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WISCONSIN’S RESOURCE FOR ALL ANIMALS GB/FC Region

December 2011

FREE

Volume 1, Issue 4

Barts Little Sister by Colleen Bertram, Pet Journal Contributor In last month’s issue you read the story about the Big yellow lab named Bart who survived Hurricane Katrina. This is another story about Doug and Karen Weiss and their love for animals in need of love, patience, and a lot of tender loving care. After Doug and Karen adopted Bart, Karen told Doug, “No more dogs for a while”. I laugh as I write this because over the short periods of time I’ve spent with Doug and Karen, Doug has a very magical, infectious and mischievous grin. Knowing Karen said,” No more dogs for a while,” Doug set out for the Tri-county humane society in Green Lake, Wisconsin. I’m sure Doug would agree that he was just in the neighborhood. Later on that day, Karen came home from work, walked in the door and found Doug at the top of the stairs holding a ball of fur. Karen said,” I thought I said no more dogs?” Doug held up the dog and said,” I didn’t bring home another dog; I brought home three quarters of a dog!” The little red Pomeranian had only three legs. They named her Tri-Pod. Doug began to tell Karen what had happened to Tri-Pod in the first five years of her life. Tri Pod had been severely abused by her previous owners. Tri-Pod was in the humane society for quite some time, she was hard to adopt out because of her condition and she was not potty trained. Doug handed Tri-Pod to Karen and an instant bond of love and trust began. Karen fixed her new little love up with diapers that are taken off when they go outside. It is so cute because when it is time to go outside, TriPod rolls over on her back and waits to have her diaper taken off. Tri-Pod loves her big brother Bart but she does rule the house.

see

Tri-pod on page 11.

Photo courtesy of Portraits by Design

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November 2011

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ABOUT

OUR

PET JOURNAL

COVER MODEL

Our December cover model is Tigger is a 3 year old, Domestic Short Hair cat, who was adopted as a stray kitten found on the side of the road. As a kitten he tested positive for FIV, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus. This can be a common positive result in kittens that can carry their mother’s antibodies for up to 6 months. Lucky for Tigger, as of 6 months old, he is negative for FIV, and now he is a very healthy, very large and happy cat. For more information on FIV and if your cat might be at risk, consult your veterinarian. Tigger is the pet child of Laura and Corey of Menasha. Photo courtesy of Portraits by Design, Kaukauna, WI.

December 2011

Editors Notes

Dear Readers,

our distribution department at distribution@petjournalmidwest.com

Thank you for reading the December issue of Pet Journal. The staff of Become a friend of Pet Journal on Pet Journal would like to wish all of our Facebook! Join the growing group of readers a Merry Christmas and a Happy Pet Journal readers following us, and New Year. upload a picture of your pets, it could be featured as our pet of the week! We would like to welcome member of the staff of the Northeast Wisconsin Zoo Would you like to see your pets in Pet (NEW Zoo) who will be submitting ar- Journal? Email a picture of your pet(s) ticles on animal related topics. Look for to petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com these articles as well as more Eco News and we will feature them in our Pet from the staff of the Bay Beach Wildlife Pictures Page. No email? No problem. Sanctuary. Mail a copy of the picture to the Pet Journal mailbox, listed below. All picOur columnists would love to hear tures received by mail will be returned your questions. Contact information is after scanning. found at the end of their respective columns! Please feel free to send us your Have you seen the updated events story ideas and photos. We want to page on the Pet Journal website yet? be the publication you look forward to It now features an interactive calendar reading each and every month. by goggle, as well as, the event posters and event listings it had before. To acAre you interested in Advertising in cess the events page go to the Pet JourPet Journal? For more information on nal home page and click on the events advertising in this edition of Pet Journal page link at the top of the page. email lakeshoreadvertising@petjour, Editor nalmidwest.com. If you would like to have pet journal delivered to your business for you staff or clients please email

Lee J Schneider

Table of Contents 1 - Bart’s Little Sister by B. Bertram

3 - About our Cover Model Publishers Notes 4 - Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets Hosted C. Larson

Keeping Your Pets Safe During the Holidays: Christmas Edition

by Pet Journal Editors

5 - Ask Scrappy Q & A

Hosted by Scrappy the Pit Bull

Eco News:

Alternative Energy by K. Diedrich

6 - Calendar of Events 7 - Nitrogen Cycle for Beginners by P. & M. Verner

Ask the Alpha Dog

Hosted by T. Pool Pet Journal newspaper is published by LSRB Media, LLC, on a monthly basis and is available free of charge to readers at various locations in the region that it is printed. Questions or comments regarding content in this edition can be made to GBFC@petjournalmidwest.com or by calling our offices at: (920) 393-4818. Pet Journal is always on the lookout for new advertiser’s if you are interested in advertising with us please contact the Lakeshore Region advertising department at GBFCadvertising@petjournalmidwest.com. To contact Pet Journal by mail please send all correspondence to our mailbox at: Pet Journal attn: GB/FC Region Advertising 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524. If you have a questions for a specific columnist please use the email at the end of their respective columns. If you have a questions for a specific department, please contact them via their email address listed below. General Information................... petjournal@petjournalmidwest.com Advertising Department............. advertising@petjournalmidwest.com Distribution Location Requests... distribution@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Journal Archives...................... archives@petjournalmidwest.com Pet Photo Submissions................. petphoto@petjournalmidwest.com Our Website........................................ www.petjournalmidwest.com

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8 - Ask the Vet

Hosted by Dr. K. Strickfaden

9 - Pixie The Story of a Mill Auction Dog by F. Schemberger

Pet Adoption Section

10 - Evie’s Story part 2 by L. Ledbeter

The Exotic Pet Trade by A. Kawski

11 - The Holyland Donkey Farm by D. Johnson

Interview with an Adopted Dog by J. Gallhardt

12 - Photos of your Pets 13 - Finding A Good Home

from CatsInternational.org

14 - Christmas Wishes by K. Ahrens

November Word Search Answers 15 - Grooming your Pet Hosted by D. Schmidtl

Coming in October The Stress Factor

from CatsInternational.orgr

16 - Classified Ads 17 - Event Posters 18 - Pet Journal Word Search


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December 2011

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Holistic & Natural Options for Your Pets by Cheryl Larson, Down to Earth Nutrition holistic-and-natural@petjournalmidwest.com ingredient groups. The specific product Why Should My Pet you select should be based upon how Eat Raw Foods? you prefer to prepare your pet’s food A raw diet recreates the way our (from scratch or serve a prepared compet’s ancestors have eaten in the wild plete and balanced formula right from for thousands of years. Dogs and cats the package) or on the specific needs of are carnivores. Left to their own devic- your companion animal. es, their typical daily diet, like that of their wild cousins (wolves and the big cats), would involve catching (or finding) and eating another animal. A raw diet returns our pets to this more natural and healthy form of nutrition, as if they had hunted and caught their “perfect” dinner. When a carnivore eats an herbivore (plant and grass eating animal) like a rabbit or a deer, the carnivore eats some meat, some bone, some organ meats (liver, heart, kidney, etc.), and a small amount of green vegetation contained in the herbivore’s digestive tract.

The ability to customize your pet’s diet by selecting the exact type of formulation you want is enjoyed by people who feed raw. One of the most important differences in a raw diet is the absence of any grains or preservatives typically used in kibble. In fact, most commercial grade kibble uses little to no real meat in their formulas and low percentages of quality protein. There are, however, a variety of kibble brands that are grain free and made with a high percentage of quality protein and other beneficial ingredients. The key is to become an educated label reader.

Dog and cat owners who have already switched to raw, as well as a small but growing number of veterinary professionals, now feel that kibble may sustain life but may not promote health. They believe that whole, natural foods Specially formulated raw dog and are the most likely to result in: • A longer life span cat food includes some or all of these • The decreased possibility of a debilitating disease at an earlier age • Lower veterinary bills and dental problems • An overall increase in vitality These ingredients are the five main food groups of a good raw diet: fresh, raw meat, some uncooked bone, raw organ meats, green vegetation, and natural vitamins and minerals.

Yes, your pet will survive on a kibble diet, but they will not thrive. Choosing to feed raw food does not mean that you can never feed kibble or canned food again. Many people find a balance that works well for their individual pet. Feeding an all raw diet is the ideal. However, if you cannot feed all raw, feeding some cooked, canned, dehydrated or kibble foods is fine, so long as they are a high quality, grain-free brand of pet food. Just aim for the ideal as often as is possible. I recommend adding ¼ cup of water to 1 cup of dry food to prevent chronic dehydration of the internal organs. Water is the most important nutrient for all species, so it is best to mimic the water content of fresh prey (60-80%). Also, never microwave any pet food. Microwaves cause the fat molecules to radically change, making fats less digestible, and ultimately they can become harmful to your pet’s long-term health. Whether you decide to feed 100% raw or a combination, the idea is to feed a variety of high quality foods, including all five of the main pet food groups.

see

Raw Food on page 8.

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Keeping Your Pets Safe During the Holidays by the Editors of Pet Journal

Editors Note: Keeping your pet safe column will appear in months where there is a holiday that could have items that are potentiality dangerous to your pets. Christmas and Pets As we continue through the holiday season, we still need to be aware of certain precautions regarding our little, and sometimes not so little, companions. Christmas and New Years is a time of great fun and joy for us, but for our companions it can be both scary and potentially dangerous. There are so many new things for them to deal with, so much noise and all the new people coming and going. This can be a very stressful time for pets, especially if this is their first big holiday. It’s up to us to take care of them, because our pets can’t make the right decisions for themselves. They don’t know the difference between what is good for them and what is bad. For this reason, I want to go over a few points to keep this a wonderful and fun holiday for everyone in your household. Food and Treats As mentioned in last month’s Thanksgiving article, it is very important to keep high fat, sugary, or overly salty foods away from pets. Their digestive systems are not capable of handling such rich, fatty foods and can lead to serious pancreatitis and require emergency veterinary treatment. Chocolate should be absolutely avoided, especially the dark or bakers variety of chocolate. Chocolate contains caffeine and theobromine (a compound related to caffeine), which can be deadly to pets. I know at this time of the year chocolate is pretty much everywhere. Just remember to keep it out of the way of curious noses. Alcohol is a factor as well, especially with New Years so close to Christmas. Some people like to give their pets a little champagne to bring them into the holiday celebration, but this has to be avoided, as alcohol is very bad for our little companions. What may put us in a festive holiday spirit could put a pet’s health in danger. The bottom line is, avoid human food altogether. Stick with the food that was designed specifically for their special nutritional needs and their delicate digestive system. During clean-up, make sure to keep all scraps away from pets. Place all left-

overs or waste in a sealed container and away from curious noses. When placing trash containing food leftover outside, make sure it is placed in a covered and sealed waste container. Power Cords Some cats and dogs seem to find electrical cords irresistible and chew on them whenever they have access. If possible, try to cover power cords. You can easily do this by using a nice big tree skirt. A festive tree skirt serves a dual purpose of looking great and covering the cords leading to the outlet. Many stores carry flexible plastic tubing with a slit on one side that can be used to cover cords up to the outlet. Pets are less likely to chew on the larger housing covering the cords. Most importantly, always unplug cords when leaving the area for extended periods of time. Inspect cords regularly for chewing damage and replace when needed. Christmas Trees Natural and artificial trees both pose hazards for pets. Natural trees can have sharp needles that are shed. These needles, when ingested, can cause damage to the inside of the mouth and puncture a pet’s intestines. Needles also pose a puncturing danger to a pet’s soft pads. Anyone who has ever owned a real pine Christmas tree and walked around the floor near it can completely understand. There is no effective way to reduce the shedding process, as it is natural for the tree. Pine or fir trees may be a better choice since they have softer needles, though it is always best to keep the area free of shed needles. In addition, many natural trees are treated with preservatives to keep them looking fresh for longer and these can be potentially injurious to animals prone to chewing on branches. Natural trees also require water to keep them fresher for longer. Dogs and cats may drink this water. Though the water in itself is not dangerous, preservatives and fertilizers can leach into the water and make pets very sick. Also, water that is not changed regularly can become stagnate and harbor bacteria which can potently cause a pet to become ill. One last point on water, allot of people also use tree preservatives, which are sold in many stores to keep the tree green throughout the holidays. These chemicals too can pose a health risk for your pets.

see

Safety on page 19.


PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

by Scrappy, the Lovable Pit Bull askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com

I hope everyone is being good for Santa this year. I’m trying to be on my best behavior. I have my eye on a memory foam bed. Yes, this is the same bed I had my eye on last year. Though this year will be different. If there’s no bed under the tree, I’m going to start doing all those creepy things dogs like to do. You know, like growling at the dark basement, starring at the empty air like something invisible is talking to me, and many other unnerving antics. I hope those concerned are reading this. Beware! Misty, on the other hand, simply purrs, snaps her tail and its salmon and Prada collars. I hope everyone reads the various columns this month on pet safety. Remember, we’re dumb pets (some dumber than others! You know who you are!!) and we need all the help we can get. Really, I’ll eat anything I can get. Dog food, cat food, bird seed, anything! If I find my family has a bird feeder, they won’t have to worry about the squirrels climbing up into it with me around. People who say that a shark feeding frenzy is a horrible thing to witness, haven’t seen me tear into a fresh bowl of food. Ha, sharks are amateurs. So, it’s important that someone be the voice of reason with us. Especially during the holidays when everything

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ECO NEWS

ASK SCRAPPY!

Greetings and salutations to all my friends! I hope everyone had a great and, most importantly, safe Thanksgiving holiday! My family spent the holiday at their relatives. This, of course, meant that I spent it at home with the diva/queen of all cats, Misty. I kinda wanted to sneak into the living room and watch football, but knew if I did everyone would hear about it. Incriminating photos or video of me sitting on the sofa with the remote would be “leaked” to the proper authorities and extreme penalties would be exacted against me. It amazes me that something so small and fluffy can be so vengeful and vicious. I should be safe for December, at least. I already paid her “hush” money in the form of a bag of Whisker Lickins Crunch Lovers Tartar Control. She prefers these because they keep her breath fresh and her fangs sharp. I assume there’s a veiled threat in there, but I don’t want to think about it. I already live in enough fear from the fuzzy demon. I guess I should be nicer; she is my big kitty sister. She helped keep me inline when I was a wild puppy. Though there is always a little venom in every brother/sister relationship. I’m sure some of you can relate.

December 2011

Alternative Energy by Kim Diedrich, Chief Naturalist, Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary econews@petjournalmidwest.coml There has been quite a bit of coverage in the news recently regarding uses of alternative energy. Alternative energy is defined as “a form of energy derived from a natural source, such as the sun, wind, tides, or waves; energy derived from sources that do not use up natural resources or harm the environment.” Wisconsin is seeing an increase in the use of solar panels, water for electricity and wind turbines. smells delicious and I’m leaving drool puddles everywhere (I know, not the most appealing image. But hey I’m a dog, it’s what we do). We don’t always think clearly when it comes to tasty things. We revert to the primitive cave dog brain that says “it smell yum yum. Must eat yum yum”. That’s where having a clear thinking human around helps. Preventing us from chewing on all things electrical and blowing our tails off. Being a tailless pitbull seems exotic, but it’s a look I’ll have to pass on. Reminding us that just because it’s a tree, we shouldn’t do what comes naturally. Presents are to be enjoyed on Christmas, not torn to shreds before. Actually, from what I’ve seen of human behavior, we’re just doing what we see you do every year. What happened to “imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”? I guess if it wasn’t for you guys, we’d be a lot worse off. Well, I’m hoping everyone has a wonderful Christmas this year. Remember, we like presents too. They don’t have to necessarily come from a store. A long walk, some fun time outside, extra treats for being good, a massage or brushing, a trip to the doggy day spa in Europe, a brand new car!!! Opps, where did that come from? Guess I better lay off the game shows in the afternoons. You get the idea though. Everyone take care and have a safe holiday! See you next month,

Scrappy Editors Note: Scrappy love to get mail and questions from his readers; please email him at askscrappy@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Ask Scrappy! 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Misty, Assistant writer of Ask Scrappy!

One of my favorite poses!

Wind turbines seem to be the most controversial. While in theory, it sounds like a great use of something that is completely natural – the wind, just what is the impact on wildlife? Birds and bats, yes that is right, bats are the species that are being negatively affected more. While flying most often at night, running into the blades, plays a major role in these deaths. Research done in southeastern Wisconsin shows there are 10 bat deaths to every one bird fatality. Why? Don’t Wisconsin bats use echolocation to “hear” vibrations bouncing back to them to avoid running into things? That is true, but the problem seems to be with the rate that the blades are turning. Most often the blades are spinning too fast for the bats echolocation to help them; they don’t have enough time to react and fly out of the way. The other factor is the change in pressure that happens around the turning blades. The pressure change causes a buildup of fluid in the bat’s ears and this leads to disorientation and trauma. Our 3 species of native bats that migrate are most affected during their fall migrations. Migrating birds also face increased hazards of wind turbines. Many of these birds migrate in large flocks that fly close together. They, too, often fly at night when it makes the tubines more difficult to see. Greater numbers of birds are taken out at one time. The question isn’t so much that bats and birds are attracted to wind turbines, it’s more a matter that the turbines are being put up in areas of high bat concentrations and along migration routes. Wildlife officials and developers are now working more closely to define these areas and take them into consideration before the turbines go in place. Wind is one of our strongest, uncontrolled natural factors. It is a powerful force that can be highly destructive and have long term affects on not only people’s lives but also wildlife. Is it really “alternative energy” or should we call it energy that causes people and wildlife to alter their lives?

Editors Note: Kim and the staff of the Bay Beach Wildlife Sanctuary will be bringing you a topic of interest in Eco News to you each month. If you have a question for the staff that you would like to see in a future issue of Pet Journal please email her at: econews@petjournalmidwest.com.


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PET JOURNAL

December 2011

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DECEMBER 2011 SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

5

THURSDAY

1

All Events that appear on this page are also available for viewing on the Events page of the Pet Journal website, www. petjournalmidwest.com. Events will be posted to our website first and then added to the Print Edition as space allows. If you have a smart phone with a barcode reading program you can scan the code on the facing page to right to go to the events page.

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WEDNESDAY Lincoln Park Zoo Open Manitowoc, WI Monday - Saturday 7:00 am - 3:00 pm

6 St. Nicholas Day

7 Pearl Harbor 8 Remembrance Day

Two Left Paws at Pet Smart, 4013 Hwy 28 at Deer Trace, Sheboygan, 11 AM - 3 PM.

19

18

13

14

15

Day

Chances Animal Rescues’ 2nd Annual Holiday Festival, Waverly Beach, Menasha, 5 PM - Midnight.

See Poster on page 17 for more information.

For more information see event poster on page 17.

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16

10 Christmas Bake and Craft Sale; Photos with Santa, Parkside Animal Care Center, 123 N Military, Green Bay, Fundraiser for Mit Liebe GSD Rescue, 920-639-4274, 10 AM 3PM.

17

A Christmas Walk Goes to Two Left Paws at Petco, the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms 4144 Harbor Town Ln., Rescue, 435 E Mill St., Manitowoc, Plymouth, 2 PM - 8 PM. 11 AM - 3 PM.

See Poster on page 17 for more information.

See Poster on page 17 for more information.

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21 First Day of 22

27 Visit the Zoo 28 Day A Christmas Walk Goes to the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms Rescue, 435 E Mill St., Plymouth, 1 PM - 7 PM. See Poster on page 17 for more information.

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24 Christmas

Eve A Christmas Walk Goes to the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms A Christmas Walk Goes to Rescue, 435 E Mill St., the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms Plymouth, 2 PM - 8 PM. Rescue, 435 E Mill St., See Poster on page 17 for Plymouth, 9 AM - NOON. more information.

Winter

See Poster on page 17 for more information.

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A Christmas Walk Goes to the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms Rescue, 435 E Mill St., Plymouth, 1 PM - 7 PM.

A Christmas Walk Goes to the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms Rescue, 435 E Mill St., Plymouth, 1 PM - 7 PM.

25 Christmas

SATURDAY

A Christmas Walk Goes to the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms Rescue, 435 E Mill St., Plymouth, 2 PM - 8 PM.

See Poster on page 17 for more information.

See Poster on page 17 for more information.

12

2

A Christmas Walk Goes to the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms Rescue, 435 E Mill St., Plymouth, 2 PM - 8 PM.

A Christmas Walk Goes to the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms Rescue, 435 E Mill St., Plymouth, 1 PM - 7 PM.

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FRIDAY

See Poster on page 17 for more information.

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30

31 New Years

Eve A Christmas Walk Goes to the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms A Christmas Walk Goes to Rescue, 435 E Mill St., the Dogs!, Furry Bottoms Plymouth, 2 PM - 8 PM. Rescue, 435 E Mill St., See Poster on page 17 for Plymouth, 9 AM - NOON. more information.

Pet Journal provides this calendar as a service to the local community. If you have an event that you would like listed please email us at: petjournal@ petjournalmidwest.com, with the following information: date(s) and time(s) of event, your contact information, a short description of what will be happening, if it is a fundraiser please list who the proceeds are going to, and please list the subject as “PJ Calendar Submission.” Please send this to us no later than the 23rd of the month for inclusion into the next months issue. Thank you.

See Poster on page 17 for more information.


Animal Foundation & Pet Pantry of Wis. Keeping pets at home by providing food assistance for animals.

We are here to help those who may of lost their job, have poor health, or are shut-in. Our economy has forced many to surrender their companions because they can’t afford to feed or get them proper health care. With donations we are able to assist individuals Bus: in keeping their pets fed and at home.

www.AFPPW.org

PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

920-428-PETS (7387) Toll Free: 888-924-2333 E-mail: petsathome@yahoo.com

The Animal Foundation & Pet Pantry is a 501 (C) (3) not-for-profit orginization

December 2011

7

Ask the Alpha Dog by Alpha Dog - Tamara Pool, 4-Paws Private Training, Sheboygan, WI alpha-dog@petjournalmidwest.com With the holidays fast approaching and everyone running from place to place and gathering all the goodies for the celebrations, I want everyone to take a moment and breathe. Realize that your dogs are probably a bit confused as to why their “pee post” is now inside with strange things hanging off of it. I, of course, am talking about the Christmas tree that has displaced their favorite chair or taken over the spot where their bed used to occupy. This could be a hazard for little chewers or boys that like to lift their legs on anything that remotely looks like a tree. Not to mention the danger of the electric cords going from the tree to the wall. A couple of things can help keep your pet safe this holiday season. First of all, use the Leave It command whenever they go near the tree to sniff it. Bitter Yuck spray, which can be found at any pet store, will help with any chewing issues. Bitter Apple is less effective because many dogs like the taste of apple and it could act as a lour rather than a deterrent. This cord chewing thing reminds me of a scene in National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation when the cat chews on the cord and gets fried. This was funny in the movie, not so funny in real life. Poinsettia plants have long been believed to be poisonous for animals to

Nitrogen Cycle for Beginers

eat. Although I don’t recommend feeding them to you pooches, it will not require a trip to the emergency room if a bit is ingested. The myth has been proven false. However, there are plenty of other edible hazards to watch out for. Family dinners with kids at the table could cause many digestive problems for dogs. Simply live by this easy to remember rule...NO HUMAN FOOD...PERIOD! Human food is for humans and should never be given to dogs. In addition, watch out for other problems that may arise. Grandma’s cane or wheelchair could prove to be very frightening and a danger to tails laying on the ground. When the hustle and bustle of the family gatherings gets a little too out of hand, it’s best to keep puppy out of the way and tucked safely in their kennel or bedroom. They can come out again when things calm down. The holidays are a happy time. Let’s keep things happy and health for everyone involved. And remember, that when it comes to your dogs, it’s your house and your rules. Be the Alpha Dog!

Editors Note: Alpha Dog, Tamara welcomes your questions on pet training, please email her at the email above or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Alpha Dog 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Is your cat driving you crazy?

Patrick and Melissa Verner, The Betta Boutique, LLC, Appleton, WI Establishing the Nitrogen Cycle in your new aquarium is an important step toward successful fish keeping. The Nitrogen Cycle can take up to four weeks to complete depending on the size of your tank. If you are able to get a dirty filter, that already has some beneficial bacteria established on it and half of the fishy water for your new tank from an already established healthy aquarium, this will help jump start the Nitrogen Cycle. If not proceed with caution, overstocking and overfeeding your tank will spell disaster for your fish. Please remember that during the Nitrogen Cycle you do not add more fish or replace dead fish, overfeed, and do not remove your filter cartridge as it contains and holds the beneficial bacterias that are growing in your tank until you complete the Nitrogen Cycle. Make sure you buy a good freshwater test kit, I recommend and use API Freshwater Master liquid test kit. Most pet stores including mine, Tropical Fish at The Betta Boutique, LLC offer free water testing. Within the first three days to a week after adding fish, you should start testing your water and continue weekly. Test your water sooner and more frequently if you start seeing your fish showing signs of distress such as rapid breathing, clamped fins, erratic swimming, or hanging at the surface for air. This is a good indication that some-

thing is happening in your tank. I also recommend testing your water after you loose a fish. Now on to explain the Nitrogen cycle in simplified terms. Most living things produce toxic ammonia when they eat, grow, breathe and drink. We can shower it away or flush it away, but an aquarium fish has to live in an enclosed environment. What goes in, stays in and will poison the fish if it’s not removed or converted to something harmless, enter the Nitrogen Cycle. The initial stage starts when you add fish to your aquarium. Fish waste and uneaten food will cause toxic ammonia. If you do not have enough beneficial colonies of bacteria to break down the fish waste and uneaten food the ammonia will rise. High amounts of toxic ammonia 2ppm or higher will cause burns, ammonia poisoning, and possible fish death. If your ammonia levels are higher than 1ppm do an immediate 20% water change without vacuuming your gravel as your gravel contains and holds the beneficial bacteria growing in your tank. Doing the water change will help get the ammonia down to a safer level. Test for Ammonia after completing the water change. If it has not dropped down to 1ppm do another 20% water change and test again.

The second stage of the cycle begins when a new bacteria called Nitrosomonas. The Nitrosomonas bacteria oxidizes the ammonia and eliminates it. During this process the level of Nitrites will rise. High Nitrites are also toxic to your fish and can cause death. If your Nitrite is higher than 2ppm do an immediate 20% water change without vacuuming your gravel. Test for Nitrite after completing the water change. If it has not dropped to 1ppm do another 20% water change and test again. In the last stage of the Nitrogen Cycle, a Nitrobacter bacteria will convert the Nitrites into Nitrates raising the level of nitrates and signaling the final step of the Nitrogen Cycle. High Nitrates are not highly toxic to fish. After you test for Nitrates, I recommend you gravel vac while removing 20% of your water. After this initial cleaning it is important to start and maintain a regular maintenance schedule.

see

Helping you understand why your Cat behaves the way it does and how to change problem behaviors ... call or email for an appointment Vonnie Keebaugh, CVT (920) 720-0678 catsense2me@aol.com www.catsense2me.com

Let PET JOURNAL help you with your Advertising Needs!

Nitrogen on page 18. Call us at 920-393-4818 or by email at advertising@petjournalmidwest.com to find out how your bussiness can advertise here.


8

PET JOURNAL

December 2011

Raw Food from page 4.

Ask the Vet by Dr. Karen M. Strickfaden, Countrycare Animal Complex, Green Bay, WI ask-the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com

Protecting your Pet’s Pancreas What is Pancreatitis? Pancreatitis means “inflammation of the pancreas”. The pancreas is an organ located near the stomach. It has two main jobs: releasing digestive enzymes to break down food and to secrete insulin. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic, mild or severe. It causes widespread inflammation and can be very painful & even life-threatening.

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Symptoms such as vomiting and discomfort after eating may occur intermittently. One may also see depression, a loss of appetite or weight loss. Signs may be subtle and nonspecific such as a ‘picky eater’, skipping meals or lack of interest in playing. Chronic pancreatitis may also flare up with episodes of acute pancreatitis. Because chronic pancreatitis symptoms are non specific, this condition is not as readily diagnosed, however, it is quite common.

Causes of Pancreatitis In most cases, we never find out the What are the Symptoms? The classic signs of pancreatitis in- specific cause; however there are some factors that may predispose to pancreclude the following: atitis: • loss of appetite – skip meals 1. Dietary indiscretion—such as eat• vomiting ing fatty scraps of human foods. • diarrhea 2. Hormonal imbalances such as dia• painful abdomen betes, hypothyroidism and Cush• fever ing’s disease. • restlessness 3. Certain medications such as sulfa • hunched appearance antibiotics, potassium bromide or some chemotherapy Most pets will not show all of these symptoms. You may only see loss of ap- 4. Middle aged, overweight and inactive pets petite and vomiting. 5. Pets with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) and food allergies Who gets Pancreatitis? Pancreatitis is a relatively common 7. Miscellaneous causes including trauma, infections or pancreatic condition in dogs, most likely due to tumors. their indiscriminate eating habits. Cats can also have pancreatitis. In fact, in Pancreatitis is a very common and ofcats we use the term, “triaditis”, to indicate a combination problem of pancre- ten very devastating disease. Prevention includes careful selection and conatitis, gastroenteritis and hepatitis. trol of your pet’s diet, diagnosing and treating any underlying problems (such Diagnosing Pancreatitis Amylase and Lipase are pancreatic as thyroid, etc.) and keeping your pet fit enzymes that can be measured with a and trim. blood test. Unfortunately, the test does not find all cases of pancreatitis—50% Editors Note: Dr. Strickfaden welof dogs and most cats with pancreatitis will not have elevated enzymes. A newer comes your questions on general pet test called PLI (pancreatic lipase immu- health topics, please email her at asknoreactivity) test can be helpful in diag- the-vet@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail at: nosing pancreatitis. Pet Journal, Attn: Ask the Vet 3120 S Business Dr Suite 270 Treating Acute Pancreatitis Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 Acute pancreatitis can be extremely painful and cause many secondary problems including dehydration, electrolyte / acid-base imbalances, and infections. Hospitalization is often required with pancreatitis in order to administer IV fluids and medications and provide the appropriate intensive treatment and monitoring.

More and more professionals in the world of dogs and cats (breeders, veterinarians, breed ring handlers, sports competitors) and thousands of concerned pet owners are advocating a second look at what we feed our animals. There is a growing belief that dogs and cats need a raw natural diet in order to be healthy, and that commercial pet foods cannot supply the nutrients necessary for good health and a long life. An overabundance of the wrong ingredients may serve to satisfy a hungry pet, but they may also contribute to long-term health problems. Just like us, our pets are what they eat. The following is a short list of the benefits that raw-feeding pet owners around the world see in their raw-fed pets: • Shinier, healthier skin and coat • Cleaner teeth and fresh breath • Better weight control • Improved digestion • Reduction of allergy symptoms • Harder, smaller, less smelly stools • More energy and stamina • Decrease in abnormal hyperactivity • Increased mobility in older animals • Reduced or eliminated need for veterinary dental work Switching an animal with an existing health problem to a raw diet can often produce an improvement in their conditions. Among healthy animals, a raw diet is likely to help them avoid some of the illnesses that are now becoming common in our companion animals. Regardless of the starting point for your pet, a high quality raw diet will help promote a long and healthy life.

Additionally, raw meat is about 60-70% moisture, and is an excellent source of dietary water. Adequate water intake is considered by many veterinarians to be the first line of defense against kidney and urinary disease. Dogs and cats are biologically the same as ‘wild’ animals. Wolves and dogs even share the same genetics. They look different because of the way they are bred to be different; however, their digestive systems actually functions the same. Breeding changes your pet’s appearance and demeanor, not their internal organs. Cats are even more similar to wild animals than dogs since they have experienced less breeding. Dogs and cats are meat eaters by nature; raw, fresh meat is the most instinctive and natural nutrition for your pet. For more information, join us for a frank discussion about the pet food industry, benefits of feeding raw and the Wisconsin based raw pet food manufacturer Stella & Chewy’s. Gerry Stewart will speak at Down to Earth Nutrition on January 18 at 6:30 pm. Please call ahead for seating 920434-2073.

Editors Note: Cheryl welcomes your questions on Holistic and Natural options, please email her at holisticand-natural@petjournalmidwest.com or by mail: Pet Journal Attn: Holistic and Natural 3120 S Business Dr, Suite 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524

Cooking food causes proteins to denature, and many become distorted or damaged, essentially destroying their biochemical identity. Raw diets are superior to cooked diets because the proteins, vitamins, and minerals are more intact and more bio-available, meaning they are available for your pet to utilize and benefit from.

At Countrycare Animal Complex, we also utilize herbal enema therapy specifically designed for pancreatitis. We feel that hese herbal treatments can dramatically improve the treatment outcome. Chronic Pancreatitis Chronic pancreatitis refers to a smoldering, low-grade inflammation of the pancreas.

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PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

December 2011

9

Pixie the Story of a Mill Auction Dog by Frank J Schemberger, Pet Journal Contributor A New Morning For dog number 0695885-001 the morning of March 11th, 2009 was different than any she’d known before. Her life until that time consisted of a small cage, food, water, a breeding mate, and a litter of pups twice a year. Oh yes, and her Universe was the cold dark barn where she and her fellow inmates were kept in. They weren’t sure what lay beyond the barn. Glimpses of sunlight and new smells an occasional open door didn’t provide much of a clue as to what the outside world was really like. On this morning the miller came through “the door” with an empty cage and set it next to hers. The 4 year old female poodle had seen others placed in cages and go out that door. She became nervous at the thought and remembered her previous litters leaving forever in a cage, too soon for her to finish her important behavioral teachings. This time she thought “was it my turn to go, I don’t have pups to surrender today, so it must be for me!” Her question was soon answered. The miller grabbed her, put her into the wire poultry cage and headed for the door. The cold blast of air was her first taste of the outside world, even colder than her barn. She started shaking. Her eyes had trouble staying open due to the sun she had seldom seen, and a sub-zero wind chill caused the squinting to continue. She had just a glimpse of the “outside world” before she was loaded in the van with other cages and dogs. She clenched the wire floor as the van started its trip that

would take her to the Thorp Dog Auction. 0695885-001’s journey was underway. The Rescuers, Protestors, and Dogs.…. The morning of March 11th was frigid, even by Wisconsin standards. That didn’t deter the hopes and emotions of rescuers and protestors who started their trips from all over Wisconsin. Their destination was the dog auction at Horst Stables, South of Thorp. For Milwaukee area travelers that meant getting on the road before 5:00 AM. For others it will be a much shorter trip. For the dogs it will be something new. The day will produce a bevy of emotions… anger, shock, sadness, hope. For the dogs however, fear will define their day.

Photo: Pixie Photo Credit: Frank Schemberger Dogs are now arriving via van, truck, and buggy at the Horst auction, an outlet for puppy millers to sell their old, injured, sick, and unwanted stock.... including 0695885-001, still shaking, curled in cage, unsure what this is all about. She is brought into the auction

PETS AVAILABLE

Storm is a senior male coonhound who loves to cuddle. He is friendly to people and dogs. Chases cats. His life up to now has been a bit rough and he has been waiting patiently at the Neenah Animal Shelter for someone to come along and love him. If you could make room for him on your couch and in your heart, he would be your friend forever. Storm is neutered, up to date on routine shots and house trained. Storm can be found at the Neenah Animal Shelter 920-722-9544 or visit their website at www.neenahanimalshelter.com.

FOR

ADOPTION

barn and quickly processed. Dogs are checked in, given an auction number, a USDA Inspector does a visual inspection, and cages are stacked in line awaiting “show time”. She is now #80. Dogs auctioned here have 3 possibilities facing them: 1) Being purchased by a rescue group who will foster them until adoptable. 2) Being purchased by an individual looking for a pet. 3) The worst scenario, purchased by another breeder sentencing the dog to a return to Hell. Now it’s #80’s turn. She is carried to the auction table and held up like some inanimate object at a household auction. Most dogs are not allowed to stand because their shaky legs from months/years of confinement in small cages wouldn’t bring as high a price. Of course, others too, cannot stand. The bidding starts and, after a short period, the auctioneer points to someone in the crowd and yells “$400 SOLD!” #80’s fate is now sealed. She is lucky. She has won the lottery. She has escaped Hell. Even though she is a Toy Poodle she has been purchased by a nice lady from Racine, WI who specializes in Maltese rescue. #80 is going to have a real home, with kind hands, and her own name. #80, formerly 0695885-001, formerly a puppy mill captive, is now PIXIE!

Pixie’s Final Journey Pixie’s new life and surroundings were very puzzling to her and when the chance presented itself she darted from her foster home and was reported lost on Thursday evening March 18, 2009. Fliers with Pixie’s picture were immediately printed and distributed throughout the area. Automatic “area blanket” calls The Trip To A Real Home The first leg of her journey to a new were placed to 500 homes. Volunteers life began as soon as the auction was and neighbors continued the search for over. Again she was lucky to be head- 4 days and nights. ed South, away from Clark County “the

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AT

AREA RESCUES

Coach is a super handsome 5 month old kitty! He is named after the designer brand Coach...because he is so good looking. Coach is super playful and has a purr motor that NEVER stops!!! Coach is current on vaccine, de-wormed, and neutered. Coach is however FIV positive.. all this means is he can not be around cats that are not FIV positive. He is very health and can live a long happy life is someone can look past him imperfection and give him a home. He is currently rooming with Frank (also FIV postive). T hey get along great and could be adopted together or seperate. Coach’s adoption fee is $45 (half off the normal kitten adoption price). If Frank and Coach could find a home together the adoption fee is $45 total!! We really want to see these great cats in a wonderful home!!! If you are interested in meeting Coach, please contact us at (920) 830-2392 or email info@savingpaws.com.

For The Life of Charlie

The Pet Journal Adoption Section Brought to by these sponsors:

Charlie Wery Farms

To find out how to have your business listed here call our offices at: (920) 393-4818

1748 Lenwood Ave. Green Bay

Puppy Mill Capital of Wisconsin.” Her luck was not totally grasped by Pixie because all this kindness, petting, and soft words were very foreign to her. Still, she started looking around with a little less fear and nervousness, and enjoyed the comfort of a clean, soft blanket. The trip was long and allowed her to finally fall asleep next to some treats that she was unsure of. Her first night of freedom was spent in Mukwonago, WI and the next day she was taken to Racine. Pixie’s next new experience was a complete grooming, a bath to wash away the stink from her former life, a haircut to make her look like the poodle she was meant to be. On March 16, 2009 she was given complete veterinary care including dental care, shots, and spaying. She left the hospital on March 18th to go to her foster home in New Berlin, WI. This was a big adjustment for Pixie. A change from nearly 4 years in a cold barn to being pampered and loved is not an easy undertaking for such a small being.

AND

Pixie on page 13.

SHELTERS

Adoption Fee Waived *UPDATE* Scout went to the vet this past week and found out that it isn’t as bad as we had originally thought. We are placing Scout back up for adoption to find him a great place to live out his life. *UPDATE* At a recent visit to Globe, they found that he had a heart murmur and an extremely large heart. He was taken to the vet where they found that he is also in congested heart failure. Scouts prognoses was listed as poor and the vet feels that his life expectancy is only up to one year. Because of this news he will be moved from adoptable and put as a permanent resident while he lives out his life. Meet Scout! He is young Blue Heeler that was born on 12/25/2010. Though he was left behind to fend for himself a nice lady found him and took really good care of him. Scout has gone through 2 training classes and an agility class that he loved. He gets along well with other dogs, cats and children. He used to live on a hobby farm and decided he didn’t like to share his home with the chickens and has killed a few of them. Other than his dislike of chickens he is a great pup that loves to please. If you are interested in meeting Scout, please contact us at (920) 209-PAWS (7297) or (920) 470-PAWS (7297) or email dogs@savingpaws.com.

Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue PO Box 245 Plymouth, WI 53073 920 207-5642 easternwiherps.com


10

PET JOURNAL

December 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Evie’s Story - part 2 by Linda Ledbeter, Animal Connections In October’s issue I shared the story of Evie, my foster dog. Several people responded to the article with laughter and are patiently waiting to hear how she and I are doing. I am proud to say, we have learned a lot from each other AND that I was mistaken….we do deserve each other. It was a Friday night; my house was over flowing with friends who, like me, love animals. Everyone was interacting with Angel Wings, Bo Jangles and of course Evie. Knowing Evie like I do, the excitement of the evening would spiral her behavior from a dog bouncing of the walls to a super ball in perpetual motion. By leashing her I was able to allow for controlled activity; for her safety, my guests’ comfort and my sanity. Entertaining with a dog attached to your hip drew a few comments. I absolutely love my friends, but when I was attempting to control the environment without putting her in a crate (which would have caused more disruption) all the experts decided they were going to resolve everything I had failed to do in 6 weeks.

Sometimes it is difficult to paste a smile on your face and listen to their wellmeant suggestions without feeling like you just fell of the turnip truck, splitting your head open on the pavement, leaving you incapable of basic training and applying common sense. As the evening began to wind down, a dear friend who communicates with animals commented that Evie was either unwilling or unable to listen……YEAH, what do you think I have been saying all this time? This little dog could not make the mental connection between action and correction or vice a versa. Her little brain was completely in another universe. The following day, our Furry Bottoms Rescue president decides he is going to test her further. Twenty minutes later he returns, saying he felt she may be deaf. I instantly felt like I had fallen off the turnip truck, how could I have missed the obvious? The next few days I began to test the theory. Indoors she could hear bread wrappers in the kitchen while resting in the living room, outside was another story all together. Now I began to wonder, was this selective hearing or sensory overload? The following week we had an appointment with Dr. Strickfaden at Country Care Animal Complex for a full evaluation. Either way I looked at it, one of us needed help and I was almost certain it wasn’t me. Pictures:

(this article)

Upper Photo: Evie in the yard Lower Photo: Evie at Furry Bottoms Rescue’s Office

Within minutes of entering the clinic, Evie was greeted by the staff. She lapped up the attention like an alcoholic bellying up to the bar with a buddy who is footing the bill. In my desperate need not to look like an irresponsible foster mom unable to control a 10lb dog, all I could do was gently explain that I believed she suffers from Attention Deficit Disorder. I then laughed and said we are here for one of us to receive medication. The staff knows me fairly well as I have become a regular and knows my sense of humor reflects my opinions on some subjects, this was no acceptation. Max, a shepherd mix from the rescue also had an appointment; he was quiet and well behaved greeting everyone like a model dog. Then there was Evie...I rest my case. Dr. Strickfaden begins evaluating Max, testing for any possible allergies with the BiCom therapy, while Evie is bouncing around like a pin ball. Even in my arms, she was fighting to leap into action. While working with Max, Dr. Strickfaden and her assistant were observing Evie. They agreed Attention Deficit Disorder was not far off. After Evie’s BiCom therapy evaluation, it was discovered she had food sensitivities which more than likely was creating the behaviors. After a BiCom treatment, chiropractic adjustment and a Cranial Sacral treatment, I watched a 10lb pin ball, turn into a completely relaxed pile of white fur. All my treatments I have been giving her never held for longer than 30 minutes and nothing was anything close to what I was witnessing. A small disk programmed just for Evie was placed on her collar and acts like a time release to help stabilize her energetic body while it detoxes. This is where I want to stress the point of how much I adore Dr. Strickfaden and how close I am to kissing the ground she walks on. She has the technology to go to the source of the problem rather than treating the symptoms. Most of all I was not the one needing the tranquilizer!

It has been four weeks since our visit. I was told the disc would probably no longer be active after 3 weeks and the behaviors may return especially if the food sensitive’s have not cleared her body. Since then we have changed Evie’s food, she has learned how to sit, and come. No means no. She has learned to snuggle and even wait for her food. The most exciting new behavior that warms my heart and makes me laugh, her smile! The sensory overload is better, but will more than likely will always remain a part of her special personality. This special little dog is trainable when given the proper medical attention, anything is possible.

Photo’s courtesy of Linda Ledbeter.

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Evie on page 18.

The Exotic Pet Trade by Angela Kawski, Northeastern Wisconsin Zoo (NEW Zoo) The commercialization of exotic animals as pets, known as the exotic or black-market pet trade, is a multi-billion dollar industry. In fact, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the illegal trade in wildlife is second only to that of drugs in the United States. Each year, thousands of animals enter the exotic pet trade, many of which are harmed, abused, and even killed during the process of smuggling them from their native habitats into new countries.

Zoo would never accept an animal into our collection unless we could provide it with everything it needs to liv a healthy, happy life.

To be AZA Accredited, a zoological facility has to maintain the absolute highest standards in the industry. That includes standards involving everything from husbandry care, medical care, proper housing and enrichment, and even standards on how the exhibits are built and designed and how the people Smuggling is often a very danger- who work with the animals are trained. ous and risky process, especially for the A big part of any AZA Accredited animals. Statistics show that approximately 50% of all exotic animals that are facility is also environmental education smuggled across national borders die and conservation. At the NEW Zoo, for during transit alone – whether it be from example, we are constantly striving to stress, disease, or the unfortunate, of- educate our visitors about the natural ten crowded and unsanitary, conditions world, to help people develop an apin which they are forced to travel. In preciation for it and a desire to protect the United States, many of the exotic it. Animals like Arwin even travel to animals that do survive the transport schools and other organizations around are sold at dozens of auctions that take Northeast Wisconsin to teach students place each year. The highest bidders can about the importance of protecting aniimmediately claim ownership to almost mals during our “Zoomobile” programs. any type of animal you can imagine, Despite his unfortunate beginnings, Arfrom tigers, bears, lions, primates, rep- win now serves as an ambassador for tiles, birds, and more. The buyers are his species, and for all the animals that not questioned about their expertise are endangered by the exotic pet trade, and knowledge about the animals they among other things, around the world. are about to take home, nor are they reYou yourself can work to protect quired to provide proof that the states they live in permit the ownership of the these animals by making sure that you species. The sad truth is that very few are not contributing to the black market states even have laws that regulate ex- pet trade, or supporting organizations otic animal auctions. In fact, only ten that “surplus” their animals to the trade. states do, and most of those only require For example, you should only purchase a license or permit to operate the auc- pets from reputable breeders, or bettion. While the auctioneers are respon- ter yet – only keep pets in your house sible for complying with federal laws and that are domesticated and meant to live regulations, such as the Animal Welfare with humans, like cats and dogs. You Act, even those laws do little to curtail can also help protect the environment the vast majority of problems associated by supporting local organizations that work to protect and conserve these aniwith the industry. mals responsibly, such as your local acAnother sad side to the exotic animal credited zoo, wildlife sanctuary, or other trade is that many people that purchase zoological facility. these exotic animals don’t know how to It’s not hard to figure out which suitably care for them. The animals can end up suffering from a variety of afflic- of these organizations are behaving tions, including a lack of nutrition, or be- responsibly; all you have to do is ask ing enclosed in too small of a habitat to a few questions. Is the organization’s get proper exercise. Here at the NEW goal to protect the species? Are animals Zoo, we actually have animals in our col- being bred responsibly, in accordance lection that once suffered at the hands with Species Survival Plans to avoid inof uneducated owners before they were breeding and ensure genetically healthy confiscated or surrendered. The zoo’s young? Or are babies being born evAsian Leaf Turtle, “Arwin,” was previ- ery year, put on display while they are ously kept as a pet, but was not fed a “cute” and “cuddly,” and then disappear proper diet under his owners’ care. His from the organization when they start to poor nutrition as a young turtle led to reach maturity? If the latter is the case, Arwin’s shell being permanently dis- then you may have cause to worry if that figured. Today, Arwin receives a very organization is participating in the exotic healthy diet that the zookeepers prepare pet trade. But if the former is true, then for him, and he certainly seems to be a you’re likely to have found a responsible very happy turtle in his current home, facility that takes pride in caring for its but the truth is that Arwin is one of the animals and in helping to protect the lucky few that survive and escape an ill- species and their native habitats. Once informed owner. It is rare that the NEW you’ve found that organization you want Zoo is able to provide a home for such a to support, then every visit you take, ev“rescued” animal, as every animal has its ery purchase you make, helps us makes own species-specific requirements. As a difference. And that, as they say, is a facility accredited by the Association certainly a great place to start. of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the NEW


Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

PET JOURNAL

December 2011 11

The Holyland Donkey Farm by Debra Johnson, Holyland Donkey Farm Angela Langoski, founder and president of Holyland Donkey Haven, Inc., is realizing a dream. Holyland Donkey Haven is that dream, a home for abused, neglected, and unwanted donkeys. Like many dreams, Angela’s began many years ago in childhood. Growing up on a family farm in central New Jersey, Angela learned how to care for animals. She also learned the importance of proper nutrition, good safe housing, love knowledge, and compassion for all of God’s creatures. She learned how to care for the sick and injured animals, nursing them back to health. That included strays and the occasional wild life. Caring for these animals taught Angela many things about being responsible for another living soul and the passion to learn even more about the various animals in her care. She matured into an enthusiastic life long learner, getting her hands on every book pertaining to animal husbandry and nutrition.

birth to a jack foal and wanted to give the jack foal to Angela. This all happened on Christmas Eve. On Christmas Day the jack foal came to Angela’s farm along with his mother on loan until the jack foal was weaned. Suzy’s owners said the jack foal had the same father as Gabriela. The jack foal was named Kris Kringle. Angela noticed immediately that Kris Kringle had poorly formed legs due to poor prenatal nutrition. Little Kris Kringle could not play like little Gabriela. He had frost bite on his ears and eventually lost the tips. Again, Angela meticulously restored the mother jenny, Suzy to full health for Suzy’s sake and for little Kris Kringle’s sake. Angela’s experience was so skilled that he became stronger each day and was able to be as playful as his half sister. It took months of constant care, proper nutrition and physical rehabilitation to fully rehabilitate Kris Kringle. Without it, he would have been crippled for life.

Angela returned Annie and Suzy to their owners when Kris Kringle was In April of 2004, Angela retired six months old. She taught the owners from her 34 year job, as a medical of- about proper care and nutrition for their fice professional, sold her home in New donkeys to prevent similar situations Jersey, took her animals, and friend, from arising in the future. and bought a 40 acre farm in WisconThis was the turning point in Ansin. Then it happened. A beautiful gela’s life. She saw the profound need new born donkey stole Angela’s heart. to educate the public on proper equine She bought the little foal and took the husbandry, specifically, donkeys. Sadly, mother jenny along. The little foal, donkeys for some people are the forgotonly one day old, was named Gabriela. ten lawn ornaments in the pasture that The jenny, Annie, was not in the best can be left to care for themselves. The of health and her hooves had been nerealization that some people were neglected for a very long time. Angela got glecting donkeys or treating them like right to work. She had the farrier take small horses, spurred Angela into action. care of the hooves, the veterinarian adShe established Holyland Donkey Havministered the necessary shots to Annie en. Not only is Holyland Donkey Haven and Angela developed a nutrition plan home to abused and neglect donkeys, to help her. it is an educational center that strives Little Gabriela was growing up to work within the local community and strong and happy. Six months later the surrounding area to educate the public owners of Annie called Angela to tell on all things donkey. her that Annie’s mother, Suzy, just gave

Tri-Pod from page 1. Karen and Tri-Pod are bonded with a powerful bond of trust and unconditional love. Tri-Pod has no problem keeping up with everyone when out for a walk, but Tri-Pod also loves to be carried in a back pack on Karen’s back. Thank you again Doug and Karen for having hearts of gold, filled with unconditional love for animals that may not have had a chance in the world of making it out alive. I again have been blessed to bring this story and look forward to bringing our readers yet another story of the blessings from Doug and Karen Weiss.

Holyland Donkey Haven is home to any donkey in need, whether it be a donkey that has suffered abuse, neglect, passing away of their caretaker, the owner moves away and is unable to take their donkey along, an owner’s divorce, a sick donkey with high medical costs, loss of income to the owner, or an owner downsizing their herd. Holyland Donkey Haven take in any donkey in need no matter what the circumstances. Every donkey upon arrival, is given a thorough medical checkup and seen by the farrier. Angela evaluates every donkey for any psychological or emotional scars. Every donkey undergoes a comprehensive rehabilitation plan tailored to the individual. After completing rehabilitation most donkeys are put up for adoption. A strict adoption process must be passed for potential adopters. A background check is done, potential adopters must be able to afford the upkeep for a donkey, a veterinarian and farrier must be in place, proper shelter and pasture must also be in place before a donkey can be adopted. For those donkeys that can never be adopted, Holyland Donkey Haven is their forever home.

Editors note: This article is the second article on the Weiss family. The first was Bart, a Katrina survivor, who was in last months column. Next month, we will meet Mishka.

If you would like to donate your time, send a donation, sponsor a donkey for as little as a dollar a day for as long as you choose, adopt a donkey, or just stop by for a visit, please call Angela at (920) 915-2873. Holyland Donkey Haven is a public 501 (c) 3 charity. All donations are tax deductible. Holyland Donkey Haven is located at: W2082 Mueller Lane, Mt. Calvary, WI 53057. Seven miles east of Fond du Lac Wisconsin off highway 23.

Interview with an Adopted Dog by, Joel Gollhardt, Furry Bottoms Rescue I sat down with Ricky, a Furry Bottoms Rescue Alumni, recently to discuss how things have been since his adoption. Ricky is a now nine year old long-haired miniature dachshund who was rescued from a puppy mill last year. So, Ricky, has that always been your name? “No, I didn’t have a name

when I was rescued. A lot of puppy mill dogs don’t. I was just another number until Furry Bottoms Rescue took me in. The foster family named me Alaric – with Ricky as a nickname. Most of the time they just call me ‘Wiener,’ though.”

I understand your foster home ended up adopting you. “Yeah, they call

Pictured Karen Weiss and Tripod, photo courtesy of Colleen Bertram.

The dream is not yet finished. In the future Angela plans develop Holyland Donkey Haven into an equine therapy center for disabled children and adults. At the heart of the equine therapy center will be the donkeys. They are wonderful therapist, loyal, loving, tolerant, patient, gentle, kind, and protective. Angela also hopes to work with the Make A Wish Foundation and continue educating the public and helping donkeys in need. What started out as a childhood dream has developed into a first rate rescue center, with a caring staff made up of volunteers. Holyland Donkey Haven is run entirely on donations.

it “Failing Fostering 101.” It happens to many foster families. They end up falling in love with the dog they foster and adopting them into their family. It doesn’t surprise me, though – I mean, just look at me. What’s not to love?”

You’ve been in your home for a year now, how has that been for you?

“It’s awesome. I love my foster family. They let me sleep all day in a warm bed and I can always count on regular meals. Life at the puppy mill was lonely. Even though I was surrounding by other dogs, we were never allowed to interact. The only time I got to spend with people was when they were using me for breeding. Here I get all the attention I could want.” Is there anything you don’t like about being a “house dog?” “My fam-

ily makes me wear a belly band all the time. I don’t like it, but I’ve gotten used to it. Since I’m older and was never housebroken, I tend to have a few accidents, so I understand why they do it.” Does your family still foster other dogs? “Yeah, they have one right now.

He’s kind of a dork if you ask me, but he’s OK. He kind of likes to hog all the attention, but I know what it is like to be in his paws. At first it can be frightening to be in a new place, but over time, you learn to trust the family. Some dogs come into the rescue and are clingy – desperate for attention. Others will hide whenever you look at them. At the core of it, though, we all just want to be loved.”

Do you have any advice for people that are considering adopting a dog?

“Take your time in picking out a dog. I know we are all so cute and lovable, but we want someone who is committed to us – no matter what. That means making sure we are a good fit for your family and situation. Dogs are a responsibility, but you will never find more joy in being responsible than you will when it is for the love of a dog.” I know this writer is happy to be responsible for a dog, but I would be – I’m the one that adopted Ricky. So if you are ready to make that commitment, check out the dogs at www.furrybottomsrescue.com or check with your local shelter or rescue.


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PET JOURNAL

December 2011

PHOTO GALLERY

Iris, a Pomeranian, soaking up the sun out on the patio, Cassie T., Random Lake, Wis.

OF

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READERS PETS

Anne, a Seal Point Siamese, trying hard not to notice the camera, Brenda B., Location Unknown

Pebbles, having fun in the yard and will be celebrating a birthday soon, Beck N., Location Unknown

If you would like to see your pet(s) on this page, please email them to us at petphotos@petjournalmidwest.com with a short description including: your pets name, your name, city, and a little statement about what they are doing in the photo. If you do not have email and would like to mail a glossy photo, please mail it to our mailing address: Pet Journal, attn: Pet Photos, 3120 S. Business Dr. Suite 270, Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 (all photos received by mail will be returned after they have been scanned for print.) All photos received will also be posted in our online photo gallery at http://images.petjournalmidwest.com/ gallery.html, due to space limitation’s some submissions may not be printed in Pet Journal the same month they are received.

Use your Smartphone with a barcode scanning program to go to the Pet Journal gallery section.

PHOTOS OF OUR FRIENDS WHO ARE GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN

Princess, an American Eskimo, on the couch, passed away last January shortly after her 11th birthday, Cassie T., Random Lake, Wis.


PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

December 2011

13

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Finding A Good Home from catsinternational.org Every cat lover at some time or another finds himself in the position of having to find a home for a cat or kitten. Let’s face it...we are “marked”. Those little orphans know where we live and as iron is attracted to a magnet, they find us. Our soft hearts won’t allow us to ignore them, so what do we do? If you have been a cat lover for awhile, you probably already have your quota of furry family members. “A good home” is what we want for the little waif, but how do we find one? First of all, get the word out. If the cat is a stray, your first responsibility is to try to find the owner. Flyers passed out to neighbors, ads in the newspaper, and “word-of-mouth” may serve to alert the owners to the whereabouts of their lost pet. While some description of the characteristics of the cat will be necessary for advertising purposes, leave some of the identifying features of the cat for the caller to supply. For example, the owner of the cat should know that Kitty has four, not two, white socks, a black dot on his nose, a striped tail. It’s important to keep the cat from the hands of those who just want a “free” pet. They may not have the best intentions for the animal and they may be very good actors, so beware! If you have determined that the original home cannot be found, then it is time to look for a new permanent home for Kitty. If friends and family are already supplied with cats, a little advertising may be necessary. Remember, never mention free in the ad--it is always advisable to request some reasonable fee. The next step is the telephone screening. Don’t skip this very important procedure, as it is much easier to tell a prospective adopter that you do not feel that the cat would do well in his home, over the phone, than it is to say this to his face while he is sitting in your livingroom. (You can word your feelings more delicately, like “I just don’t think this is the right cat for you”.) Here are some good questions to ask to help you determine the type of home the caller would provide for the cat: 1)

Have you had cats before? What happened to them? The answer to these questions can tell you a lot about this prospective home and the care they intend to give the new pet. 2) Do you rent or own your home? If the answer is “rent”, then get an official “okay” from the landlord. 3) Do you have children? What are their ages? If you are looking for a home for a young kitten, and the family has children under

five years of age, this may not be the best placement. Some adult cats do not do well with children either. Make sure that this is not to be just a toy for the children, but a family member whose welfare will be safe-guarded by the adults in the family. 4) Do you intend to have the cat spayed/neutered? You may prefer to have the cat altered before you look for a new home. If not, make sure that you get a definite “yes, of course,” to this question. Even better, get it in writing. 5) Do you plan to declaw the cat? If you are against declawing, you can use this as an opportunity to educate. Many cat adopters will opt to keep the nails on the cat if they are told what the operation involves and how some cats have been known to exhibit adverse temperament and behavior changes after this operation. If possible, a sturdy, sisal-covered scratching post should go to the new home with the cat. 6) Do you intend to let the cat go outside? The “correct” answer depends on how you feel about this issue and the local ordinances. You know the cat and the community, it is up to you to decide what is in the best interests of the cat. Most animal shelters that adopt to people who live in residential areas insist that their felines go to “inside-only” homes. Be friendly and informative with potential adopters, but be persistent. Ask to see a driver’s license. Check references, including the person’s veterinarian. You may decide to use a written adoption contract similar to the ones used by humane societies. If so, be sure to give one copy with your name and telephone number on it to the adopter to take home and keep a signed copy for your files. You’ll know that it’s all worth the effort when you see the little orphan go home with his happy, caring family. Now don’t forget the final, and very important step of calling to check with the family a few days later, and again in a few weeks, to see how Kitty is adjusting. Reprinted with permission.

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Pixie from page 1. The Elmbrook, WI Humane Society provided a cage trap which was set near an earlier Pixie sighting. At dusk, on evening of Sunday March 22 Pixie’s body was found a few feet from a busy New Berlin walking path, only a block or two from her foster home. Her eyes were still open although her body was still. I happened to be in the area when I saw one of the fellow searchers walking towards the road with Pixie wrapped in her jacket. My immediate reaction was joy and celebration. I could tell by the look in the rescuer’s face that the news was bad. My stomach sank like it never had before and the tears couldn’t be held back. Pixie was rushed to an emergency facility but the effort was in vain.

walkers. All Pixie needed to do was say “Hi” and she would have immediately been ushered to safety. Instead, Pixie’s lack of understanding about friendly hands, soft voices, and love, prevented her from being rescued.

A Lesson From Pixie The message left for us in Pixie’s story is that of the emotional damage puppy mills imprint on their captives. It’s a triple jeopardy scenario for the puppy mill populations. 1) Dogs that stay there never get socialized and for that reason are difficult to “save”. 2) The pups that are born there leave their mothers at too young an age and miss their Moms’ finishing school lessons and in turn become behavior problems for their adopters. And, of course 3) Puppy Mill dogs are treated inhumanely. Again, further testimony as to why Wisconsin needed a Pixie, #80, #0695885-001, who had law in place to monitor and control this won the lottery by not having to return cancerous industry. to a puppy mill, left us for a journey to Mary Palmer, Pixie’s auction rescuer her final resting place. put it best: “She will never be forgotten, The emotional imprinting the life in a although only with us for a very short puppy mill gave Pixie cost her life. Pixie period of time, she was loved. Those died only an arm’s length from a busy black berry eyes will remain forever emwalking path, used by many local dog bedded in our hearts”. Amen to that.


14

PET JOURNAL

December 2011

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FIND PET JOURNAL

Christmas Wishes

From the Bunnies and Guinea Pigs at K&R Small Animal Sanctuary by Kristin Ahrens, K&R Small Animal Sanctuary When I was getting ready to write and stuff to play with!!” -- Star my column for the journal the critters asked if they could take over this time. “More TREATS!!” -- Mr. Hamster (Like all little kids they are quite excited about the upcoming holiday season!) You could use some of these ideas to spoil your own pets! “This year for Christmas we were hoping we could get a new home! It’s As you might imagine what our nice at our foster home with Dawn and furry friends really want this year is a her family. She takes great care of us home with a great forever family. We but there are these other rabbits all have lots of friendly, well trained, adoraround and we just wish we could have able small animals waiting to find famia family all to ourselves again.” -- Man- lies of their own. At this moment we ny & Hoppers have; 7 guinea pigs (plus 3 litters on the way), 2 hamsters, 26 single rabbits, and “I was hoping to get more fresh 6 rabbit pairs. If you are looking for a veggies!! They keep telling me straw- great pocket pet for your family we ask berries aren’t in season anymore but I that you think adoption before you buy sure like the tops! Anything green is at your local pet store! great!” -- Zeke If you have any extra items or want “I need more boxes to shred and to make holiday donations to our resrearrange! I like the small ones so I cue critters please drop everything off can hide in them and then carry them at The Dog House (2230 W. Nordale, around on my back too.” -- Theo Appleton). The bunnies especially are very excited about the idea of pres“I would like a few more of those ents. Not sure the guinea pigs know balls that have bells in them. The big what that means but I’m hoping they ones are my favorite!” -- Sebastian will soon find out!! “We want more hiding tunnels. We love to keep out of sight while we watch the world around us. It’s nice to have a place to hide.” -- Telly & Grover “For my gift this year I would love some more fleecy blankets! I like to push them all around and then snuggle in for a nap.” -- Callie “We want more stuff to chew on! Anything we are supposed to chew on I guess would be better so we can stay out of trouble.” -- Chompers & Spike “Some more hay would be great! I like the softer strands (not those big thick ones). The fun flavors are great like the ones with fruit bits in them.” -Daddy-O “I would love some more wicker baskets to climb on and chew up.” -Matilda “I want a cool house like the foster bunnies at The Dog House get to stay in. Have you seen how big that thing is!! It has all these shelves to jump on

Editors note: Kristin Ahrens is cofounder of the K&R Small Animal Sanctuary a rescue specializing in small animals such as rabbits, guinea pigs and other small animals. To find out more about K&R Small Animal Sanctuary or to see their adoptable pets go to: krsmallanimalsanctuary.vpweb.com

AT THESE

LOCATIONS

Fish Unlimited 1259 S Military Ave Green Bay, WI 920 491-9220

Portraits By Design 151 E 3rd St Kaukauna, WI 920 766-2304

The Betta Boutique 4055 E Calumet St Appleton, WI 920 716-1137

Pulaski Warehouse 5665 Quarry Dr Pulaski, WI 920 822-3536

Liberty K9 Lodge 1550 Cornell Rd Green Bay, WI 920 661-0867

Two Paws Up Bakery 305 E College Ave Appleton, WI 920 954-1420

Noah’s Ark Boarding & Grooming 1158 Appleton Rd. Menasha, WI 920 725-7421

Pink Shears Pet Grooming Salon 135 W Pulaski St Pulaski, WI 920 621-9149

PJ’s Collectables 817 S Military Ave Green Bay, WI 920 321-1030

Saving Paws Pet Rescue, Inc. N3130 Meade St Appleton, WI

For the Birds 1040 N Broadway De Pere, WI 920 336-9525 Starbucks Coffee Appleton, Ashwaubenon, De Pere, Green Bay, Neenah, & Oshkosh WI Walgreen’s Drugstores Appleton, Clintonville, De Pere, Green Bay, Fox Cities, Oshkosh, Shawano, & Sturgeon Bay For more locations please visit our website at: www.petjournalmidwest.com and click on the link “Where can I find Pet Journal..”

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Grooming your Pet by Diana Schmidt, Happy Tails Pet Grooming and Boarding groomingyourpet@petjournalmidwest.com The upcoming holidays and prepa- the year appointments fill up fast, so ration for them keeps everybody busy, call now to get your time reserved, and but let’s not forget our four legged have a safe and happy holiday season. friends in all the hustle and bustle. Grooming is important during the fall Editors note: Diana welcomes and winter because the heat is turned on in our homes, which can cause more your questions on grooming; please shedding and dry skin. Frequent groom- email her at groomingyourpet@petjouring removes dead hair, which not only nalmidwest.com or by mail at: makes the dog look better but also conPet Journal trols shedding, helps reduce odors, and Attn: Grooming your Pet can also stimulate blood flow to help 3120 S Business Dr Ste 270 improve the skin and coat. When the Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 dog is being groomed it also give the groomer a chance to notice if there are any problems or changes. A pet that is groomed regularly looks healthier and well cared for, and they feel better. So make sure you get your best friend groomed before Christmas so he can enjoy the holidays too. This time of

December 2011

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Coming in January With Christmas behind us, winter is here in force and the party planning of New Years in underway. Look for the January issue of Pet Journal at one of our many distribution locations. Coming in the January issue we will be bringing to you the following:

Keeping your Pets Safe During the Holidays Post Holiday Edition Eco News & more articles of Pet/Animal interest. More from our columnists: Ask the Alpha Dog Ask Scrappy! Grooming your Pet Holistic & Natural Options for your Pets Ask the Vet Pet Journal Word Search Pictures of your Pets and more!

The Stress Factor from catsinternational.org In order to solve behavior prob- niture, new home, new litter substrate), lems it is necessary to understand what change in daily routine, strange scents causes stress in cats as well as what (eg., cat or dog scents on family memreduces stress in cats. Stress is a criti- bers), loud noises, a dirty litterbox, the cal factor in most behavior problems, angry or hostile behavior of the owner, whether the problem is inappropri- overcrowding, new family members ate elimination, destructive scratching, (people or pets), the absence of certain over-grooming, excessive vocalization, family members, etc. Even the boredom aggression, or a variety of other disturb- of living in an unchanging environment ing behaviors. When threatened, cats, can be stressful to our intelligent and like most mammals, have four major de- sensitive feline companions. fense strategies: • Flight (Withdrawal from the threat) • Fight (Defensive aggression) • Freeze (Crouching and lying still to avoid attention) • Appeasement (Actively submitting to the attacker) Unlike dogs, cats rarely choose appeasement. Prolonged anxiety reactions are commonly provoked by a threatening situation which cannot be dealt with by flight, fight, freeze, or appeasement. It is sometimes difficult for us as humans to relate to what stresses felines. Deadlines, grouchy bosses, work overload, and computer crashes are so unlike feline concerns: an animal viewed from outside (territorial invasion), a change in the environment (eg.,new fur-

The term stress is used by veterinarians to describe the mental and physiological changes that occur in an animal when it perceives something potentially threatening. The threat triggers a flood of activity in the animal’s autonomic nervous system--the portion of the nervous system that controls involuntary body functions such as heart rate, blood distribution, and respiration. The biological changes that occur prepare the animal to either combat or escape the challenger. For example, “the pupils dilate to admit as much visual in-

formation as possible and tiny muscles in hair follicles contract, causing the cat’s fur to stand erect and make the animal look bigger and more intimidating. Mood changes often accompany the physiological changes. The animal may become extremely alert and behave aggressively toward anything (or anyone) that approaches too near.” (CATNIP newsletter, Oct. 1995, a publication of Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine) The stress response can be lifesaving to cats living in the wild, but the indoor cat rarely needs the protective benefits of this physiological reaction. When the stress is caused by a known foe (eg., another cat) and that challenge has been met with either fight or flight, its fear subsides and its bodily systems revert to their normal “unstressed” state. “But when a cat can’t recognize the source of its fear (for instance, random loud noises from the construction workers next door) or can’t avoid a recurring source of fear (a resident feline bully), its fear can lead to anxiety...the anxiety can become chronic (recurring or continual)... Because an indoor housecat can neither flee nor confront the source of its anxiety, it cannot easily relieve its stress. The cat must either live with its

stress-response or act out behaviors in its stress-response repertoire to try to relieve the anxiety.” (CATNIP newsletter, Oct. 1995)

A cat that is in a chronic state of anxiety can experience health problems as well as behavioral changes. One indication of stress is high concentrations of the corticosteroids (hormones secreted by the adrenal gland) in the blood and/ or urine, particularly cortisol. If large amounts of the hormones persist in reaction to chronic stressors, the result can be illness or even death

Editors Note: Cats International was founded by Betsy Libscomb, a cat behavioral expert. If you would like more information on Cats International or for cat behavioral assistance, please visit the Cats International website, www.catsinternational.org. Reprinted with permission.


16

PET JOURNAL

December 2011

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PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS Pet Journal classifieds are a free service for our readers. Classifieds are for free or paid services offered by individuals or families, such as a teenager looking for a dog walking job over the summer. Classifieds are also available for our Local Humane Societies/Shelters and Animal Rescues to post their needs lists. Please contact the respective Humane Society/ Shelter/Rescue if you have questions or would like to donate an item or two. Events from our advertisers and readers will also be printed as space allows. To place your classified ad please email Pet Journal at: petjournal@petjournalmidwest. com. Please include the following when submitting your classified: Name, Phone, email, best time to call (in case there is a problem with your classified ad), what text you would like in your ad. Please limit to 25 words and keep your wording clean. Remember this is a family paper. How many months you would like the listing to be available for, and list in the subject of your email “PJ Classified”. If you would prefer to mail it to us, you may do so, with the same items as requested above. Mail it to: Pet Journal attn: PJ Classified’s 3120 S. Business Dr. STE 270 Sheboygan, WI 53081-6524 Please submit your classified no later than the 20th of the month to make the next edition.

Section 1: Individual/Family Classifieds Section 1.1: Puppies for Sale

Shih-Yzu puppies for sale. They are ACA RegisAKC Gordon Setter Pups Ready for forever home. Champion show blood lines. Vet checked, shots, wormed, dew claws removed. Both parents on site. 920-757-5699/920-213-7440

Section 2: Humane Societies & Animal Rescues/Shelters Needs Lists Section 2.1: Humane Societies Eastshore Humane Association of Chilton, WI Bay Area Humane Society of Green Bay, WI is looking for: • Bleach • Paper Towels • Clay Cat Litter (non-clumping) • Rawhides • Kongs • Dog Toys • Canned Cat Food • Small Litter Boxes • Cat Toys • Chew Blocks & Treats for Small Animals • Carefresh Bedding (no pine or cedar) • Liquid Laundry Detergent • Powder-free Exam Gloves • Scratching Posts, Towers or Cat Trees or consider these as a way to recycle: • Blankets • Bath Towels • Leashes To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Bay Area Humane Society at: 920.469.3110 or visit their website: www.bayareahumanesociety.com. Door County Humane Society of Sturgeon Bay, WI is looking for: • Animal Supplies • Purina Pro Plan Adult Chicken and Rice Formula • Purina Pro Plan Kitten Chicken and Rice Formula • Purina Dog Chow (green bag) • Purina Beneful

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Dog Toys Rawhide bones Cat Litter (scoopable, any brand) Office Supplies Copy Paper Postage Stamps HP Ink Cartridge #60 for HP printer model# F4280 Cleaning Supplies Bleach Paper Towels Towels Blankets Toilet Tissue High Efficiency Laundry Detergent

To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Door County Humane Society at: 920.746.1111, by email at: nail@dooranimals.com or you may visit their website: www.doorcountyhumanesociety.org. Eastshore Humane Association of Chilton, WI is looking for: • Non-scoopable Cat Litter • Purina Cat Chow -or• Purina Complete • Purina Dog Chow • Laundry Detergent

EASTSHORE HUMANE ASSOCIATION COLLECTS WEIGHT CIRCLES FROM PURINA CAT AND DOG FOOD PRODUCTS Please help out by sending us the weight circles. The Purina products include: Purina dog and cat food products such as Pro Plan, Purina One, Purina Cat Chow & Kitten Chow, Kit ‘N Kaboodle, Happy Cat, Purina Veterinary Diets. These weight circles enable Eastshore to earn points toward the purchase of Purina products for the shelter animals. As an added bonus, the weight circles from Purina dog food products can also be used to help Eastshore Humane pay the veterinarian bills! To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact Eastshore Humane Association at: 920.849.2390, by email at: ehashelter@gmail.com or you may visit their website: www.eastshoreha.org. Fox Valley Humane Association of Appleton, WI is looking for: • Pet Supplies • Purina or Iams cat food and dog food • Purina Kitten Chow • Purina Puppy Chow • Canned cat, kitten and dog food • Pine or aspen shavings • Timothy hay • Cleaning Supplies • Lemon Pine-sol • Dish Soap • Tall Kitchen Garbage bags • Febreeze air freshener • Bleach • Liquid laundry detergent • Garbage bags (33-gallon) • Miscellaneous • Gas gift cards to local gas stations • X-large wire and plastic crates • Cash sponsorships • One months’s supply of pain medication for cats and kittens after surgery - $40/ per mo. • One month’s supply of pain medication for dog s and puppies after surgery - $75/per mo. • Surgical packs, 12 needed - $850 each • Sponsorship to spay or neuter a cat, 800 needed - $18.50 each • Sponsorship to spay or neuter a dog, 650 needed - $30.50 each

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Fox Valley Humane Association at: 920.733.1717, by email at: shelter@foxvalleypets.org or visit their website: www.foxvalleypets.org. Oshkosh Area Humane Society of Oshkosh, WI is looking for: • Purina Kitten Chow • Purina Cat Chow • Purina Puppy Chow - regular flavor • Purina Dog Chow • Caned Cat Food - pate type only (please no shredded or sliced in gravy) • Canned dog food • Canned kitten food • Romaine Lettuce (for rabbits) • Rolled Raw Hide Chews - Larger sizes only, please • Soft Dog Treats • Scoopable cat litter • Bleach • Tall Kitchen garbage bags • Dryer Sheets • Paper Toweling • Swiffer Dry Mops • Small paper plates • Degreaser - like Jungle Jake • Micro Fiber Cloths • Cotton Swabs & Cotton Balls • Copy Paper To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Oshkosh Area Humane Society at: 920.424.2128 or visit their website: www.oahs.org.

Section 2.2: Animal Rescues & Shelters K&R • • • • • • • • • • • •

Small Animal Sanctuary is looking for: Baby Blankets Fleece Blankets Stuffed Animals Hard Plastic Baby Toys or Rattles Bunny/Guinea Pig Toys Natural Small & Large Wicker Baskets Natural Wicker Craft Wreaths PLAIN Rabbit Pellets (no seeds or treats mixed in!) Bagged Hay 16oz or 32oz Water Bottles Ceramic Dishes Treats

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the K&R Animal Sanctuary by email: kr_small_animal_sanctuary@yahoo.com or visit their website at: www.krsmallanimalsanctuary.vpweb.com. Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary, Inc. of Marion and Green Bay is looking for: • Liquid Laundry Detergent • Anti-bacterial Liquid Dish Soap • Garbage Bags • Bleach • Anti-bacterial Hand Soap • Blankets (new or used) • Sheets (used) • Bath Towels (new or used) • White Multipurpose Printer Paper (8.5 x 11) • Purina Kitten Chow • Caned Cat Food (Friskie’s Plate) • Purina Cat Chow Original • Rubbermaid Pets High Sided Litter Pan (can be found at PetSmart) • Metal Litter Scoops (Durascoop Large Cat Litter Scoop, found at PetSmart) • Large Ceramic Dog Food Dishes • The Loops 2 Leashes (can be found at Fleetfarm or PetSmart) • Canned Dog Food (Lamb and Rice, cans with pop tops only, please) • Dog Treats (Snausages, Liver Treats, Beggiin’ Strips, T’ Bonz, ect.) • Dog Chewies (Rawhides, Dingo Bones, Pressed Bones, ect.)

• • • •

Dog Toys • Tuffies Ultimate Dog Toys • The Almost Indestructible Ball • Air Kong Squeeker Dog Toys • Jolly Pets Tug and Toss Ball • JW Pet Good Cuz/Bad Cuz Dog Toys • Kong Wubba Dog Toys • Kong Rubber Balls • Kongs Gift Cards to PetSmart, PetCo, Fleet Farm, Menards Energy Star Washer and Dryer Large Van Cash Donation

To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Happily Ever After Animal Sanctuary, Inc. at: 920-634-9701 or visit their website: www.happilyeverafterinfo.org. Saving Paws Animal Rescue, Inc. of Appleton is looking for: • Cat Litter • Dry Cat Food (Please no Ol’Roy) • Dry Kitten Food (Please no Ol’Roy) • Canned Cat and Kitten Food • Dog Toys • Dog Rawhides/Chews/Bones • Bleach • Laundry Detergent • Paper Towels • Fly Traps • Any Cleaning Supplies • Bug Spay • Metal or Ceramic Bowls • Styrofoam Bowls • Folders (Red and Blue) • Any Pet Supplies To donate any of the items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Saving Paws Animal Rescue, Inc. at: (920) 209-PAWS (7297) or visit their website at: www.savingpaws. com. All Animal Rescue Center project of the Eastern Wisconsin Herpetological Society & Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • Reptile Cage Thermostats • Storage Space • Cargo Tailers • Livestock Trailers • Tow behind RV • Mini Van or Full Size Van • Kennel Fencing • Commercial/Large Capacity Washers/Dryers • Chest Freezers/Walk-in Coolers • Animal Control Equipment • Office Furniture • Gift Cards for Hardware or Home Improvment Stores • Lumber and 3/4” Plywood • Cash Donations To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the EWHSR at: 920.207.5642, by email at: info@allanimalresourcecenter.com or visit their website: www. allanimalrescuecenter.com. Furry Bottoms Rescue of Plymouth, WI is looking for: • 4 - 4-shelve storage units on wheels To donate any items on this list or if you have any questions, please contact the Furry Bottoms Rescue at: 920.449.5084, by email at: info@furrybottomsrescue.com or visit their website: www.furrybottomsrescue.com.


PET JOURNAL

Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

December 2011

PET JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS Section 3: Event Posters

‡ Boarding

Liberty K9 Lodge, LLC

‡ Day Care

1550 Cornell Rd. Green Bay (Village of Howard)

‡ Hydro Therapy ‡ Behavior Training

(920) 661 - 0867

www.libertyk9lodge.com

“Where you are always a member of our family.”

FREE HYDRO THERAPY ORIENATION

$10.00 OFF BOARDING OR DAY CARE

Expires: 03/31/2012

Expires: 03/31/2012

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PET JOURNAL

December 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

Nitrogen from page 7.

Evie from page 10.

Week 1: Ten percent water change, wipe down inside of tank Week 2: Gravel vac while performing a ten percent water change. It is okay if you do a little more. Remember to take our your decorations and clean them. Week 3: Ten percent water change, wipe down inside of tank Week 4: Replace filter cartridge and do a ten percent water change

After our next appointment, Evie will be available for adoption. I call her our special needs little girl and unlike many dogs that will need expensive medications, she needs to be on a special diet which can be found in pet stores and continued care with a holistic veterinarian. Many believe we have spent a lot on Evie thus far, even though FBR will never recover their expenses from the adoption fee; Dr. Strickfaden’s fees are more than reasonable, especially considering the results.

Editors note:

Patrick and Melissa are the owners of Tropical Fish by The Betta Boutique, in the KK Center Mall in Appleton. For more information please visit their website: thebettaboutique.com.

Evie and I have made an awesome team; she taught me how important it is not to judge uncontrolled disruptive behavior before a full medical evaluation from a qualified holistic veterinarian. Something as simple as food allergies or food sensitivities, can be the root cause of behavioral problems in animals and in our children. Many times it is a simple fix to a huge problem.

PET JOURNAL WORD SEARCH C C T E P D Q K G H T J G D P W L S E R Y K T J E Z Q G D I

K D C D J S M I L J Z J U B S W N W I N T E R H Z X X C M E

W N J M D A Y U L Q H R E H W O D E A F Z N H S P O B P L I

U B N G E Q N F K V P T T Q W Q J H M Q H F J I T V C D W X

I E O I C T C R N G A U F X E Q M Y E K N O D W U I G S O K

J L T E O D U U F N T Q O B S E K R B W R C Q S T I S R T S

A J E Q R H S S C S I T I T A E R C N A P G V Q V V Q I A D

K A C F A C M Y S T I B B A R I P V Q D S V G C H A E M W L

M H Y U T R X Z G G Y D B C R O Y P I U S E N N K G T D U N

Q U L T I P S H V Z K K O G Z C Y F G D X B I Z O S F N A O

L U I K O P N R B N H H U S U A Y T A W C B G T I U W I J K

B H M E N R U S B Y W Z R Q W T J D E Y Z J Z R R E Z D J X

F M A P S E Z X J Y X Q A E R N K D T F O L H V D A I K U L

G S F K I S R C L M N R S F E A P C R L A C N T J T P Q U B

F G R F F E R Z M C X B D W T S A F E F W S Y Z J F M H Z T

H Q R M O N K O I L A P V Z I M R X E E F M Y H R O H H L R

T G I R M T D W U E E L C Y C N E G O R T I N P T B X A C L

W S L J Y S R Y G R E N E E V I T A N R E T L A U O V A Q N

A B V I P P C F C G E N O I T P O D A E L U Y A Q U V O O V

P N Z C V O I S Y T Z D O O F W A R L B P I M T D R U I Y Q

W B T C Y R Q E Q G P S S N O I N A P M O C C Y K A T S O M

V G J Q W J S I S E I T T I K C G G G K E U L K H A W Z S T

D D H U C R G P H M T Z A I H O O U N I Z U E H C S P N B Y

F M H A O G P P E J U X Y M Y X C X B I W C C A Z D S X F P

H E G H K K I U I S T O A H S D W A I U V Y V S Q V W M A P

C P J O L Z K P X Q V V D X C X R M R F R I G W E A E Y Q J

P H B Y V M X P I C H I I V Y V E A N O G Q G X R R S H N C

W N F O W F R Z P N K I L V T S A T F R L H T N B D R N O P

T Q I A B N Q W J Z O V O U A B T B E U L S G X P B K H N B

L O Q J N P N R T V D A H W F A H D Y S L J M A S H F G P H

ADOPTION ALTERNATIVEENERGY CAROLS CHRISTMAS COMPANIONS DECORATIONS DONKEY FAMILY GIVING HOLIDAY HORSE KITTIES NITROGENCYCLE PANCREATITIS PARTIES PIXIE PRESENTS PUPPIES RABBITS RAWFOOD RESCUE SAFETY SANTA SNOW TREE VACATION WINTER WISH WREATH YULE

Words to find, they can go across, up or down, diagonally. Answers will appear in next months issue or on the Pet Journal website about the 20th of the month, on the Lakeshore Region page.


Green Bay/Fox Cities Region

Safety from page 4. There are also those who put aspirin in the water believing, as with cut flowers, that aspirin will keep a tree more vigorous. Aspirin can be very dangerous to pets and put their health or life at risk. Once again, a tree skirt can be used to cover the reservoir that holds the water and keep pets safe. Cats pose another risk since they love to climb into Christmas trees. This can cause the tree to tip over and hurt the cat. Again, there are those tasty power cords to chew on. There really is not much that will keep a curious kitty out of the tree, but there are precautions you can take. If you are going to be away from the tree for an extended period of time, turn off the power to the lights. If possible, close the door to the room that contains the tree. To prevent the tree from tipping, anchor the tree to the ceiling with cord and use weights to stabilize the base. Presents Many people, myself included, like to wrap and put presents under the tree as soon as you buy them. It looks really nice and adds to the holiday spirit. However, when placing presents under the tree for extended periods there are a few points to bear in mind. Avoid placing gifts of food or candy under the tree where pets can get to them. Their strong sense of smell will draw them to those presents and result is usually the same. A box torn to pieces and a po-

PET JOURNAL

tentially very sick pet on your hands. It is also a good idea to avoid using small thin ribbons, cord, or string to seal or decorate gifts. As mentioned above regarding power cords, these decorations are almost irresistible to some pets who love to chew on them. Remember to never leave children’s toys unattended. Small plastic pieces can be chewed or ingested causing choking or intestinal blockage which may require surgery to remove. Ornaments Ornaments made from glass, though beautiful, can break into small pieces, which can cause cuts to the paws and mouth. In addition, many older decorations contain lead based paint that can be hazardous to both pets and children when handled. Tinsel and angel hair can, when chewed or eaten, cause blockage and internal injury. There has been a return to natural ornaments such as popcorn, candy, cranberries, gingerbread and so on. These look nice and add a rustic charm to a tree, but they are far too tempting for animals. This is mostly because they are food and if they can smell it, they will want to eat it. Though the decorations themselves are not bad for them, it’s the string used to hold them together that they will ingest and can cause internal damage. Christmas stockings can be another problem when it comes to our little friends. It is not so much the smaller gifts that are placed in them, but the chocolate and candy often placed there. Even wrapped, a keen nose can detect the

December 2011 19

scent of treats in the stocking and they will chew through or dig them out to get to them. Try to hang them up out of the reach of pets to prevent this. Holiday Plants There are a number of holiday plants that need to be kept out of the reach of pets. As mentioned earlier, pine needles cause not only irritation from sharp points, but can also cause nausea, trembling, and weakness. Holly can cause nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and depression. Mistletoe is extremely dangerous not only to our pets, but also to us. Poisoning from Mistletoe can cause nausea, vomiting, breathing difficulties, collapse, hallucinations and even death. Poinsettias have had a tough time during the holidays. Though their deadly reputation has prevented many concerned people from decorating with them, studies have shown them to be non-lethal to pets and children. They can, however, cause nausea and stomach irritation. Guests As is common during the holiday season, people love to visit one another. If you plan to have more than one visitor or a party, consider confining your pet to a room with plenty of food and water while your guests are in your home. Many people coming and going can be very stressful for your pets and giving them a refuge away from all the excitement and noise is very calming and makes them feel safe. In addition, this reduces the risk of them slipping past

guests as they enter or leave. Sometimes this is unavoidable, for this reason it is a good idea to have your pets licensed. Also, never let your guests feed your pets any food. I know they can be irresistible when begging for food, but treats of human food must be avoided. I know what some people are thinking, “What’s the point of doing anything for the holidays if the potential of harm is so high”. This does seem overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. You can have the same amount of decorations and holiday fun as you did before your little friend arrived, just be a little more aware of them when decorating or celebrating the holidays. Using common sense, observing your pet for any unusual behavior, and being prepared for any eventuality by having your veterinarian’s emergency number available can make this a wonderful and safe holiday for the entire family.

Editors Note: Please join us next month for our Post-Holiday follow-up column.

“Modern Veterinary Medicine with Old-Fashioned Caring”

Country Care is a complete care center - all of your pet’s needs under one roof

Dr. Richard A. Barr Dr. Karen M. Strickfaden

Comprehensive Medical & Surgical & Holistic Care for Dogs, Cats & Horses Surgical Services include: ‡ Othopedic ‡ Soft Tissue ‡ Dentistry Holistic Alternatives include: ‡ Acupuncture ‡ Spinal Manipulation (animal chiropractic) ‡ Bioresonance Therapy ‡ and a wide range of Herbal Supplements

4235 Elmview Rd, Green Bay, WI 54311 ‡ www.countrycareac.com ‡ (920) 863-3220

This holiday season, remember ƚŚĞŐŝŌƐƚŚĂƚĚŽŐƐďƌŝŶŐƚŽLJŽƵƌ ůŝĨĞĂŶĚƌĞƚƵƌŶƚŚĞĨĂǀŽƌ͘͘͘ Donate - Foster - Adopt

&ƵƌƌLJŽƩŽŵƐZĞƐĐƵĞ͕/ŶĐ͘ ϰϯϱĂƐƚŵŝůů^ƚ͕WůLJŵŽƵƚŚ͕t/ϱϯϬϳϯ ϵϮϬͲϰϰϵͲϱϬϴϰ ĨƵƌƌLJďŽƩŽŵƐƌĞƐĐƵĞΛLJĂŚŽŽ͘ĐŽŵ ǁǁǁ͘ĨƵƌƌLJďŽƩŽŵƐƌĞƐĐƵĞ͘ĐŽŵ


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PET JOURNAL

December 2011

www.petjournalmidwest.com

SEYMOUR FEED & PET SUPPLY No Appo intment Necessa Mon - F ry ri 8 - 6; Sat 8 - 3

We Have Great Gifts for Bird Watchers & Animal Lovers!

PUGZ Dog Boots

Winter Pet Clothing

Pete & Vicky Bloemer Owners

Don’t Shop, Opt to Adopt! Deer Feed and Attractants

We Carry These Fine Products: FROMM Chicken Soup for the Dog Lover’s Soul Nutri Source Blue Buffalo Loyall Nutro Canidae Taste of the Wild Holistic Select Red Paw Evanger’s Diamond American Natural Premium Vital Essentials Avo Derm

Horse Feed

Foods

for Rabbits, Goats, Chicken, Llamas, Wild Game and Wild Birds

Supplies, Shampoo, Supplements, Halters and more

2451 Velp Ave. Howard Silicone

Dog Treat Pans Make your own homemade treats!

Dog Food

Pet Toys

Treats, Beds, Toys, Clothing, Chews and More!

Cat Food and Litter

Rabbit and Horse Feed

Triumph Horse Feed Equishine Horse Feed

We Accept Used Motor Oil During Business Hours

(920) 434- LUBE (5823)

We Are A Nutrena Dealer We Now Carry...

Candles By Wick, Reed & Wood, Specialty Pet Odor Eliminator

‡ Oil Change ‡ Coolant Flush ‡ Tire Rotation ‡ Motor Flush ‡ Transmission Flush ‡ Fuel Filter

Bird Baths

Come see us for Pet, Bird and Small Animal Foods and Accessories

and Water Garden

Mon - Fri 8:00 am - 5:00 pm ‡ Sat 8:00 am - 1:00 pm

239 E. WISCONSIN ST. SEYMOUR

920-833-0434

(across from McDonald’s)

$3.00 off

Full Service Oil Change With coupon only. Not valid with any other offer. Valid only at V.I.P. Lube, 2451 Velp Ave., Howard.


PJ_GB_I5_Dec11