Page 1

Peter Wildfeuer design

portfolio

2015­–2017

Lead Design Futurist Studio Bitonti wildfeuer.peter @gmail.com 917.993.4935


01 02 03 04 05

DUAL LAYERS 4–13

{ C U T } D’ E T A T 14–21

S P A T I A L M A S S  22–27

T R I B E C A A P T  28–35

SUNGLASSES 36–43


06 07 08 09 10

LEG COVER 44–51

3D PRINTED SHOES 52–59

A D R E N A L I N E D R E S S  60–67

CONDUCTVE POLYMER 68–77

SCOLIOSIS BRACE 78–91


01

DUAL

LAYERS

This studio project (done with Jose Holguin) under professor Franca Trubiano focused on the creation of three distinctive programmatic typologies. Due to the measured differences in light on either side of the building, the structure is organized in three separate layers. Each layer of the project is physically distinct and separate but connected through environmental conditions to create a greater entity. Ultimately the project is read as a double layered whole that begs the question of what it means to be a structural skin versus an occupied space and everything in between.


DUAL LAYERS Building and testing experimental surfaces, the first observation we made was that the natural state of the reflective surface itself will determine the qualities of the light. Tilting and disturbing the reflective surface can reduce glare, produce clarity, and hopefully brighten spaces.

To further understand the relationship between light and geometry we built “bio-machines� that manipulate the intensity and direction of incoming light. This eventually became the sectional logic for this project

6


Peter Wildfeuer

10AM

9AM 10AM 8AM

EAST

9AM 7AM 10AM

8AM

EAST

9AM

7AM

8AM

EAST

11AM

12PM 11AM

7AM 1PM

SOUTH

12PM 2PM 11AM

1PM

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2PM

5PM

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SOUTH

4PM

WEST

5PM

2PM 3PM 4PM

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5PM

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3PM

Recursive facade studies

A genetic algorithm was implemented to optimize the structure of each perforation in the bio-machine, for every orientation and time of day.

7


DUAL LAYERS Based on our observations and experiments, we designed a facade strategy with operable surfaces that can bend, pushing light further through the facade or redirecting intense glare.

8


Peter Wildfeuer

Thin Skin Detail Section (done by Jose Holguin)

9


DUAL LAYERS The overall facade of the office building was designed to optimize light penetration, air flow and create a heat buffer on the south side; however, the facade also generated the program organization.

The model image above shows how the facade was pushed inwards to create spatial nooks and free spaces for team meetings and spaces for eating.

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Peter Wildfeuer

The overall design was approached as the interaction between two different bio-machines coexisting at the same location, but oriented in opposite directions.

11


DUAL LAYERS

+282 ft [Level 20]

+269 ft [Level 19]

+256 ft [Level 18]

+243 ft [Level 17]

+230 ft [Level 16]

+217 ft [Level 15]

+204 ft [Level 14]

+191 ft [Level 13]

+178 ft [Level 12]

+165 ft [Level 11]

+152 ft [Level 10]

+139 ft [Level 9]

+126 ft [Level 8]

+113 ft [Level 7]

+100 ft [Level 6]

+87 ft [Level 5]

+64 ft [Level 4]

+51 ft [Level 3]

+38 ft [Level 2]

+25 ft [Level 1] +21 ft [Highline]

Mezzanine

SITE

SITE

Lobby

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[Ground]


tre

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Peter Wildfeuer

Highline Plan

Ground Plan

13


02

{C U T} D’E T A T My last fall semester studio done with Michael Royer under Professor Francois Roche asked for a different kind of design. Instead of resolving an architectural issue, we were asked to form an architectural situation based on the destruction of an existing structure that was designed to be a residential building for the upper class in Bangkok . For our project we focused on creating a center for those hoping to escape from the government’s gaze in order to freely commit unorthodox acts.


{C U T} D ‘ E T A T Our project used a system of construction lines and vital points to cut and rearrange the existing structure. The resulting form was meant to act as a labyrinth that only those with a key could decode and navigate. We cut the existing structure into three different types of pieces, which we then layered on one another form typologies

Construction Lines

Form Cut (1)

16

Generated Form

Form Cut (2)


Peter Wildfeuer

1

2

3

1–Cavern

2–Junction

3–Alcove

17


{C U T} D ‘ E T A T The construction lines we formed were designed to surround a large vacancy in the center of the structure that could only be understood by those with a key. The three different types of pieces we formed were extracted from the columns and floor slabs, which determined there jack-like form.

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Peter Wildfeuer

1–Small pieces are removed from column-slab intersections and the slab edge

2–Three leg pieces emerge from the corners of the column

3–More small pieces are removed from the column core

4–Six leg pieces emerge from the intersection of the column core and floor slab

5–The process produces 196 pieces per column span.

[De]construction diagram

19


{C U T} D ‘ E T A T Once the units were constructed they were layered on one another to form paths. The paths were then combined to form the labyrinth, which was then designed with a coding system of pieces that would act like an address book for those needing direction.

A 4

3

2

1

Zone 4

Zone 3 Zone 2

Zone 1

20

B

C


Peter Wildfeuer

21


03

SPATIAL MASS This studio project of a cooking college dormitory done under professor Kutan Ayata follows students through a three year program , in which , they gradually progress until they start selling their recipes to the people walking down from the Highline.


S PAT IA L MA S S The basic unit that underwent a series of aggregation strategies started off as a simple wall that was manipulated through pulling and squeezing to create a spatial mass that could be occupied. The site massing was developed using this same concept.

The basic unit was duplicated and merged with other units to form larger spatial masses for students at different points in their education

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Peter Wildfeuer

25


S PAT IA L MA S S The 1st Year Floor is designed to provide students with more study space and closer connections. Units are formed to contain one large kitchen for every four students.

1st Year Dorm Four Bedrooms Two Bathrooms One Large Kitchen and 4 desks

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Peter Wildfeuer

1

1

1st Year Floor 1 Classrooms 2  Private Access Lounge Areas 3  Practice Kitchen 4  Laundry Room

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04

TRIBECA PLAYROOM This project, done in the summer of 2015 for PRESENT Architecture in New York City, was an interior renovation of an apartment in Tribeca that required a “modern” playroom for two kids of 4 and 8.


T R I B E C A A P T.

( P R E S E N T A R C H I T E C T U R E)

The client requested a playroom with space for a small bed and plenty of storage. We decided to focus on making the storage in and of itself a framework for centering the bed as a refuge of calm in a room focused on play.

X

L

T-X-L

T

Vertical dimensions were more or less fixed, while horizontal dimensions were very much design variables with the relationships shown above

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Peter Wildfeuer

2 - Concealed corner shelves

1 - Private shelves

3 - Fake drawer

4 - Fake closet

The images above show four different examples of playful storage designs that emphasized the nature of a playful refuge for children.

31


T R I B E C A A P T.

( P R E S E N T A R C H I T E C T U R E)

The last few iterations combined this use of hidden nooks and playful storage units to create an exciting and stimulating environment for a child’s imagination.

Above are some of the initial iterations for “hidden” storage integration.The goal was to find out how to incorporate our hidden storage studies in a way that did not take away from the room’s proportions.

32


Peter Wildfeuer

The built design did not include all of the hidden storage designs, but still focused on a balance between stable proportions and surprising details.

33


T R I B E C A A P T.

( P R E S E N T A R C H I T E C T U R E)

The final design of the playroom consisted of three parts, a desk, a nook and monkey bars. The desk and the nook were surrounded in hidden methods of storage.

05

07/17/2015

Playroom Ladder

04

07/17/2015

Playroom Millwork Revision 2

03

07/13/2015

Playroom Metalwork Drawings

02

07/10/2015

01

06/04/2015

NO.

Playroom Millwork Drawings Prelim Construction Set

04/03/2015

Condo Board Review

DATE

ISSUE

DWG. CONTENTS:

DATE: SCALE: DWG. BY: PROJECT NO.: DWG. NO.:

SHEET NO.: B-SCAN:

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Peter Wildfeuer

The design placed the monkey bars in plain view of the entrance, while the desk and nook were hidden inside of the room.The renders and photos were done by Robert Deitchler, and the project began construction in 2015

35


05

SUNGLASSES This project was done in the beginning of 2016 as a collaboration with an Italian eye-wear company called OXYDO. We chose to highlight the formal advantages of additive manufacturing by replacing the glass frame with a “meta material� generated computationally.


S U N G LA S S E S

(O X Y D O)

The first step for this project was to “pick� a material. We chose to base our material off of an interwoven form that took advantage of the additive manufacturing process.

The hatch is based off of two angles and a spacing that decreases over its length

Interwoven forms started with the formation of a hatch pattern based on two angles that would then undergo a transformation. In order to account for structure and density, the spacing between the pattern was varied.

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Peter Wildfeuer

1.0

1.5

0.5

Curves are attracted to one another within a certain range, creating a web pattern

A simple network curves system with varying levels of strength was used to attract hatch lines together. The network curve process, along with the hatch pattern variations gave us a multitude of material options that were eventually layered on one another.

39


S U N G LA S S E S

(O X Y D O)

Precedent research revealed the delicate balance between structure and transparency in eye-wear. The frames designs were eventually chosen to highlight the meta-materials role in replacing structure.

A large part of the OXYDO brand focused on highlighting structure over transparency.

A lot of the OXYDO collection emphasized structure over transparency. In order to retain that precedent, we felt the need to keep the lens presence minimal by designing structure around a simple primitive.

40


Plan View (mm)

Peter Wildfeuer 2.4

112.6

4.6

Lens

3mm gap b/w lens&frame

4.6 2.3

5.8 19.0 132.6 2.4

2.4

20.4

4.8

20.4

57.2

4.6

57.3

50.4Lens

2.4

28.8

Plan 5.7 View (mm) 4.8

17.7

26.3

17.7

4.8

29.0

Side

5.7

132.6 2.4

Fro

2.4

2.4

Front Elevation (mm)

112.6

4.8 3.1

4.8

Lens

3mm gap b/w lens&frame

29.5

19.8

132.6 2.4

2.4

47.6

21.6

Lens Front

2.4 18.2

Side El 17.7 Plan10.6 View (mm)

4.8

17.7

26.3

17.7

4.8

17.7

10.6

132.6 2.4

Front Elevation (mm)

112.6

4.6 2.3

Lens

3mm gap b/w lens&frame

4.8 20.4

57.3

20.4

50.4

4.6 50.4

Lens Fro

29.0

4.9

Side

Plan View (mm)

4.8

8.2

16.7

4.8

26.3

8.2

132.6

Front Elevation (mm) 4.6

4.6

19.0

20.4

4.8

20.4

57.2

4.8

57.3

4.6

17.2 29.0

Lens

3mm gap b/w lens&frame

4.8

5.6

4.8

2.4

5.6 4.7

16.6 37.1

4.7 5.6

4.8

Side El

5.6

2.4

132.6

Front Elevation (mm)

41


S U N G LA S S E S

(O X Y D O)

The final product focused on using the meta material to suspend the frame in a webbing form that would hold the product together.

Top Bar Meta-material Lens Support Lens

Front Elevation

Top Bar Meta-material Lens Support Lens

Side Elevation

The webbing holds a bar, which would normally connect the lenses in order to complete the structural frame of the glasses.

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Peter Wildfeuer

43


06

L E G  C O V E R After the scoliosis brace, we worked on another project with UNYQ to design a new leg cover for female amputees. Feedback from female customers indicated that the shape of their current leg cover designs were unappealing. The challenge here was to create an appealing leg cover design for female amputees that would fit all the hardware requirements for large scale SLS 3D printed manufacturing.


L E G C OV E R

(UNYQ)

Our goal was to first understand what makes a “beautiful� leg shape. A process for gathering quantitative data of a legs shape was created by measuring the medial, lateral, anterior and posterior profiles of each leg relative to a center line running up the tibia.

Anterior

Posterior

Lateral

Medial

Condyle Y

Gastrocnemius Muscles X

Peroneus Longus Tibulus Anterior

Tendon

Ankle

Tibius Center Line

The key muscle groups that determine the profile of the leg are illustrated above. These play the largest role in defining the inner (medial), front (anterior) and back (posterior) profiles.We measured the contour of these profiles relative to their position up the leg (from the ankle to the lateral condyle)

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Peter Wildfeuer

Anterior Profile of Leg Type A:

Distance from Tibius (rel units)

Medial Profile = Blue, Lateral Profile = Red 6.0 5.0

B

4.0 3.0 2.0

A

1.0

0

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

Location up the leg (0 = ankle, 1.0 = Condyle)

The diagram above shows how leg profiles were mapped out. “A” is the point at which the anterior profile becomes symmetric and “B” represents the asymmetry above point A. Our research showed that larger areas of asymmetry and a point of symmetry closer to 40% up the leg seem to be more appealing

47


L E G C OV E R

(UNYQ)

Once all the profile data from each model was collected, we used the prevalence of leg shots in Google searches to rank the models and performed a Case StudyCase Study L E G C LOE V ER G C O V average. ER weighted The surface design of the leg cover was focused on highC O N CC E POTNS C E P T S lighting the properties of the “ideal” leg shape.

ut

The Averaged Leg Shape The Averaged Leg Shape

On the right side, is a lateral image of the “perfect” leg generated from a weighted average of the data, some of which is shown on the left.

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Peter Wildfeuer

Tilt = .01

Tilt = .03

Tilt = .05

Speed = .1

Speed = .3

Speed = .5

We articulated the leg geometry with a flow system that moved up and down the leg at different speeds and different vectors. As the speed and tilt increased, the geometry of the leg played less of a role in dictating the pattern.

49


L E G C OV E R

(UNYQ)

Once flow lines run across the idealized form, the design went through subtle adjustments to fit over standard prosthetics. Most covers require an unnatural amount of thickness around the ankle to fit, but by rotating the seam of the cover we were able to maintain our designs overall shape.

Lateral Elevation

Medial Elevation

Anterior Elevation

The final design, shown above, was a product of a weighted average, a flow line algorithm, and a rotated seam line.

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Peter Wildfeuer

The diagram above shows the typical placement of the seam down the side of the cover vs our designs use of a flow lines as the seam.

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07

3D PRINTED SHOES A small startup called FEETZ approached us with a manufacturing problem. They wanted to create an efficient way to manufacture a completely 3D printed shoe, from sole to upper.


3 D P R I NT E D S H O E S ( F E E T Z ) The concept of Feetz was to create a method for ordering custom fit footwear from your home. Due to the unique shape of every customer’s feet, each order would have to be 3D printed. The problem was how do you make production quality shoes quickly and cost-effectively.

1 - Photograph Feet

2 - Translate to Mesh

Feetz customers would take photos of their feet at home.Those photos were translated into a three dimensional mesh that would determine the shape of the shoe’s upper and midsole.

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Peter Wildfeuer

3 - Print Upper and Midsole

4 - Combine Midsole and Upper

That shape would be sent to an FDM farm where each shoe upper and midsole would be printed on demand, then attached before being delivered to the customer.

55


3 D P R I NT E D S H O E S ( F E E T Z ) In order to ensure sufficient print times we had to customize the tool paths to eliminate any excess movement and eradicate the need for supports. However, printing the upper without supports was difficult because the cantilever area at the toe-box was very large, so to accomplish this we created a sine wave tool path pattern.

High Frequency

Low Frequency

Traditional Tool Path

Sine-wave Tool paths

In order to produce an effective compound we had to choose an additive and manufacturing process that would result in high levels of distribution and dispersion. Co-rotating twin screw extruders with flight heights and channel depths that decreased across the barrel were used to introduce the additive.

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Peter Wildfeuer

360

Typical Failure Location

120 60

High frequency

Layer 60 Typical Failure Location High frequency and amplitude

Layer 120

Low Frequency Layer 360

Cross Sections

Cross sections of the printed upper show how frequency increased in areas requiring more support, and how amplitude increased in areas with higher overhangs, and greater failure potential.

57


3 D P R I NT E D S H O E S ( F E E T Z ) Aside from the frequency and amplitude, the phase difference between layers of the print creates a varying woven aesthetic that had to be addressed carefully.

Layer Structure

For its overall “woven� quality, Feetz chose to print the layers at a constant phase. This prevented tool paths from aligning unexpectedly, and creating a rib-like diagrid structure.

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Peter Wildfeuer

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08

ADRENALINE DRESS This project was done in collaboration with Chromat and the Intel wearable division. The goal was to create a dress responded to the wearer, by expanding with the wearer’s heart rate. The dress was featured in the New York City Fashion Show in 2015.


A D R E NA L I N E D R E S S

(CHROMAT+INTEL)

Because we were working with hundreds of joints combined to make a large shape the profile of the mechanism was very important in determining how much it was capable of expanding and contracting.

Back Mechanism Density and Design

More scissor joints would create a denser visual effect, but would also fail to expand as easily. Ultimately we decided to go with a lower density design.

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Peter Wildfeuer

Calm State

Excited State

The resulting low density profile expanded significantly based on the movement of an actuator located on the dress back.

63


A D R E NA L I N E D R E S S

(CHROMAT+INTEL)

We chose to design the dress by breaking its surface into 100+ panels that would be printed with a farm of FDM machines.

Printed Panels on Dress (White)

Because we working with an FDM machine, we had to create visual hierarchy to disguise the mechanism with only threads of TPU polymer material.We decided to create rib like structures on each panel that would branch across the whole dress.

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Peter Wildfeuer

Panel Profile Tool-paths

Panel Rib Tool-paths

Panel Infill Tool-paths

Back Top Right Panels

To achieve the visual effect we wanted, we customized the print pattern to create single separated tool-paths in the background of each panel, a series of bunched up tool-paths along the rib structures on each panel, and a larger series of stacked threads along the profile lines of each panel.

65


A D R E NA L I N E D R E S S

(CHROMAT+INTEL)

Panels were also placed on the actuator of the mechanism mounted on the dress back to camouflage its appearance. The final dress was made up of over 100 unique panels and laser cut carbon fiber scissor joints.

Photo of the Actuator (NYC Fashion Show)

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Peter Wildfeuer

Photo at NYC Fashion Show

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09

CONDUCTIVE POLYMER This R&D project was done with Intel and was split into three parts. The first part focused on developing a flexible polymer that could be 3D printed, the second part focused on creating basic sensors from our polymer formulation and the third part focused on applying that formulation in a series of potential POCs.


C O N D U C T I V E P O L Y M E R

(INTEL)

The first phase of this project involved picking a base polymer and polymer additive to compound together. Once we explored potential polymer and additive choices, we had to find which combination would result in the most conductive polymer with the least stiffness.

Bad distribution & dispersion

Bad distribution & good dispersion

vs

Good distribution & bad dispersion

vs

Good distribution & dispersion

Distributions vs. Dispersion

In order to produce an effective compound we had to choose an additive and manufacturing process that would result in high levels of distribution and dispersion.

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Peter Wildfeuer

Additive Concentration vs. Stiffness

The challenge was to optimize additive concentration and elongation potential.The more conductive additive introduced, the more likely free electrons would be able to bridge across the polymer, but the more likely the mechanical elongation of the original polymer would be compromised.

71


C O N D U C T I V E P O L Y M E R

(INTEL)

After our compound was finalized, we had to find a way to print sensors effectively. Therefore, the second phase of the project involved two parts. Developing printing hardware and testing basic sensor designs.

XY Guide Rails

Titan Motor Custom Mount

e3D Volcano Thermal Block

Hotend Custom Mount Design

The additive we added to our base polymer made it much harder to print.The compound could only be printed with a heavy torque motor and at temperatures above 290 C.Therefore, we needed to design a custom mount to combine a special nozzle, special thermal sensor and direct drive on a Ultimaker 3d printer.

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Peter Wildfeuer 40 mm 14 mm 3.0 mm 12.5 mm

Y-Rod Guide X-Rod Guide

3.0 mm

5.0 mm

3mm Filament Feed

12.5 mm 3.0 mm

6.25 mm

34mm Dia 3:1 Gear

3.0 mm

90 mm 42 mm

90 mm e3D Plastic Cover

42 mm

e3D Titan Motor Filament Guide Al Heat Sink 29 mm

18 mm

Cooling Fan Snap Fit

29 mm

24V Thermosistor Thermal Heat Wire

18 mm

e3D Al Heat Block 1.2 mm or .8 mm diameter steel nozzle e3D Thermal Heater

35 mm

6.25 mm Y-Rod Guide X-Rod Guide

X-Rod Guide 3.0 mm Y-Rod Guide Custom Mount Filament Tube

42 mm

Al Heat Sink

Motor Ledge

Al Heat Sink

e3D Thermal Heater 1.2 mm or .8 mm diameter steel nozzle

e3D Plastic Cover e3D Titan Motor Filament Guide

3mm Filament Guide

e3D Al Heat block

34mm Dia 3:1 Gear 90 mm

e3D Titan Motor

Snap Fit Fan

3mm Filament Feed

12.5 mm 3.0 mm

29 mm

18 mm

Cooling Fan Snap Fit 24V Thermosistor Thermal Heat Wire e3D Al Heat Block 1.2 mm or .8 mm diameter steel nozzle e3D Thermal Heater

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C O N D U C T I V E P O L Y M E R

(INTEL)

We designed two different apparatuses with arduinos to measure stretch and compression sensor outputs. We tested a variety of sensors with different infill percentages, nozzle diameters, layer heights and thicknesses, to see which print settings performed the best.

Vsource

D =75 mm

.01 sec .10 sec

Stress Sensor Setup

The stretch sensor tests measured resistance across the parallel circuit formed by the sandwich resistor design, while the compression sensor tests measured capacitance changes under pressure.

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Peter Wildfeuer

Sensor Data Collection Methods

Our sensor tests showed that with the right print settings, geometric choices and some simple data manipulation, our stretch sensors could pick up and differentiate changes in less than 20g of weight.

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C O N D U C T I V E P O L Y M E R

(INTEL)

Our sensors proved to work well as stretch sensors. Therefore, when we needed to find wearable applications for this new technology, we really focused on high impulse and strain situations.

4 Strip Sensors

4 Strip Sensors

Perforated Pattern

Surface Lattice Pattern

4 Leads

4 Leads

Intel Curie

Intel Curie

Patterned Band Sensors

The advantages of being able to 3d print these sensors is that we can generate a form fitting object that can vary parametrically across its shape.Therefore, in theory we can map out stretch forces across the body in high strain locations.

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Peter Wildfeuer

Swimming Goggles Application

We can measure the strain exerted on the knee under valgus forces during high contact sports, or map out how pressure is distributed across a swimmers head during laps.

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10

SCOLIOSIS BRACE This project was done in collaboration with UNYQ and Intel. They wanted to come out with a new SLS printed scoliosis brace design that would fight against the stigma associated with wearing a medical device. We improved upon their design, by utilizing all the opportunities additive manufacturing affords to create an appealing, lightweight and breathable solution.


S C O L I O S I S B RA C E

(UNYQ)

Traditional brace designs encase the entire torso in a solid mass, even though the majority of the applied force exists in a few select areas, and sweat buildup is a serious comfort issue.

Traditional Boston Brace

Traditional braces are manufacturing by forming a thermoplastic around a mold, resulting in a heavy solid design. Because the majority of scoliosis patients are adolescents, this limiting design can create real compliance issues

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Peter Wildfeuer

UNYQ Align Brace v.01

The First UNYQ Align Brace used additive manufacturing to incorporate a decorative pattern that also improved airflow in an effort to increase compliance without compromising performance.

81


S C O L I O S I S B RA C E

(UNYQ)

While the first Align brace did take advantage of additive manufacturing to some extend, we still felt that all of the benefits of the SLS process weren’t being utilized.

Apex

Apex

FEA of Original Boston Brace

Every traditional Boston Brace works by incorporating 3 or 4 bads at different sections of the torso to push against the body in an effort to correct or prevent further deformation of the patient’s spine. By utilizing the location of these pads and straps, we can execute an FEA on the design.

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Peter Wildfeuer

Front View Front View

Right View Right View

Back View Back View

45% Reduction

Left View Left View

60% Reduction

Using the location of the pads as constraints and the location of the straps as loads of up to 330 N, we ran a topology optimization on the traditional Boston brace to optimize for weight.

83 45% Reduction 45% Reduction

60% Reduction 60% Reduction


S C O L I O S I S B RA C E

(UNYQ)

To reduce mass further we replaced the large nylon cloth straps with polymer bindings that were designed to be printed directly into the brace, eliminating the need for any post-production.

Binding Mechanism

Side Elevation

Buckle Tail

Buckle Live Hinge Teeth

60 ยบ 3 mm

.75 mm

Brace Connection 4 mm

1 mm 30 mm

Buckle Structure

Utilizing the high resolution capacity of SLS manufacturing, and the flexible qualities of nylon polymers, we designed a buckling system that uses a live hinge to enclose the brace.

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338 mm

Peter Wildfeuer

18 mm

450mm 18 mm

18 mm

296 mm 338 mm

450mm 450mm

338 mm

296 mm

Elevations

After the topology optimization and the new binding enclosure system, we arrived at the design shown above for one of the patients.The process managed to reduce the patient’s original brace mass by over 60% and drastically increase flexibility. 450mm

85


S C O L I O S I S B RA C E

(UNYQ)

Finally, we wanted to increase airflow further and bring in the original aesthetic choices of the first UNYQ Align Brace by incorporating a pattern; however, we wanted this new pattern to reflect the design process and speak to the unique form of every patient.

FEA of Topology Optimization

To introduce a customized pattern, we did a second FEA to map out areas of low stress in the brace. Once we identified areas of low stress, we introduced a varying porosity that would increase airflow without compromising structural integrity.

86


Peter Wildfeuer

Prototype with Applied Pattern

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ices) S C O L I O S I S B RA C E

(UNYQ)

UNYQthe brace FEA design was finalized we had to verify that all of our modificaAfter brace tions would still result in a structurally sound brace.

Max stress observed is very similar for both parts, of the order of 7MPa (though it is partly due to modeling choices) STRESS ANALYSIS

Stress [Pa]

1

SLS Nylon

2

FDM Co-polyester

Stress [Pa]

5

Max stress = 6.9 MPa

Max stress = 7.1 MPa Note: Stress is Von Mises

30 November 2016

5

Max Stress = 23 MPa

FEA Stress Validation

We did another FEA on the body of the brace and the printed straps separately to ensure that the maximum von mies stress stayed well below 30 MPa (the yield stress of SLS nylon in the xy plane)

88


Peter Wildfeuer

Prototype with Buckling Closure System

89


S C O L I O S I S B RA C E

(UNYQ)

Two braces were made for two different patients, and are currently in the testing phase of the production process. The first brace was featured in the 2016 White House Inclusive Design show and the second was acquired by the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum

A prototype of the second patient’s brace with threaded connections (seen above) was acquired by the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, for its permanent collection.

90


Peter Wildfeuer

A prototype of the first patient’s brace (seen above) was featured in the 2016 White House Inclusive Design show.

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PHONE: 917-993-4935 EMAIL: wildfeuer.peter@gmail.com WEBSITE: peterwildfeuerdesign.com

Peter Wildfeuer

793 Hart Street Apt # 3F Brooklyn, NY 11237

Proficient in:

Rhinoceros, Maya, Revit, Auto-CAD, Python, Javascript, Grasshopper, HTML, CSS, Matlab, Simulation Mechanical, Adobe Suite, Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign, V-Ray, Keyshot, Microsoft Office, Machine Learning, Material Science, Finite Element Analysis and CFD.

Design Experience: Lead Design Futurist at Studio Bitonti

2015-Present

[Brooklyn, NY]

Oversaw projects related to emerging manufacturing technologies and structural optimization Led research, analysis and proof of concept design projects for large clients Managed product development and engineering for start-up clients

Adjunct Professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

[Troy, NY]

2016

Taught a studio on the application of biomanufacturing techniques in design Guided the construction of a large mycelium paste 3D printer.

Architectural Designer at PRESENT ARCHITECTURE

[New York City, NY]

2015

Designed plans and interiors for contractor and client approval Drafted millwork and construction details for project interiors Sourced/researched materials and products for project construction

Architectural Intern at Avinash K. Malholtra Architects

[New York City, NY]

2014

Designed diagrams/massings used to explain concepts and organizational strategies to clients Assisted with the translation of Design Development detail and plan drawings.

Related Experience: Physics Research, Johns Hopkins University

[Baltimore, MD]

2009–2011

Designed and tested methods for increasing grain size of thin Aluminum Films under Professor Nina Markovic Defended results and findings to our lab team of doctoral candidates and professors once a month.

Education: Johns Hopkins University [Baltimore, MD]:

2007 - 2011

University of Pennsylvania [Philadelphia, PA]:

2012 - 2015

Bachelor of Science in Physics [3.25 GPA] Civil Engineering Minor Masters in Architecture [3.50 GPA]

Awards & Honors: MD&M Conference Speaker 2017 CittĂ della Scienza Guest Workshop Instructor 2017 Featured in the Permanent Collection of the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum in NYC 2016 REU (Research Experience Undergraduate) Award for 2009 and 2010


PETER WILDFEUER University of Pennsylvania 2015 917-993-4935 wildfeuer.peter@gmail.com

2017 Portfolio  
2017 Portfolio  
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