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sherwood scene

April-May 2021


Board of Directors

Calendar of Events

Mark Wittenburg: President 7161 SW Fountaindale Rd. Topeka, KS 66614 785.925.0170 / markw@batisdev.com

May 24 (7 p.m.) SLC Board Meeting

Kurt Bossert: Vice President 7544 SW Blue Inn Pl. Topeka, KS 66610 785.224.9999 / kurtbossert@netscape.net Aline Barrett: Secretary 7601 SW Robin Hood Ct. Topeka, KS 66614 785.273.7889 / barrett.aline@gmail.com

May 26 (7 p.m.) Boater Safety Course June 8 (7 p.m.) SID Board Meeting June 28 (7 p.m.) SLC Board Meeting

Welcome New Member

Mike Rothfuss: Treasurer 6440 SW Suffolk Topeka, KS 66610 785.633.4920 / mike@alltechks.com

Samir Zaouch, 7241 SW Fountaindale Rd.

Annette Beck 6820 SW Dancaster Rd. Topeka, KS 66610 785.224.0008 / topekabeck@cox.net

Shoreline reminder: Any dock or shoreline additions or improvements must be approved by SLC. KSWR and Shawnee County Planning require a permit for any NEW improvements. Repairs or replacing existing shoreline without changing the layout do not require permits. When in doubt, call the SLC lake manager at 785.221.3248.

Tracy Lynch 7545 SW Robinhood Ct. Topeka, KS 66614 785.806.4357 / lynchplaza@aol.com Kerry O’Neal 7138 SW Robins Dr. Topeka, KS 66610 785.478.9559 / kmoendo@hotmail.com Kevin Beck 6971 SW Fountaindale Rd. Topeka, KS 66614 785.224.0489 / Kdbeck95@sbcglobal.net Jo Hunt 7031 SW Fountaindale Rd. Topeka, KS 66614 785.640.4490 / jajenhunt@aol.com

2 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

Reminders

Refresh yourself on the SLC Boating Rules.

Click here!

Stickers: Don’t forget to get your 2021 boat stickers from the Lake Patrol. All boats must have them: kayaks, canoes, paddleboards and boats. NO guest boats, large or small, motored or paddled, are allowed on Lake Sherwood. This rule is extremely important to keep out zebra mussels. Fines and suspensions will be assessed.

Inside This Issue Board President’s Letter............................................... 3 Letter from the Lake Manager...................................... 4 Meet the SLA Lake Courtesy Patrol.............................. 5 Lake Sherwood Fishery Report..................................... 6 Lake Sherwood Fishery Management Plan................ 18 Spring Clean-Up......................................................... 21 July 4 News You Can Use........................................... 22 Sherwood Sailing Club News..................................... 24 Buy/Sell/Trade............................................................ 25 Annual Stockholder Meeting Minutes........................ 26 SLC Income and Balance Sheet................................. 31 Meeting to Elect SLC Officers.................................... 32 January 2021 Board Minutes...................................... 33 February 2021 Board Minutes.................................... 36 March 2021 Board Minutes........................................ 39


Letter from the SLC Board President

H

ello fellow Lake Club members,

It is wonderful to see spring return at the lake. There are many reasons to enjoy this time of year, but the best part is the wonderful people who make up our neighborhoods and share the lake as a community. Please remember to enjoy the lake safely – we owe it to each other. Thanks to Mike Rothfuss and Joe Anderson, our financial records are in excellent condition. Our membership remains strong, with a waiting list for B memberships and a full slate of A members. Due in large part to the full membership and fee structure changes, we no longer have any loans, and the club has returned to having a small cash reserve. The fish study was completed, and it shows the health of our fish to be very good. It confirmed two things for us: 1) We have too many crappie – please harvest the crappie you catch, and 2) Our lake is still free of zebra mussels. We are one of the few lakes remaining in Kansas that has not been overtaken by zebra mussels; please do not permit your guests to bring kayaks, canoes or even floats to our lake. This is against the rules for good reason and in the long run will save all members the added cost and pain of a zebra mussel infestation.

Finally, YES! We do hope to have our July 4th celebration this year. Jo Hunt has the challenge of planning the events, and she has asked everyone to pray for continued declines in COVID numbers leading into July. Please help Jo by volunteering for one of the many activities our club enjoys on the 4th. Thank you, Jo! Please be safe and enjoy our wonderful community! Mark Wittenburg

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 3


Letter from the Lake Manager

B

oating season is almost here. The buoys are in the water and we are working on getting the beach spruced up for the summer. FYI: Storms on the nights of May 7 and 8 washed nearly 2 feet of sand from under the boardwalk at the beach. That area for now is closed, and repairs are under advisement. Also, work is underway to repair several broken sections of SLC beach dock. Two connecting hinges of the lower framework have broken due to ice and wind effects. That area of the dock is also closed. Travis Hirt has been hired back this year as our head of the Lake Courtesy Patrol. Travis is a B member, grew up at Lake Sherwood and is an employed civilian of Department of Homeland Security in the US Coast Guard. He cares deeply about the lake and will be an excellent leader of the patrol. Aubree Anderson, Dirk Moss and Rachel Weaver are also returning from last year. The Courtesy Patrol is in place to help keep our lake free from zebra mussels and keep the lake a safe environment. Reminder: If you are wanting to launch your boat, please call 221.2628 before coming to the launch area and let the Courtesy Patrol know what time you will arrive. That way they can promptly meet you to open the boat ramp.

Get great service & great rates.

Chip Munk, Agent 28th & Wanamaker,, 5990 SW 28th St Topeka, KS 66614 Bus: 785-272-8858 chip.munk.b6g6@statefarm.com

You know I’m always here with Good Neighbor service. But I’m also here with surprisingly great rates for everyone. Call me for a quote to see how much you can save. You might be surprised. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.® Individual premiums will vary by customer. All applicants subject to State Farm underwriting requirements.

When you bring your boats to the beach to launch them, the Lake Patrol will do an annual safety inspection. Please be sure to have a USCG-approved fire extinguisher along with an appropriate number of life preservers. If you are skier, be sure to have a Skier Down Flag. The beach gate security system was more than 20 years old and failing to operate. A new system was installed in March. New security gate access beach cards were sent out to all members in March and April. One card was distributed to each member’s family. If you want to purchase extra cards, please email Joe Anderson at office@sherwoodlakeclub.org. Joe and I will compile a list, and we will get the new cards programed and sent to you by mail. New cards are $10 each. I apologize, but your old beach gate cards will not operate the new security system and should be thrown away. The Boater Safety course was offered on May 5 and was a success. The class will be offered again on May 26. If you and other family members are needing to take the class, look for the sign-up email that will be sent out to all members one week before the scheduled date. The class will be held by Zoom, so you can relax at home while taking the class. The class is about an hour in length, and there is a short quiz that will be sent to your email address upon conclusion of the course. Please review the boating and swimming rules of the lake before you begin the recreational summer season. They can be found on the Sherwood Lake Club website. Go to the top of the home page and click on “Perspective Members,” and then scroll down and click on “Rules of Sherwood Lake Club.” Boating and Swimming Rules are found under Sections E and I. No Wake Zones: Please note that the tall white cylinder buoys and the orange ball shaped buoys indicate the “No Wake Zones” of our lake. Homeowners on the lake get extremely frustrated when these zones are not observed by all boaters. Their shoreline can be damaged, and most importantly swimmers maybe in the water behind these buoys, so please slow down. In conclusion, I am excited for the upcoming summer. I have a sense that this will be a great season on the lake. The quarantine is for the most part over and restrictions are being lifted statewide. A little lake freedom and relaxation sounds wonderful. We live in a beautiful park here at Lake Sherwood. So, be safe out there and have fun. Happy summer to all – it is a great time of year!

®

State Farm Bloomington, IL 2001875

4 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

Respectfully, Jeff Handley


Meet the SLC Lake Courtesy Patrol Travis Hirt I was born and raised in Topeka, Kansas, and attended Hayden High School and Washburn University where I duel majored in finance and management. I have one more class to complete my degree in accounting. I work for the United States Coast Guard. I am currently engaged and will be married this upcoming June. I enjoy a lot of the aspects of the outdoors whether that be sports like soccer, baseball and football or activities like fishing, camping and hiking. This will be my second year with lake patrol, and I am looking forward to seeing a lot of my neighbors for another great summer! Rachel Weaver I am from Topeka, and I work for USD 437. I am a single mother of five kids, ages 14, 12, 10 and 6-yearold twins. I do not have time for a lot of hobbies, but I enjoy being outdoors, camping, fishing, hiking and kayaking.

Dirk A. Moss I grew up in Topeka and left in 1972 to attend Wichita State University. I completed my B.S. and master’s degree. I spent the next 44 years in south-central and western Kansas. I retired in 2016 after spending over 40 years in the criminal justice field and teaching college. My wife and I returned to Topeka in 2016 and decided to stay since my wife and I have family here. I am active in fly fishing and belong to two fly fishing clubs – one in Kansas City and the other in Wichita. I also do woodworking and I am in the process of updating our house. Aubree Anderson My grandparents have lived on and been members of Lake Sherwood since the early 1980s, so I grew up always on the lake. I just graduated from Washburn Rural High School, and I plan to attend Allen Community College next fall. My hobbies are hanging out with friends and taking my dog on adventures, as well as hanging out with family.

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 5


Lake Sherwood Fishery Report Fishery Management Plan for Sherwood Lake April 12, 2021

SUBMITTED BY:

7561 SW Prairie Ridge Rd Polo, MO 64671 Ph: (816) 804-5604 6 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021


April 12, 2021 Sherwood Lake Club 6910 Fountaindale Road Topeka, KS 66614 Dear Sherwood Lake Club Members: Enclosed, please find your copy of the Management Report we recently completed for Sherwood Lake. The report was prepared to provide you with an assessment of the fishery in its current state and recommendations to improve the fishing quality in the lake. Our analysis was based on fish community data we collected using electrofishing gear during the late afternoon and evening hours on April 12, 2021. In particular, we collected data on species composition, size distribution and relative abundance, as well as relative weight data for the primary predator species, largemouth bass and walleye. Our data indicate that Sherwood Lake supports a diverse, abundant and balanced fishery. We were pleasantly surprised by what we observed during our sampling; particularly with regard to the largemouth bass and walleye populations. The impressive size structure and body condition of the predator species is no doubt due to the presence of a robust forage fish community (primarily gizzard shad and bluegill) which is driven by relatively fertile water. Fertile water is a double edged sword in a multi-use, multi-stakeholder lake such as Sherwood Lake. Residents that value non-angling uses typically prefer relatively clear water. However, from a fish production standpoint, fertile water is actually quite beneficial. Nutrient-rich water that is stained or turbid due to phytoplankton production simply grows more and larger fish than infertile, clear water. The downside of nutrient-rich water is the potential for episodic bluegreen algae blooms during the hot summer months. Unfortunately, it is difficult to maintain a moderate level of fertility that enhances the production of fish, yet avoids the potential for episodic algae blooms run amok. Further, it is nearly impossible to maintain an abundant, well-structured sport fishery in a midwestern reservoir without relatively fertile water. Our recommendations to maintain or even improve the fishery in Sherwood Lake center on enhancing fish-attracting habitat, attempting to control the crappie population via harvest and introducing hybrid-striped bass, continued stocking of walleye, removing common carp, and annual monitoring of the fishery: • • • • • • •

Largemouth bass can be harvested as you see fit, but there is no “need” to harvest bass. Harvest crappie liberally to help prevent density-dependent growth suppression. Stock hybrid striped bass to suppress crappie recruitment in the future and diversify the sportfish community. Continue annual stocking of walleye. Construct and deploy habitat reefs to concentrate sportfish and increase angler catch rates. Remove as many common carp as possible. Conduct an annual electrofishing assessment each year to monitor fishery trends.

Thank you for choosing Midwest Lake Management as your aquatic consultants. We are always available to discuss these recommendations or answer any other questions you might have. Sincerely, Jeff Slipke, Ph.D. AFS Certified Fisheries Professional 2

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Lake Sherwood Fishery Report continued from page 7 Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Introduction

Among these concerns were a lack of submersed and emergent aquatic vegetation, a lack of water clarity due to a phytoplankton dominated vegetation community, excessive sedimentation, sub-standard fishing quality, and the presence of nuisance fish species. Our report will address these issues as they are related to the fishery in Sherwood Lake. The goal of this management plan is to create and maintain a balanced fish community with quality fishing for a variety of sportfish species. The following evaluation report and management plan details and explains our recommendations with the following goals in mind:

Managing recreational fisheries is of utmost important if quality fishing is desired. Managing fisheries involves setting realistic goals and working toward achievement of those goals. This process can be challenging because involved stakeholders may have different perceptions of the term “quality.” Further, dealing with an ecosystem with uncontrollable variables (weather, plants, fish species interactions, etc) can be challenging. Professional fisheries managers assist groups in defining realistic goals, and they use their education and experience in accounting for variables while making science-based recommendations. Fisheries management is a dynamic process. Adjustments are often necessary to not only create but to maintain a level of fishing that is desired. Sherwood Lake is a 242-acre lake located in Shawnee County, KS. The lake is relatively shallow (mean depth approx. 12 feet) and fertile, typical of most Kansas reservoirs. With the exception of rocky shoreline habitat and boat docks, the lake generally lacks fish-holding habitat. Aquatic vegetation had not started growing at the time of our survey, but we did observe the presence of dormant stands of emergent vegetation that appeared to be alligator weed or water willow. The exact stocking history of the lake is unknown. However, a variety of sportfish and forage species have been stocked over the past few decades. The stocking records we have reviewed from your white paper reports suggest that much of the stocking in the past has been somewhat haphazard and non-targeted. Midwest Lake Management visited Sherwood Lake, KS on April 12, 2021 to conduct a comprehensive fish community survey. A representative sample of the fish community was collected by electrofishing to accurately assess the relative abundance of each species and determine the present state of balance between the predator and prey species. Results from our sampling, plus consultation with Dr. Randy McAllister and other members of the fishing club, provide the basis for this management report. We have reviewed some of the white papers developed by your Lake Quality and Environmental Committee and a number of concerns were expressed regarding Sherwood Lake and its fishery.

8 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

Create conditions favorable for the consistent production of “quality size” and “trophy size” largemouth bass and other sportfish.

Generally maintain a high level of water quality as well as an aesthetically pleasing environment for aquatic recreation.

Provide Sherwood Lake anglers with data necessary to make informed management decisions and set realistic goals for the fishery.

This report is designed with the above interests in mind. Normally, we feel most comfortable with the recommendations listed at the end of this report. However, we encourage you to pursue whatever goals you may choose. In addition, although parts of this report may seem quite technical, we include this information only to clearly illustrate the present fish community structure. As biologists, we depend on the electrofishing survey to show us where management input is necessary. It is important to note that improved fishing quality will not be accomplished overnight. As you read through this plan, bear in mind that the specific activities we have recommended are not one-time inputs, but rather a collection of ongoing management activities that will establish and maintain long-term quality fishing. Proper lake management, like the management of any natural resource, is an ongoing process. Each management input is recommended individually; however, it should be noted that the management program suffers if all activities are not implemented. Feel free to contact us and further discuss management ideas you may have.

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Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Fisheries Terminology

Table 1. Length categories used to compute size distribution indices for dominant fish populations in Sherwood Lake. Species include largemouth bass (LMB), walleye (WAE), white crappie (WHC) and bluegill (BLG).

Fisheries biologists use two generic terms to describe a given fishery: population and community. The term fish “population” refers to the entire assemblage of an individual species living within a particular body of water. A fish “community” is referred to as the assemblage of all species living and interacting within a given body of water. Therefore, a fish community is comprised of two or more fish populations. Lakes and the animals they support are governed by a predator-prey relationship. The interactions of predator and prey are characterized by a concept we refer to as “balance.” By definition, suitable balance in a fish community is characterized by a healthy distribution of both predator and prey over a wide range of age and size classes. In order to assess the relative balance of a fish community, the species functioning as predators and the species functioning as prey must be defined. Predators are species which rely on other fish as their primary food source. Prey or forage species rely on sources other than fish for their food source. Classic balance in small impoundments is defined by several parameters, not the least of which involves a suitable ratio (by weight) of predator to prey. Further, the key to maintaining balance in a sport fish lake is a healthy size distribution of both predator and prey. If one sizeclass becomes overly abundant or lacking, a condition of imbalance results. By analyzing an electrofishing sample it is possible to determine the state of balance within a given fish community. Fisheries biologist utilize a suite of metrics and graphical representations to describe the dynamic interactions of a fish community. The size distribution of a fish species is typically described graphically with length-frequency histograms and numerically with size structure indices. Size structure indices used in this report will be computed as follows:

Category

LMB

WAE

WHC

BLG

Stock

> 8 in

> 10 in

> 5 in

> 3 in

Quality

> 12 in

> 15 in

> 8 in

> 6 in

Preferred

> 15 in

> 20 in

> 10 in

> 8 in

Memorable

> 20 in

> 25 in

> 12 in

> 10 in

Trophy

> 25 in

> 30 in

> 15 in

> 12 in

In fisheries science, the condition of individual fish is used as another indicator of the overall balance of the entire fish community. Relative weight (Wr) is an index used to categorize the condition of fish within a given population. Calculated Wr values greater than 100 indicate plump, robust fish. Wr values less than 100 suggest that individuals are in less than excellent condition, perhaps the result of some predator:prey imbalance. Wr values less than 85 would indicate malnourished fish; a sign of intense competition for forage. Finally, age and growth is analyzed by removing the otolith (ear stone) of the fish. Ages are estimated by sectioning the otolith and counting the number of rings (annuli) that represent the age similar to counting the rings on a tree (Figure 1). Age and growth data provides a variety of prescient information for the management of fish populations. However, due to the time and expense required to remove otoliths and age them under a microscope, age and growth studies are not often used in most fisheries surveys.

PSD = (Number >Quality/Num>Stock)*100 RSD-P= (Number>Preferred/Num>Stock)*100 Figure 1. Representative photo of an otolith from a 9 year old largemouth bass.

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Lake Sherwood Fishery Report continued from page 9 Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Fishery Community Assessment

Table 2. Species observed and/or collected during the fish survey at Sherwood Lake, Spring 2021. Catch per Unit Effort (CPUE) is the number collected per hour of active electrofishing. Species with and asterisk were observed but not collected.

The fishery in Sherwood Lake was sampled with standard boat-mounted electrofishing equipment. We conducted our sampling throughout the lake attempting to sample all representative habitat types. Our sampling occurred commenced in the middle of the afternoon and continued until approximately sunset. Our goal was to identify all species present in the lake and to collect as robust a sample as possible for largemouth and important species. All fish collected were released back into the lake. Our sampling resulted in the collection of 13 different species (Table 2). We did observed, but did not collect common carp and grass carp. We also did not observe and hybrid striped bass, despite this species have been stocked in the past, but only as recently as 2013. We use Catch Per Unit Effort (number of fish collected per hour) as a surrogate for population density. However, because some species are more vulnerable than other species to electrofishing gear, we caution you against making direct abundance comparisons among species. Additionally, CPUE can vary both seasonally and diurnally for a given species. For example, gizzard shad are undoubtedly the most abundant species in Sherwood Lake, but they did not account for the highest CPUE because gizzard shad are more of a pelagic (offshore, open water) species. Crappie are also relatively pelagic most of the year. However, they become more littoral (near shore) during the spring. Walleye tend to utilize littoral, shallow habitat as well as deeper offshore locations depending upon time of day and season. Despite the inherent biases associated with using CPUE as a surrogate for population density, we as biologists still find such data very telling and informative. CPUE and other population metrics will be used in the following pages to help describe the fish community dynamics in Sherwood Lake. We will focus our discussion on the primary species of management interest in Sherwood Lake, largemouth bass, walleye, crappie, bluegill, and gizzard shad. Other species may be of great interest to Sherwood Lake anglers, and understandably so, but from a fisheries management perspective, the five species listed above are the major players in the lake.

10 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

Species

CPUE (N/hr)

Largemouth Bass

30

Smallmouth Bass

<1

Walleye

43

Bluegill

144

White Crappie

59

Freshwater Drum

25

Gizzard shad

39

Channel Catfish

7

Flathead Catfish

3

Redear Sunfish

4

Green Sunfish

13

Common carp

*

Grass carp

*

A rare but impressive smallmouth bass from Sherwood Lake.

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Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Largemouth Bass Largemouth bass ranging in length from 7 to 22 inches were collected in moderate abundance (Figure 2). The bass population was represented by a broad size distribution and not dominated by any particular size group. Given the fact that bass harvest is relatively light in Sherwood Lake, the broad distribution indicates relatively low, but stable annual recruitment. From a management perspective, you could not ask for a better situation because low, stable annual recruitment alleviates density-dependent growth suppression and discourages the development of growth-bottlenecks. The result is a population of chunky, healthy, fastgrowing fish. The PSD of the bass population was 83, the RSD-P value was 62 and the RSD-M value was 20. These values collectively describe a population with an impressive size structure and a low annual recruitment. Most of the adult bass in your lake are 15 inches and longer. Furthermore, 35% of the bass we collected measure 18 inches and larger. The average relative weight (Wr) of adult bass collected from Sherwood Lake was 103 (Figure 3), which is actually quite impressive for a lake that has not been actively managed. Even so, there was a great deal of variability around this average. Most of the bass were plump and well-fed while others

were relatively skinny. The skinnier bass are likely individuals that have been out-competed and thus their growth has been stalled. These shinny bass are likely older individuals compared to those that are the same length but much plumper. But again, the majority of the population was comprised of fish that had a Wr at or above 100. In fact, 29% of the adult bass had a Wr of 110 or higher, the fattest bass having a Wr = 128. Impressive! The heaviest bass we collected measured 22 inches long, weighed 7.0 pounds and had a relative weight of 109.

A couple of the many beautiful, healthy, fat largemouth bass we collected from Sherwood Lake, April 2021.

Sherwood Lake Largemouth Bass Relative Weights - 2021

12

130

10

120

Relative Weight

Percent

Sherwood Lake Largemouth Bass Population - 2021

8 6 4 2

0

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Length (inches)

Figure 2. Length distribution of largemouth bass collected from Sherwood Lake in April 2021.

110 100

90 80

70 60

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

Length (inches) Figure 3. Relative weights (W r) of adult largemouth bass collected from Sherwood Lake in April 2021.

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Lake Sherwood Fishery Report continued from page 11 Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Walleye Our sample of walleye contained fish ranging in length from 6 to 24 inches (Figure 4). The size distribution of the walleye population was relatively broad, but not nearly as evenly distributed as was the largemouth bass population. On the contrary, the size distribution of the walleye population was multi-modal, with the distinct modes likely representing one, or perhaps two, distinct cohorts. The 6-8 inch walleye are almost certainly from the most recent stocking event. The next mode, those measuring 10-14 inches could be from a single cohort of fish stocked at the same time, or it could be comprised of fish stocked on two separate occasions. The 17-21 inch length-group of walleye are likely represented by fish from two or more cohorts. As fish become older and larger, disproportional growth makes identifying distinct year-classes from a length-frequency histogram much more difficult. Regardless of the age of the walleyes we collected, the size distribution was favorable from an angling perspective. The PSD of the bass population was 59 and the RSD-P value was 38. Anglers should have amply opportunity to catch nice-sized adult walleye, those 18 inches and larger, with reassurance that there are other cohorts of fish

behind them that will eventually grow into a size more preferrable to anglers. The average relative weight (Wr) of adult walleye collected from Sherwood Lake was 97 (Figure 5). Similar to what we observed with the largemouth bass, there was a good bit of variability around this average. Some of the walleye were quite plump and well-fed while others were relatively skinny. The heaviest walleye we collected measured 24 inches long, weighed 6.4 pounds and had a relative weight of 121.

An absolutely gorgeous walleye collected from Sherwood Lake, April 2021. This beauty might make it to 10lbs.

18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

Sherwood Lake Walleye Relative Weights - 2021 130

Relative Weight

Percent

Sherwood Lake Walleye Population - 2021

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Length (inches)

Figure 4. Length distribution of walleye collected from Sherwood Lake in April 2021.

12 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

120 110

100 90 80 70

60

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

Length (inches)

Figure 5. Relative weights (W r) of adult walleye collected from Sherwood Lake in April 2021.


Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Crappie Sherwood Lake Bluegill Population - 2021 60 50

Percent

Our sample of white crappie was indeed what we had been told to expect; a population dominated by fish all in the same size range (Figure 6). That is actually a common occurrence in most ponds and lakes as crappie populations typically exhibit inconsistent year-class production. Therefore, crappie fisheries can be good one year and bad the next depending upon the strength of a particular year-class. Occasionally, crappie populations can become dominated by a single year-class, as is evidently the case in Sherwood Lake. Nevertheless, crappie will serve as forage fish for the bass and other predators when they are small and vulnerable to predation, but as they grow, crappie will become direct competitors with bass and other predator species for the limited forage available in the lake. Crappie are best managed by maintaining a diverse predator community to help buffer the strength of strong year-class and by maintaining an abundance of forage to facilitate adequate growth.

Percent

30 20

10 0

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Length (inches)

Figure 7. Length distribution of bluegill collected from Sherwood Lake in Spring 2021.

portion of the forage fish community in the lake. Bluegill provide the backbone of the forage fish community in most lake where largemouth bass are the dominant predator species. Bluegill can reproduce multiple times per year and thus create the mainstay of the bass’ diet in recreational fishing ponds and lakes. Accordingly, a robust population of small to intermediate sized bluegill is one of the keys to growing big, fat bass and walleye in your lake.

Sherwood Lake Crappie Population - 2021 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

40

Gizzard Shad

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Despite the importance of bluegill as a forage fish species in most ponds and lakes, gizzard shad are an even more important species in large lakes like Sherwood. In our opinion, there is not better forage fish species than gizzard shad for growing big predator fish such as largemouth bass, walleye and hybrid striped bass. We collected gizzard shad between 6 and 13 inches during our survey (Figure 8). Given the size distribution of predators fish in your lake, every gizzard shad we observed was vulnerable to predation. And the observation of 6-inch shad indicates a successful spawn last year, which bodes quite well for predator growth this year. We caught gizzard shad at a rate of 39 fish/hr. However, considering the fact that gizzard shad are primarily pelagic, we are fairly certain that the gizzard shad population is much more robust than our catch rates indicate.

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Length (inches)

Figure 6. Length distribution of white crappie collected from Sherwood Lake in Spring 2021.

Bluegill Bluegill were collected at a rate of 144 fish/hr and ranged in length from 3 to 7 inches (Figure 7). The size distribution was sub-standard in terms of fishing quality, as we observed no bluegill longer than 7-inches. We suspect that panfish enthusiasts would prefer much larger bluegill. However, the upside was that the bluegill population was wellstructured in terms of providing a substantial

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Lake Sherwood Fishery Report continued from page 13 Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Sherwood Lake Gizzard Shad Population - 2021 60

Percent

50 40

30 20 10 0

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Length (inches)

Figure 8. Length distribution of gizzard shad collected from Sherwood Lake in Spring 2021.

Gizzard shad are a preferred food item for largemouth bass and other predators due to their slender body shape and lack of hard spines. Accordingly, predators can consume much longer shad than bluegill. That means more bang for the buck in terms of caloric content per meal. The key to managing a gizzard shad population is to ensure that lake fertility remains high enough to support strong year-class production of the shad. In clear lakes with little phytoplankton production, gizzard shad become less of a benefit and more of a nuisance fish. More on this later in the report.

the Sherwood Lake fishery in their own right by offering anglers the opportunity to catch impressively-sized sportfish. Common carp and grass carp were observed during our survey but not collected nor enumerated. Considering the size of carp, collecting them into the boat during an electrofishing survey creates a measure of chaos that hampers our efficiency at collecting other species. Although we did not enumerate the carp we observed, our best guess was that we saw approximately two to three dozen common carp and less than 10 grass carp. Frankly, we were expecting to see more than we did based on the information in the anecdotal evidence presented in the white papers we read. Although we strongly suggest removing carp to the extent possible, our observations on the water and our analysis of the data we collected lead us to believe that carp are not severely impacting the fishery in Sherwood Lake.

Other Fish Species In addition to the five primary species just discussed, we will briefly touch on some of the other species we observed, the most abundant of which was the freshwater drum. Drum were relatively abundant in our sample. Despite the fact that drum are omnivorous and do in fact consume fish in addition to invertebrates, we have no reason to believe that drum are negatively impacting the populations of preferred species in the lake. We collected channel catfish and flathead catfish, both of which are predaceous and thus competitors with bass and walleye, particularly flathead catfish which might be considered the most voracious freshwater fish species. In fact, one of the flathead catfish we shocked was in the process of consuming an 18-inch walleye. Although catfish are competing with your other predators, and actually consuming them, they do add diversity to

14 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

A couple big cats collected from Sherwood Lake.


Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Summary

will eventually perish due to old-age because they cannot reproduce. But unfortunately, common carp can reproduce and there is now way to eliminate common carp from you lake. There are ways to manage/reduce their density such as establish bowfishing tournaments or conducting large-scale netting operations. But these methods will require increased boat visitation which will increase the risk of introducing zebra mussels into your lake, and neither of these methods will rid the lake of common carp. We will no return to the positive aspects of the Sherwood lake fishery and how best to maintain or even improve upon them. The size structure and body condition of the bass and walleye is directly related to the production of forage fish in the lake, which is related to the productivity of the water. Sherwood Lake is eutrophic, meaning rich in nutrients, primarily nitrogen and phosphorus. Nutrient-rich lakes are productive lakes, meaning they grow lots of plant life. In the case of Sherwood Lake, most of the plant life is planktonic algae, which form the base of the food pyramid in aquatic ecosystems. In some ponds and lakes, the plant community is dominated by macrophytes, larger vascular plants such as Coontail, Pondweeds, Milfoils, etc. Although macrophytes create food and shelter for invertebrates and small fish, macrophyte-dominated plant communities are not as productive in terms of fish production as phytoplankton-dominated lakes. The reason being that plankton-dominated lakes produce much more gizzard shad and bluegill than macrophytedominated lakes. And that higher rate of forage production cascades up the food chain to support more and larger predator species. Gizzard shad in particular are a major component of the forage fish community in Sherwood Lake. Ideally, most lake owners would probably prefer that gizzard shad were not part of the forage community in their lake, because most lake owners prefer clear water and gizzard shad offer little benefit in clear, non-productive lake. But there is no turning back now. Gizzard shad are in your lake to stay. The common carp are in your lake to stay as well. Thus, reestablishing a macrophyte-dominated plant community will be tenuous at best, if not downright futile. That is just the nature of reservoirs as they age. They become

We were pleasantly surprised by what we observed during our electrofishing survey. It is our opinion that the fishery in Sherwood Lake is in excellent shape, particularly with regard to the largemouth bass and walleye population. Both species were abundant, but not over-abundant. Abundant enough to provide adequate angler catch rates without developing density-dependent growth suppression. The majority of the walleye exhibited average to above average body condition, whereas most of the bass we collect had excellent body condition. High relative weight metrics indicate that forage is not lacking and competition for forage is minimal. This bodes well for the near-term because plump fish are healthier, fight harder and have sufficient energy reserves for future growth. In addition to the bass and walleye, we observed a few large, healthy channel and flathead catfish. Your lake supports a very nice mix of predator species so that anglers should find appealing. The were a couple negative aspects regarding the fish community that are worth mentioning. First, the white crappie population was dominated by what appears to be a single, strong year-class. This has created a situation where too many fish of similar size are competing for the same food and habitat resources. The result is density-dependent growth suppression. Crappie populations are notorious for inconsistent recruitment patterns, where year-class production can be weak or even absent over consecutive years then followed by an average or unusually strong year-class, the latter of which appears to have happened in Sherwood Lake. When such a situation happens, the best course of action is to attempt to reduce the density of that cohort via harvest. And hope for a more moderate year-class production in the future. The other negative was the presence of common carp, and to a lesser extent grass carp. Common carp pose numerous problems such as increasing turbidity, resuspending nutrients, disrupting fish nests, competing with other more desirable species by consuming invertebrates. Common carp also inhibiting the establishment of aquatic vegetation as do grass carp. The grass carp

continued on page 16 10

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 15


Lake Sherwood Fishery Report continued from page 15 Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

shallower due to siltation and more fertile due to increased nutrient loading. This aging process known as ecological succession. The aging process can be slowed or even reversed, but at a tremendous cost. Even if the Sherwood Lake community were able to successfully eradicate the common carp and grass carp, and reestablish macrophytes, you could potentially trade one problem for another. Sherwood Lake has large expanses of water that is less than 10 feet deep and therefore highly susceptible to infestation of submersed aquatic vegetation (SAV) if the carp were remove and macrophytes were to gain a foothold. In our experience, lake owners generally despise SAV infesting their particular lakefront access or inhibiting their boating and swimming activities. We suspect such a situation might have been the impetus for stocking grass carp in the past. An alternative to reversing the aging process of your lake is to accept, even embrace the beneficial aspects of the succession process. The nutrient-rich water has resulted in a fertile fishery. We have worked on thousands of ponds and lakes over the years and the Sherwood Lake fishery in its current

state ranks as one of the best we have ever seen. In addition, the lack of SAV allows unimpeded boating access to virtually all parts of the lake. Of course there is a downside to reservoir success and cultural eutrophication. The water is generally more turbid and the lake is subject to episodic algae blooms that can be unsightly. Further, if algal blooms are comprised primarily of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), the potential exists for toxins to periodically inhibit swimming activity and other uses of the lake. In most eutrophic Midwestern reservoirs, harmful algae blooms are relegated to the peak summer season when water temperatures are elevated and water stagnates. We do not have enough history and institutional knowledge with Sherwood Lake to know the frequency and severity of such seasonal algae blooms. The remainder of this report will list a few management activities that will maintain or even improve the fishery in Sherwood Lake. As you read through our recommendations, please keep in mind that they are formulated from the viewpoint of a fishery management perspective.

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Sherwood Lake Management Report - 2021

Recommendations Our recommendations for the management of the Sherwood Lake fishery are outlined below. Although these recommendations are list individually, they should be viewed as parts of a comprehensive, integrated plan. The greatest benefit to the fishery will be realize by full implementation of the plan, rather than a piecemeal effort.

The staff at Midwest Lake Management is grateful for the opportunity to be part of the Sherwood Lake improvement effort. We love what we do for a living; providing lake owners with sound, professional advice and comprehensive management services We will be glad to handle the implementation of any or all of our recommendations, or to assist you should you prefer to implement the activities yourself.

Implement harvest regulations for largemouth bass and walleye as you see fit. There is no “need” to harvest bass or walleye because neither population has developed a growth bottleneck. Therefore, catch and release fishing will maintain adequate density and sustain angler catch rates. If anglers prefer to harvest some of the bass and/or walleye they catch, then we recommend doing so in moderation by limiting annual harvest to 10 pounds per acre, per year. We also recommend directing your harvest on fish of moderate length and releasing the large individuals to maintain a superior size structure.

Harvest white crappie liberally. A growth bottleneck has developed here with the majority of the population dominated by a single cohort.

Continue with regular stocking of walleye. What you have been doing in the past has been working.

Consider stocking hybrid striped bass to help control excessive crappie recruitment in the future. Research has shown that hybrid stripers can be effect consumers of small to intermediate sized crappie. In addition, hybrid stripers will add some more diversity to the fishery. The gizzard shad population in your lake appears adequate to support the addition of hybrid stripers. We recommend stocking at a rate of 10-15 fish per acre.

Cease stocking fathead minnows, threadfin shad or any other forage fish. Save that money and direct it elsewhere.

Consider adding habitat reefs to enhance the fishing experience by making the fish easier to locate. You can use natural habitat such as cedar trees, etc., of one of the artificial products on the market. The keys is to build reefs that are large in size, larger than you realize. The idea is to attract a lot of fish. Just like the famous line in The Field Of Dreams, “If you build it they will come.” We would be glad to assist you with a habitat enhancement project if you decide to pursue such an activity.

Conduct a follow-up electrofishing evaluation each year. This will allow us to track the progress of the fishery and make adjustments if necessary. The fishery is currently in great shape and appears to poised for a good year upcoming. We wish we could say that the lake will keep running on autopilot, but fisheries are dynamic and a lot can change from year to year. The production of a huge year-class of crappies, is one such example.

Call upon us anytime with questions or concerns. We love to see photos of nice fish. We’d appreciate the opportunity to keep your business and help monitor the status of your lake. April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 17


Lake Sherwood Fishery Management Plan Background n early 2021 the membership was surveyed regarding general expectations and specific recent angling experience. In April 2021 a formal electroshocking sampling of the fishery was also conducted. Both of these studies were designed to provide baseline information for the Club to ascertain the current state of the fishery and to develop a plan for its improvement. General concern had been raised by the members who fish that the quality of the fishery had declined. It had been years since a formal sampling had occurred. Since the last survey, management efforts were based on perceptions of need rather than data. This plan melds together the angling survey with the electrofishing data to create an adaptive management plan for improvement. The key phrase is “adaptive management,” as implementation recommendations will change over time in response to additional data gathered to monitor progress.

I

Expectations During the angling survey, which was distributed to the entire membership, baseline data regarding general expectations of the recreational experiences (including angling) for Lake Sherwood were also collected. Approximately 50% of respondents rated “clear water” as the first item on their lists of expectations. Roughly equal numbers of respondents rated “excellent water sports” and “aesthetic value” as their first choices. Approximately 33% rated “quality fishing” as their first choice. Lake Sherwood is an algae-dominated lake and has become increasingly so over the last 20 years. This trend was accelerated by herbicide treatment to reduce Chara (a form of algae) in the late 1990s and early 2000s and by the introduction of grass carp. Common carp have also contributed to the shift as beneficial aquatic vegetation was consumed. Both of these processes accelerated the natural aging of the lake. Though not the subject of this plan, it is becoming increasingly clear that a reversal to a macrophytedominated ecosystem may be an unreal expectation due to the lack of sufficient club resources, available expertise, and the competing expectations for “excellent water sports,” “clear water” and “quality fishing.” The upper third of the lake is in the littoral zone, which means that the restoration of beneficial aquatic vegetation would potentially create navigational and water sports impediments in that area due to that vegetation. This was alluded to in the Aquatic Vegetation Management and Protection Plan (2001). Further, a reduction in phytoplankton (which creates the greenish cast of the water) will result in fewer prey species such as gizzard shad and bluegill being available to predator species such as largemouth bass and walleye. This would diminish the quality of the fishery. The

18 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

majority of any remaining beneficial aquatic vegetation is in the form of Alligator weed. Alligator weed lines the shoreline in places and provides cover for juvenile fish as well as ambush predators such as largemouth bass. Some members pull this vegetation from in front of their properties. This practice should be discouraged. Angling Expectations and Practices The Anglers’ Survey noted that 36% of the respondents wanted to catch fewer but larger fish, while 25% wanted to catch a lot of fish regardless of size. Further, an important driver of any management plan is the harvesting of fish from the fishery as well as hooking and handling mortality. Of the overall respondents (including those who do not fish), 43% of the respondents practice catch and release; 28% catch and keep some fish; and 2% catch and keep all the fish they catch. Even accounting for hooking and handling mortality, the percentage of fish removed from the fishery is low. The results indicate that a significant number of anglers want to catch larger fish – perhaps even trophy fish. A smaller but significant percentage wants to catch larger numbers of fish regardless of size. Harvesting of fish is a minor part of the experience for most anglers. There is some disparity between targeted species and caught species. The anglers responded that the following species were preferred targets: Crappie....................................................................... 56.5% Largemouth bass........................................................ 46.1% Walleye....................................................................... 41.7% Channel catfish.............................................................. 27% In addition, 12.2% targeted wipers. The last stocking of wipers occurred in 2013. There is no reproduction in Lake Sherwood of wipers. The same anglers reported that the following species were caught: Crappie.......................................................................... 60% Channel catfish.............................................................. 45% Bluegill........................................................................ 42.6% Largemouth bass........................................................ 37.4% Of note, walleye were caught by 27% of the anglers and wipers by 7%. Clearly, crappie are the most sought-after fish in the fishery. The electroshocking study noted little size variation in the crappie captured – the majority were 9 inches in length. These are an inch or two shorter than the desirable size for harvesting. The study report indicated that increased harvesting and removal from the population through predation by walleye and wipers would increase the size of the crappie over time. There are also variable success rates in the annual spawn that show waxing and waning


cohort recruitment of crappie. Largemouth bass are highly targeted but with less success than would be expected. The electroshocking survey demonstrated an impressive and healthy largemouth bass population. As a bonus a small population of very healthy smallmouth bass also exists (a single individual was electroshocked but was an impressive specimen with anecdotal reports of others being caught by anglers). Walleye are targeted with some success but not to the degree expected when the data from the electroshocking survey is examined. Channel catfish are well established in the lake and are targeted and caught frequently. These require no management presently. Of note is the number of anglers targeting wipers, particularly since none have been stocked since 2013. Recommendations As noted in the Midwest report, the fishery is impressive especially considering the lack of formal management based on sampling over the recent past. The seemingly divergent goals of catching fewer but larger fish and more fish of any size can be balanced. The reduction in the population of relatively stunted crappie is possible as well. CRAPPIE MANAGEMENT The abundance of 9” crappie is attributed to a strong cohort, which is suppressing the average size of the population. Thinning out the population will allow for growth of the remaining individuals. Walleye and, at one

point, wipers were introduced to prey on the crappie population. Anglers play an important role in harvesting crappie but will need to do so in larger numbers than is currently the practice to have much impact. A 9” specimen averages 0.36 lbs. A 10” specimen averages 0.52 lbs. Our goal should be the growth in the average size of the crappie to 10 inches or larger. To achieve this goal over time will require: • Increased harvest of crappie with no bag limit for the foreseeable future • Continued stocking of walleye • Resuming stocking of wipers. LARGEMOUTH BASS MANAGEMENT The largemouth bass population is healthy and relatively diverse in age/size distribution. While there is no need to harvest any, in order to allow for meeting the competing goals of larger fish caught and more fish caught with some kept, the recommendations are: • Establishing a slot limit allowing the harvest of bass from 15-18 inches (on average, 1.83-3.25 lbs) • Daily bag limit of 2 largemouth bass and a possession limit of 0. This is on the honor system and recognizes the value of the resource to the overall continued on page 20

SHERWOOD LAKE CLUB FISHING REGULATIONS The following creel, possession, and slot limits shall apply to all fishing on Lake Sherwood. SPECIES Crappie Largemouth Bass

DAILY CREEL LIMITS No Limit 2

POSSESSION LIMITS No Limit 2

Smallmouth Bass Walleye

None 3

None 6

Wiper Flathead Catfish Channel Catfish Bluegill Other

None No Limit No Limit 20 No Limit

None No Limit No Limit 20 No Limit

HARVEST SIZE LIMITS N/A 15 - 18 inches/over or under must be released N/A 18-21 inches/over or under must be released N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Individuals who violate these limits shall be suspended from all Lake Club Privlidges for one (1) year from the date of violation, in addition to "Penalties" as may be determined under the Sherwood Lake Club Rules and Regulations which may be amended or updated from time to time. NO WARNING WILL BE ISSUED!

Adopted 05/2021

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 19


Lake Sherwood Fishery Management Plan continued from page 19 health of the fishery while allowing some harvest • All individuals less than 15 inches or greater than 18 inches in length must be quickly returned to the water to limit handling mortality. SMALLMOUTH BASS MANAGEMENT The smallmouth bass population is anecdotally reported to be small but these are valuable additions – and unexpected – to the fishery population. In order to preserve these, the recommendations are: • NO smallmouth bass may be harvested • All individuals must be quickly returned to the water to limit handing mortality. WALLEYE MANAGEMENT Walleye are managed through annual stocking. A very limited number of walleye are produced naturally in the lake but the number is insufficient to maintain the population. These are valuable tools in the management of the crappie population, fine game fish, and excellent table fare. The population should be managed with the following recommendations: • Establishing a slot limit allowing the harvest of walleye from 18-21 inches (on average, 2.24-3.65 lbs) • Daily bag limit of 3 walleye and a possession limit of 6. This is on the honor system and recognizes the value of the resource to the overall health of the fishery while allowing some harvest of a tasty game fish • All individuals less than 18 inches or greater than 21 inches in length must be quickly returned to the water to limit handling mortality • Continued stocking of walleye to supplement the existing population. WIPER MANAGEMENT Wipers are excellent game fish and an integral part of managing the abundance of crappie. Most people consider these to be only fair table fare. No reproduction occurs as these are sterile hybrids between white bass and striped bass. Management recommendations follow: • Resume stocking of wipers at a rate of 10-15 individuals per acre (2400-3600 fish total) • NO wipers may be harvested • All individuals must be quickly returned to the water to limit handing mortality. Additional Recommendations Further recommendations include: • NO additional prey species should be stocked. That includes fathead minnows, threadfin shad, or other forge fish. To this the LQEC recommends no crayfish be stocked as well.

20 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

Thank You to the Fish Study Contributors Chris Bagshaw Larry Leinwetter Mark Bigler Jeffrey Moser Kurt Bossert Gary Muza Nelson Dean Kerry O’Neal Stacy Florence Ed Parr Randy Forbes Matt Pivarnik Donald Grause Mike Rothfuss Diane Green Bryon Schlosser Melvin Guffey George Schuler Bryan Hall Vernon Seigel Ron Hein Sam Wempe Christopher Jones • Research by the LQEC with the assistance of Midwest Lake Management on the feasibility and deployment of artificial reef structures. • Annual electrofishing surveys to evaluate the progress in fishery management as well as guide further management strategies. To these recommendations, the LQEC would add: • Educational efforts to the membership regarding the removal of Alligator weed as the existing stands provide beneficial cover for juvenile fish and ambush points for predators. • Enhanced efforts to educate the membership regarding the additional nitrogen and phosphorus that lawn fertilizers contribute to the nutrient load of the lake and algal blooms in the late summer. • Continued research into the desirability, feasibility and cost associated with revegetation of the lake with beneficial aquatic vegetation. Clearly there are also additional issues to consider that are generated by competing desires of the membership identified during the recent anglers’ survey. • Deploying artificial reef structures to provide beneficial cover for juvenile as well as adult fish species as initial activity to address some of the lack of structure that beneficial aquatic vegetation normally would provide. • Continued educational efforts directed at the membership regarding Aquatic Invasive Species, in particular zebra mussels. • Engagement of the membership of Lake Vaquero through Board-level meetings to cooperate on the reduction of risk from Aquatic Invasive Species, in particular zebra mussels. • Removal of common carp and grass carp through gill netting in the fall of 2021 and in the future as dictated by ongoing surveys. • Follow-up angling web survey in the fall of 2021.


Spring Clean-Up

S

herwood Lake Club “Annual Spring Clean-up Day” took place on Saturday, April 17, with the help of several members who came ready to work with gloves and rake in hand. As clean-up day indicates, volunteer members picked up trash and debris that had accumulated over the winter months. As members arrived our lake manager, Jeff Handley, presented them a list of items that needed to be addressed so volunteers could select an area they would like to help in. The main emphasis was centered around the clubhouse, tennis court area, volleyball court and also at the beach. Trash was picked up, leaves raked, downed tree branches hauled off, roof gutters cleaned and repaired, as well as flower beds cleaned and remulched. This was all accomplished in just over two hours with the outstanding help from our membership. A special thanks to Carl Maichel for bringing his garden tractor with dump trailer and getting additional mulch as needed. Thanks to all those who helped!

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 21


July 4 News You Can Use

Sherwood Lake Club July 4th Calendar of Events Saturday, July 3rd 7:00 am

SLC Run – Register & run start from the beach. You must complete the entry form prior to start of race.

9:00 am

Fishing tournament – Bring your LIVE catch to the beach for weigh-in. No sign up required. Two categories for contestants – 15 and older; and under 15.

11:00 am

Volleyball tournament – team registration starts at 10:00 am for this double elimination tournament. All teams must have at least one SLC Member and at least two female team members on the court at all times.

1:30 pm

Horseshoe tournament – Registration will begin at 1:00 pm behind the clubhouse. Bring your lawn chairs.

5:00 pm

(Tentative) Food Trucks and Fun at the Beach from 5:00 to 8:00 – Don’t cook dinner! Come have dinner at the beach! Music, ice cream, and dancing too. Bring your own beverages, no glass containers. All members and their guests are welcome; children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. You may also pick up dinner at the beach and eat at home or on your boat.

Sunday, July 4th 11:30 am

Parade – Register your float at the clubhouse parking lot starting at 10:30 am. Balloons and flags available for participants. Decorated pets, bikes, walkers, etc. are all welcome. The parade will be led by the fire trucks, then pedestrians, pets, bikes and the finale will be the floats.

12:00 pm

Picnic at the beach – Free hot dogs, chips and drinks for members and guests only.

1:00 pm

Beach games – Sandcastle building, water balloon toss & noodle races.

3:00 pm

(Tentative) Canoe Races – Two person teams; registration table at the beach.

9:45 pm

Fireworks – on the dam.

Volunteers Needed Please consider volunteering for a lead or just for an hour or two. Click the button below, and we’ll contact you with more information. Thanks! • Parade – help to blow up and distribute balloons • Picnic at the Beach: • Cooks – start charcoal and cook over 1,000 hot dogs • Servers – set up serving area and process to distribute the dogs, chips, condiments, etc. • Drink dispensers – pour drinks for people to pick up.

22 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021

• Canoe race – Arrange to borrow canoes and paddles from members, develop bracket for races, run the canoe races on July 4. Each person can bring their own life jacket. • Food Trucks at the Beach Night (Saturday) – coordination Click here

to let us know of your interest!


An email with an order form to purchase July 4 T-shirts will be coming soon!

Parade Entry Form

Want to show off your patriotic pride? Fireworks Display Sponsorship Sherwood Lake Club is looking forward to another fabulous fireworks show on July 4. The cost of fireworks continues to increase, and once again we are asking for sponsors to underwrite our additional expenses. Sherwood Lake Club will have: • RED sponsors for a $50 donation. • WHITE sponsors for a $100 donation. • BLUE sponsors for a $250 donation.

Your name and sponsor level will be published on our website and sent out in an email blast after July 4. Corporate and individual donations greater than $250 will be given special recognition. Please make checks payable to Sherwood Lake Club Fireworks and place them in the Sherwood mailbox, contact Jo Hunt or Joe Anderson, or email office@ sherwoodlakeclub.org. They will be happy to pick them up or set up for electronic payment.

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 23


Sherwood Sailing Club and Calendar

H

ello sailors! Our first race was canceled due to weather, so the sailing season started May 23. We plan to have treats at the beach after our Sunday races (usually 2:30 to 5:30), and the Commodore Cup Regatta, like last year. We’re not sure yet about having our traditional indoor parties; namely, the Treasure Hunt and Dinner, the Commodores Cup Awards Dinner and the Christmas Party Awards, Gift Exchange and Dinner, but we will keep you posted.

A Zoom meeting was held Saturday, May 15, where members discussed the upcoming season, the races, social events and answer questions for any new members. If anyone is interested in learning about sailing or joining the Sailing Club, call the Commodores, Jim and Joy Phelps, at 785.422.2997. Dues are $20 per year.

In Memoriam: Bud Bromich Bud Bromich, our dear friend and fabulous neighbor, passed away April 30. Bud and Judy ran the committee boat for the sailing club races for many, many years, and they also were active in the Sherwood Tennis Club. The couple also loved to travel.

24 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021


Buy/Sell/Trade 1

14-foot Dolphin sailboat. $750. Contact Janell and Don Grause at 785.554.3333 or email jmgrause@cox.net. (image 1) 2015 Sun Tracker Party Barge 22 DLX. 90hp Mercury. Bought new and only one owner. All service performed by Lakeside Marine and has only left Lake Sherwood for indoor storage during winter. $15,000. Call Jim at 785.380.1119. Airhead three-person tube nearly new + tow rope. More than $200 new. Will sell for $90. Also several older life jackets, M-XL, $5 each. Call Randal at 785.220.4112. (image 2) Looking for A-member with an unused dock or boat slip for the summer. Willing to pay the A-member/owner and would not park or loiter at the property. Reach Kent at 785.806.4539.

2

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 25


Annual Stockholder Meeting Minutes SHERWOOD LAKE CLUB, INC. MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL STOCKHOLDERS’ MEETING January 26, 2021 The Annual Stockholders’ Meeting of the Sherwood Lake Club, Inc. was held on Tuesday, January 26, 2021, at the Sherwood Clubhouse, 6910 SW Fountaindale Road, Topeka, Kansas and also held via zoom.com due to Covid-19 limitations on gatherings with more than 10 people in the county of Shawnee, Kansas. I.

Welcome Larre Betsworth welcomed members to the Annual Meeting and brought the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. with the following Directors present: Larre Betsworth, Annette Beck, Tracy Lynch, Stan Oyler, Mike Rothfuss, Brett Meggison and Mark Wittenburg.

II.

Minutes of the 2020 Annual Stockholders’ Meeting A motion was made by Annette Beck and seconded by Tracy Lynch to approve the minutes as presented for the Annual Stockholders’ Meeting held on January 28, 2020. The minutes were published on the Lake Club website on February 15, 2020 and published in the January/February/March 2020 Sherwood Scene emailed to members on April 23, 2020. Motion carried.

III.

Election of Directors Larre Betsworth conducted the election. Ballots were collected by Club Secretary Joe Anderson. He had a committee that included members Brad Hermann, George Hopper, and Curtis Shafer to count the ballots upon receipt of ballots was confirmed at 6:30 pm on Tuesday, January 26, 2021. The Nominating Committee nominated Aline Barrett, Kevin Beck, and Kerry O’Neal to serve three-year terms from 2021-2023. After the ballot count, the three candidates with the most votes: Aline Barrett, Kevin Beck, and Kerry O’Neal. Thank you to Mark Wittenburg, Brett Meggison and Stan Oyler for serving on the Board.

IV.

President’s Report Larre Betsworth presented the report. Bartlett & West update regarding sewer redesign project that will impact two coves (Aylesbury-Chelmsford, Aylesbury-Dancaster). An additional report will come from B&W in the coming months and a presentation. The Board will continue to update the membership on the development of this project that will begin later on in 2021, most likely after the boating season concludes in November 2021. Updates will come in the form of email blasts, information in the Sherwood Scene, and at regular monthly board meetings. Dam update – been through 3 different state representatives in the last 12 months. It is the plan for Larre and Stan Oyler go down and visit with the state representative assigned to our account to determine where our money is at and when we can expect to see a deposit for the grant funding that we received. Further updates will come at future meetings held by the Board of Directors. Mark made a comment that the sewer work will be done at a no-cost expectation of the membership. Q: Is there a time constraint on the completion of the dam project? A: We are currently unable to start the project until money is given to the organization. If we use any of our money prior to receiving money from FEMA, then we will most likely lose the ability to receive the grant money from FEMA. That is why we are waiting to begin work on this project until we receive the money from FEMA.

V.

Manager’s Report Jeff Handley reported that there have been quite a few changes over the past year. Thanks to Steve Brewster for the work he did and the service he gave to the club over his 10 years. We had

26 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021


a total of 53 new members, 70 new boats – MORE MEMBERS, MORE BOATS, PANDEMIC = Busiest year on the lake in a long time. The lake was a very fun place to be. Hope for more of the same in 2021. Learn from our mistakes, we had a boat capsize on July 3, but it was out of the water by 7:00 that evening. Big thanks to the following families: Shafer, Lynch, Russell among many others. Once again, learn from our mistakes and know that things happen that are beyond our control. In October, 2020, there were some upgrades to the marina electrical system that was done by D&L Smith. All electrical outlets were replaced with water repellent covers, lines were grounded, weal line replaced, breaker was replaced and lighting over the gate area was repaired. They also provided a do’s and don’t of renting marina slips, as well as general care around the lake for all houses. This will be distributed out to members in the spring of 2021. Sold the crane boat for $12k during the year and the white patrol boat is currently up for sale. It has a good motor and trailer; if you are interested, please reach out to Jeff. Dredge is also currently listed for sale and we have had several people look at it. Jeff then gave a Zebra mussel update. After discussions w/ Jeff Metzler at Lakeside Marine who has worked on the lake since the ‘70’s, he indicated that he has seen no signs of Zebra Mussels in our lake and/or on any watercraft that has been in our lake. This is good news. We are currently one of the few lakes in NE Kansas that can make that claim. Keep up the good work and continue to be observant of other boats and follow the rules and procedures we have in place. This will continue to protect our lake from Zebra Mussels. No guest boats, inspections at the beach, red tags: all of these measures help protect the lake. Currently there are upgrades being done on the beach gate system at the beach. We are in the process of updating technology that will benefit the members for years to come. There are also plans to update the security cameras at the beach and the clubhouse in the next few months. Water Quality Committee commendation of the work that they have done over the past year. Waddles were installed on 12/19/20 to help prevent sand and other components from entering the lake after the winter months pass. There will be communication sent out to members who appear to have watercrafts on their property that do not have a lake sticker on it. In the fall of 2020, lake patrol staff counted 139 watercrafts that didn’t have necessary stickers. 121 of these are personal watercraft vessels and the remaining 18 were ski, pontoon or fishing boats. VI.

Financial Reports Mike Rothfuss presented the Sherwood Lake Club financial report for Fiscal Year End 2020. is 28 continued onSLC page in a much-improved financial condition and strength than previous years. We were able to pay off the line of credit loan during 2020. This is the first time in over 5 years that SLC has no long term debt. Balance Sheet – Highlights -Cash Balance increased by $56,830. Balance at December 31, 2020 was $78,943 as compared to $20,684 previous year end. -Fixed Assets decreased $12,000 this past year mainly due to the sale of our crane work barge for $12,000 that was used in dredge projects in previous years. -The Line of Credit decreased from $80,042 at December 31, 2019 to $0 at December 31, 2020 largely due to the membership drive that was held in the months of April-June, 2020. Only dredging expense for 2020 was for repairs of the dredge that were around $20,000. Income Statement – Highlights -Our overall Revenue for the year [excluding the Insurance Assessment] increased from $276,361 for 2019 to $334,923 in 2020 mainly due to the membership drive in the Spring of 2020. -The bottom-line Net Revenue for the Fiscal Year End was $98,359. This surpassed the net loss of 2019, which was $43,000. Budget for 2021 -Similar to Budget of 2020 with Projected Revenue at $319,550 with a Net Revenue of $23,000.

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 27


and the clubhouse in the next few months. Water Quality Committee commendation of the work that they have done over the past year. Waddles were installed on 12/19/20 to help prevent sand and other components from entering the lake after the winter months pass. There will be communication sent out to members who appear to have watercrafts on their property that do not have a lake sticker on it. In the fall of 2020, lake patrol staff counted 139 watercrafts that didn’t have necessary stickers. 121 of these are personal watercraft vessels and the27 remaining 18 were ski, pontoon or fishing boats. continued from page

Annual Stockholder Meeting Minutes VI.

Financial Reports Mike Rothfuss presented the Sherwood Lake Club financial report for Fiscal Year End 2020. SLC is in a much-improved financial condition and strength than previous years. We were able to pay off the line of credit loan during 2020. This is the first time in over 5 years that SLC has no long term debt. Balance Sheet – Highlights -Cash Balance increased by $56,830. Balance at December 31, 2020 was $78,943 as compared to $20,684 previous year end. -Fixed Assets decreased $12,000 this past year mainly due to the sale of our crane work barge for $12,000 that was used in dredge projects in previous years. -The Line of Credit decreased from $80,042 at December 31, 2019 to $0 at December 31, 2020 largely due to the membership drive that was held in the months of April-June, 2020. Only dredging expense for 2020 was for repairs of the dredge that were around $20,000. Income Statement – Highlights -Our overall Revenue for the year [excluding the Insurance Assessment] increased from $276,361 for 2019 to $334,923 in 2020 mainly due to the membership drive in the Spring of 2020. -The bottom-line Net Revenue for the Fiscal Year End was $98,359. This surpassed the net loss of 2019, which was $43,000. Budget for 2021 -Similar to Budget of 2020 with Projected Revenue at $319,550 with a Net Revenue of $23,000. This concludes my report. Annette Beck made a motion to approve the 2020 Treasurer’s Report and the 2021 budget as presented. Stan Oyler seconded. Motion carried.

VII.

Director’s Reports Dam/Lake Environment/Fireworks. Larre Betsworth gave the presentation. Fireworks fundraising will begin in the next couple of months. If you are interested in helping with the fundraising, please contact Larre.

Lake Environment update. Randy McAllister, head of the LQEC committee gave the presentation. Re-branding of the dredging committee to focus more on the health of the lake and all facets of the quality of our lake. The committee developed white papers during the last 18 months around the following areas that will be focused on by their committee: • Sediment Management Plan • Fisheries and Ecosystem Management Plan • Aquatic Vegetation Management and Protection Plan (updated version) • Lake Sherwood Recovery and Restoration Plan They also developed an Action Timeline and Budget that covers the next 4 years of operations for their committee. They have started having dialogue and started forming a partnership with Sherwood Improvement District and Mission Township. One phase of their project has already been completed. This was related to the deployment of wattles around the lake community to trap sand and other particles from entering the lake environment later on this spring. Additionally, members of their committee have begun doing research on the following areas: • Bathymetric Study • Funding for future dredging • Redefined Monitoring Process for water quality in and around Lake Sherwood • Revegetation of the Lake Environment • Managing excess nutrient loading o Lawn Fertilizer  Ensure that appropriate chemicals are being used around the lake 28 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021 waterfront o Waterfowl Feces (Geese)


Additionally, members of their committee have begun doing research on the following areas: • Bathymetric Study • Funding for future dredging • Redefined Monitoring Process for water quality in and around Lake Sherwood • Revegetation of the Lake Environment • Managing excess nutrient loading o Lawn Fertilizer  Ensure that appropriate chemicals are being used around the lake waterfront o Waterfowl Feces (Geese)  Removing these birds from the area throughout the year in a professional manner The committee is also concerned and focused on providing education to members throughout the year in a variety of topics that include the following areas: • Sedimentation management • Aquatic invasive species Please look for communication sent out to members via the Sherwood Scene and/or email blasts that relate to this work. Finally, the committee identified several keys to success for the lake environment to continue: • Fiduciary responsibility • Science based interventions/ data driven • Benchmark progress • Integrated Ecosystem Management • Adaptive Management • Institutional Memory • Preserve and Expand Partnership with SID/MTWP This is not a quick fix, but if we take the necessary steps carefully and continue with membership education, we can succeed and have continued success for years to come. Safety/ Security. Scott Hunsicker was not available to give a presentation during the meeting. Any information beneficial to the membership will be shared in the next Sherwood Scene. Legal/Rules/Bylaws/Insurance. Stan Oyler gave the presentation. Gave review of duties of the Club Secretary – meetings can be held electronically; verbiage updated in several other areas including non-cumulative voting rights. Dues structure updated and approved by the membership. Insurance issues in the past, issue was addressed and resolved in the prior year by going with a different carrier and renewal went off with no issues of renewal during 2020. Social/Membership/ Scene. Annette Beck gave the presentation. Regarding the Sherwood Scene, we are very blessed to have Jeff and Gayla Peterson as members. Their publishing company, Peterson Publications, has taken on the task to publish and host the Sherwood Scene content that we distribute to our members 5 times a year. We are very pleased to have such a great way to communicate and share information and images with our members. Please join me in thanking them when you have a chance. Regarding content for the Scene, we would like input from our members. Please send high quality pictures, articles, other information to share to us for inclusion in our publications. This information can be sent to either abecksonsulting@gmail.com and/or office@sherwoodlakeclub.org. Look for 2021’s first Sherwood Scene in mid-February. As you are aware, we held a membership campaign in the Spring of 2020. Research, brainstorming, modeling, trending, listening, and collaborating led a sub-committee of the board to a B Membership Drive that resulted in 133 B members. The club had reduced down to 81 B members prior to that campaign. The dues and fee structures were modified for A and B members starting in January, 2021. As evidenced by our financial report, these actions leave the lake club with a positive net income and ability to save for current and future capital needs. We are very happy that so many SLC members, families and friends were able to use the lake in a safe way during the pandemic of 2020. Social activities during 2020 were minimal at best. No need to elaborate on that. We did have food trucks on a weekly basis from March to May. We hope to continue this luxury as well as be able to instigate some of the additional great ideas that we originally planned for last year. These include kid events, outdoor movie night, social gatherings/dance at the beach, fish fry, volleyball on page 30 tournaments, and more. Here’s to hoping to a more social calendar later thiscontinued year. Fishery/Fish Eradication/Water Quality/Watershed/Club Liaison.April-May Brett Meggison gave the 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 29 presentation. Re-stocking of the lake was done. Crawdads and Walleye were stocked throughout


members starting in January, 2021. As evidenced by our financial report, these actions leave the lake club with a positive net income and ability to save for current and future capital needs. We are very happy that so many SLC members, families and friends were able to use the lake in a safe way during the pandemic of 2020. Social activities during 2020 were minimal at best. No need to elaborate on that. We did have food continued from pagetrucks 29 on a weekly basis from March to May. We hope to continue this luxury as well as be able to instigate some of the additional great ideas that we originally planned for last year. These include kid events, outdoor movie night, social gatherings/dance at the beach, fish fry, volleyball tournaments, and more. Here’s to hoping to a more social calendar later this year.

Annual Stockholder Meeting Minutes

Fishery/Fish Eradication/Water Quality/Watershed/Club Liaison. Brett Meggison gave the presentation. Re-stocking of the lake was done. Crawdads and Walleye were stocked throughout the year. Abundant amount of crappie still in the lake. Fish was stocked throughout the lake this year compared to more centralized unloading near the beach that was done in prior years. 4th of July. Mark Wittenburg gave the presentation. Thanked the volunteers that were ready to go up until the last minute. Hopefully, we can use some of the plans and ideas for 2021 celebration that we had planned for 2020. More on that to come in the next few months. Beach & Grounds Beautification. Kurt Bossert was not available to give a presentation during the meeting. Any information beneficial to the membership will be shared in the next Sherwood Scene. Boater Safety Program/ Docks, Buoys & Water Samples. Tracy Lynch gave the presentation. Zoom meetings that were held to do the boater safety course for new boaters throughout 2020. Slalom course – no issues. Buoys will be adjusted throughout the year based on boat traffic, water level, etc. Dock update – if you make any construction on the waterfront, please get approval from the board of directors prior to doing any construction plans at all. Dock guidelines will be coming out. This may lead to the removal of some old docks that are on the water that are unsafe in their present condition. VIII.

Questions, Answers and Comments None.

IX.

New Business There was no new business to discuss.

X.

Adjournment There being no further business, the Stockholders were thanked for their attendance and support of the Lake Club, and the meeting adjourned. The next Annual Meeting is scheduled for January 25, 2022.

30 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021


SLC Income Statement and Balance Sheet Sherwood Lake Club, Inc. PROFIT AND LOSS COMPARISON January - December 2020

TOTAL

Income Cost of Goods Sold GROSS PROFIT

JAN - DEC 2020

JAN - DEC 2019 (PY)

CHANGE

$357,907.68

$318,386.52

$39,521.16

% CHANGE

12.41 %

$0.00

$1,635.00

$ -1,635.00

-100.00 %

$357,907.68

$316,751.52

$41,156.16

12.99 %

115,657.97

164,282.71

-48,624.74

-29.60 %

Expenses 50 Facilities-Maintenance 5025 Facilities-Maintenance

3,996.33

52 Administrative & General

120,719.56

5205 Annual Meeting Expenses 5240 Advertising/Promotional

3,996.33 129,670.05

219.78

-8,950.49

-6.90 %

219.78

863.18

863.18

18,015.90

18,118.01

-102.11

54 Social

6,424.63

8,922.40

-2,497.77

-27.99 %

7527 PEM-Repairs & Maintenance

4,857.94

2,353.13

2,504.81

106.45 %

53 Security

QuickBooks Payments Fees

-0.56 %

793.59

35.43

758.16

2,139.88 %

$271,548.88

$323,381.73

$ -51,832.85

-16.03 %

NET OPERATING INCOME

$86,358.80

$ -6,630.21

$92,989.01

1,402.50 %

Other Income

$12,000.00

$ -4,003.76

$16,003.76

399.72 %

$0.00

$32,444.38

$ -32,444.38

-100.00 %

NET OTHER INCOME

$12,000.00

$ -36,448.14

$48,448.14

132.92 %

NET INCOME

$98,358.80

$ -43,078.35

$141,437.15

328.33 %

Total Expenses

Other Expenses

Sherwood Lake Club, Inc. BALANCE SHEET As of December 31, 2020

TOTAL AS OF DEC 31, 2020

AS OF DEC 31, 2019 (PY)

CHANGE

% CHANGE

ASSETS Current Assets $78,954.61

$23,124.44

$55,830.17

241.43 %

Accounts Receivable

$7,742.27

$6,772.26

$970.01

14.32 %

Other Current Assets

$37.24

$0.00

$37.24

0.00%

$86,734.12

$29,896.70

$56,837.42

190.11 %

Fixed Assets

$150,279.49

$181,555.99

$ -31,276.50

-17.23 %

TOTAL ASSETS

$237,013.61

$211,452.69

$25,560.92

12.09 %

$18,202.37

$18,047.15

$155.22

0.86 %

$0.00

$81,153.10

$ -81,153.10

-100.00 %

Bank Accounts

Total Current Assets

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY Liabilities Current Liabilities Long-Term Liabilities Total Liabilities Equity TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

$18,202.37

$99,200.25

$ -80,997.88

-81.65 %

$218,811.24

$112,252.44

$106,558.80

94.93 %

$237,013.61

$211,452.69

$25,560.92

12.09 %

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 31

Accrual Basis Tuesday, January 26, 2021 04:54 PM GMT-06:00

1/1


Meeting to Elect SLC Officers SHERWOOD LAKE CLUB, INC. MINUTES OF THE MEETING TO ELECT OFFICERS SHERWOOD LAKE CLUB February 8, 2021 In accordance with Article X, the Meeting to Elect Officers of the Sherwood Lake Club, Inc. was held on Tuesday, February 8, 2021, via zoom.com platform due to restrictions on gatherings of 10 or more people within Shawnee County, KS. Board members present: Larre Betsworth, Tracy Lynch, Kerry O’Neal, Aline Barrett, Annette Beck, Kevin Beck, Mike Rothfuss, and Mark Wittenburg. Larre Betsworth indicated at the start of the meeting that he would be stepping down from the Board effective immediately. He has served 10 years on the board and feels that the board is in a good spot currently and able to transition over to new leadership without him serving out the remaining year of his term. I.

Election of Officers Motions were made and seconded to nominate Mark Wittenburg to serve as President. Mark Wittenburg was elected President. Motions were made and seconded to nominate Kurt Bossert to serve as Vice-President. Kurt Bossert was elected Vice-President. A motion was made and seconded to nominate Aline Barrett to serve as Secretary. Motion carried. A motion was made and seconded to nominate Mike Rothfuss to serve as Treasurer. Motion carried.

There being no further business to discuss, the meeting was adjourned.

32 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021


January 2021 Board Minutes MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE SHERWOOD LAKE CLUB, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS January 25, 2021 The regular meeting of the Sherwood Lake Club, Inc. Board of Directors was held Monday, January 25, 2021 through the online portal www.zoom.com as the rise of Covid-19 cases in and around Shawnee County has made it recommended that gatherings larger than 10 people not be held in person. Larre Betsworth called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT: Larre Betsworth, Annette Beck, Mark Wittenburg, Tracy Lynch, Stan Oyler, Kurt Bossert, Scott Hunsicker, Brett Meggison, and Mike Rothfuss. STAFF MEMBERS PRESENT: Joe Anderson, Jeff Handley 1.

MEMBERS/PUBLIC COMMENT: Members present: Randy McAllister, Joy Dodd

2.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES: The Board approved the minutes as presented of the December 28, 2020 Regular Board Meeting. Motion made by Annette Beck, seconded by Scott Hunsicker. Motion carried.

3. REPORTS: (a) PRESIDENT’S REPORT: Larre presented the report. He has reached out to Jason and B&G regarding an update from on the grant funds several times and has not heard anything back from Jason. Stan is going to pursue this matter a little more aggressively over the next week or so. Larre also mentioned that we have been assigned to a new representative at Division of Water Resources, this is our 3rd representative over the last 12 months. They are going to plan a visit to DWR if they don’t hear anything in the next couple of days. Survey work is set to start in the next couple of months, however, we can’t start work until we receive the grant funds or FEMA may indicate that they are pulling their funding due to the work being started before funds were granted to us. Mike indicated that we do have to turn in a dam inspection. This work has to be done prior to 4/30/21 in order to remain in compliance with governing bodies. Stan indicated that he will continue to stay involved with this project even after he goes off of the board. (b) MEMBERSHIP REPORT: Stan presented the report. • The board reviewed the application for the new A membership of Samir Zaouch and Rozanne Holloway (7241 SW Fountaindale Rd.) The application that was turned in indicated it was two individuals who owned the property that the membership is tied to. Upon review of the recorded deed that Stan pulled from the County records, the owners of the property are Mr. Zaouch and Hays Investment, LLC. Based on current by-laws, a corporation cannot be a partial or full owner of lake club property. Stan indicated that he would like to decline the application because of the false information as it pertains to the owners of the property being different from the deed that we obtained. Annette indicated that she thinks we should learn more about the property intentions and to see if the intentions of the house are applicable to current rules and by-laws that we are governed by. She said she would be happy to reach out to the applicant and obtain further information prior to the next meeting. Larre indicated that we will give him 30 days to present new applications and supplemental information as required and we will proceed forward on this application at that time. (c) OFFICE MANAGER’S REPORT: • See attached calendar for events scheduled for clubhouse and shelter. (d) SHERWOOD SCENE: Annette presented the report. An email has been sent out to board members detailing the components of the next Sherwood Scene that is slated to go out in February 2021. She has asked for items by the 4th of February to begin the compilation of the newsletter. There is an update from the LQEC to be included as well as additional volunteers to help with the wattles and ensuring their efficiency in keeping sand and other sediment out of the lake over the next few months. (d) TREASURER’S REPORT: Mike reviewed the Financial Statements as of January 25, 2021. Current cash balance is $192,160, with Accounts Receivable of $170,615. Mike gave a review of the income statement for the year ended 12/31/20. He indicated that membership fees were over budget for 2020 due to the membership drive in the Spring of 2020 to generate more B members. We currently have a waiting list for B memberships that will start to be pulled from once we attrition down to 130 B members from our current level of 133. We had a full capacity of slips rented out at the marina for 2020. There is currently a waiting list for slips for 2021. There was an increase in beach expense over what was budgeted for due to increased use

continued on page 34

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 33


the lake over the next few months. (d) TREASURER’S REPORT: Mike reviewed the Financial Statements as of January 25, 2021. Current cash balance is $192,160, with Accounts Receivable of $170,615.

January 2021 Board Minutes

Mike gave a review of the income statement for the year ended 12/31/20. He indicated that membership fees were budget continued from over page 33 for 2020 due to the membership drive in the Spring of 2020 to generate more B members. We currently have a waiting list for B memberships that will start to be pulled from once we attrition down to 130 B members from our current level of 133. We had a full capacity of slips rented out at the marina for 2020. There is currently a waiting list for slips for 2021. There was an increase in beach expense over what was budgeted for due to increased use during the summer months. Clubhouse expense was down due to decreased use because of covid-19 restrictions for most of the year. The dredge is fixed and listed for sale. We have had several different parties look at it over the last 6 months. He commented about the lack of expense incurred due to the donated services of the Sherwood Scene publication throughout the year that was done by Peterson Publications. Finally, he mentioned that we brought in more money in fireworks donations this year than prior years. Hopes are that this increase will continue in future years. CHECKS FOR APPROVAL: None to approve The treasurer’s report was accepted as presented. Annette Beck made the motion to approve the treasurer’s report, Tracy Lynch seconded. Motion approved. (e) MANAGER’S REPORT: Jeff Handley presented the report. Boat ramp is closed down, only one person used it in January. He has ordered more red tags for next summer. Expense was approximately $500 and he has 40 or so on hand currently to use until the next shipment arrives by the end of March. New member, Joelle Etzel-Scott, 3611 SW Nottingham Rd, is wanting to put a new fence in on her property that runs along the dam area to keep their dog contained in their yard. She is planning to draw up plans for the fence and provide those to us in the next couple of months prior to starting work on this project. It was discussed that surveying may be necessary prior to any work being done on this project to insure that any boundaries are clearly defined. Additionally noted, due to the work that may be done on the dam in the coming months, we need to insure that she is aware of these issues and knows that the level of the dam may be raised, which could impact her fence if it is already in place when the work on the dam commences. Regarding the waddles that were placed around the lake on 12/19/20, he is fixing any issues he sees as he is driving around the lake. He received a $550 repair bill on the boat to get it up to par. Some of the work done on the boat was covered under warranty. Tracy asked Jeff if there was any damage done to the wattles after the snow storm earlier this month? Member Randy McAllister chimed in and gave an update on what has happened and how the project has evolved over the last month or so. Warren Schmidgall has developed a Wattle watch program with several other members around the lake. All people involved are assigned an area near their home to watch and correct any issues that the wattles have on a regular basis. They have been asked to check for misplacement of wattles and/or if one is destroyed and needs replaced, communication is sent through Warren and Randy to make sure a replacement wattle is deployed to the necessary area(s). All in all, the snow removal plows did a great job of avoiding the wattles as they worked their way around the lake neighborhoods. Mark: What is the status of the two boats we have? Jeff indicated that the white boat is water-logged and basically useless, may get about $1,000 out of it if we can find someone interested in the motor and/or trailer. The pontoon boat has had its repairs done on it, seats will be repaired and replaced with wood and is in good condition to serve as the sole lake patrol boat this coming summer. (f) DIRECTORS’ REPORT: Larre: No other update on Dam repairs, FEMA update, etc. Scott: Mike:

Nothing to report at this time Website: Nothing to report

Stan:

By-laws/ Insurance: Stan indicated that he has had conversation about turning over insurance policies and renewals of such to continuing board member Kurt Bossert. He will work with him during renewals coming up in the next couple of months to insure that the process goes smoothly and Kurt is brought up to speed moving forward as the board member responsible for this area. Annette:

34

Membership: nothing to report Scene: Joe will send new advertisements to Annette for inclusion in the next scene. Kurt will also get for her cleanApril-May up days so members Sherwoodspring Scene 2021 can be ready to help throughout the grounds and get the lake club property ready for Summer, 2021.


Stan:

By-laws/ Insurance: Stan indicated that he has had conversation about turning over insurance policies and renewals of such to continuing board member Kurt Bossert. He will work with him during renewals coming up in the next couple of months to insure that the process goes smoothly and Kurt is brought up to speed moving forward as the board member responsible for this area. Annette:

Membership: nothing to report Scene: Joe will send new advertisements to Annette for inclusion in the next scene. Kurt will also get for her spring clean up days so members can be ready to help throughout the grounds and get the lake club property ready for Summer, 2021. Brett: Kurt Mark Tracy

Fishery, Water Quality: Nothing to report Properties Nothing to report 4th of July

Nothing to report

Docks/Buoys/Boater Safety: Nothing to report

Lake Quality Environment Committee Update by Randy McAllister – He did want to mention that when it comes to soiling eggs of the geese, this is a very important step in water conservation and the efforts of those involved will definitely be noticed. He brought up the Aquatic Invasive Species document that was sent out to the board after the last meeting. He didn’t hear anything back from any of the board members and thus, would like to have a motion to approve that additional whitepaper for future use by his committee under the direction of the Board of Directors. Annette made the motion to approve the additional whitepaper. Mark seconded. Motion carried. He will sending to Joe Anderson an angler survey that he would like to have sent out to membership to assess their perspective of the fishery quality of the lake. 4. OLD BUSINESS: (a) Drain connection to outlet tube under Nottingham – Nothing to report. (b) Finance/Budget & Membership Standing Committee – Nothing to report. (c) Lake Quality and Environment Committee – Nothing to report. (d) Bylaws/Rules Standing Committee – Nothing to report. (e) Membership Directory – Nothing to report. (f) Boat Dock Rules – Nothing to report. 5. NEW BUSINESS: (a) Zoom Account – Joe Anderson will sign up for a zoom account for the lake club to use for future online meetings. They have been using Annette Beck’s account previously and should get their own account to use going forward. Cost for this subscription is roughly $200/year. (b) Pump Station Project – Jeff handed the floor over to Ethan Meyer of Bartlett & West among others to present their information to the board for review and consideration. There are several sewer pump stations throughout our community that need work done on them and/or replacement of key parts, if not replacement of the whole station as part of work that Shawnee county is starting to work on. Bartlett and West will handle the county projects around pump station 53 (Chelmsford-Aylesbury) and 54 (Aylesbury-Dancaster). Professional Engineering Corporation will handle the projects around pump station 61 (Blue Inn) and 57 (Robinhood Ct), as well as the spillway project on Nottingham Road and 37th Street. They are currently at a 60% design stage on these projects. Once they get to a 90% design stage, they will be able to engage contractors and start the bidding process to get the work done. This should happen around Summer, 2021. Currently, they are planning on starting work before the end of 2021, but after the boating season has ended, which should be around Thanksgiving, 2021. Work will be done on a single pump station and then at or near completion of that project, they will begin work on the next scheduled pump station. Work may involve on pump station 53 for a floating pipe to be across the lake for a portion of the time that the station work is being done. This is the more efficient way to handle this particular project in lieu of submersing a tube under the water for the duration of the project. There was much discussion about the work that will be done on a project by project basis. It was determined that the board would discuss further amongst themselves after this meeting and get back to the engineering firm with any questions and/or comments and then move forward with discussions at such time. 6. ADJOURNMENT: There being no further business, the regular meeting was adjourned. The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors will be Monday, February 22, 2021. ________________________________ Stan Oyler, Corporate Secretary

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 35


February 2021 Board Minutes MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE SHERWOOD LAKE CLUB, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS February 22, 2021 The regular meeting of the Sherwood Lake Club, Inc. Board of Directors was held Monday, February 22, 2021 through the online portal www.zoom.com as the rise of Covid-19 cases in and around Shawnee County has made it recommended that gatherings larger than 10 people not be held in person. Mark Wittenburg called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT: Annette Beck, Mark Wittenburg, Kurt Bossert, Aline Barrett, Kevin Beck and Mike Rothfuss. STAFF MEMBERS PRESENT: Joe Anderson, Jeff Handley 1.

MEMBERS/PUBLIC COMMENT: Members present: Randy McAllister, Joy Dodd

2.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES: The Board approved the minutes as presented of the January 25, 2021 Regular Board Meeting. Motion made by Annette Beck, seconded by Aline Barrett. Motion carried. APPROVAL OF MINUTES: The Board approved the minutes as presented of the January 26, 2021 Annual Board Meeting. Motion made by Annette Beck, seconded by Mike Rothfuss. Motion carried. APPROVAL OF MINUTES: The Board approved the minutes as presented of the February 8, 2021 Special Board Meeting. Motion made by Kurt Bossert, seconded by Annette Beck. Motion carried.

3. REPORTS: (a) PRESIDENT’S REPORT: Mark presented the report. Remaining open seat on the board, he would like to meet in person middle of March as they meet to set goals for the next year. He has suggested to the board that Jo Hunt, a long time A member of the club, to be a possible candidate for the vacant position. Aline commented that time is of the essence on filling this spot so that the new board member is not 3 or 4 months behind when they get on board with the rest of the directors. After much discussion regarding the term of the new member and deciding that it will be the remainder of the current year and next year with their term expiring January, 2023, it was determined that Jo Hunt will be contacted regarding the vacant position to see if she is okay with that term length. If she accepts, she will begin her work on the Board of Directors immediately. Mark and Annette will keep the board updated on the status of her acceptance so they can move forward accordingly. Mark is wanting to meet in March to work on goals for the next year. He is going to send out an outline that he has put together for review by the members prior to the meeting. The plan is to meet in person at the clubhouse later on in March to discuss what areas of the responsibilities of the board will be handled by what board member so we can proceed forward and everyone knows what they are responsible for. This does include potentially putting together a Capital Budget for the lake club. He would like to engage Mike and Joe. Mike mentioned that he believes we should wait until we hear back on funding on the dam project before we do any capital budget recommendations and take them to membership. If committees and/or sub-committees are wanting to plan for projects, they should put together estimated costs, get those to the finance committee who can work on a long-term budget beyond one calendar year and see what will work based on our current membership and revenue streams to see what is possible and what may need to be put on hold for the time being. (b) MEMBERSHIP REPORT: Joe presented the report. • The board reviewed the application for the new A membership of Samir Zaouch and Rozanne Holloway (7241 SW Fountaindale Rd.) After much discussion, it was decided that the current application will be denied due to the deed to the property being partially owned by a Corporation. If the member is able to have the deed re-issued by the County without the corporation as a partial owner, then we will be able to approve the membership as it will be in accordance with our current by-laws regarding property ownership of a membership property. If it is determined that there must be a 2nd party on the deed, this must be an individual and not a corporation of any kind. The 2nd member on the application would not have ownership rights associated with this property. Annette will reach out to the potential member and see if they can make these changes to the deed and submit a new application to the board for review and possible approval after these changes have been made to the deed. (c) OFFICE MANAGER’S REPORT: • See attached calendar for events scheduled for clubhouse and shelter.

36 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021


(d) SHERWOOD SCENE: Annette presented the report. Another great issue was sent out earlier in the month to membership. Advertising revenue streams were discussed at length and whether or not it was a good idea to reach out to members to see if they are interested in advertising in the scene. Annette indicated that she would take this on and get the input from the publishers to see what there thoughts are and proceed forward accordingly. (d) TREASURER’S REPORT: Mike reviewed the Financial Statements as of February 16, 2021. Current cash balance is $302,360, with Accounts Receivable of $50,368. CHECKS FOR APPROVAL: None to approve There was discussion about members who still have yet to pay their annual dues for 2021. It was determined that reminders will be sent out on 3/1/21 asking for payment prior to 3/15 or additional late fees will be assessed at that time. Mark will get new signature card from the bank to remove Larre’s name and add new officers. The treasurer’s report was accepted as presented. Annette Beck made the motion to approve the treasurer’s report, Aline Barrett seconded. Motion approved. (e) MANAGER’S REPORT: Jeff Handley presented the report. He has had a couple of requests for private parties at the beach that include weddings over the next couple of months. After much discussion, it was determined that a rental agreement needs to be drafted for these types of events and that communication with the member who is renting the beach for these events understands that the rental does not mean that exclusivity of the beach area during those events will be granted. We have some guidance in our bylaws regarding these types of events, but nothing for the extent of what is being asked at this time. It was determined that Aline will work with Joe and others to draft a rental agreement for these types of events and get something to the board at the next meeting. He is waiting on bids to get the carpet replaced at the clubhouse. More to come on that at the next meeting. He and Mark will work together on replacing trash cans at the beach that need some updating. Finally, he has ordered boat stickers for this year from Fast Signs. (f) DIRECTORS’ REPORT: Mark: No other update Kurt:

Mike: Aline: Annette:

Kevin:

Tennis court project: on hold Insurance: all policies renew on May 1, 2021 except for our boat insurance policy which renews 6/30 of each year. He is getting quotes for renewal premiums by 3/19/21 to present at the March meeting so we can make review them and make decisions by the April board meeting for May 1 effective dates of the new policies. Spring Clean-up: Promote family activity and try and engage newer members who joined in the last 12 months. An email blast will be sent out to solicit volunteers and information will be sent to Kurt so he can assess the number of volunteers we have and the work that needs to be done as we approach the day of the event, which is scheduled for 4/17/21. Website: Nothing to report By-laws: Nothing to report Membership: nothing to report Scene: Annette will work on forming a committee for special events to help promote and get new members involved with the club activities as we get going into the summer months. More on that to come in future months. Fishery, Water Quality: Nothing to report

continued on page 38

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 37


February 2021 Board Minutes continued from page 37 Kerry: Mark Tracy

Properties: Nothing to report 4th of July

Nothing to report

Docks/Buoys/Boater Safety: Nothing to report

Lake Quality Environment Committee Update by Randy McAllister – written proposal for bathymetric study – to accompany fish study in May $10,900 reduced price due to being able to do being able to do it at the same time as the bathymetric study 4. OLD BUSINESS: (a) Drain connection to outlet tube under Nottingham – Nothing to report. (b) Finance/Budget & Membership Standing Committee – Nothing to report. (c) Lake Quality and Environment Committee – Nothing to report. (d) Bylaws/Rules Standing Committee – Nothing to report. (e) Membership Directory – Nothing to report. (f) Boat Dock Rules – Nothing to report. 5. NEW BUSINESS: (a) Al Hunt Boat Dock Addition – Mark presented the plans that were submitted for an addition to the boat dock at Al Hunt’s property. Annette made the motion to approve the plans that have been submitted by the Hunt family. Mike seconded. Motion carried. (b) Jeff Handley Boat Dock – Mark presented the plans that were submitted for a new boat dock to the newly purchased property by Jeff and Patty Handley. After much discussion about the design that has been submitted, Mike made a motion to approve the design submitted by the Handley’s. Motion seconded by Annette. Motion carried. 6. ADJOURNMENT: There being no further business, the regular meeting was adjourned. The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors will be Monday, March 22, 2021. ________________________________ Aline Barrett, Corporate Secretary

38 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021


March 2021 Board Minutes MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE SHERWOOD LAKE CLUB, INC. BOARD OF DIRECTORS March 22, 2021 The regular meeting of the Sherwood Lake Club, Inc. Board of Directors was held Monday, March 22, 2021 through the online portal www.zoom.com as the rise of Covid-19 cases in and around Shawnee County has made it recommended that gatherings larger than 10 people not be held in person. Kurt Bossert called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. BOARD MEMBERS PRESENT: Annette Beck, Kurt Bossert, Aline Barrett, Kevin Beck, Tracy Lynch, Jo Hunt and Mike Rothfuss. STAFF MEMBERS PRESENT: Joe Anderson, Jeff Handley 1.

MEMBERS/PUBLIC COMMENT: Members present: Randy McAllister, Joy Dodd

2.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES: The Board approved the minutes as presented of the February 22, 2021 Regular Board Meeting. Motion made by Annette Beck, seconded by Tracy Lynch. Motion carried.

3. REPORTS: (a) PRESIDENT’S REPORT: Due to Mark not being available for the meeting, there was no report presented. (b) MEMBERSHIP REPORT: No report to present for this month. (c) OFFICE MANAGER’S REPORT: • See attached calendar for events scheduled for clubhouse and shelter. (d) SHERWOOD SCENE: Annette presented the report. Interest in one-time advertisements, swap shop – classified ad page that can be used to promote items for sale, services to offer. Annette will get information pulled together and present it to the board. Next issue is coming out in May, look for communication to come from her. (d) TREASURER’S REPORT: Mike reviewed the Financial Statements as of March 19, 2021. Current cash balance is $326,182, with Accounts Receivable of $36,155. Discussion was had regarding members who have yet to pay dues for 2021. CHECKS FOR APPROVAL: None to approve Annette Beck made the motion to approve the treasurer’s report, Tracy Lynch seconded. Motion approved. The treasurer’s report was accepted as presented. (e) MANAGER’S REPORT: Jeff Handley presented the report. Work on the gate has been on-going for the last few weeks. He has been instructed how to add cards to the system. New cards were mailed to all members and we will allow additional cards to be purchased for $15 per card if members need additional cards. These can be purchased by contacting either Jeff or Joe Anderson. He has received an offer of $500 for the old white boat offer from Lakeside Marine. Motion to approve the sale of the boat made by Mike Rothfuss. Annette Beck seconded. Tracy would like to get a little more money on the sale since we give Lakeside so much business. Motion carried. LP Staff: Dirk Moss, Rachel Weaver, Aubree Anderson, Travis Hirt will be the manager, one part time person will help on an as-needed basis have all been retained from last year. They will begin work later on in April, 2021. He has retained Tod Longstaff for mowing services for the next year. He has dropped his price from $700 to $650/mow for the dam, lower spillway and beach area. He will also be mowing the clubhouse, marina and volleyball court areas at a rate of $150/mow. Jeff did solicit bids from other contractors but Tod has beaten all those prices which made Jeff certain that we should retain him for another year. Mowing will begin in early April, 2021. Jeff has reached out to member Curtis Shafer who operates Epic Supply, a cleaning supply business. He is going to continued on page 40 solicit some bids for a deep clean of the clubhouse twice a month. He will bring back to the board what he receives

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 39


LP Staff: Dirk Moss, Rachel Weaver, Aubree Anderson, Travis Hirt will be the manager, one part time person will help on an as-needed basis have all been retained from last year. They will begin work later on in April, 2021.

March 2021 Board Minutes

He has retained Tod Longstaff for mowing services for the next year. He has dropped his price from $700 to $650/mow for the dam, lower spillway and beach area. He will also be mowing the clubhouse, marina and volleyball court areas at a rate of $150/mow. Jeff did solicit bids from other contractors but Tod has beaten all those prices continued from which pagemade 39 Jeff certain that we should retain him for another year. Mowing will begin in early April, 2021. Jeff has reached out to member Curtis Shafer who operates Epic Supply, a cleaning supply business. He is going to solicit some bids for a deep clean of the clubhouse twice a month. He will bring back to the board what he receives and recommends for approval to get this going so he doesn’t have to perform a deep clean of the clubhouse anymore like he has been doing for the last 6 months. (f) DIRECTORS’ REPORT: Mark: No update as he was unable to attend the meeting Kurt:

Jo:

Tennis court project: on hold Insurance: Renewals are coming in at same cost as last year; dredge will be removed from the insurance policy, so we will see some savings there. We did drop the white boat as well from coverage so the only boat we have coverage on is the pontoon boat. Spring Clean-up: Set for 4/17/21 from 10am to 12pm; Jeff and Kurt have list prepared for work to be done Clubhouse repairs bid work 4th of July: Nothing to report

Mike:

Website: He is going to begin work looking for options, will lean on Annette as he gets some options to assess the functionality that we are wanting given her expertise in these areas Aline:

By-laws: Nothing to report Clubhouse Rental Agreement: She did some work and presented a new draft of the clubhouse rental agreement as it also includes the rental of the beach facility that is often rented as well during the summer months. After much discussion and determining that the efforts or strengthening the rental form for this purpose, it was decided to stick with the current parameters that are in place that restrict an event of more than 30 people and time restrictions in line with the beach hours that are currently in place. Aline was thanked for her work on this, but no changes will be made to this form at this time. Annette:

Kevin:

Tracy

Membership: Nothing to report Scene: Nothing further to report Fishery, Water Quality: LQEC had a meeting last week that he was unable to attend, but Randy is on the call this evening and will fill in the board on developments from that meeting later on in the meeting. Dam Project: Reached out to KS Water office, no return phone call yet from their office, he will make another phone call with them in the next week. Trying to get engagement between Jason from B&G and KS Water Office to discuss project Docks/Buoys/Boater Safety: Grant Rempe: He has followed up with him indicating that we are okay with the lift that he is wanting to purchase. Ryan Koster dock plans – Tracy is hoping to keep it from going out any further than the current dock sits. The new plans would take it close to the property line with his neighbor, but not cross the property line. He has had conversation with the neighbor and they are in agreement with the plans that have been presented to the board for consideration.

Lake Quality Environment Committee Update by Randy McAllister – 5 year budget projection work has been started by the committee as asked by Mark. There are a lot of moving parts as part of this projection, so they are making sure they are staying in motion on an annual basis. April 12 fish study and bathymetric study will be done. They will also have a Carp shock done at that time. Wattle update – 3 fairly significant rain falls over the last few months. This has caused significant ponding on the roadway. The wattles are expected to be picked up by SID over the next few weeks. Communication will be sent out to members to alert them of the wattles once again and to let us know if there are any that are compromised.

40 Sherwood Scene April-May 2021


4. OLD BUSINESS: (a) Drain connection to outlet tube under Nottingham – Nothing to report. (b) Finance/Budget & Membership Standing Committee – Nothing to report. (c) Lake Quality and Environment Committee – Nothing to report. (d) Bylaws/Rules Standing Committee – Nothing to report. (e) Membership Directory – Nothing to report. (f) Boat Dock Rules – Nothing to report. 5. NEW BUSINESS: 6. ADJOURNMENT: There being no further business, the regular meeting was adjourned. The next regular meeting of the Board of Directors will be Monday, April 26, 2021. ________________________________ Aline Barrett, Corporate Secretary

April-May 2021 sherwoodlakeclub.org 41

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