull Terrier has become the most vilified and misunderstood breed of dog out there. The dogs did not do this, man did this to this wonderful breed of dog. Human aggression is not a characteristic of this breed. Human aggression in any breed of dog is not to be tolerated.

Please, be kind to the Environment! After reading please Recycle. Thank you.

best of their ability. You can find the list at Bad Raps website here http://www. bapbr.org/10_PIT_BULL_COMMANDMENTS.html. Any person wanting a “Pit Bull” or any mix thereof should do their research. Be responsible! Spay and Neuter your dog. There has not been one report of an altered “Pit Bull” being involved in a fatality. Spaying and Neutering is important it does affect the dog and its health. Owners need to obey their leash laws. APBT owners must be at a higher standard. Fenced in yard is always good, NEVER leave a APBT’s outside unattended, dog fighters are always looking for dogs to fight or bait dogs. Responsible dog ownership is always the key word, especially when it comes to the wonderful American Pit Bull Terrier. However this can be expanded to many breeds, as people looking to supply the fight rings will also need bait dogs.

Determination and loyalty is in the APBT, I can tell you from experience. Each dog is different in their own ways, just like humans are. Some of these dogs will pick up training very easily and others you must find their drive. Some of them like treats and some need to be more challenged. But I can tell you once you find they key to their hearts. You will get them trained. They love to please to their owners. Positive training with them is the best. Rewards get more out of them and you will enjoy your bond with your dog. Be prepared to find one of the best friends you will ever have. Never judge a dog by what another dog has done. Never judge one of these dogs by its looks. There are many that are just teddy bears waiting for the opportunity for a new home. Many are sitting in rescue’s being fostered by people who care. Some of them are sitting in Humane Societies hoping you will give them a chance. There is a list of the Ten Commandments of Pit Bull Ownership and I do believe every owner should follow to the

The next time you visit a Rescue or Humane Society open up and take a look at the Pit Bull. That dog just might be what you are looking for. Great APBT References - Check them out and make yourself a better owner! www.badrap.org www.pbrc.net www.chicagolandbullybreedrescue.org www.puppylove-lovecats.org/ unitedapbt.ning.com www.understand-a-bull.com/ Mecca Stanley, Owner/President Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue www.meccapitbullrescue.com


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PET JOURNAL

February 2011

Prong Collar vs. Choke Collar Myths by Linda Ledbeter, Animal Connections

This month I would like to talk about dog collar myths: True or False: The prong collar or often called the pinch collar, is inhumane and may cause grave harm to your dog. True or False: Choke collars (loose chain style) are perfectly safe. You may be surprised to know choke collars do exactly that, CHOKE. A study was done in Germany with 100 dogs for the dog’s entire life: Fifty with choke collars, the other fifty with prong collars. Forty-six out of the fifty with choke collars had injuries to the trachea, neck or back, two of the fifty was determined to be genetic. The fifty dogs with the prong collar only two had injuries to the neck area and one was determined to be caused by trauma. I don’t know about you, but I’m leaning towards the one with less trauma and medical cost for repair. When your dog is straining, pulling you down the sidewalk, he/she is more than likely gasping for air, while you are pulling back attempting to remain upright. In reality the dog is slowly being strangled to death, while you become more frustrated. I remember hearing myself say, “Well then! Stop pulling!!!” Dog’s simply don’t think like we do, or do they? All of us know someone who simply hasn’t learned from their actions and continues the same old behavior not putting two and two together. So how do we stop the insanity? I think all of us have used the term with our fellow human beings “Snap Out Of It!” Many parents have used, “I’ll slap you into the next county if you don’t stop!” or the well known quote from Bill Cosby, “I brought you into the world, I can take you out”. Dogs like kids can push us to the limit, especially when the tools we are currently using aren’t getting the desired results and we don’t have any other ideas left in our survival kit. I am here to tell you the answer lies at your fingertips. In basic training, we learn to change directions in the walk quickly and without notice to the dog. Many dogs and their humans get this technique quickly, while others need more practice. Some dogs simply are not grasping our idea of correction at all or could it be directly related to our body language and expectations or the lack there of?

I am not a personal fan of the gentle leaders simply because I have experienced what I call, “dumbing the dog down effect”. For many dogs and their humans, this is the proper collar. I am not discouraging the gentle leader, but I am saying our dogs are smarter than what we have been lead to believe. Like we humans, we get the message of correction when our brain receives consequences. Consequence do NOT have to be painful, they do however have to register in the brain. By this I mean simply, a quick snap, snaps the brain out of the old pattern of unconscious behavior. In my practice, helping owners and their dogs master a common ground of understanding has been rewarding. More dogs could and will be walked more often if the walk is mastered correctly and most importantly, safe. If your dog is pulling you, then the odds are, if you have a personal injury walking your dog is not a safe activity regardless of the season. With less activity for your dog, other problems will certainly arise. Dogs with aggressive tendencies will also benefit from the prong collar. The proper fitting and use of this collar is imperative for maximum results. If the collar is too tight, your dog will receive abrasions along with his/her brain “tuning out” the pressure. The timing and your body language is crucial to your success. It is easily learned once you understand when and how correction is delivered. Getting over the idea and the general belief the prong collar is barbaric, while ignoring the scowls of disapproving looks, you will save yourself and your dog trauma later on in years. Slowly choking your dog to death is more barbaric in my opinion. I have maintained the belief, NO is a positive word not used often enough in the human or animal world. As a dog owner, take back your power, your companion is relying on you for guidance and health care needs. Call Animal Connections 920892-6180 for your personalized attention to you and your pets needs.

www.petjournalmidwest.com

FIND PET JOURNAL

AT THESE

LOCATIONS

Eastshore Humane Association 1100 Park St. Chilton, WI 920 849-2390

Fond Du Lac Humane Society 624 Triangle Rd. Fond Du Lac, WI 920 922-8873

Sheboygan Co. Humane Society

3107 N. 20th St. Sheboygan, WI 920 458-2012

Ozaukee Co. Humane Society 2073 Hwy. W Grafton, WI 262 377-7580

Walgreen’s Drugstores Chilton, Fond Du Lac, Manitowoc, Plymouth, Sheboygan, & Two Rivers, WI

Walgreen’s Drugstores Cedarburg, Grafton, Hartford, Jackson, Saukville, & West Bend, WI

Bondie’s Quick Mart 1517 North Ave., Clevelend, WI -andN911 State Rd 57, Kiel, WI

Cousins Subs & Patsy’s Mobil 816 N. 22nd St. Two Rivers, WI

Lincoln Park Zoo 1215 N. 8th St. Manitowoc, WI

Sheboygan County Libraries Cedar Grove, Kohler, Lakeview,, Mead, Oostburg, Plymouth, & Sheboygan Falls

Z Spot Espresso & Coffee 1024 Indiana Ave. Sheboygan, WI

Calumet, Fond Du Lac, & Manitowoc County Libraries Brillion, Chilton, Manitowoc, Lester, Kiel, New Holstein, & Spillman

Z Spot Espresso & Coffee 1024 Indiana Ave. Sheboygan, WI

Jumes Restaurant 504 N. 8th St.. Sheboygan, WI

Animal Outfiters 661 S. Military Ave. Fond Du Lac, WI

For more location please see page 5 or visit our website at: www.petjournalmidwest.com and click on the link “Where can I find Pet Journal..”

Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanning program to go to the Pet Journal Distribution Locations page.

Advertise with PET JOURNAL! Call us at 920-785-3048 or by email at advertising@petjournalmidwest.com to find out how your bussiness can advertise here.


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

Grooming your Pet by Dede Diehl, Silde Kennels and Grooming groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com Dede, I recently adopted a standard poodle puppy and had a few questions for you. I understand the poodles have some issues with skin, are there any suggestions you have for specifics regarding shampoos to maintain healthy skin and coat as he grows. Being he has a very dense curly coat, what are the best kinds of brushes and combs to use when grooming him. Thanks, Julie T. Stockbridge, WI Julie, Congratulations! You are going to be charmed be a bright, happy, bouncy bundle of joy wrapped up in a lovely, fluffy, curly hair. I, as a standard and miniature poodle breeder of some 50 years can tell you that now you are on the most wonderful journey of a lifetime. I hope you will enjoy it! The equipment you will need to start your puppy on a lifetime of coat care are a brush and a metal comb. Now don’t skimp on your grooming supplies as you will regret it in the long run. There are two different kinds of brushes, slicker and pin. A slicker brush is a brush with bent wire pins set very close together in a rubber backing in either a flat or slightly curved platform with a handle. The flat regular back slicker is the one I prefer. You have a choice of either soft or firm wires and again, I prefer a stiffer

brush. Now don’t think that this brush is going to hurt the dog, they use this kind of brush on mink coats so it is surely gentle enough, but still strong enough to get the knots out. The poodle does not shed seasonally as other dogs do, his hair is more like wool and sheds a little at a time, all the time. Now the other kind of brush is called a pin brush. It comes in several shapes and sizes. You have straight pins about 1” – 1 ½” long set fairly far apart in a domed flexible base and set in a wooden or plastic handle. The shape of the head of the brush can be anywhere from oblong (my favorite) to oval, large to small. The brush is for long hair and is basically for straightening and rearranging the hair and not for taking snarls, undercoat, and mats out. You do not need a brush like this if you are not grooming your dog for show. You will also need a comb, metal with teeth that are at least 1” – 1 ¼” long. These combs come from 4” to 13” in long, the average, which you will need is about 7” long. The teeth of the comb come in course, medium, and fine. This is the pitch, or spaces between teeth. You will need a comb with two types, medium and course, on the same comb.

February 2011

Coming in March Now that the Superbowl and Valentines Day are behind us and are looking ahead to St. Patricks Day and sring is just around the corner; the March issue of Pet Journal will be available! Coming in the March issue we will be bringing to you the following planed stories:

Feature Story - A Look at Animal Hording and other stories of Pet/Animal and Ecology interest. More from our columnists: Ask the Alpha Dog, Alpha Dog Ask the Vet, Dr. Dell and staff Ask Scrappy!, Scrappy Grooming your Pet, Dede Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets, Shellie

As I said do not skimp on your grooming equipment! You can go to your local pet store, the internet, or select from catalogs selling to pet professionals as well as to pet owners. Several

Another Pet Journal Word Search

See Grooming on page 18.

and more!

Pictures of your Pet

NOTE: convert to grayscale!

SILDE KENNEL & GROOMING

DORRIT E. DIEHL January Word Search Answers BREEDING SERVICES SILVER MINIATURES POODLES

GROOMING & BOARDING SERVICES

STANDARD POODLES LONGHAIRED MINIATURE DACHSHUNDS CHAMPION STUD SERVICE

OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE BOARDING ALL BREEDS GROOMING ALL BREEDS

SHOW & PET PUPPIES

N7364 LAKESHORE ROAD SHEBOYGAN, WI 53083 (920) 565-2231

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PET JOURNAL

February 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Good pets need homes, Adopt!

Furry Bottoms Rescue, Plymouth, WI Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue, Sheboygan, WI

Eastern Wis. Herpetological Society & Rescue Plymouth, WI

Please support these local pet rescues and your local Humane Societys

Two Left Paws Animal Sanctuary, Sheboygan, WI Amazing Grace Equine Sanctuary, Elkhart Lake, WI

S

Tailwagers 911 Dog Rescue, Saukville, WI

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIED’S Pet Journal classified’s, are a free service for our readers. Classified’s are for free or pay services offered by individuals or families (that are not listed as a business, such as a teenager looking for a dog walking job over the summer.) Classified’s are also available for our Local Humane Societies/Shelters and Animal Rescues to post their needs lists. Please contact the respective Humane Society/Shelter/Rescue if you have questions or would like to donate an item or two. Event’s from our advertisers and readers will also be printed as space allows. To place your classified ad please email Pet Journal at: petjournal@ petjournalmidwest.com. Please include the following when submitting your classified: Name, Phone, email, Best time to call (in case there is a problem with your classified ad), what text you would like in your ad (please limit to 25 words and keep your wording clean remember this is a family paper), how many months you would like the listing to be available for, and list in the subject of your email as “PJ Classified”. If you would prefer to mail it to us, you may do so, with the same items as requested above and mail it to: Pet Journal attn: PJ Classified’s 3120 S. Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 Please submit your classified no later than the 20th of the month to make the next edition.

Section 1: Individual/Family Classifieds Section 2: Humane Societies & Animal Rescues/Shelters Needs Lists Section 2.1: Humane Societies Eastshore Humane Association of Chilton, WI is looking for: • Non-scoopable Cat Litter • Purina Cat Chow -or• Purina Complete • Purina Dog Chow • Laundry Detergent

EASTSHORE HUMANE ASSOCIATION COLLECTS WEIGHT CIRCLES FROM PURINA CAT AND DOG FOOD PRODUCTS Please help out by sending us the weight circles. The Purina products include: Purina dog and cat food products such as Pro Plan, Purina One, Purina Cat Chow & Kitten Chow, Kit ‘N Kaboodle, Happy Cat, Purina Veterinary Diets. These weight circles enable Eastshore to earn points toward the purchase of Purina products for the shelter animals. As an added bonus, the weight circles from Purina dog food products can also be used to help Eastshore Humane pay the veterinarian bills!

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Eastshore Humane Association at: 920.849.2390, by email at: ehashelter@gmail.com or you may visit their website: www.eastshoreha.org. Ozaukee Humane Society of Grafton, WI is looking for: • Digital Camera with rechargeable battery, at least 7 megapixel preferred • Dish Soap • Small Dog Training Treats • Laundry Detergent (for High Efficiency

• • • • •

Postage stamps Kongs Fabric - large, colorful solid material 8 oz. - 12 oz. disposable cups 45-gallon garbage bags Aspen Bedding Bleach Bottle Brushes Cardstock paper Cat-nail clippers (scissor type) Cat toys Copy paper, white & color, 8.5” x 11” Dog toys (Nylabones, squeaky toys, ropes,

Washington County Humane Society of Slinger, WI is looking for:

Items marked with a * are priority needs.

• ◊

• • • • • •

Hand Sanitizer Highlighters Kitchen scrub brushes with handles LaserJet mailing labels (Avery 5160) Lingerie bags (for washing small toys) Mailing envelopes, 9 x 12 or 10 x 13 Manila folders (letter size only) Paper towels Peanut butter Pens Post-it-notes Printer ink cartridges ◊ Canon (5PGBK, 8C, 8M, 8Y) ◊ HP (23, 45, 92, 94, 95) Rabbit pellets (no fruit or seed mix) Rechargeable AA batteries, with charger Scissors Soft Dog Toys Staples Steno notepads

Animal Needs Dog Needs ● “Natures Variety Instinct” or Grain free Dog Food* (for dogs with special dietary needs)

● ●

Purina Puppy chow Liver Sausage (to hide medication for dogs)

Cat Needs ● Non-scoopable cat litter* (we always need litter)

“Before Grain” dry food*

(for cats

with special dietary needs)

Septic Swaps* (can get at Walgreens)

● Baby Food* ● Feliway Spray Small Animal Needs ● Hamster/Gerbil food* ● Aspen bedding* (can get at Fleet Farm - called Horse Cubes)

● ●

Timothy Hay* Carefresh pet bedding* (any color)

Vita drops* ● Ferret Vite* ● Guinea Pig food ● Toys/Treats ● Plastic Slinkys ● Rat pellets ● Ferret food Shelter Needs Nurtical* Paper plates Toilet Paper Oster shaver blades - #40 Fabuloso floor cleaner Plastic clipboards - 9” x 12” 75 to 100 ft. Industrial strength hoses New or working Dehumidifiers New or working Chest Freezers Postage stamps Thick “Welding” leather gloves

or if you have any questions, please contact the Washington County Humane Society at: 262.677.0388, by email at: wchs@washingtoncountyhumane.org or visit there website at: www.washingtoncountyhumane.org.

Section 2.2: Animal Rescues & Shelters Furry Bottoms Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • Small Refrigerator • 4 - 4-shelve storage units on wheels To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Furry Bottoms Rescue at: 920.449.5084, by email at: info@furrybottomsrescue.com or visit their website: www.furrybottomsrescue.com. Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Paper towels • Lysol Spray • Dog toys • Puppy food - moist and dry • Bowls • Leashes • Collars • Volunteers • Wisconsin Foster Homes To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Mecca’s Pit Bull Rescue at: 920.627.6727, by email at: mecca@ meccapitbullrescue.com or visit there website at: www.meccapitbullrescue. com.

hard rubber balls, ect.)

• • • • • • • • • • • •

cardboard

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Ozaukee Humane Society at: 262.377.7580, by email at: info@ozaukeehumane.org or you may visit their website: www.ozaukeehumane.org.

Washers)

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Stretch & “Scratch” scratching pads Swiffer Dusters Timothy hay Toilet paper Vinyl (non-latex) gloves Wild birdseed

• ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊ ◊

(should go to the elbow)

◊ ◊ ◊

Eraser board markers Heating Pads with temp adjustment Gift Cards (Walmart, Office Max, Fleet

Toner for printers: ● HP DeskJet 990cse #78 - color ● HP DeskJet 990cse #45 - black ● HP #28 - Tricolor ● HP #27 - Black ● HP LaserJet 2200d #96A - black

Farm, Menards, Gas Cards)

To donate any items on this list

Two Left Paws of Sheboygan, WI is looking for: • Dog/Cat food (Evo, Fromm, Wellnes, Feliade, Canide) • Canned wet food (any kind) • Clumping litter (any kind, non-sented) • Litter scoops • Puppy pads • Dog/Cat treats • Dog/Cat toys • Dog/Cat beds • Towels • Paper towels • Disposable gloves • Kennels • Cages • Live traps for Small Animals • Fleet Farm gift cards To donate any items on this list or if yoou have any questions, please contact Two Left Paws Animal Sanctuary at: 920.331.0100 or via their website at: www.twoleftpaws.org.


Lakeshore Region

PET JOURNAL

February 2011

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIED’S Section 3: Event Posters

A Day in the Country – Relaxation – Rejuvenation – Renewal And Playing with Horses Mother Daughter Sister Mini-Retreat Saturday June 11, 2011 CoachHorse Wellness Center Location: 17412 W. Washington Road Kiel, WI 53042 (Located in the northern tip of the beautiful Kettle Moraine Forest) The day is yours to remember while sharing with your loved ones. Unwind and play, inspirational and fun filled activities – enjoying the special bond of soul friendship between mothers, daughters and sisters. There is no better gift you can give to your mother or daughter or sister than the gift of yourself! Your day — led by Diane Pauly, her daughter Pam Kachelmeier and her daughter Wendy Jeske — will be rewarding as we breath in the fresh air, listen to mother nature ,and take in the serene valley. Our intention is for you to share new experiences in a natural and creative way. We will have experiences together that may be new and different to you: yoga, beautiful slow short hike, horse meditation, facial or foot treatment, a sample horse-human personal development session, and a healthy lunch! We will also incorporate a unique story telling time in the 20-foot wide tipi to help us to get to know each other. R.S.V.P. by June 4 by calling 920-980-5326 or e-mail: coachhorse@excel.net. Fee: $50.00/person Participants must be 18 years or older to attend. No horse experience required. Pam Kachelmeier PC EAMH

CoachHorse Counseling and Learning Center www.coachhorse.com 920-980-5326

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PET JOURNAL

February 2011

Bats from page 11.

Grooming from page 15.

(Perimyotis subflavus). These four Wisconsin bat species are susceptible to WNS and will possibly perish if the fungus G. destructans is not controlled. There is no evidence that shows WNS affects migratory bats.

I use are: • PetEdge - www.petedge.com • Lambert Vet Supply – 800 344-6337 • Ryan’s Pet Supplies – www.ryanspet.com • Revival Animal Health – revivalanimal.com

Some things that are being done to slow the spread of WNS are restricting access to certain caves. Regional and local cave closures have been put in place to help lessen the chance of spreading WNS by keeping people from transferring the fungus from cave to cave. To find more information on cave closures go to http://www.caves.org/ WNS/. Scientists are also researching possible treatments to combat WNS but need to be careful not to damage the delicate cave ecosystem by using fungicides. Things that you can do are educate the people around you about the importance of bats and what WNS will do to Wisconsin’s cave bats. Ask the State and Federal government to help fund the WNS research. If unusual bat behaviors are noticed, such as, bats flying around midwinter or during the day and unexplained bat deaths, report them to the Wisconsin DNR. Abide by all advisories and cave closures to help lower the chances of transmitting the fungus from one cave to another and practice decontamination protocols when entering caves set forth by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. For information on updated cave protocols go to http://www.fws.gov/northeast/wnsresearchmonitoring.html.

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ADOPTION COMPANION FAMILY GROOMING KITTIES PITBULL PLAY TRAINING TREATS PETEXPO SHELTER RESCUE DOGPARK WHITENOSE BATS PYTHON SNAKES BRUSHES COMBS CHOKECOLLAR PRONGCOLLAR FOSTERCARE HORSECOUNSELING MARDIPAWS HUMANESOCIETY

You will also need a good quality canine shampoo, as he will need to be bathed every two weeks. I have already discussed the bathing process, but if you need more discussion, just drop me a note and I would be more than happy to help. The above names listed for brushes also have shampoos available. Now back to maintenance. First you must teach you puppy to be brushed. Gently, but firmly, brush him first with the hair and then against the hair with the slicker brush. Brush all the hair. His head, his tail, his back, his legs, and his arm pits, ALL OF IT. Do this gently but firmly to the skin while he is still small enough so if he fights, you will still be in control. He must learn to sit or lie down quietly. After you have brushed him, run the comb throughout his hair to the skin, if you cannot get through, start again. He will not be interested in this as he would rather be playing, but stick to your guns, it is very necessary. He MUST be brushed and combed for the rest of his life. He will fight you about this and if you don’t settle this now, you and he will be unhappy (you groomer also) for the rest of yours and his time together. Please listen to me, a small amount of persistence and time now will payoff in the long run. Do this daily while he is a puppy, it will not take long and he will enjoy the time with you. DeDe

Dear Dede, What are your views on trimming or shaving cats for the summer? Thanks, Alice M. Hartford, WI Alice, I do not think cats should be shaved, especially not shaved for decoration or convenience. Cats that are badly matted do need to be shaved. Some will let you shave them willingly and some need to be medicated to allow this. The cats that get badly matted are usually long-haired, such as Persians and Angoras. If you take some time as kittens and teach them to be handled, brushed, and combed, just like the poodle in the above response you will not need to shave them off on down the road. So work on it! Teach your kitten to enjoy being brushed and you will profit from it for a lifetime. Dede Until next month,

Editors Note:

Words to find, they can go across, up or down, or diagonally. Answers will appear in next months issue or on the Pet Journal website about the 20th of the month, on the Lakeshore Region page.

Dede

Dede welcomes your questions on animal grooming; please email her at groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail at: Pet Journal Attn: Grooming your Pet 3120 S Business Dr. Ste. 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524


PET JOURNAL

Lakeshore Region

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Soft Sizes avaiable: 18” x 24“ or cut to size Strong Heavy Duty for Pet Cleanup Absorbant Disposable Also Household and Shop Toweling Biodegradable

Let PET JOURNAL help you with your Advertising Needs! Eastshore Humane Society, Chilton, WI

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February 2011

Also available Food Grade 5, 6, and 55-gallon plastic pails with lids Great for storing animal food and more

Rays Handy Wipes 920‡579‡9978 cell 920‡795‡4765 home Call us at 920-785-3048 or by email at advertising@petjournalmidwest.com to find out how your bussiness can advertise here.

Visit your Local Humane Society!

Fond Du Lac County Humane Society, Fond Du Lac, WI Lakeshore Humane Society, Manitowoc, WI

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Ozaukee Humane Society, Grafton, WI Sheboygan County Humane Society, Sheboygan, WI

These Humane Societies are in the Lakeshore Region

Washington County Humane Society, Slinger, WI


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February 2011

PET JOURNAL

www.petjournalmidwest.com

March 31, 2011

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Trish Bruner of Legacy Studios in Sheboygan, WI has earned a Bronze Level Photographer of the Year Award from the Professional Photographers of America (PPA). A PPA member earns a Bronze Level Photographer of the Year Award by placing four images included in their case in the PPA’s renowned General Collection - an incrediable accomplishment. In 2010, Trish was one of only 44 Bronze Level Photographer’s of the Year. Congratulations Trish! Legacy Studios 1402 S. 12th St. Sheboygan, WI 53081 920.803.8880 www.legacystudios.net

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