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Volume 1, Issue 1

October 2010

The Campus Crier S

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University News

Teacher Interviews

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Student Interviews

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Advice to Freshman

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WELCOME TO THE FIRST ISSUE From Party Secretary for Guiyang University, Mr. Meng Qiuming: I‟d like to express my congratulations for this first issue of The Campus Crier, the first ever English newspaper at Guiyang University. I‟m certain it will serve as a medium for helping our students to develop ideologically, spiritually, and intellectually, while playing a role in disseminating knowledge of the English language and Western Culture. I‟m very happy with the first offering, and I know it will only improve in the future.

From the Editor

Photos of Guiyang U.

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Recipes

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Puzzles

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Jokes

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Opinion/Editorial

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Students and faculty of Guiyang University, on behalf of the entire team here at The Campus Crier I would like to welcome you to a new academic year, and the first issue of our newspaper. In this issue you will find good information about University happenings, teacher interviews, student interviews, original material from two university faculty members, fun stuff like puzzles and jokes, recipes, and beautiful photos taken on our campus and in Shanghai. We‟re all very proud of what we‟ve

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produced in this issue, and we hope you enjoy reading it as much as we enjoyed writing it. Here is our Mission Statement:

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“The Campus Crier is a student-run, student-written, and 50% student-edited English-language newsletter, published monthly by Guiyang University. The newsletter was conceptualized and designed by

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the students, and is published with the approval of Guiyang University. All work contained within the newsletter is original and student-produced.

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The mission of The Campus Crier is to satisfy the need for an English-language newsletter at Guiyang University. The Campus Crier provides an opportunity for any student of Guiyang University to con-

Letter from Singapore

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tribute original artwork, journalism, and/or literature for publication in a published newsletter. In addition to entertaining the readership, The Campus Crier aims to further the English-language education of the Guiyang University academic community.”


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UNIVERSITY NEWS The First Technical Innovation Competition of Guiyang University On 21 June 2010 Guiyang University‟s Education Department hosted the Student Technical Innovation Competition. The exhibits were placed on the 2 floor of Laboratory Building B. Teachers Dai Yue, Yu Wenwu, Deng Xiaohong, Zhang jinyun, Ren Yongli, and Huang Shulin acted as judges. The competition began in the afternoon. The space was set up to exhibit students‟ creative technical designs, like wind turbine installations, Leifeng Pagoda, China Pavilion, Machine Tools, and Suspension Bridges. Every student was required to introduce their design, discuss the materials used, and discuss the potential value of it all. Of the works exhibited, most were made of wood, though some used of recycled materials. The design called “Living Near the Sea” (seen below) was most popular. It was a diorama depicting a fancy cottage located by the blue sea, upon which floated a traditional Chinese ship. Judges marveled at the work and decided it was the overall No.1 in the competition. The competition was a rousing success, and showed off one of the many talents of the Guiyang University student body.

82 Guiyang University Athletes Compete in the 2nd Provincial University Games On 8 July 2010 Guizhou University hosted a grand opening ceremony for the 2nd annual University Games. Guiyang University vice Party Secretary Ren Fei, University Vice President Zhou Guifa, and 30 student representatives were in attendance. The purpose of the University Games is to "unite, civilize, and educate people," according to the Guizhou Provincial Government. The games were divided into 12 events: track and field, swimming, basketball, volleyball, soccer, table tennis, badminton, martial arts, aerobics, orienteering, taekwondo, and chess. 3500 athletes competed, from 39 different universities. Guiyang University sent 82 athletes, competing in seven of the events. This competition was made possible by the Guizhou Department of Education, and the Guizhou Administration of Sports, and will close on 9 August 2010.


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TEACHER INTERVIEWS Come, and be Enlightened. -Pete

In September 2010 The Campus Crier was lucky enough to get an interview the always busy Mr. Li, the new Dean of the Foreign Languages Department. Q1 How long have you worked for Guiyang University? Mr. Li: I have been with Guiyang University for 12 years Q2 What are your impressions of Guiyang University? Mr. Li: Great changes have taken place in our school over the past 5 years. We are proud of our university for becoming one of the most beautiful schools in Guizhou Province. Q3 You studied science as a student, but your spoken English is excellent. How did you wind up in a Foreign Languages department? Mr. Li: It wasn‟t just a coincidence; practice is what did it for me. I did major in science, engineering to be exact, but in Guizhou Province it‟s not so easy to find a decent position in the engineering field. For a while I worked in a large company that made optical instruments. Unfortunately, it went bankrupt. So I went out looking for something new. Previously I had worked a year in the computer science department of my university, and gave a few lectures on software. Our leader, the school leader, wanted to found an English Department for Jinzhu University. I must have made a good impression on him because I was appointed to supervise the establishment of that new English Department. Many years later, here I am. Q4 How long have you been studying English? Mr. Li: For a long time I was spending seven to eight hours a day studying English. Sometimes I felt disgusted, really disgusted. I wanted to just change the course of my life and never speak English again. But, then I discovered English literature, while at Guizhou University, and that changed everything. Q5 Since you are our writing teacher, can you give us some advice on improving writing skills? Mr. Li: It can‟t be summed up in only a word. In fact, we cannot focus on only our writing skills; we need to simultaneously improve all of the skills needed to use a foreign language. The best thing to do is to immerse ourselves in an “English environment.” You know that we can divide language learning into two classifications: one is learning in the classroom, the second, and more important of the two, is learning in a real environment. You can pick up on subtleties and learn proper usage in such an environment. English speakers, native speakers, say something. You hear it, understand it, practice it, and then someday you speak just as they do without even thinking. This is real learning. The technical skills we learn in the classroom are equally necessary to completing our education, but speaking with people whose mother-tongue is English is the only way become fluent.


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TEACHER INTERVIEWS

In September 2010 The Campus Crier spoke with Mrs. Yang, the new Party Secretary for the Foreign Languages Department: Q1: How long have you been at Guiyang University? I have worked for Guiyang University for 15 years, since it was a normal technological academy. Q2: What do you think of the changes Guiyang University has undergone in that time? In general, our school has developed so quickly. The university has taken on a completely new look. In my opinion, the teachers and students are more spirited than they were before. Q3: Some students in our department would like to get a Master‟s Degree but are confused about which subject to choose. Can you offer some advice? I think you should obey your interests. Interest is the best motivator, but students should try to stay with their undergraduate major. If you want to master a field, you should have a systematic knowledge of this subject. Naturally, some consideration should be given to which field of study will be most beneficial to your future working life, but I think that is last on the list. Q4:Where are you from? Can you tell us a bit about your hometown? I come from Zunyi City, Guizhou Province. It is really a marvelous place. The people are simple and sincere. In recent years, the local economy has surged forward. It is the site of a pivotal meeting in Chinese history, the Zunyi Meeting. As such, it is called “The Turning Point City.” Loushan Pass, situated 50 kilometers south of Zunyi, is another historic site, attracting tourists with its dangerously steep cliffs. However, Zunyi is not simply a place of revolutionary tourism. It boasts rich natural resources, beautiful scenery, and unique cultural characteristics. Q5: There are ten extra-curricular clubs in our Foreign Languages Department. It is one of the things that set us apart from the other departments at Guiyang University. Unfortunately though, most students from the other departments are not informed of their existence. What measures should we take to address this situation? First, we should enlarge the groups. Hopefully, our clubs will enroll new students from every department of our university in the future. Second, we should try to obtain financial support from the university. With university funding we can easily expand and improve our already excellent extra-curricular activities. Third, we should encourage our students to develop new and innovative activities. More activities will present more opportunities to exhibit our work and talents.


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STUDENT INTERVIEWS On mid September 2010 The Campus Crier spoke with a 4th year English major called Tang Jiajia, English name Carmen, about her time at Guiyang University. Q1 What are your plans for after graduation? Carmen: The first thing I will do is take the examination to be a public servant. By doing so I might have the opportunity to become a police officer. Being a police officer has been dream since I was a child. Q2 Do you want to receive further education? Why or why not? Carmen: No. I have always held the opinion that graduate education is for people who want to spend their lives exploring knowledge. Frankly speaking, I am not interested in exploring knowledge. I want to work, support myself, and enjoy the freedom that comes with independence. Q3 Would you like to work in the education field? Carmen: Maybe. It is said that if you want to change a person, you should change his mind first. Education is the key to changing one‟s life. I believe that education is a great career, and educators can positively influence many people. Through education we can transmit the truth and know what should we do and not. Q4 What is your ideal job? Carmen: My ideal job is being a police officer. It has always been my dream. I am confident that I will make an excellent officer of the law. Honestly, I believe myself to be strong, reasonable, and fair, and these are the characteristics of every great police officer. A group of third-year students from Guizhou Normal University and the College for Professional Training in Guiyang City transferred to Guiyang University this semester. Joining the English major, the 16 students were evenly divided amongst the four classes of juniors. On 14 September 2010 The Campus Crier spoke to two of them: Lei Qianqian and Cao Yanxia. Q1: What do you think of Guiyang University? Lei: The University is very beautiful. The air is so clean. I think the learning environment here is what every student dreams of. Cao: I think most impressive is how modern and advanced the facilities are. And there are many extra-curricular clubs for English majors. This is good for students. Q2: What is your favorite part of this University? Lei: I like the library. It‟s really spectacular. Cao: Yes, I agree. Q3: Are you having any problems adjusting to life at this University? Lei: Yes; this University is much bigger than the school we came from. I lost my way yesterday. We are not familiar with the school. Cao: We‟re concerned about our academic credits. We missed some courses, and we don‟t know how to make up the credits for them. We‟ve asked different people here, but no one seems certain of the answer. We hope to know soon. Q4: Is there anything here that you find particularly exciting? Lei: Yes. There are courses here which have never been offered to me before, like Japanese. I‟m excited to expand my mind and learn new things, things I may never again have the opportunity to study.


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STUDENT INTERVIEWS In September 2010 The Campus Crier spoke with Lolita, a 4th year English major, to discuss her time at Guiyang University. Q1 How is the fourth year of university different from the previous three years? Lolita: In the fourth year students are busy fulfilling graduation requirements and preparing for the future, so we don‟t do as much socializing. Unfortunately, despite this extra preparation time, I don‟t feel I‟m fully ready to enter society as an adult. At this point in the year, I think seniors can be divided into several groups: searching for a career position, furthering their study, studying for the public servant examination, and a large majority who are just confused. I would bet 90% of the students are in that last group. They don‟t know what they want to do, how to make choices, or which of the choices are best for them. Currently, I‟m just “testing the waters” in many different areas, knowing I may not be doing these things in the future. I‟m keeping my chin up and looking toward the future. You know, win or lose I‟m being proactive. Q2 So you have no concrete plans for the future? Lolita: Well…I think plans do not adapt well to the changes in our lives. I make plans for my life, and I divide them into smaller and more specific targets. Unfortunately, I often don‟t, or am unable to, follow through. A better way is to make simple daily goals. By having reasonable short-term expectations of ourselves, we can feel satisfied with our efforts everyday. A plan is nothing more than a good starting point. No, I have no idea what‟s next. Maybe I‟ll go on studying, or find a job. I‟ll go where the wind blows me. Q3 Now that your time at university is almost finished, what‟s the most unforgettable memory of your time at Guiyang University? Lolita: When I think about my time at university I‟ll always fell a sense of regret. I made a lot of plans for myself, but, sadly, I never saw any of them through to completion. For the sake of preparing for the examinations, I spent plenty of time studying English and doing exercises. But being able to speak, read, and write in English is not enough to succeed in life. We must also work on our social skills. I regret spending too little time developing my social skills.

In September 2010 The Campus Crier spoke with Crys, a 4th year English major, to discuss life as a student at Guiyang University. Q1 What's the difference between senior year and the previous 3? Crys: The life of a senior is busier. The first 3 years of university were just being a student, and the only thing I needed to do during that time was study and improve my academic skills. But now, as a senior, I must consider my future and my career. I don‟t worry about scores anymore, now I worry about “life.” Q2 What's your plan for the future? Crys: At first I thought I would try to open my own company, so I wouldn‟t need to bend to anyone else. But, now I think I want to focus on passing the TEM8 and getting a job as a civil servant. Q3 What would you like to say to your university teachers? Crys: I want to say thank you. You are the people who made me what I am. When I entered university, I was not very good at communicating and I was terribly shy. I really had a hard time expressing myself. You helped me with this problem and brought out what is best in me. You recreated me! I will keep you in heart forever! Q4 What's the most unforgettable memory of your time in university? Crys: The most unforgettable experience of my time in university was my junior year. In that year, I wished I could have more than 24 hours in a day. I was so busy. I had so much homework and I was constantly preparing materials for the next day‟s class. But being busy like that prepared me for life as a working adult.


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STUDENT INTERVIEWS In September 2010 The Campus Crier spoke with SuLei, a 4th year Computer Science major, about his time at Guiyang University. Q1: What have you learned during your time at Guiyang University? I‟ve learned so many things. Before university, I was a boy dependant on my parents. I never washed my own clothes or worried about what to eat. Now I am independent. I can do everything for myself. Aside from that, I‟ve learned a great deal about Computer Science, which should help me in my career. However, the most significant thing I have learned is how to build relationships with other people. I joined many organizations and took part in many activities, which helped me to learn the skills of communication and management. Q2: What‟s the most unforgettable event from your campus life? I‟ll never forget the day I met my girl friend. I had a meeting the day I met her. She came in wearing a white T-shirt and jeans, wither hair in a ponytail. It may seem that she looked very ordinary, but I fell in love with her at first sight. Q3: What effect on your later life do you expect your time at Guiyang University will have? University is society in miniature. In university we can meet many different types of people. We can learn the skills needed for good communication. I think this is vital for success in later life. Also, the academic knowledge I learned will be invaluable to my working life. Q4: Can you offer some advice to the new class of Guiyang University students? There is no denying that learning is the primary reason we go to university, but university students have a great deal of spare time. I advise the freshmen to make full use of it; they should participate in various extra-curricular activities to build their confidence and improve their communication skills. Q5: What‟s your plan after graduation? I want to be an officer and marry my girl friend.


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ADVICE FOR THE FRESHMEN 1. Gain some perspective. University isn‟t heaven- it doesn‟t last forever. No matter who you are, you need to plan for what comes after. That plan can take much of the stress off of you. 2. Try to become “well-rounded.” Society is tough. Life can be a fierce competition, and those who are most successful in it are multi-talented. You will have many opportunities to broaden your appeal to future potential employers while at university. Take advantage of them. Earn certificates and make your resume more colorful. Look into computer classes, CET-4, CET-6, Putonghua classes, sports classes… 3. Make good use of the school library. The university library is the greatest academic resource at your disposal. Use it. As a student you have the time, energy, and opportunity to read hundreds or thousands of books. After you have left school, with a job and a family, you will not have such freedom to read books. 4. Develop your own methods of independent study. University is nothing like high school or junior school; you should motivate yourself and learn independently. The teacher‟s function is only to be a guide for you. You should find what technique works best for you, and then stick with it. University is the first, and maybe the only time you will have the freedom to make this type of decision for yourself, so take advantage of it. 5. Don‟t take the word of salespeople. What is cheap is not good, what is good is not cheap. Don‟t be gullible; keep a cool head, and make sure you buy good quality. 6. Don‟t leave your books on library‟s desks. “Several men, several minds.” We‟ve all heard stories of someone whose books were lost, stolen, or “misplaced.” Books are valuable and expensive, so cherish them. Winnie 08/04 This month, many recent high-school graduates joined our academic community. They will be faced with a series of challenges in their new lives, and some of them will feel pressured and confused. According to research, 70% of university freshmen in China are unsure of how to get started, while 30% claim to have clearly mapped goals. Some advice for that 70% who may be feeling lost: 1. Join student societies. Hobbies are relaxing. 2. Take part in “practicum” (in 3rd year) in order to accumulate experience. 3. Find a part-time job if you have free time on weekends. 4. Exercise, to keep healthy. Special advice for English majors: Listening: Listening to VOA and BBC for about a half hour everyday will drastically improve your listening skills. Speaking: Increase your cultural background knowledge of English and English-speaking countries, and try to communicate with native speakers. Reading: Reading in the morning and at night. Whenever you have time, you can read. Writing: Try doing some free writing exercises for 10 minutes every day. Andy and Eleven 08/03 1. You need make a plan for your university life. Make a plan for what you will do, what you will study, and how you will study. 2. Try to get long well with your classmates and teachers. They are wonderful resource in your university, and you can learn a lot from both of them. 3. Find some nice places to travel during holidays. Don‟t just stay in your dorm. The library is an important part of your university experience, but new and beautiful places off campus can hold meaningful life experiences. Enjoy your university life. 4. Last, but not least, find the right path for yourself, and decide on your ultimate goal. Do whatever is necessary to achieve that goal. Athena 08/04


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PHOTOS TAKEN AROUND GUIYANG UNIVERSITY

Photos by: Liu Yu (Editor) Wang Lin

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RECIPES Wheat-flour Foods There are many kinds of wheat-flour foods (noodles, steamed buns, steamed stuffed buns, round flat cakes…) which are part of Chinese cuisine. They are a delicious and nutritious part of our diet because they can be stuffed with all types of meat and/or healthy vegetables. Today, Xiao-long-bao. Ingredients: wheat flour 600g, shrimp meat 200g, Chinese cabbage 500g, two eggs, cooking wine 15g, salt 3g, pomade 15g, edible vegetable oil 30g, yeast 8g, hot water 60ml. To Prepare: 1. Put the wheat flour, oil, and yeast in a bowl, and then add water. Knead into dough. Let the dough rise for 40 minutes. 2. In the meantime, we can do the stuffing. Beat the eggs in a second bowl, and dice the vegetables. Pan-fry eggs and vegetables. When fully cooked, finely dice the “vegetable pancake.” Finely dice the shrimp meat, and then combine with diced “vegetable pancake.” Add cooking wine, salt, white sugar and pomade, and mix thoroughly. 3. Roll risen dough into a cylinder 5cm in diameter. Use a very sharp knife to cut the cylinder into round discs 2mm in thickness. 4. With a rolling pin, roll every disc flat. 5. Place a small scoop of meat/egg/vegetable mixture in the center of each flattened disc, then pinch the sides together. Be sure the contents are sealed inside. That is a xiao-long-bao. 6. Put xiao-long-baos into s steamer for about 40 minutes. 7. Eat with a soy sauce or soy vinegar.


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RECIPES Ma-Po Tofu Ingredients: 6 oz. ground pork, 1 tsp. soy sauce, 1 tsp. soy sauce, 2 tsp. Corn starch, 1 cup water, 1/2 tsp. sesame oil, 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil, 1 tsp. minced garlic, 1 tsp. hot bean paste, 1/4 tsp. ground Sichuan peppercorns, 1/4 cup water chestnuts, 2 green onions trimmed and cut into 1/2 inch pieces, 1 package (14-ounces) soft tofu, drained and cut into 1/2-inch cubes To Prepare: 1. Pour enough warm water over the water chestnuts in a small bowl to cover them completely. Soak until softened, about 20 minutes. Drain. Chop coarsely. 2. Marinate the pork: Stir the ground pork, soy sauce and cornstarch together until evenly distributed. 3. Prepare the sauce: Stir the water, soy sauce and sesame oil together in a small bowl. 4. Heat a wok over high heat until hot. Add the oil and swirl to coat the sides. Add the garlic and stir-fry until fragrant about 20 seconds. Add the pork, hot bean paste and peppercorns and stir-fry until the pork is crumbly, 2 to 3 minutes. 5. Pour the sauce into the wok, and stir in the water chestnuts and green onions. Slide the tofu into the wok, and stir gently to coat the tofu with the sauce and heat through, 2-4 minutes. 6. Pour in the dissolved cornstarch and cook gently, stirring, until the sauce thickens, about 1 minute. Spoon the tofu and sauce onto a serving platter and serve hot.

Vegetarian Sushi Ingredients: 1 cup rice, fresh vegetables (cucumber, carrot), seaweed wraps (cut into 4x6 rectangles), lettuce, 1 tsp. soy vinegar To Prepare: 1. Boil the rice in water and soy vinegar. Let cool completely.. 2. Cut the vegetables into strips the size of your little finger. 3. Lay the seaweed flat on the table. Spoon 4 tblsp. rice into the middle of the seaweed, lengthwise. 4. Put the cucumber, carrot and lettuce on the rice. 5. Roll everything into a cylinder, with the seaweed wrap on the outside. 6. Cut it into 6 discs. 7. Eat with a soy/wasabi dipping sauce.


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PUZZLES 2-3. What bargain hunters enjoy. 4-5. A written acknowledgment. 6-7. Such and nothing more. 10-11. A bird. 14-15. Opposed to less. 18-19. What this puzzle is. 22-23. An animal of prey. 26-27. The close of a day. 28-29. To elude. 30-31. The plural of is. 8-9. To cultivate. 12-13. A bar of wood or iron. 16-17. What artists learn to do. 20-21. Fastened. 24-25. Found on the seashore. 10-18. The fiber of the gomuti palm. 6-22. What we all should be. 4-26. A day dream. 2-11. A talon. 19-28. A pigeon. F-7. Part of your head. 23-30. A river in Russia. 1-32. To govern. 33-34. An aromatic plant. N-8. A fist. 24-31. To agree with. 3-12. Part of a ship. 20-29. One. 5-27. Exchanging. 9-25. To sink in mud. 13-21. A boy. Question 1. What letter of the alphabet is an insect? 2. What letter is a large body of water?

10. What wears a cap but has no head? 11. What rises in the morning and waves all day?

3. What letter is a drink?

12. What is an astronomer?

4. What letter is a question?

13. How can you tell clocks and watches are shy?

5. What letter is a part of the head?

14. What is wind?

6. What gets larger, the more you take away?

15. What comes after the letter A?

7. What do we get if we cross a woodpecker with a homing pigeon?

16. What starts with a T, ends with a T, and is full of T?

8. Where does afternoon come before morning?

17 What word can you make shorter by adding to it?

9. What do all of the great scientists of the 18th century have in common?

18. What person does every man take his hat off to?

their hands in front of their faces 14. Air in a hurry 15. All the other letters 16. Teapot 17. Short 18. A barber 1. B (bee) 2. C (sea) 3. T (tea) 4. Y (why) 5. I (eye) 6. A hole 7. A bird that knocks on the door when delivering messages 8. In the dictionary 9. They are all dead 10. A bottle.11. A flag 12. A night watchman with a college education 13. Because they always have Answers:


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JOKES Getting Lost A man had a pet pig. At first, he liked the pig very much. But as the pig got older it became lazy and sloppy. The man then tried to get rid of the pig. The first day, he chased it away from his home, but it found its way back. The next day, he loaded the pig into his truck and drove it 10 minutes from his home, but the pig found its way back. The third day he drove it 20minutes from his home, but the pig found its way back. The fourth day, the man drove 30 minutes away, but the pig found its way back. This continued for many days, until the man was driving almost two hours from his home. Always the pig would find its way back. Finally, the man drove three hours from his home, making many turns, driving on many roads, into the mountains. When he threw the pig out of his truck he said to himself, “There is no way the pig can find his way back from this place. I win, heh heh.” The man drove all night, trying to remember the way to his home, but he couldn‟t. In the morning he called his family at home. He asked his wife, “Is that pig there, at the house?” His wife answered, “Yes, the pig came back early last night. Where are you?” The man angrily said to his wife, “Give the phone to the pig, I‟m lost.” I'll See to the Rest A conductor was about to signal his train to start when he saw an attractive girl standing on the platform by an open door, talking to another pretty girl inside the carriage. "Come on, miss!" he shouted. "Shut the door, please!" "Oh, I just want to kiss my sister goodbye," she called back. "You just shut that door, please," called the guard, "and I'll see to the rest." Sleeping Pills Bob was having trouble getting to sleep at night. He went to see his doctor, who prescribed some extra-strong sleeping pills. Sunday night Bob took the pills, slept well and was awake before he heard the alarm. He took his time getting to the office, strolled in and said to his boss: "I didn't have a bit of trouble getting up this morning." "That's fine," roared the boss, "but where were you Monday and Tuesday?" Hunting Two hunters were hunting in the forest. One of them suddenly fell to the ground. He seemed to have stopped breathing. The other hunter soon took out his mobile phone to call the emergency center for help. The operator said calmly, "First, you should make sure that he is already dead." The operator heard a gunshot from the other end of the phone and next he heard the hunter asking, "Ok, what should I do next?" Faster than You Two guys were walking through the jungle. All of a sudden, a tiger appears at a distance, running toward them. One of the guys takes out a pair of Nike running shoes from his bag and starts to put them on. The other guy, with a surprised look, exclaims, “Do you think you can outrun the tiger with those?” His friend replied, “I don't have to outrun it, I just have to outrun you.” Which Woman? One evening I drove my husband's car to the shopping mall. On my return, I noticed how dusty the outside of his car was, and cleaned it up a bit. When I finally entered the house, I called out, “The woman who loves you the most in the world just cleaned your headlights and windshield." My husband looked up and said, "Mom's here?" Present for His Girlfriend At a jewelry store, a young man bought an expensive locket as a present for his girlfriend. "Shall I engrave her name on it?" the jeweler asked. The customer thought for a moment, and then said, "No. Engrave it: „To my one and only love'. That way, if we ever break up, I can use it again.”


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OPINION/EDITORIAL Justin Bieber—Just for Teens Angel face, sweet voice, innocent smile, what else do you have, shorty? Recently, having caved to my friends‟ forceful persuasion, I spent 20 minutes listening to Justin Bieber‟s Billboard top singles and half an hour watching his mini-concert. I was surprised by how profound and thoughtful those beautiful lyrics are and how well -organized and carefully-arranged the melodies are. There is no denying that a Justin Bieber definitely can exert a significant influence over society. I‟m not sure that I like that, but with my friends, all of which are adoring Justin Beiber fans, standing in a circle around me I certainly couldn‟t say so for fear of being attacked, both verbally and physically. “While listening to Justin Bieber‟s second album <My World 2.0>, I wondered if I had somehow jumped ahead in my life 20 years. From the perspective of an adult, a great many criticisms came to my mind: completely commercial, assembly-line, clichéd everything, “bubblegum” love songs…Despite that, it is a catchy pop music album. It reminded me of Aaron Carter‟s debut album, which was released when Aaron even didn‟t have his front teeth, so adorable…when I was 10. I necessarily arrived at the conclusion that this album was not intended for adults, or people with taste. Then I looked at it from and adolescent‟s point of view: <My World 2.0> possesses all the elements capable of driving teen boys and girls (especially the girls) crazy. You know all the melodies by heart after listening to the songs just once, you can predict the lyrics simply by reading the song titles (because they are so played out), and you will be transported into a juvenile world of sappy, unrealistic love because that is the premise of every track. <My World 2.0> should bear a warning sticker: „UNDER 14 YEARS OF AGE ONLY!‟” The above opinion comes from a Chinese music critic (translated by The Campus Crier staff), editor of HIT Magazine (a professional Chinese music magazine, focused on European and American music). What amazes me is that such short paragraph of professional commentary has caused a whirlwind of anger among Beiber fans. They complain that HIT has offended them with unprofessional, improper, and untrue criticism. They feel that their “little price” is beyond reproach. There is even a movement to boycott HIT Magazine, and Beiber fans all over China are networking to make the blacklisting of the magazine more effective. Has Justin cast a spell over these people? How can something as insignificant as an album review (which is completely accurate, I might add) spark such a social movement? [Speaking of casting spells over people, a Beiber fan recently paid $683 for a water bottle from which Bieber sipped! Has the world gone crazy?] Who or what is to blame? First of all, the entertainment industry. The young fans of Beiber are deceived by an elaborately designed image. Bieber is a Cupie doll, created by the record companies to attract the un-discerning ears of teenagers and those who demand nothing more of entertainment than a pretty face and mind-numbing drivel. By those standards Beiber is a walking, talking gold-mine. And that is of course the ultimate goal: profit. Equally at fault are the fans. They are drawn to this “crap culture” like moths to the flame because of insufficient music education. The deluge of teeny-bopper trash out there has washed away their appreciation for innovation and talent. All over the world orchestras are in dire financial straits, if they survive at all, but Justin Beiber is a multi-millionaire. It just ain‟t fair. -Music Fan at Guiyang University


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OPINION/EDITORIAL High-Tech Fraud In September 2010 there was an unfortunate case of high-tech fraud at Guiyang University. The father of a current student received a text message telling him that his son was seriously sick, in the hospital, and in urgent need of a large sum of money. He assumed it to be genuine as his son‟s name was written in the message. Without hesitating, he deposited the money into the account detailed in the text message. Later, he followed up on the message and called the school to inquire as to the health of his son. The school informed him that his son was fine and that there had never been any health problems. The poor father had been duped. There are various ways of using technology to defraud people of money today. Using a text message to do so is sadly common these days. In our high technology world, personal and private information is too easy to come by. The text message seemed to tell the truth, and any parent would jump at the need of their child, and so the father of our fellow student was an easy target. Naturally, I am amazed by how quickly high technology can raise our living standards to levels never seen before. But, I am also troubled by the potential for evil that high technology presents. It is what we would call a “double-edged sword.” The benefits outweigh the detriments, but we must be vigilant! -Neo, Guiyang University

Too Much Expenditure on Fashion The word “fashion” is significant among us young people. Ever-changing fashion reflects the advance of human civilization to some extent. The desire for beauty and advancement is universal and natural. However, some college students too often dip into their purses to keep up with the tide of fashion. Some college students even cut back on book and meal money to satisfy their desire for fashionable dresses, hair styles, and such. Such behavior is common among contemporary college students. How does this obsessive pursuit of fashion come about? I think it is the reflection of a person's insecurities; those who obsess over fashion are desperate to seen as be attractive and charming among their peers, satisfying their vanity and dependence. I think it‟s dangerous for college students to fall into this trap. As far as I am concerned, college students should not pay any attention to fashion. First of all, the pursuit of fashion has caused many students to lose focus on their study. Next, being a slave to fashion is a costly habit. Students don‟t make money, if they make any at all, and such a hobby will certainly cause financial stress for their parents. Finally, and most significantly, fashion is a waste of money, time, and energy. Often, fashionable clothes are uncomfortable and impractical, and the amount of time people spend looking for or at them can be staggering. In short, we students should use our ability to reason and our common sense in the pursuit of fashion. Remember, what lasts forever is not fashion, but education. -Smart Dresser at Guiyang University


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PHOTOS FROM SHANGHAI

Photos by: Liu Yu (Editor)

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CRUMBS OF KNOWLEDGE Will They Be Persuaded? -Lewis 08/01 Two of the richest men in the world, Warren Buffett and Bill Gates, have persuaded 40 American billionaires to commit to bequeathing half of their fortunes to charity. In September 2010, Buffett and Gates visited China to host a charity banquet. 50 of China‟s wealthiest were invited. Buffet and Gates made it clear that the purpose of the banquet was not to persuade the Chinese magnates to make the same commitment, but only to further the cause of charitable donation in this developing nation. On 2 September Ye Lei, the director of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in China, reiterated that the purpose of the banquet was not to persuade the Chinese magnates to make any sort of commitment. In fact he said, the commitment made by the Americans would not even be mentioned. Lei said not everyone gladly accepted the invitations. Having received the invitations, most of the Chinese businessmen contacted personally for assurance that they would not be asked to commit to any donation. Some of them even declined the invitations, doubting the intentions of Buffet and Gates In order to clear up the misunderstanding, Buffett and Gates were forced to send personal letters to the Chinese magnates, stating in certain terms that the purpose of the banquet was to promote charity and to build partnerships. A Child Has Been Stolen! -Dana 08/01 “In just a few seconds, my kid was stolen." On 23 April, a woman in Guiyang City, whose family name is Wang, had her child stolen right from under her nose. That morning, she was at a bus stop on the #57 line, on her way to the Guiyang train station to ask for information about train tickets. On her way to the station, a seemingly friendly woman of about 30 years of age approached her. After making small conversation, the stranger suggested that they go to buy train tickets together. "I'm from a rural town, far from Guiyang. I was alone, and holding my child. That woman seemed so friendly and helpful, I appreciated meeting her from the bottom of my heart," Wang said. At the train station, Wang asked the stranger to look after the child while she used the restroom. When she returned from the restroom, the woman and her child were gone. She searched every inch of the crowded train station, but the woman and her child were nowhere to be found. Then she realized her child had been kidnapped. Distraught and feeling helpless, she dialed the police for help. To date, the case remains under investigation. Mid-Autumn Festival The traditional Chinese Mid-Autumn Festival has recently come and gone. It's one of the most important annual festivals in China. Chinese people have equated the changes of life to the changes of the moon; waxing and waning, it represents joy and pain and unity and separation. As the moon is round, we believe it to symbolize eventual reunion, and on this special day all family members come together to celebrate. People return home, whatever the distance, to enjoy time with their loved ones. Today, the celebrations of Mid-Autumn Festival are more varied. After a family reunion dinner, many people go out to attend special performances in the public parks. In the countryside, this day is also considered a “harvest festival,” because the date of the festival coincides with the ripening of autumn fruits, vegetables, and grains. Mid-Autumn Festival is a time for relaxation and celebration. After supper, people will get together and look up at the silver moon, drink wine to celebrate their happy lives, remember their relatives and friends departed or far from home, and extend best wishes to everyone around them. “Mooncakes” are an important part of the festival. Mooncakes are pastries stuffed with sweet fillings of nuts, red beans, dates, fruits, peanuts, and such. Nowadays, there are hundreds of kinds of mooncakes on sale before the Mid-Autumn Festival. We at The Campus Crier hope you enjoyed your Mid-Autumn Festival and we wish you many happy returns in the coming year.


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TEACHER CONTRIBUTIONS: Dean Li “A Trip to Ironbridge” Traveling affords many benefits, not the least of which is offering us the opportunity to admire some of the world‟s great civilizations. One of the most fascinating destinations in this world, in my opinion, is the U.K: an area relatively small in size but with a long history and a great cultural diversity. There, you can find grand museums, famous universities, ancient castles, various chapels, churches, cathedrals and abbeys, buildings of different styles from different times, beautiful lakes, and sheep enjoying their lives on the slopes of rolling hills. Imagine a tour-guide leading you to see a small bridge just, 30 meters long, over a small river…what would you think? This past summer, I went to the U.K. with a tour group. The local guide offered to show us this small bridge as compensation for his changing our schedule the day before. Most people felt the trade was unfair. But to our great surprise, the trip to the bridge turned out to be fantastic! The bridge, called “Ironbridge,” is the first arch bridge in the world, made of cast iron, in 1779. From the introduction by UNESCO: “The town of Ironbridge is known throughout the world as a symbol of Industrial Revolution. It contains all the elements of progress that contributed to the rapid development of this industrial region in the 18th century, from the mines to the railway lines. The „Ironbridge‟ itself had a considerable influence on developments in the fields of technology and architecture.” Standing by the small Severn River and the ordinary-looking “Ironbridge,” it suddenly occurred to me how lucky we are to live in modern society. We enjoy so many advanced facilities today, making our lives comfortable and easy, thanks to the Industrial Revolution. That day I bought two cup mats, made of cast iron, in the local museum so I can be forever reminded of my great fortune. For this reason, I think visiting Ironbridge is more worthwhile than a shopping trip to Burberry or Harrods. If you ever have a chance to go to the U.K., take the time to see this small bridge in Telford, Shropshire, and appreciate where we have all come from.


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TEACHER CONTRIBUTIONS: Pete Tarantola “An American Tale” I was well into adulthood before I realized that I was an American. Of course, I had been born in America and had lived there all of my life, but somehow it never occurred to me that just being a citizen of the United States meant I was American. Americans were people who ate peanut butter and jelly on mushy white bread that came out of plastic packages. Me? I ate sausage and pepper sandwiches on Italian bread. I was Italian. For me, as I‟m sure it was for most third generation Italian-American children who grew up in the 80‟s, there was a definite distinction drawn between US and THEM. We were Italian. Everybody else- the Irish, Germans, Polish, Jewish- was unlucky. There was no animosity involved in that distinction, no prejudice, no hard feelings. But we knew ours was the better way. Truly, I pitied them. Most of my American friends had to be satisfied with what their parents bought at the local supermarket. Speaking of food, it always amazed me that my American friends had only turkey on Thanksgiving or Christmas, and always with the same stuffing and cranberry sauce. Now, we Italians would have beautiful lasagna, but only after the antipasto, soup, meatballs, and salad. The lasagna was usually accompanied by some sort of roast (just in case extra guests stopped by), and was followed by an assortment of fruit, nuts, pastries, cakes, and homemade cookies. No holiday was complete without home-baked goods; none of that store-bought garbage for us. These were the days we would learn to eat a seven-course meal between noon and 4 PM, how to handle hot chestnuts, and to put tangerine wedges in red wine. Italians live a love for food. And what about Sundays? That was really the best day of the week. That was the day we would wake up to the smell of garlic and onions frying in olive oil. Laying in bed, we could hear the hiss as the tomatoes were dropped into the pan. Sundays we always had fresh sauce and macaroni. We couldn‟t eat anything yet; we had to go to mass first. But when we got home, we would find meatballs frying. Nothing tastes better than crisp, fresh bread dipped into the sauce, and a meatball. I also remember the holidays, when all the relatives would gather at my grandfather‟s house. There would be tables full of food and Italian music. Women in the kitchen, men in the living room, and kids everywhere. I must have half a million cousins, first and second, and we always had friends that we treated like family. They had achieved their goal of coming to America, and to New York. Now their children, and their grandchildren, were achieving their own goals because of the opportunities in this great country, because they were Americans, because of the sacrifices made. When my grandparents died years ago, aged in their 70s, things began to change. Slowly at first, but then uncles and aunts cut down on their visits. Family gatherings were fewer, and something seemed to be missing. We still got together, usually at my uncle‟s house, for weddings and wakes. It was understandable of course, everyone had their own families and children. But when we did come together as a family, I could always feel the presence of my grandparents, watching over us, proud of us. “SERAPHIM” Juliet, are you up there? Pity me in my despair. Stretch down and cradle my troubled head. Allow my weary soul to share your bed. Be the succor amidst my strife. Into waning dignity breathe life. With your pristine fingers, Love‟s trusted harbingers, Vanquish doubt. Even in me, poorest lout. Nod approval, give consent. „Til we are joined, I shan‟t relent. I pray only that it be You are come to save me.

Juliet and I, 22 June 2009.


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A LETTER FROM SINGAPORE Two years ago, I was an ordinary student, sitting in English class, and complaining about the food in the canteens just like you. Now, I have a Master‟s degree from Singapore‟s Nanyang Technological University (NTU), the #1 information and communication school in Asia (also ranked 74th in the QS World University Rankings). Lately, I‟ve been struggling to settle on one of the highpaying job offers. I tell you this not to show off, but to encourage you. I believe any of you could surpass my success. Two years in rapidly changing China is a long time, and I can only imagine how much the academic resources have improved in that time. Combining these new resources and facilities with the equally improved teachers in our developing nation gives you an enviable advantage over those of us that graduated a mere two years ago. As someone who has been exactly where you are, I would like to offer you some advice: 1. Make a wish. During the first “golden week” of my university career, I found an opportunity to spend my holidays studying at the New Oriental School (NOS) to study. This is a very famous language school in China, as is its principal, Mr. Yu Minhong. As a young man he took 3 entrance exams in order to attend the university of his dreams. While at university, he tried 4 times to go abroad for graduate study, but failed. He spent 7 years as an ordinary teacher in Peking University. He wanted more from his life and so he founded the NOS. In the latest financial year, more than 1 million students enrolled in his training school. A year ago, NOS listed on the New York stock exchange, with an IPO of $15. As of 31 August 2010 the NOS stocks were listed at 52.95. In only one year, NOS stock had risen in value more than 3.5 times. Today, Mr. Yu, who holds 44 million in NOS stock, is worth more than 2 billion dollars… the richest teacher in the world. After my time at NOS, I went back to Guiyang University determined to go to a top university in US to further my study. So if you feel the desire to improve yourself and your situation, congratulations, you have already taken the first step toward success. 2. Doing one little thing repeatedly can lead to success. In order to go to a university in US, I had to take the TOFEL and GRE tests. One was to prove my language proficiency, the other was to prove my academic ability. I found some sample tests in the Sisyphe book store, but I was startled by how much of the material was unfamiliar to me. Beginning with a vocabulary list, I made a plan to prepare myself for the different sections of the tests. I got up at 5am everyday and went straight to the library, with the goal of learning 100 new words per day. 30 days later, I could easily read any article in National Geographic magazine. Even with something that seemed so difficult and foreign at first, if you work at it enough, you can achieve perfection. Remember, “Rome was not built in a day.” 3. Circumstances change, and dreams must adapt to them. Dreams lead us to move forward, but they must be flexible. I fought with the TOFEL and GRE tests for four years. In the third year, I got an offer from a program co-organized by Berkley and Macquarie Universities. However, I could not accept because even if I won the scholarship offered, the living standard was unaffordable for me. After graduation, I worked in a preparatory school in Suzhou where I taught the American College Test (ACT) and helped high school students to go abroad. Thanks to another chance encounter, I came across a Singaporean university teacher in charge of recruiting students in Suzhou. She told me so many wonderful things about her home country and suggested that I apply to the two best universities in Singapore. I was fortunate to be chosen over many candidates, some from top universities in China including Peking University and Tsinghua University. I finally got the chance to peruse my Master‟s degree, though in Singapore rather than the US. Lucky for me, I became a classmate of my favorite pop singer Stefanie Sun (Sun Yanzi in Chinese). Important as goal setting is, goals alone do not ensure that you will achieve what you desire, especially because life presents us with unexpected opportunities. I didn‟t get what I had originally dreamed of, but I took advantage of the opportunity life threw at me, and now I couldn‟t be more satisfied. Helen Yang: “College Mother” (as we called the senior students appointed to advise freshmen)

CONTACT US ON THE WEB AT: thecampuscrier@gmail.com THE CAMPUS CRIER PEOPLE‟S REPUBLIC OF CHINA

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GUIZHOU PROVINCE, GUIYANG CITY Luo Tian Ying: Lead Student Editor, OP/ED Editor GUIYANG UNIVERSITY

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