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Driving Goods Vehicles Vans up to 3.5 tonnes

Maximum Authorised Mass

Workbook Activities

Š Accrington & Rossendale College MMXIII - HB V2


Driving Goods Vehicles YOUR NAME: ……………………………………………………………………………………............................

ASSESSOR NAME:

……………………………………………………………………………………............................

START DATE:

................................................................................................................................................ .

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Driving Goods Vehicles

To confirm the evidence sumitted to claim competence is authentic, tick (a ) the appropriate box to indicate the assessment methods used to show competence for each unit Then, complete a statement showing how you have achieved these units. This statement should include; » how you completed the units and what you have learnt from the experience.

» how long you have been working towards this qualification.

» how this has affected the way you approach driving goods vehicles.

Once you have done this, your assessor will write a statement providing support for your statement and describing how you have achieved these units.

UNITS ACHIEVED

UNIT CU1200: Plan the Route & Timings for the Collection and delivery of goods

OB KU PD WT PE OT

UNIT CU2161: Drive the Van on Public Roads in a Safe and Fuel Efficient Manner

OB: Observation

PE: Product Evidence

Learner Statement:

KU: Knowledge / Workbook WT: Witness Testimony

Assessor Statement:

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PD: Professional Discussion OT: Other

Candidate Declaration

UNIT CU2160: Manoeuvre the Van in Restricted Spaces


Driving Goods Vehicles If a candidate is dissatisfied with an assessment outcome, they have the right to appeal. There are 3 stages in the appeals procedure and each stage must be exhausted before proceeding to the next one. Candidates are advised to keep their own copies of all the documents used in the appeals procedure. The main reasons for an appeal are likely to be : »

Complaints and Appeals Procedures

»

The candidate does not understand why they are not yet regarded as competent, due to unsatisfactory feedback from the assessor.

The candidate believes they are competent and that the assessor has misjudged them, or has failed to utilise some vital evidence.

Stage 1 If a candidate has received a decision as to their competence with which they are unsatisfied, they have the right to appeal directly to the assessor who carried out the assessment. This appeal must be in writing and clearly indicate: »

»

Points of disagreement

The evidence in the portfolio that the candidate believes meets the requirements of the standards for claiming competence

Stage 2 Candidates who are not satisfied with the outcome of their stage 1 appeal can next appeal to the Centre's Internal Verifier. This appeal must be in writing, but need not repeat the detail provided at Stage 1 as all the documentation used at stage 1 will be passed onto the Internal Verifier. The verifier will forward a decision to the candidate & assessor within two weeks.

Stage 3 Candidates who are not satisfied with the outcomes of stage 2 of the appeals procedure and who have exhausted all the Centre's internal appeals procedures, may proceed to Stage 3. This appeal must be in writing to the EDI General Manager Operations, and must be accompanied by copies of all documentation from Stages 1 & 2. There must also be evidence that the candidate has exhausted all the Centre's internal appeals procedures.

An investigation will be undertaken on behalf of EDI and a report will be compiled for consideration by the EDI Appeals Panel. This consideration will lead to one of 2 decisions EITHER the Appeals Panel will support the recommendation of the report for the appeal to be upheld or rejected. OR the Appeals Panel will appoint an independent assessor and require the candidate to re-submit their portfolio and be available for an interview on an agreed date. The independent Assessor will then report to the Appeals Panel. The appeal will either be rejected or upheld. THE DECISION OF THE APPEALS PANEL WILL BE FINAL.

A fee will be charged to the candidate at Stage 3. This fee will be refunded if the appeal is upheld.

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Driving Goods Vehicles The appeals procedure aims to ensure the following: »

» »

The operation of the appeals procedure, and results arising from it, are monitored to determine future policy

All candidates' complaints are acknowledged and investigated to establish the facts and evidence supporting the appeal. If a complaint is considered justified, remedial action will be taken

The appeals procedure and how it may be utilised must be communicated and available in writing to all candidates. Composition of the Appeals Panel

The Appeals Panel will comprise the chair and one other independent member of the Advisory Council for Education and Training, the General Manager Operations and the Director of Technical Development. The Land Transport Team Co-Ordinator contact details are: Graham Rowe Accrington & Rossendale College, Broad Oak Campus, Broad Oak Road, Accrington, Lancashire. BB5 2AW.

Telephone: 01254 389933. Fax: 01254 354001. e-mail : landtransport@accross.ac.uk

Accrington & Rossendale College Complaints Procedure

If you wish to make a complaint about any aspect of the college or your assessor, forms are available from Information+ and guidance centres.

Completed forms are sent to the responsible college manager who will respond within 15 working days. If you are dissatisfied with the manager's handling of the complaint, you can appeal to the College Principal, who will investigate the matter again and give you a response within 10 working days.

If you are still dissatisfied your final recourse is to the Chief Executive of the Further Education Funding Council or the Secretary of State for Education and Employment. Telephone: 01254 389933. Fax: 01254 354001. email - info@accross.ac.uk

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Complaints and Appeals Procedures

All candidates who register an appeal receive a formal reply within 8 weeks. It is intended that the response will be to the mutual satisfaction of the candidate and EDI


Driving Goods Vehicles Skills Activity

Complete the boxes below with the skills that are required to be a competent Goods Vehicle Driver. When these have been completed, you will have identified the criteria by which your performance and knowledge will be assessed. CUSTOMER SERVICE SKILLS

Skills of a Goods Vehicle Driver

BASIC SKILLS

DRIVING SKILLS

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Driving Goods Vehicles

This is about checking a van before driving it on the public road. It covers the physical checks that a driver needs to make and the documentation that they need to complete to comply with legal and organisational requirements before the start of each driving duty.

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Workbook Activities

Prepare the Van for Driving


Activity 1.1

Driving Goods Vehicles

For this activity, identify defects that would render your vehicle unsatisfactory for safe operation.

Daily Vehicle Checks

Defects affecting safe operation

If you find any defects during the above procedure, how should they be reported?

Explain how to check that the rigid vehicle has sufficient fuel, additives and water.

Explain how to check vehicle systems, instruments and controls. Include what would indicate electrical or mechanical problems.

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Safe Working Practices

Contains public sector information published by the Health and Safety Executive and licensed under the Open Government Licence v1.0’.

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Safe Working Practices

Banksman (Reversing Assistant)


Driving Goods Vehicles

BANKSMEN (REVERSING ASSISTANTS)

Banksmen (reversing assistants) are defined as trained employees who play an active part in reversing manoeuvres by giving prearranged hand signals to the driver. (www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/waste04.pdf)

Their role is to:

Banksmen (Reversing Assistants)

• •

signal the vehicle driver to stop when necessary to prevent the vehicle colliding with pedestrians and other road users; warn approaching vehicles or pedestrians; assist trained and competent drivers to safely manoeuvre the vehicle. They do not take responsibility for the manoeuvre.

Additional training is essential for reversing assistants wherever they are expected to indicate clearance distances between the vehicle and obstructions on the street.

Only trained reversing assistants should assist reversing vehicles.

The banksman (reversing assistant) should stand 5 -10 m back and 1 m out from the side of the vehicle, on the pavement wherever possible, so that the driver can see them.

Banksmen (reversing assistants) should never stand directly behind the vehicle.

If the driver loses sight of the reversing assistant they MUST stop the vehicle at once. The driver should not reverse until the banksman (reversing assistant) is in position and have signalled that it is ok to start reversing.

Loading should never take place while the vehicle is reversing.

Banksmen (reversing assistants) should never walk backwards while giving signals (this poses a slip/trip risk) and should be sure the driver can see them at all times.

Before making the manoeuvre the driver and banksman (reversing assistant) should agree who will stand where. The final decision to reverse or not is the driver’s reponsibility. (www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/waste04.pdf)

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Driving Goods Vehicles

CRUSH ZONE

Banksmen (reversing assistants) must: • avoid distractions when assisting a driver to complete a manoeuvre.

• be alert and aware of pedestrians and warn them that the vehicle is reversing.

CLEAR VIEW

Poor all around visability can cause accidents or collisions with other vehicles.

Banksmen (reversing assistants) must be able to see the driver in the mirror and ensure the driver can also see them.

Drivers must keep the Banksman (reversing assistant) in full view when manoeuvring the vehicle.

CLEAR AGREED SIGNALS

It is vital that the banksman (reversing assistant) and driver use correct and clear agreed signals.

Consistency and the use of correct hand signals throughout is essential for maintaining safety.

Drivers should not start reversing until they are given a clear signal to do so by the banksman (reversing assistant).

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Banksmen (Reversing Assistants)

The crush zone is highlighted in red on the picture. Picture: www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/waste04.pdf

• ensure that both they and other people are not in the crush zone during reversing, ie between the rear/sides of the vehicle and fixed objects such as walls, lamp posts or cars.


Activity 2.1

Driving Goods Vehicles

Banksman (Reversing Assistant) Signals

With reference to your practical training, identify the banksman (reversing assistant) signals pictured below.

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Restricted S p ace

Banksman (Reversing Assistant) Signals

When guiding a reversing vehicle in a restricted space the banksman (reversing assistant) should stand on a pavement or walkway. If this is not possible the banksman (reversing assistant) must have sight of the crush zone at all times. The manoeuvre must not start until the banksman (reversing assistant) is in place and visible.

In A Strai g ht Line

When the vehicle has to make a straight reverse, the banksman (reversing assistant) should be positioned to make sure no-one enters the crush zone. The banksman (reversing assistant) may need to progressively move as the vehicle reverses, but should remember to do so with extreme care, and not to walk backwards while signalling.

Around Corners

This reversing procedure may vary depending on whether the side road is on the left or right. In the right-hand option, the banksman (reversing assistant) may need to take up a position on the nearside corner. Once the manoeuvre has begun, they can move to a safe distance in preparation for reversing in a straight line as above.

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Activity 2.1 (Continued)

Driving Goods Vehicles

What is the definition of a Banksman (reversing assistant)?

Banksman (Reversing Assistant) Signals

Describe the role of a Banksman (reversing assistant).

When guiding a reversing vehicle, where should you position yourself and why?

When guiding a reversing vehicle, what should you be aware of?

Fill in the blanks in the sentences below. When guiding a r

vehicle in a restricted s

banksman should stand on a pavement or walkway. When the vehicle has to make a s

should be p

to make sure no-one enters the crush zone.

The reversing procedure for c

w

reverse, the banksman

the

may vary depending on

the side road is on the left or right.

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Driving Goods Vehicles Why is it important to be consistent and use standard signals?

What personal protection equipment (PPE) should you wear and why?

Why is it important to agree a clear set of signals with a driver?

Banksman (Reversing Assistant) Signals

What is the crush zone?

You are guiding a reversing vehicle and have positioned yourself 9 metres away. The vehicle reverses at 0.75 metres per second. In the box below calculate how long will it take the vehicle to reach your position if you do not move. SHOW HOW YOU HAVE WORKED OUT THE ANSWER IN THE BOX

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Manual Handling

Manual Handling is any transporting or supporting of a load (including lifting, putting down, pushing, pulling, carrying or moving) by hand. Manual handling can be a hazard and accidents or injuries can result if this is not carried out appropriately and safely, not just to yourself but to others. More than a third of all reported injuries in the workplace are caused by manual handling activities. The most common injuries caused, as a result, are sprains and strains, though broken bones and internal injuries can also result.

Manual Handling

Manual Handling Regulations Manual Handling Operations Regulations DO NOT give weight limits for lifting. There is no limit below which lifting is considered safe. This is because what is safe depends on the person involved in the lifting and the situation. Manual Handling Good Practice:

Think before you lift. Avoid risky handling activities. Use mechanical aids wherever possible. Obtain assistance if the load is heavy or difficult. Inform your employer if you have a medical condition that affects your capability. Manual Handling Bad Practice:

Bending the back when lifting. Holding loads away from the body. Attempting to lift heavy loads without assistance. Carrying loads for long distances without resting. Carrying uneven loads with the heaviest side away from you.

YOU ONLY HAVE ONE BACK! If you look after it, it will last a lifetime. Employers are duty bound by legislation to carry out risk assessments regarding the moving and lifting of heavy or bulky loads. Section 2 of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and regulations 10 and 13 of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require employers to provide their employees with health and safety information and training. Employees who are expected to manually handle loads MUST receive the correct training and be provided with suitable and appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

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Driving Goods Vehicles Activity 2.2

What manual handling or lifting tasks do you carry out or might expect to carry out when transporting your load?

What should you consider before manually lifting something on to, or off your vehicle?

Why should you avoid lifting something or someone that appears to be too heavy?

Where can you get advice and guidance on manual handling best practice?

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Manual Handling

What course of action would you take if you had difficulties manually loading or unloading your vehicle?


Activity 2.2 Continued

Driving Goods Vehicles

Identify manual handling best practice. T

Manual Handling - Good & Bad Practice

Avoid r

before you lift.

handling activities.

Use m

aids wherever possible.

Obtain assistance if the load is h Inform your e capability.

or difficult. if you have a medical condition that affects your

In the table below, identify manual handling bad practice.

1.

Manual Handling - Bad Practice

2. 3. 4. 5.

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Plan the Route and Timings for the Collection and Delivery of Goods This unit is about planning a route for a goods vehicle in the light of information about the delivery requirements and schedule. It includes the identification of factors relating to the vehicle and the load that will influence route choice, such as weight and height restrictions. It includes the need to comply with legal requirements for breaks during driving duties and to identify suitable places for such breaks.

This unit is relevant to drivers of good vehicles or those who plan delivery schedules for goodsvehicles and those who are responsible for goods vehicles within logistics organisations.

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Workbook Activities Unit CU 1200

Unit CU 1200


Activity 3.1

Driving Goods Vehicles

Planning the Route & Timings

Explain the relevant organisational policies and procedures, in relation to planning the route and timings for the collection and delivery of loads, that relate to: • health, safety and security • legal requirements • operating requirements • personal protective equipment

Activity 3.2

Explain the impact that the following factors have on route planning • restrictions on the load • vehicle dimensions and weight • requirements to plan alternative routes • road restrictions on selected route • load restrictions on selected route

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Driving Goods Vehicles Activity 3.3

Explain how you make effective use of your driving time.

Describe the implications for the vehicle and load on the selection of particular routes

Explain the appropriate action to take in order to deal with identified problems

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Planning the Route & Timings

What problems can occur when planning the route & timings for collection & delivery of goods?


Using Route Planning Resources

Driving Goods Vehicles

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Driving Goods Vehicles Activity 3.4

Referring to the map on the opposite page, use a highlighter pen to illustrate the best route to get from Preston to Euxton and then to Darwen. Then, below, write down the route you have chosen

Satellite navigation systems are now common place. What should you consider when using a ‘SatNav’ to plan your route?

Using this mileage grid, work out the distance from:

Birmingham to Oxford ................ miles. Manchester to Carlisle ............... miles. Glasgow to Portsmouth .............. miles.

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Using Route Planning Resources

What factors should you consider when planning this route?


Driving Goods Vehicles

Delivering Goods- Route Planning

As part of your driving assessment your assessor will ask you to demonstrate that you can deliver goods to one of the destinations on the deivery sheet below. Your assessor will advise you of your allocated destination. You will also need to demonstate that you can use a map or satellite navigation system to assist you finding this destination.

Job:

Assessment Drive Delivery Sheet

1 2 3

Driving Academy Delivery Sheet

Destination:

Load

Special Instructions

Do not enter the site. Park outside in Fragile front of the building or where it is safe to do so. Do not enter the site. Park outside in Weldmesh Ltd. Widow Hill Rd, Heasandford Ind Est Fragile front of the building or where it is Burnley. BB10 2TJ safe to do so. Do not enter the site. Park outside in Stockley’s Sweets Dutton’s Way, Shadsworth Ind Est, Fragile front of the building or where it is Blackburn. BB1 2QR safe to do so. Blackburn Chemicals, Cunliffe Road, Whitebirk Ind Est, Blackburn. BB1 5SX

Identify below the primary route you would use to reach your allocated destination.

........................................................................................................................................

........................................................................................................................................ Identify below an alternative route you would use to reach your allocated destination ensuring effective use of driving time. ........................................................................................................................................

........................................................................................................................................ Estimated driving time required to reach the allocated destination.

....................................................................................................... Estimated distance to the allocated destination. ...................................................................................................... Comments:

Planned and arrived at the allocated destination satisfactorily. Assessor Signature:

..........................................................

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Manoeuvre the Van in Restricted Spaces

This unit is about manoeuvring a van in any restricted space either on a public road a private road or in a depot. It covers the checks that a driver needs to make before a manoeuvre is carried out and the safe conduct of the manoeuvre. This unit is relevant to drivers of vans.

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Workbook Activities Unit CU 2160

Unit CU 2160


Driving Goods Vehicles

Activity 4.1

In the box below, identify suitable spaces for safe manoeuvring your vehicle.

Manoeuvring The Van

Safe manoeuvring spaces

Activity 4.2

Identify problems that can occur when manoeuvring the van in restricted spaces.

Problems when manoeuvring

Activity 4.3

For this activity, identify the types of hazard that could occur during manoeuvring. Then decide how you can reduce or elimate each hazard.

Hazard or Danger

How to reduce or eliminate

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Driving Goods Vehicles Activity 4.4

Explain the relevant organisations policies and procedures, in relation to manoeuvring the van, that relate to: • health, safety and security • legal requirements • vehicle operating requirements

Explain the observations required to ensure the safety of yourself and other road users.

Explain the effects of inappropriate speed during manoeuvring.

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Manoeuvring The Van

State the: • dimensions of the van • clearances required for the van during different activities • types of signals to be used when manoeuvring the van


Driving Goods Vehicles Activity 4.5

Vehicle Control & Manoeuvring

A professional driver can safely manoeuvre around and negotiate road and traffic hazards, that occur during a journey, by means of correct vehicle control. A defensive driver achieves this by constantly planning ahead and being aware of what situations are developing around his/her vehicle. The Driving Standards Agency recommends the use of the MSM - PSL method whilst driving. What is the MSM - PSL routine?

M

Manoeuvring The Van

P

S

M

S

L

Identify three methods of steering. 1) 2) 3) Which of these methods of steering do you consider to be the safest?

Why do you consider this method of steering to be the safest?

What should you be aware of when making a 90 degree left turn?

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Drive the Van on Public Roads in a Safe and Fuel Efficient Manner This unit is about the safe and fuel efficient driving of a van on the public road. It covers the appropriate use of vehicle controls to maximise safety and fuel efficiency. It covers knowledge of the factors that maximise fuel efficiency and the safety of other road users. . This unit is relevant to drivers of vans whose duties involve driving on public roads.

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Workbook Activities Unit CU 2161

Unit CU 2161


Driving Goods Vehicles

Weather Conditions and Stopping Distance

Activity 5.1

As a professional driver, you encounter all sorts of weather conditions. It is important that you adapt your driving according to the current conditions. In this activity, identify some weather conditions you may face. Then describe how you adapt your driving style to meet these conditions.

Weather Condition

Describe how to adapt your driving style to meet these weather conditions

How do you calculate stopping distance? (fill in the blanks)

+

At 30mph (48km/h), your vehicle is travelling at 44 feet (13.4m) per second. Extensive research has shown that 90% of the driving population can react to a situation, on average, in 2 seconds. How far would your vehicle have travelled in this time?

SHOW HOW YOU HAVE WORKED OUT THE ANSWER

You are travelling on a dual carriageway in wet weather at 60mph (96km/h). You have made sure to leave the recommended four second gap between you and the vehicle in front. What would this distance be in feet?

SHOW HOW YOU HAVE WORKED OUT THE ANSWER

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= Stopping Distance


Driving Goods Vehicles

Activity 5.2

Driving and Braking Safely

Safe driving and braking is very important and can have a direct consequence on the safety of your load as well as the components of the vehicle.

Firstly, describe the effect of scenario ‘A’ on the load and vehicle, then determine what could happen if speed humps or tables are driven over in this manner.

Then, describe how scenario ‘B’ affects your load, vehicle and what could happen if you use your brakes in this manner.

A - Driving too fast over speed humps or tables. B - Sharp, hard, harsh braking.

Effect on the vehicle

What could happen as a result?

B Activity 5.3

Hitting, Clipping or Mounting Kerbs

No matter how good a driver you are, sometimes you may mistakenly hit or intentionally mount a kerb. Describe the possible consequences of this to your load, your vehicle and the kerb.

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Forces in Motion

A

Effect on the load


Activity 5.4

Driving Goods Vehicles

Road Safety and Fuel Efficiency

How do you position the van on the road to ensure the safety of yourself and other road users?

How do you use the controls of the van to adjust braking under different road conditions?

Explain the relevant organisational policies and procedures, in relation to driving the van in a fuel efficient manner, that relate to: • health, safety and security • legal requirements • varying driving conditions that result in changes to the schedule

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Activity 5.5

Eco-safe driving is a recognised and proven style of driving that contributes to road safety, whilst reducing fuel consumption and emissions. For this activity, describe how the fuel efficiency of your vehicle can be maximised by the correct use of the gearbox and brakes. Include in your statement how to adapt your driving style to be more fuel efficient in various traffic conditions.

Road Safety and Fuel Efficiency

If your vehicle will achieve 25 miles (40 km) per gallon (4.54ltrs) of diesel, how many gallons or litres of diesel would it take to travel 300 miles (483 km)? SHOW HOW YOU HAVE WORKED OUT THE ANSWER

The fuel tank on your vehicle holds 20 gallons (91 litres) of diesel, based on the fuel consumption figures above, how far could you travel before the tank was empty? SHOW HOW YOU HAVE WORKED OUT THE ANSWER

1 gallon = 4.54 litres.. Based on the fuel consumption figures above, how many litres of fuel would you need for a journey of 225 miles (362 km) SHOW HOW YOU HAVE WORKED OUT THE ANSWER

On a journey, your average speed is 35mph (56km/h). How far will you have travelled after three and a half hours? SHOW HOW YOU HAVE WORKED OUT THE ANSWER

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Activity 5.6

A professional driver is constantly on the look out for hazards that will affect their driving during their journey. These hazards can be many and varied but essentially, they fall into three categories; •

Fixed Hazards

Moving Hazards

Hazard Perception and Types of Hazard

Temporary Hazards

For this activity, identify in the word search below the fixed, moving and temporary hazards that are listed underneath by circling them with a pen and crossing them off the list. When you have identified all of them select two of each type of hazard and use these to complete activity 5.7.

ROADWORKS

PEDESTRIANS

ROUNDABOUTS TRACTORS

CROSSINGS

CYCLISTS

DIVERSIONS

ACCIDENTS

RAILINGS

BOLLARDS

BUSES

ANIMALS

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JUNCTIONS


Driving Goods Vehicles

Activity 5.7

In this activity, select TWO fixed, moving and temporary hazards. Then, describe how you would adjust your driving for each. Fixed Hazard 1

Fixed Hazard 2 How would you adjust your driving for this hazard?

Moving Hazard 1 How would you adjust your driving for this hazard?

Moving Hazard 2 How would you adjust your driving for this hazard?

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Hazard Perception and Types of Hazard

How would you adjust your driving for this hazard?


Temporary Hazard 1

Driving Goods Vehicles

Hazard Perception and Types of Hazard

How would you adjust your driving for this hazard?

Temporary Hazard 2 How would you adjust your driving for this hazard?

Activity 5.8

Identify when overtaking should and should not occur.

What hazards are involved when overtaking?

What factors affect the distance required to overtake other vehicles?

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Assessment Documents

37


Driving Goods Vehicles

ASSESSMENT PLAN Driving Goods Vehicles (3.5 tonnes)

CANDIDATE ..................................................... DATE ASSESSOR

................................................

ASSESSMENT METHODS TO BE USED :

ASSESSMENT LOCATION

OBSERVATION

TIME. .................................. .............................................

ORAL QUESTIONING

WRITTEN EVIDENCE

WORK PRODUCTS

WITNESS TESTIMONY

WRITTEN TEST

SIMULATED EVIDENCE

Assessment Plan

..............................

ACCREDITED PRIOR LEARNING

a) UNITS THAT YOUR PERFORMANCE WILL BE ASSESSED AGAINST (a Depot Health and Safety and Banksman Signalling UNIT Plan the Routes and Timings for the Collection and Delivery of Goods CU1200 UNIT Manoeuvre the Van in Restricted Spaces CU 2160 UNIT Drive the Van on Public Roads in a Safe and Fuel Efficient Manner CU 2161

ASSESSOR SIGNATURE ...................................................

CANDIDATE SIGNATURE ...................................................

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Driving Goods Vehicles Vehicle Checks

Good

Adequate

Needs Improving

Moving Off & Stopping Use of Mirrors

Use of Signals

Lane Discipline

Awareness and Planning

Judgement Meeting Traffic Use of Speed

Distance From Other Vehicles Clearance From Obstructions Junctions and Roundabouts Reversing Manoeuvre Banksman Signalling

Assessment Feedback.

Development points learner should address prior to next assessment.

Learner Signature ................................................... Instructor Signature ............................................... Date .............................. 39

Interim Driving Assessment and Progress Report

Response to Signals and Signs


Driving Goods Vehicles

ASSESSMENT PLAN Driving Goods Vehicles (3.5 tonnes)

CANDIDATE ..................................................... DATE ASSESSOR

................................................

ASSESSMENT METHODS TO BE USED :

ASSESSMENT LOCATION

OBSERVATION

TIME. .................................. .............................................

ORAL QUESTIONING

WRITTEN EVIDENCE

WORK PRODUCTS

WITNESS TESTIMONY

WRITTEN TEST

SIMULATED EVIDENCE

Assessment Plan

..............................

ACCREDITED PRIOR LEARNING

a) UNITS THAT YOUR PERFORMANCE WILL BE ASSESSED AGAINST (a Depot Health and Safety and Banksman Signalling UNIT Plan the Routes and Timings for the Collection and Delivery of Goods CU1200 UNIT Manoeuvre the Van in Restricted Spaces CU 2160 UNIT Drive the Van on Public Roads in a Safe and Fuel Efficient Manner CU 2161

ASSESSOR SIGNATURE ...................................................

CANDIDATE SIGNATURE ...................................................

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Driving Goods Vehicles

Driving Assessment - Category 3.5 tonnes

Your assessor will use this sheet to record any faults you make during your assessment drive. You wll be allowed to make up to FIFTEEN faults (F) and still gain a pass. However, should you make ONE or more serious/dangerous faults (S/D), then you will fail the assessment drive. Multiple faults in any one category may result in a serious/dangerous fault being recorded. S/D F S/D F Eyesight

Ancillary Controls

Vehicle Checks

Judgement

Control

Crossing Traffic

Accelerator

When Overtaking

Gears

Clutch

Use of Speed

Footbrake

Handbrake

Steering

Move Away

Postion for Normal Stops Delivery / Loading

Safely

Position for Loading / Unloading

Undercontrol Use of Mirrors

Clearance from Barriers

Clearance from Buildings

Before Signaling

Distance from Other Vehicles

Changing Speed

Clearance from Obstructions

Changing Direction Use of Signals

Meeting Traffic

Junctions & Round Abouts

Where Necessary

Observation

Correctly

Approach

Properly Timed Responses

To Signs Signals

To Other Road Users Lane Discipline Pedestrian Crossings Awareness & Planning

Postion

Total Faults Serious / Dangerous Result: Pass

Fail

Assessor Signature:

............................................................................ Date:

41

............................................................................


Driving Goods Vehicles

Driving Assessment - Category 3.5 tonnes

Your assessor will use this sheet to record any faults you make during your assessment drive. You wll be allowed to make up to FIFTEEN faults (F) and still gain a pass. However, should you make ONE or more serious/dangerous faults (S/D), then you will fail the assessment drive. Multiple faults in any one category may result in a serious/dangerous fault being recorded. S/D F S/D F Eyesight

Ancillary Controls

Vehicle Checks

Judgement

Control

Clutch

Footbrake

Handbrake

Steering

Move Away

Safely

Undercontrol

When Overtaking Use of Speed Postion for Normal Stops Delivery / Loading

Position for Loading / Unloading

Clearance from Barriers

Clearance from Buildings

Before Signaling

Distance from Other Vehicles

Changing Speed

Clearance from Obstructions

Changing Direction Use of Signals

Crossing Traffic

Accelerator Gears

Use of Mirrors

Meeting Traffic

Where Necessary

Junctions & Round Abouts

Observation

Correctly

Approach

Properly Timed Responses

To Signs Signals

To Other Road Users Lane Discipline Pedestrian Crossings Awareness & Planning

Postion

Total Faults Serious / Dangerous Result: Pass

Fail

Assessor Signature:

........................................................................... .Date:

42 ....................................................................


Driving Goods Vehicles

Professional Discussion / Review

When you have completed your workbook and practical assessment(s), your assessor will conduct a review of your work. This is an opportunity for your assessor to obtain any outstanding evidence or ensure that any weak evidence is made more robust and meets the required standards.

Your assessor will detail any discussion and reference this against the unit standards below.

Professional Discussion / Review

Professional Discussion / Review

Assessor Signature:

Date:

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Accrington & Rossendale College Driving Academy Broad Oak Campus Broad Oak Road Accrington Lancs BB5 2AW Telephone: 01254 389933 e-mail : info@accross.ac.uk


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