Plastics Decorating - January February 2011

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Today’s decoraTing & assembly source

2011 JANUARY/FEBRUARY

Focus on the World of Sustainability Welding of Bioplastics Greener Solutions for Pad Printing High-Performance Waterborne Coatings

2011 Buyers Guide


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FEATURES Profile Page 6 Royer Corporation – Stirring a Profit in Hospitality

In 1977, Guy Kitchens saw the potential in a small Madison, Indiana plastics molding company. The company had built a name for quality work in the beverage stirrer product line that it molded and decorated for local restaurants. Today, Royer Corp. has expanded its reach – molding and decorating approximately 300 million parts annually.

Market Trends Future Markets in Plastics

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Plastics Decorating 2011 Buyers Guide

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Focus Greener Solutions for Pad Printing

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Assembly Weldability of Bioplastics

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The prevailing expectation one year ago was that the U.S. economy, having reached the nadir of the “Great Recession” in June 2009, would experience either a V-shaped or U-shaped recovery. The economy actually did begin to recover in the second half of 2009, and this pattern continued into 2010. However, the pace of the recovery has been lethargic and continued challenges to get back to the levels at mid-decade remain.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011

COVER STORY The world of sustainability is here to stay. This special issue includes several articles and sections discussing sustainability issues affecting the decorating and assembly industries.

Complete listing of plastics decorating/assembly equipment and supplies for the industry.

Advancements in the pad printing industry have helped companies reduce their environmental footprint in a number of ways. The utilization of electro-mechanical drive systems in modern pad printing machines and accessories has significantly reduced utility costs and advancements in laser-engraved cliché materials have replaced older, chemically intensive film and cliché developing processes.

With the growing demand for environmentally friendly bio-renewable resources, there has been a parallel growth in the development of bioplastics. These new materials often must be joined to produce final products. This article reviews impulse and ultrasonic welding of PLA as well as friction welding of plant protein-based plastics.

Strategies Page 36 Tax Credits for Small-Business Health-Care Costs in 2010

One of the first provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to go into effect is a health-care tax credit for small businesses, effective for tax years 2010 through 2013. But is the definition of a small business the same as we have heard described for other tax incentives and disincentives? Well, of course, the devil is in the details.

Association

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Technology High-Performance Waterborne Coatings

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• Letter from the Chairman – Rory Wolf, Enercon Industries Corporation • Laser Welding Webinar Scheduled for February • Decorating & Assembly Division Presents at ANTEC™ 2011

Decorative waterborne coatings provide exceptional appearance, functionality, value and are environmentally friendly. Waterborne coating is fast-developing technology using water as the means to transfer the coating to the plastic surface and is becoming the new standard, replacing many of its solvent-based counterparts.

DEPARTMENTS Viewpoint Industry Product Focus

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Product Marketplace (Decorating Services) Calendar Ad Index

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(Pad Printing Equipment/Supplies)

Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 3


VIEWPOINT By now, we have all become familiar with words such as sustainability, carbon footprint and carbon neutral. Just a few years ago those terms would have been completely foreign to most of us. Working closely with both the plastics and graphic arts industries, I can tell you that they are no longer just “buzzwords” and consumers are going to continue to demand products and processes from suppliers that are environmentally responsible. I believe that companies can take a stance on sustainability and at the same time, develop procedures and processes that can cut costs and increase the bottom line. This can be as easy as energy-saving light bulbs, more efficient heating/cooling systems and a recycling program on-site that can dramatically decrease what is hauled to the landfill. It might surprise you that these types of simple changes can have an enormous impact on your monthly fixed costs while at the same time, develop environmentally friendly programs that instill a sense of pride amongst employees. From the molding of plastics to secondary decorating and assembly processes, sustainable options continue to become more readily available. This Special ‘Green’ Issue of Plastics Decorating provides an inside look at some of these sustainable options, including a Focus article on greener pad printing, an Assembly article on welding bioplastics and a Technology article on waterbased coatings. Lastly, as a publisher, I do continue to defend the use of printed paper. There is a wonderful book published by the Printing and Graphics Association MidAtlantic (PGAMA) called Print Grows Trees. I encourage you to read more about it at www.printgrowstrees.com. It details how the use of paper from responsible paper sources actually helps grow trees, not destroy them. I love an email I recently received from a friend in the graphic arts industry that I believe sums it all up, “What are they going to do with all those I-pads when they die anyway?!” Jeff Peterson, Managing Editor, jeff@petersonpublications.com

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January/February 2011

Published by: Peterson Publications, Inc.

2150 SW Westport Dr., Suite 101 Topeka, KS 66614 (785) 271-5801 (785) 271-6404 (fax)

Website: www.plasticsdecorating.com Email: publish@petersonpublications.com Publisher/Managing Editor Jeff Peterson Assistant Editor Kym Conis Contributing Editor Dianna Brodine Technical Editor Scott Sabreen, The Sabreen Group

Art Director Eric J. Carter Graphic Artists Becky Collins Cara Pederson Sales Director Gayla Peterson

Plastics Decorating is published quarterly. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any manner without written consent from the publisher.


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P

PROFILE

Royer Corporation

Stirring a Profit in Hospitality by Dianna Brodine

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In 1977, Guy Kitchens saw the potential in a small Madison, Indiana plastics molding company. The company was struggling, the equipment was outdated and its customer base was small. And yet, the company had built a name for quality work in the beverage stirrer product line that it molded and decorated for local restaurants. Kitchens and another partner took the leap, assuming a quarter of a million dollars of debt to establish Royer Corporation. Still struggling a year later, Kitchens received a direct phone call from Bill Harrah, owner of Harrah’s Casino in Las Vegas. Harrah was unhappy with his current supplier and asked Kitchens to manufacturer custom cocktail stirrers for the drinks he served in his casino. This was the turning point and soon, Royer was manufacturing products for the hospitality industry throughout the United States and worldwide. Building on Hospitality Roger Williams, the current president of Royer, was Kitchens’ brother-in-law. Williams was an electrical contractor, running a successful business in another state. He joined the board of directors for Royer in 1989, but had little to do with the operation of the business until 1999. Kitchens convinced Williams to move to Indiana and, when Kitchens passed away in 2000, Williams assumed control of the plastics company. At the time, Royer was producing beverage stirrers and food picks for most of the major casinos in Las Vegas and Atlantic City. Walt Disney World was a customer, as were several major resorts. Name badges also were a common sight on the production line, with customers like Choice Hotels, Burger King and Applebee’s. Today, Royer Corp. has expanded its reach into the airline and cosmetics industries. Seventy-one employees run three eighthour shifts, Monday through Friday. Annually, the company molds and decorates approximately 300 million parts, with an emphasis on beverage stirrers, food picks, meat markers, name badges and plastics disposables for the cosmetic, food and bakery industries. With 16 injection molding presses, primarily in the 200-ton range, Royer is well-equipped to handle multiple projects. However, it’s the decorating operations that add complexity. “We have several types of hot stamping presses, screen printing equipment – both single station and automatic, pad printers and digital printers,” explained Diane Amos, vice president of product development. Hot stamping is a large part of the operation, and Royer has eight roll-on hot stampers and three vertical hot stamping presses. With most of the company’s decorated products, foil is rolled-on to the raised and molded surface; however, certain detailed work must be accomplished with traditional vertical presses. With 60-70 percent of its parts decorated with foils, efficiency is very important, so Royer has modified much of its hot stamping equipment to run in-line to

improve both speed and production flow. Regulatory compliance also is important, since many of its molded and decorated products are used in food applications, so Royer works with its vendors to ensure the foils and coatings used meet standards in the U.S., Canada and Europe. Keeping Up with Customer Demands The economic downturn has put pressure on many decorators to assess their operations for efficiencies that both impact the financial bottom line and meet customers’ demands for a ‘just in time’ product. Royer has met that pressure with an emphasis on continuous improvement and a deliberate move to automate much of its processes. “We’ve tried to streamline our operation to improve the flow of materials and finished product through the plant,” explained Williams. “We’ve positioned our injection molding machines to be more efficient in getting product in and out.” The company also has improved its internal communications and upgraded its work order paperwork and work flow software. “Our niche is speed-to-market and communication is really big,” said Williams. “Each department needs to know what we’re trying to do here because we have a very quick turnaround on our products.” To manage the communication needs, each department ‘huddles’ every day, on every shift, to go over what happened the day before and discuss the day’s priorities. “We’ve searched for software for managing work flows,” said Amos, “but our company is so unique in the products we make and how things are manufactured that we have to create our own. It’s been a continuous process, adding different modules to accommodate our needs.” Due to the nature of its product, additional challenges exist for Royer. External communications – those between Royer and its customers or potential customers – must be fast and efficient as well. Royer has a strong internet presence, which has increased sales, created a familiarity with customers and provided a quicker method for communication. “Perhaps 5-10 percent of our sales are coming through the internet right now,” explained Pat Berry, executive vice president of sales, “although we’re in the process of upgrading our e-business methods. That includes the ability for our customers to complete reorders quickly online.” Also, since some of the company’s products are targeted toward children, the production and decoration of those items are guided by the recent CPSIA (Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act) regulations. Beginning with product prototyping, there are rigorous standards that must be met and documented. “We try to have all of our toys meet standards for all ages,” said Amos. “That reduces the steps we have to take internally and simplifies marketing and packaging for our customers.”

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PROFILE

Royer also must manage the client expectations created by the increased consumer awareness of environmental issues over the past several years. “We have always used recyclable plastic. We offer biodegradable promotional plastic products which provide an earth-friendly alternative to our clients, while maintaining the same wide variety of custom designs and colors,” Williams explained. Royer uses a special plastics additive in its biodegradable molded products that degrades completely under normal landfill conditions. No special processing is required. “We’re in the early stages of it,” said Berry, “but we’ve looked at a lot of different materials and we’re impressed with this additive.” Berry admits that there’s still a significant price difference between biodegradable and non-degradable plastics, but Royer is committed to making the alternative available for its customers. Stirring Up the Industry The highly-competitive hospitality industry demands differentiation, so Royer always is pushing to find new decorating techniques that will help its customers stand out. “We’ve recently found a company that can take our product and do a chrome coating,” Amos explained. “We molded a stirrer in an off color and sent it to be chrome-plated. It’s pretty extraordinary – the product looks terrific.”

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Employees at Royer Corp. work with the company's large flat bed digital printer.

“Of course, we silk screened our products,” said Amos, as she talked about the evolution of decorating at Royer. “And then we went into pad printing, and now we’re into digital printing. Customer demands have dictated our switch to digital – the multiple colors, reduced costs of decorating and the speed of process.” The hospitality industry is heavily reliant on name recognition, so the majority of products molded and decorated at Royer include customer logos, many of which require multiple colors. “We’re really hard to beat domestically, but the offshore competition was just immense. We were struggling with multicolors with our pad printing and silk screening, so the digital printing has been fantastic for us.” “Our customers and our marketplace pushed us into multiple color arts,” Berry said. “They were demanding more color on their products, and we had to find a more efficient, less costly way to do it.” “We attended the tradeshows and got our first glimpse of the digital printers,” said Amos. “What we saw excited us. The equipment could decorate product that was two inches thick, and we have one piece of equipment that can print up to 10 inches thick, which gives us a lot of flexibility.” The personalization that is possible, reduced costs associated with multiple colors and simplified process has been applied to a blend of both high-volume and smaller-volume custom work. “It’s made us rethink our minimum quantities,” Berry explained. “In addition, we’re looking at introducing some styles that we haven’t used in years because we can do smaller volume with in-house stock designs. We can do more complex designs quickly and efficiently.”


There have been some challenges in adapting the new technology. “There’s a learning curve,” said Williams. “Even the manufacturers are still figuring it out, and adjusting the technology to fit our product was a struggle in the beginning, but we figured that out.”

products in the food service industry and methods of increasing manufacturing efficiencies. “We have a strong core competency within our product lines, and that’s due to our employees and the capabilities they bring to our operation,” Williams said.

At the end of the day, customers are looking for more complex product with more colors and more elaborate decoration. To stay head of customer demands, Royer will continue to invest in the newest technologies, building automation into its production processes to increase its efficiency and speed. “Adding the digital printing equipment was a strong step forward for us,” Williams stated. “It’s opening up new avenues, and allowing us to surprise our customers with the options we can now offer.” As the new year progresses, Royer Corporation will be exploring new distribution channels, avenues for decorating paper

In the past 30 years, Royer has evolved from a small i njec t ion molder w it h bleak prospects into a major player in the hospitality industry. “We’re a fast and flexible organization now,” explained Williams, “and we’re offering our customers the most economical solution for their product needs without sacrificing quality or function.” n

Roger Williams, Royer Corp. president

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Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 9


I

INDUSTRY

In-Mold Labeling and Decorating Seminar The “ABC of IML: A Basic Course” will be presented Thursday, March 31, 2011, at the DoubleTree Hotel & Conference Center Chicago North Shore, Skokie, IL. Offered annually since 1989, this seminar is an introductory in-mold labeling (IML) and in-mold decorating (IMD) course designed for those considering entry into the IML and IMD market, as well as a refresher course for more experienced current participants in the field. The seminar, updated yearly, provides a basic grounding in in-mold labeling and in-mold decorating as well as the fundamentals of extrusion blow molding, injection IML, the in-mold process, production of in-mold labels, current markets, functions across the IML value chain and future growth opportunities. The seminar covers all aspects of in-mold labeling of packaging, as well as in-mold decoration of durable products. For additional details and registration information, contact RBS Technologies, Inc. at www.rbstechnologies.com/imlabcs.html or call 480.473.0301. Victor Georges Joins Nazdar Nazdar SourceOne, Shawnee, KS, has announced that Victor Georges has recently joined the organization as a digital equipment specialist. Based out of the Chicago facility, Mr. Georges has responsibility for digital equipment sales in the Midwest Region for SourceOne. “Victor has over 15 years of successful business-to-business equipment sales experience,” said Ray Hill, sales manager for the SourceOne Midwest Region. “He understands the challenges our customers are facing and we are confident that he will contribute to their growth and success.” Nazdar SourceOne is the largest distributor of screen and digital printing inks, equipment and supplies in North America. For more information about any of SourceOne’s complete line of quality screen printing and digital products, visit www.SourceOneOnline.com. SPE and SPI Agree on Co-Location of ANTEC with NPE2012 The Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE) will co-locate the 2012 edition of its ANTEC® technical conference with the NPE2012 international plastics exposition. Produced by SPI, NPE2012 will take place April 1-5, 2012, at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL. Both ANTEC 2012 and the NPE tradeshow will begin on Monday, April 2nd. In addition to the traditional conference sessions, SPE will organize poster sessions on the NPE show floor. “The vast range of polymer technology to be addressed at ANTEC will mirror the breadth of products and services exhibited at NPE, adding a new dimension of discovery for attendees and opening possibilities for synergy between conference room and show floor,” said Susan Oderwald, executive director of SPE. “The co-location also creates a unique opportunity for the scientists and engineers who regularly attend ANTEC to interact with sales and marketing professionals.” More information on the ANTEC Conference is available at www.antec.ws or www.4spe.org and on NPE at www.npe.org.

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ITW Trans Tech Publishes Decorating Case Studies ITW Trans Tech, Carol Stream, IL, has added a new “Case Studies” section to its website to highlight decorating solutions for various industries. “We have always wanted an outlet to better describe how our integrated solutions have positively impacted our customers businesses. This outlet allows us to do just that,” stated Scott Larson, ITW Trans Tech sales and marketing manager. The case studies will cover a variety of industries, including automotive, industrial tools, specialty advertising, and more. An overview of the customer’s current decorating situation and needs is described along with the solutions and impact the system had on the customer. Additional studies will be added as they become available. To learn more, visit the ITW Trans Tech website at www.itwtranstech.com. Plastec South 2011 Promises Bottom Line Results Slate d to t a ke place March 1617, 2011, at the Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, FL, Plastec South promises to connect attendees with the latest plastics solutions to increase efficiencies, lower costs and reduce waste. Showcasing a wide range of plastics technologies, including primary processing machinery, auxiliary equipment, molds and mold components, CAD/CAM/prototyping, automation technology, packaging equipment and materials and more, Plastec South offers fast, convenient access to thousands of new suppliers displaying equipment, materials and the latest technologies. In addition, attendees will have the opportunity to learn about the newest tools and technologies, gain fresh ideas and take projects to the next level at one of many Innovation Briefs, located right in the resource hall. Delivered by industry experts, these concise and informative presentations (which are complimentary with a show admission badge) will take place throughout the duration of the two-day show and will cover a wide range of topics. For a schedule of Innovation Briefs, a complete list of exhibitors or to register online for Plastec South, visit www. cannontradeshows.com. Dubuit Appoints New General Manager As part of its continuing growth in the US, Dubuit America, a manufacturer of screen inks and decorating machines, has announced the appointment of Dave Cordell as general manager. Cordell has spent his entire career in the screen print industry. In addition to managing the Roselle, IL, plant, Cordell will be responsible for sales for both machines and ink in the US. For more information, visit www.dubuit.com or call 630.894.9500. n


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M

MARKET TRENDS

Future Markets in Plastics By Dr. Peter Mooney

The prevailing expectation (hope) one year ago was that the U.S. economy, having reached the nadir of the “Great Recession” in June 2009, would experience either a V-shaped or U-shaped recovery. The economy actually did begin to recover in the second half of 2009, and this pattern continued into 2010. However, the pace of recovery has been so lethargic that it engendered fears it would ultimately be W-shaped (i.e., the dreaded double-dip recession). Today there are many economists (the author of this piece included) who anticipate continuing challenges to get back to the levels of household income, household consumption, capital investment, employment and unemployment obtained at mid-decade. First, let’s examine the actual trend of growth of U.S. real GDP over the period covering the recession and subsequent recovery. The downturn in this key measure of economic health began in Q1 2008, continued through Q2 2009 and then recovery ensued from Q3 2009 up through Q3 2010. Whereas the cumulative loss of output over four quarters was 4.1 percent, the cumulative recovery over five quarters has only been 3.6 percent. It will probably take six quarters (through Q4 2010) for U.S. GDP to fully recover lost output from the recession. (Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis; 2010 Q4 is author’s estimate.) There are several factors contributing to the unfolding weak recovery in our economy. On the one hand, this latest recession was unique insofar as it was the culmination of several asset bubbles bursting sequentially – the dot/com crash of 2000, the housing collapse of 2005/2006 and the global financial crisis of 2008-2009. Rebounding from financial crises historically takes longer than periodic downturns in the business cycle. On the other hand, it also was unique insofar as this was a synchronous global recession with few countries and regions spared its corrosive effects.

modification program failed, and it prevented the housing market reaching a market-driven bottom from which it could rebound. The new stimulus program negotiated between the president and the Republican leadership in December is another effort to preserve the status quo (e.g., income tax rates) rather than forcing everyone, regardless of income, to sacrifice in order to lower the ballooning national debt. The reduction in employees’ social security payments will have to be financed by borrowing which will further impede recovery. The Deficit Commission’s call to address the nation’s broken balance sheet has been put off for yet another day. The dilemma we confront as a nation is that we need to reform many of our basic institutions in order to compete in a rapidly globalizing economy. Yet in the short term, the length and depth of this recent recession, along with the anemic pace of recovery, has made both consumers and producers more cautious, more uncertain, more risk-averse. This is manifested in many ways – most clearly in our stubbornly high unemployment rate since to hire is to take a risk. What does all this mean for the U.S. plastics industry? In the adjacent table, I provide an updated and expanded analysis of the past and likely future trends of growth in volume terms for major markets served by plastics industry participants. I also have added 2010 data and out-year projections supplied by the organizations cited in the table’s sources. The trend of the unweighted averages of these market indices (Average I) suggests that the volume of production across these 10 market categories declined by 28 percent from 2004 to 2009, and it will take another five years to regain the 2004 level. The trend of the weighted averages (Average II) presents a less dire picture; the volume of output declined only 13 percent over the past five years, and it will exceed the 2004 level by 2013. The steady (2 percent per year) growth and large weight (33 percent) of plastics in packaging offsets to some extent the continued collapse of the building industry, which has the second largest weight (17 percent).

“The dilemma we confront as a nation is that we need to reform many of our basic institutions in order to compete in a rapidly globalizing economy.” A few comments are warranted regarding the likely future Much of the blame can be attributed to the inappropriate and ultimately ineffectual fiscal and monetary policies adopted since the onset of the recession. The bailouts of the banks, insurance companies, car companies and others only served to preserve the status quo rather than spur fundamental reform. The stimulus program of early 2009 preserved other elements of the status quo (e.g., bloated state and local government budgets). The mortgage

14 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

trend in selected markets:

Automotive: Of all the markets included in this year’s tables, automotive is the one bright spot. Compared to the 14-percent bounce-back forecasted for 2010 last year, the monthly production data through November point to a 43-percent surge. A return to the 2004 volume of automotive production seems within reach by 2014.


Building and construction: It’s impossible to underestimate the collateral damage to several major markets for plastics (e.g., appliances, furniture) from the continuing collapse of the housing market. House repossessions so far in 2010 have tallied 1.3 million, up from 900,000 in 2009, and the numbers are expected to go up again in 2011. Mortgage loan modifications have failed to arrest this wrenching economic and social calamity. Loans 60 or more days past due as a percentage of all mortgages will fall slightly to 5 percent in 2010 from 6.2 percent in 2009, yet both numbers are multiples of the normal 1.5-2.0 percent range. These trends push up the total housing inventory. As the supply of housing increases while demand stagnates due to continuing high unemployment levels, house pricing has to decline another 5-10 percent to clear the market. And to make matters worse, the yield on the 10-year Treasury bond on which mortgage rates are based has been rising. So it will be 2012 before any rebound in housing starts and 2015-2017 before residential building and construction regains the 2004 level.

The Trend of Output in Major Markets Served by U.S. Plastics Processors (indices: 2004 = 100)

Market Appliances Automotive Building Furniture Heavy Trucks Marine Medical Packaging RVs Other Average I Average II

2004 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

2005 100 101 106 107 117 99 103 102 104 103 104 104

2006 101 98 93 112 129 105 106 104 106 106 106 103

2007 95 95 69 115 83 97 109 106 95 108 97 99

2008 86 78 46 109 72 81 113 108 64 108 86 94

2009 75 61 28 74 43 66 116 110 45 105 72 87

2010 2011 77 80 87 90 30 30 73 77 50 76 70 75 119 123 113 115 62 67 108 111 78 84 91 94

2012 85 94 40 80 91 80 127 117 75 113 89 98

2013 95 97 50 85 97 85 130 120 80 116 95 103

2014 100 100 60 90 94 90 134 122 90 119 99 107

Notes: 1) Average I is the unweighted average of the various market indices. 2) Average II applies weights to these indices, based on the market shares of plastic product output. Sources: Appliances: 2004-2010, large appliance shipments from the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (2010 based on year-on-year through October); 2011-2014, PCRS projections Automotive: 2004-2010, car and light truck production from Wardsauto (2010 based on year-on-year through November); 2011-2014, PCRS projections Building: 2004-2010, single- and multi-family housing starts from the National Association of Home Builders (2010 based on year-on- year through October); 2011-2014, PCRS projections Furniture: 2004-2011, actual and projected sales of office furniture from the Business & Institutional Furniture Manufacturer’s Association International, deflated by the producer price index for office furniture; 2012-2014, PCRS projections Heavy Trucks: actual volume of production in 2004-2009 and projections for 2010-2014 from ACT Research Marine: 2004-2009, new boat sales (units) from the National Marine Manufacturers Association; 2010-2014, PCRS projections Medical: 2004-2014, assumed to grow 3 percent per year Packaging: 2014-2014, assumed to grow 2 percent per year Recreational Vehicles: 2004-2011, units produced from the Recreational Vehicle Industry Association; 2012-2014, PCRS projections

Other: 2004-2010, real GDP growth from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (2010 based on year-to-year through Heavy trucks: The market for Q3); 2011-2014, PCRS projections heavy (Class 8) trucks is heavily influenced by the timing of implementation of EPA’s increasingly stringent standards related to greenhouse gas emissions from the increase in the volume of production of plastic medical/pharengines in these vehicles. The standards were raised in 2002 and maceutical goods from 2004 through 2014. 2007, triggering pronounced pre-buying of trucks in previous years. Standards were raised once again in 2010, yet the recession Packaging: This is another market which defies simple meadampened the extent of pre-buying. The next set of standards surement of trends since it embraces bags, bottles, caps and will come into force in 2014, which explains the expected pause closures, film, pouches, etc. We assume that recent past and in heavy truck sales that year. likely future volume growth approximates twice the long-term growth of the U.S. population (i.e., 2 percent). Medical: Irrespective of the hotly debated constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act, in an aging society the demand for Recreational Vehicles: Recovery of the recreational vehicle medical disposable and durable products will rise inexorably. industry hinges critically on trends in household income and In the absence of official data, we assume a constant 3-percent gasoline pricing, and the latter correlates in turn with crude oil

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MARKET TRENDS

pricing. As a result of the Great Recession, oil pricing actually averaged only $62/barrel in 2009, but this positive for RV sales was overwhelmed by the erosion of household wealth. The U.S. Department of Energy expects crude oil to cost $86/barrel on average in 2011. Gasoline pricing is expected to average $3.00/ gallon in 2011, up 8 percent from $2.77/gallon in 2010. The trend of crude oil pricing obviously impacts forcefully on the cost-competitiveness of resins. There are actually encouraging signs relative to future oil pricing. There is a lot more oil lying around; in light of recent discoveries in Brazil and other countries, estimates of global oil reserves have been adjusted upwards. At the same time, despite the voracious Chinese appetite for oil (and every other commodity), global oil demand has moderated as a result of increased energy efficiency. The International Energy Agency once projected that the world would be consuming 94 million barrels a day by 2011. Now they don’t see that level being reached until 2020. As the year 2010 came to a close, over half of Americans in a Bloomberg poll conducted in early December said they are worse off now than they were in 2008, and two-thirds believe the country is headed in the wrong direction. Unemployment and jobs are the two most important issues facing the country,

and yet the focus of the next Congress will be on repealing and replacing the enacted healthcare reform and ensuring that no one’s marginal tax rate rises. The federal government can afford to put off the inevitable; state and local governments, faced with looming budget gaps, cannot. Thus the reduction of public sector jobs will offset any potential job creation in the private sector in 2011. U.S. net worth, which plummeted to $49 trillion in the first quarter of 2009, recovered to $55 trillion by the third quarter of 2010. However, it would have to recover another 20 percent (23 percent in inflation-adjusted terms) to regain the pre-recession peak of $66 trillion. Economists believe it will take at least the middle of the decade for Americans to regain all their lost wealth. In the end, any forecast for growth of the U.S. economy must be predicated on where such growth will emanate. Consumption accounts for 70 percent of GDP. The stimulus package of 2008 failed to boost consumption, and there is little prospect that the December 2010 compromise crafted by President Obama and the Republican leadership will fare any better. Government spending at every level – federal, state and local – simply has to be reduced. There is a glut of productive capacity in the country, so investment in plants, office buildings, retail outlets, et al. will languish. The depreciation of the dollar may spur exports, but it is provoking competitive devaluations among our trading partners. Some business analysts would argue that there is a rosy scenario ahead for plastics industry companies serving the major manufacturing industries. The Institute for Supply Management (ISM) reports that manufacturing output has grown for 16 consecutive months, and it projects continued recovery through 2011. Companies in the manufacturing sector are operating at 80.2 percent of capacity versus 72.8 percent in 2009. Exports are growing as the value of the U.S. dollar weakens. And yet the picture remains troubling for long-term future growth prospects in manufacturing, including the plastics industry. 2009 was the first year in recorded U.S. economic history that the capital stock actually declined. Claiming continuing uncertainty, companies accumulated huge cash hoards. Debt was reduced, and yet capital investment languished and work-forces were cut. The only V-shaped recovery in evidence is in corporate profitability. This conservative posture must be abandoned if we are to remain competitive with our trading partners in both developed and developing countries. n Dr. Peter J. Mooney is president of Plastics Custom Research Services of Advance, NC and one of the plastics industry’s foremost economic research experts on evolving domestic and global plastics industry market opportunities. Visit the Plastics Custom Research Services website at www.plasres.com.

16 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011




2011 Buyers Guide Assembly Equipment accusonics, inc. 5401 Patton dr., unit 113 lisle, il 60532 (630) 769-1886 Fax: (630) 769-1887 www.accusonics.com Spin Welding, Vibration Welding, Staking, Ultra-Sonic Welding

Tooltex, Inc. 6160 Seeds Rd. Grove City, OH 43123 (614) 539-3222 Fax: (614) 539-3223 www.tooltex.com Ultra-Sonic Welding, Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking

Contract Decorating

Dukane Corporation 2900 Dukane Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 797-4900 Fax: (630) 797-4949 www.dukane.com/us Ultra-Sonic Welding, Laser Welding, Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking

amdec inc. 2623 manana dallas, TX 75220 (214) 654-0560 Fax: (214) 654-0561 www.amdecinc.com Assembly, Screen Printing, Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

Emabond Solutions, LLC. 49 Walnut St. Norwood, NJ 07648 (201) 767-7400 Fax: (201) 767-3608 www.emabond.com Electromagnetic

automated industrial systems 4238 W. 12th st. erie, Pa 16505 (814) 838-2270 Fax: (814) 833-5661 www.padmark.com Pad Printing

Extol, Inc. 651 Case Karsten Dr. Zeeland, MI 49464 (616) 748-9955 Fax: (616) 748-0555 www.extolinc.com Hot Plate Welding, Spin Welding, Staking, Ultra-Sonic Welding, Custom Assembly Equipment, Vibration Welding

central decal company, inc. 6901 High grove blvd. burr ridge, il 60527 (630) 325-9892 Fax: (630) 325-9860 www.centraldecal.com Doming, In-Mold Decorating, Screen Printing

Forward Technology 260 Jenks Ave. Cokato, MN 55321 (320) 286-2578 Fax: (320) 286-2467 www.forwardtech.com IR Welding, Laser Welding, Ultra-Sonic Welding, Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking Herrmann ultrasonics, inc. 1261 Hardt cir. bartlett, il 60103 (630) 626-1626 Fax: (630) 736-7514 www.herrmannultrasonics.com Ultra-Sonic Welding HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Vibration Welding, Staking, Ultra-Sonic Welding, Spin Welding, Hot Plate Welding

comdec inc. 25 Hale st. newburyport, ma 01950 (978) 462-3399 Fax: (978) 462-3443 www.rucousa.com Screen Printing, Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers cPs resources, inc. 2000 innovation dr. indian Trail, nc 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (208) 247-2392 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers, Screen Printing, Pad Printing custom imprint 19573 Progress dr. cleveland, oH 44149 (440) 238-4488 Fax: (440) 238-4488 www.customimprint.com Digital Inkjet, Screen Printing, Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

leister usa 1253 Hamilton Pkwy. itasca, il 60143 (630) 760-1000 Fax: (630) 760-1001 www.leisterlaser.com Laser Welding of Plastics

Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Pad Printing, Screen Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

schwerdtle, inc. 166 elm st. bridgeport, cT 06604 (203) 330-2750 Fax: (203) 330-2760 www.schwerdtle.com Tooling, Wheels

die stampco, inc. 1301 n. lincoln st. bay city, mi 48708 (989) 893-7790 Fax: (989) 893-7741 www.diestampco.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

Sonics & Materials, Inc. 53 Church Hill Rd. Newtown, CT 06470 (203) 270-4600 Fax: (203) 270-4610 www.sonics.com Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking, Ultra-Sonic Welding, Thermal Assembly

diversified decorating sales, inc. Po box 386 Peterborough, nH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Pad Printing

DuraTech Industries 3216 Commerce St. La Crosse, WI 54603 (608) 781-2570 Fax: (608) 781-2540 www.duratech.com Digital/Flexographic Printing, In-Mold Decorating, Screen Printing Erler Industries 418 Stockwell St. North Vernon, IN 47265 (812) 346-4421 Fax: (812) 346-1892 www.erler.com Laser Etching, Painting/Coating, Pad Printing Flow-Eze Company 3209 Auburn St. Rockford, IL 61101 (815) 965-1062 Fax: (815) 965-1329 www.flow-eze.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers, Bottle Decorating, Medical Devices, Assembly, Screen Printing, Pad Printing HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Screen Printing, Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers industrial Pad Printing supplies 2212 radford st. el Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com/www.kentmexico.com Screen Printing, Pad Printing Marca Coating Technologies LLC. 31 Washington Ave. Scarborough, ME 04074 (207) 510-6888 Fax: (207) 510-6880 www.marcacoating.com Metallizing, Painting/Coating, Screen Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers mPc Plating 1859 e. 63rd st. cleveland, oH 44103 (216) 881-7220 Fax: (216) 881-7324 www.mpcplating.com Plating on Plastic Normic Industries, Inc. 1733 Park Dr. Traverse City, MI 49686 (800) 526-8746 Fax: (231) 947-1681 www.normicind.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers, Urethane Doming, Painting/Coating, Screen Printing north Pacific international, inc 14171 Fern ave. chino, ca 91710 (909) 393-3312 Fax: (909) 393-3332 www.npifoil.com In-Mold Decorating, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

Tooltex, inc. 6160 seeds rd. grove city, oH 43123 (614) 539-3222 Fax: (614) 539-3223 www.tooltex.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers Unique Assembly & Decorating, Inc. 2550 Wisconsin Avenue Downers Grove, IL 60515 (630) 241-4300 Fax: (630) 241-4306 www.uniquepadprinting.com Screen Printing, Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers Webtech, inc. 108 n. gold dr. robbinsville, nJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com In-Mold Decorating, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

Decorating/Assembly Design & Engineering sabreen group, inc., The 5837 Wavertree ln. Plano, TX 75093 (972) 250-4664 www.sabreen.com

Decorative Films akzo nobel/soliant 1872 Highway 9 bypass lancaster, sc 29721 (800) 288-9401 Fax: (803) 313-8227 www.akzonobel.com/sp Metallics, Special Effects, Chromefilm (Eco-friendly), Paintfilm Color Path Technologies 182 Industrial Pk. Trenton, NC 28585 (252) 448-9900 Fax: (252) 448-1200 www.colorpathtechnologies.com Brush Films, Carbon Fiber, Marbles, Wood Grains Normic Industries, Inc. 1733 Park Dr. Traverse City, MI 49686 (800) 526-8746 Fax: (231) 947-1681 www.normicind.com Decorative Aluminum

Digital Inkjet autoroll Print Technologies 11 river st. middleton, ma 01949 (978) 777-2160 www.autoroll.com Inks cPs resources, inc. 2000 innovation dr. indian Trail, nc 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (208) 247-2392 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Decorating

Pad Print usa, llc. 12675 danielson ct. ste. 402 Poway, ca 92064 (858) 748-3467 Fax: (858) 748-5794 www.padprintusa.com Digital Printing, Pad Printing

Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Inks, Systems Integration, Equipment

Pad Printing Technology corp. 2803 62nd ave. e. bradenton, Fl 34203 (941) 739-8667 Fax: (941) 751-3612 www.pad-printing.com Pad Printing

Fusion UV Systems, Inc. 910 Clopper Rd. Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (301) 527-2660 Fax: (301) 527-2661 www.fusionuv.com UV Curing Equipment

Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 19


2011 Buyers Guide Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 www.inkcups.com Equipment, Inks ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4473 www.itwtranstech.com Systems Integration, Equipment, Inks Mimaki USA 150-A Satellite Blvd. Suwanee, GA 30024 (678) 730-0170 Fax: (678) 730-0188 www.mimakiusa.com Equipment, Systems Integration, Inks Pad Print machinery of Vermont 201 Tennis Way east dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (802) 562-0858 www.padprintmachinery.com Equipment, Inks

Flexographic Printing Presses OMSO North America, Inc. 1420 Jamike Ave. Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 282-6676 Fax: (859) 282-9976 www.omso.com Tubes

Heat Transfers CDigital Markets, Grafixx Division 2529 Washington Blvd. Baltimore, MD 21230 (866) 237-7468 Fax: (410) 646-7786 www.grafixx.com Digital Print CFC International Corporation, An ITW Company 500 State St. Chicago Heights, IL 60411 (708) 891-3456 Fax: (708) 758-5989 www.cfcintl.com Roto-gravure cPs resources, inc. 2000 innovation dr. indian Trail, nc 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (208) 247-2392 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Roto-gravure Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Screen Printed, Digital diversified decorating sales, inc. Po box 386 Peterborough, nH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Screen Printed HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Roto-gravure, Screen Printed

ITW Graphics 375 New State Rd. Manchester, CT 06042 (860) 646-8153 Fax: (860) 533-0236 www.itwgraphicsusa.com Screen Printed

united silicone, an iTW decorating co. 4471 Walden ave. lancaster, ny 14086 (716) 681-8222 Fax: (716) 681-8789 www.unitedsilicone.com Magnesium, Silicone Rubber

Kurz Transfer Products, lP 3200 Woodpark blvd. charlotte, nc 28206 (704) 927-3700 Fax: (704) 927-3701 www.kurz.de Roto-gravure, Screen Printed

universal engraving, inc. - a uei group company 9090 nieman rd. overland Park, Ks 66215 (800) 221-9059/(913) 541-0503 Fax: (913) 541-8172 www.ueigroup.com Copper

north Pacific international, inc 14171 Fern ave. chino, ca 91710 (909) 393-3312 Fax: (909) 393-3332 www.npifoil.com Roto-gravure, Screen Printed Webtech, inc. 108 n. gold dr. robbinsville, nJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com Flexographic, Screen Printed, Rotogravure

Hot Stamping Dies cPs resources, inc. 2000 innovation dr. indian Trail, nc 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (208) 247-2392 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Silicone Rubber Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Tooling, Magnesium, Silicone Rubber, Copper die stampco, inc. 1301 n. lincoln st. bay city, mi 48708 (989) 893-7790 Fax: (989) 893-7741 www.diestampco.com Brass, Copper, Tooling, Magnesium, Silicone Rubber HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Tooling, Magnesium, Silicone Rubber, Copper Kurz Transfer Products, lP 3200 Woodpark blvd. charlotte, nc 28206 (704) 927-3700 Fax: (704) 927-3701 www.kurz.de Brass Schwerdtle, Inc. 166 Elm St. Bridgeport, CT 06604 (203) 330-2750 Fax: (203) 330-2760 www.schwerdtle.com Steel, Tooling, Copper, Magnesium, Silicone Rubber stamprite machine co. 712 bread & milk st. coventry, cT 06238 (860) 742-9222 Fax: (860) 742-2929 www.stampritemachine.com Tooling, Magnesium, Silicone Rubber, Copper

20 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

Hot Stamping Foils apex machine company 3000 ne 12th Terr. Ft. lauderdale, Fl 33334 (954) 566-1572 Fax: (954) 563-2844 www.apexmachine.com cdigital markets, grafixx division 2529 Washington blvd. baltimore, md 21230 (866) 237-7468 Fax: (410) 646-7786 www.grafixx.com Multi-colored CFC International Corporation, An ITW Company 500 State St. Chicago Heights, IL 60411 (708) 891-3456 Fax: (708) 758-5989 www.cfcintl.com Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic Color Path Technologies 182 Industrial Pk. Trenton, NC 28585 (252) 448-9900 Fax: (252) 448-1200 www.colorpathtechnologies.com Metallic, Gloss Pigment, Multi-colored, Matte Pigment cPs resources, inc. 2000 innovation dr. indian Trail, nc 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (208) 247-2392 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic, Holographic custom Foils company 185 Foundry st. newark, nJ 07105 (973) 344-1434 Fax: (973) 589-1617 www.customfoilscompany.com Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Metallic, Gloss Pigment, Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Holographic infinity Foils, inc. Po box 14275 lenexa, Ks 66285 (913) 888-7340 / (888) 932-3645 Fax: (913) 888-7397 Holographic, Metallic Kurz Transfer Products, lP 3200 Woodpark blvd. charlotte, nc 28206 (704) 927-3700 Fax: (704) 927-3701 www.kurz.de Holographic, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic, Multi-colored

north Pacific international, inc 14171 Fern ave. chino, ca 91710 (909) 393-3312 Fax: (909) 393-3332 www.npifoil.com Multi-colored, Holographic, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic stamprite machine co. 712 bread & milk st. coventry, cT 06238 (860) 742-9222 Fax: (860) 742-2929 www.stampritemachine.com Metallic, Gloss Pigment, Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Holographic united silicone an iTW decorating co. 4471 Walden ave. lancaster, ny 14086 (716) 681-8222 Fax: (716) 681-8789 www.unitedsilicone.com Metallic, Gloss Pigment Webtech, inc. 108 n. gold dr. robbinsville, nJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic Western decorating Technologies 9450 cabrillo dr. riverside, ca 92503 (951) 687-8800 Fax: (951) 687-7800 www.westerndecorating.com Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic, Multi-colored, Holographic

Hot Stamping/Heat Transfer Presses CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (208) 247-2392 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical, Custom Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical diversified decorating sales, inc. Po box 386 Peterborough, nH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Roll-on, Vertical, Peripheral HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Roll-on, Vertical, Peripheral Kurz Transfer Products, lP 3200 Woodpark blvd. charlotte, nc 28206 (704) 927-3700 Fax: (704) 927-3701 www.kurz.de Roll-on, Vertical, Peripheral north Pacific international, inc 14171 Fern ave. chino, ca 91710 (909) 393-3312 Fax: (909) 393-3332 www.npifoil.com Roll-on, Vertical


Permadur Industries 186 Route 206 S. Hillsborough, NJ 08844 (908) 359-9767 Fax: (908) 359-9773 www.permadur.com/deco Rental Machines, Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical schober usa, inc. 4690 industry dr. Fairfield, oH 45014 (513) 489-7393 Fax: (513) 489-7485 www.schoberusa.com Stamprite Machine Co. 712 Bread & Milk St. Coventry, CT 06238 (860) 742-9222 Fax: (860) 742-2929 www.stampritemachine.com Roll-on, Vertical, Peripheral Trekk Equipment Group 70 Midwest Dr. Pacific, MO 63069 (636) 271-1391 Fax: (636) 271-5187 www.trekkequipment.com Custom Decorating Equipment, Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical United Silicone, an ITW Decorating Co. 4471 Walden Ave. Lancaster, NY 14086 (716) 681-8222 Fax: (716) 681-8789 www.unitedsilicone.com Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical Webtech, inc. 108 n. gold dr. robbinsville, nJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical, Custom

In-Mold Decorating akzo nobel/soliant 1872 Highway 9 bypass lancaster, sc 29721 (800) 288-9401 Fax: (803) 313-8227 www.akzonobel.com/sp In-Mold Labels, In-Mold Inserts autoroll Print Technologies 11 river st. middleton, ma 01949 (978) 777-2160 www.autoroll.com Inks central decal company, inc. 6901 High grove blvd. burr ridge, il 60527 (630) 325-9892 Fax: (630) 325-9860 www.centraldecal.com In-Mold Inserts, In-Mold Labels DuraTech Industries 3216 Commerce St. La Crosse, WI 54603 (608) 781-2570 Fax: (608) 781-2540 www.duratech.com In-Mold Labels HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com In-Mold Labels, In-Mold Transfers, In-Mold Inserts

industramark™, a standard register business unit 600 albany st. dayton, oH 45417 (800) 806-4408 Fax: (937) 221-1569 www.industramark.com In-Mold Transfers, In-Mold Inserts, InMold Labels Inland Label 2009 West Ave. S. LaCrosse, WI 54601 (608) 788-5800 www.inlandlabel.com In-Mold Labels Kurz Transfer Products, lP 3200 Woodpark blvd. charlotte, nc 28206 (704) 927-3700 Fax: (704) 927-3701 www.kurz.de In-Mold Inserts, In-Mold Transfers mexico representation guadalajara, Jalisco, mexico, +52(1)(333)190-2840 www.mexicorepresentation.com In-Mold Labels, In-Mold Transfers, In-Mold Inserts north Pacific international, inc 14171 Fern ave. chino, ca 91710 (909) 393-3312 Fax: (909) 393-3332 www.npifoil.com In-Mold Transfers, In-Mold Labels Proell, Inc. 2751 Dukane Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-2300 Fax: (630) 587-2666 www.proell.us Inks, Thinners, Adhesives Romo Durable Graphics 800 Heritage Rd. DePere, WI 54115 (920) 712-4090 Fax: (920) 336-5171 www.romoinc.com In-Mold Labels schober usa, inc. 4690 industry dr. Fairfield, oH 45014 (513) 489-7393 Fax: (513) 489-7485 www.schoberusa.com Label Diecutter, Rotary Punching Equipment simco 2257 n. Penn rd Hatfield, Pa 19440 (215) 822-6401 Fax: (215) 822-3795 www.simco-static.com Electrostatic Pinning Systems sun chemical corporation 2445 Production dr. st. charles, il 60174 (630) 587-5216 Fax: (630) 587-5226 www.sunchemical.com Inks Webtech, inc. 108 n. gold dr. robbinsville, nJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com In-Mold Transfers, In-Mold Labels yupo corporation america 800 yupo ct. chesapeake, Va 23320 (888) 873-9876 Fax: (757) 312-9702 www.yupousa.com Pressure Sensitive, Synthetic Paper, In-Mold Labels

Laser Etching Equipment

Pad Printing Presses

burnett bros. engineering, inc. Po box 1224 Fullerton, ca 92836 (714) 526-2448 Fax: (714) 526-4961 www.burnettbros.com Direct Marking

a.W.T. World Trade, inc. 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.awt-gpi.com Dryers, Rotary, Manual

industrial Pad Printing supplies 2212 radford st. el Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com/www.kentmexico.com Paint & Laser, Direct Marking

automated industrial systems 4238 W. 12th st. erie, Pa 16505 (814) 838-2270 Fax: (814) 833-5661 www.padmark.com Sealed Cup, Rotary, Manual

Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 www.inkcups.com Paint & Laser, Direct Marking, Plate Making

comdec inc. 25 Hale st. newburyport, ma 01950 (978) 462-3399 Fax: (978) 462-3443 www.rucousa.com Sealed Cup

ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4473 www.itwtranstech.com Direct Marking

Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Rotary, Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well, Eco Cleaner

mecco marking & Traceability 290 executive drive cranberry Twp, Pa 16066 (724) 779-9555 Fax: (724) 779-9556 www.mecco.com Direct Marking

diversified decorating sales, inc. Po box 386 Peterborough, nH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Sealed Cup

Pad Print machinery of Vermont 201 Tennis Way east dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (802) 562-0858 www.padprintmachinery.com

Diversified Printing Techniques 13336 South Ridge Dr. Charlotte, NC 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 wwwdiverprint.com Servo Driven Pad Printers, Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well

Pad Printing Technology corp. 2803 62nd ave. e. bradenton, Fl 34203 (941) 739-8667 Fax: (941) 751-3612 www.pad-printing.com Laser Marking Tampoprint international corporation 1400 26th st. Vero beach, Fl 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Direct Marking, ClichĂŠ

Offset Printing Presses Apex Machine Company 3000 NE 12th Terr. Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33334 (954) 566-1572 Fax: (954) 563-2844 www.apexmachine.com Dry Offset burnett bros. engineering, inc. Po box 1224 Fullerton, ca 92836 (714) 526-2448 Fax: (714) 526-4961 www.burnettbros.com Dry Offset OMSO North America, Inc. 1420 Jamike Ave. Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 282-6676 Fax: (859) 282-9976 www.omso.com Dry Offset

HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well, Automation, Manual Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com/www.kentmexico.com Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well, Rotary, Manual Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 www.inkcups.com Semi-Automatic, Plate Making Equipment, Sealed Cup Innovative Marking Systems, Inc. 240 Smith St. Lowell, MA 01851 (978) 459-6533 Fax: (978) 459-2220 www.padprinters.com Sealed Cup ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4473 www.itwtranstech.com Open Ink Well, Rotary, Sealed Cup

Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 21


2011 Buyers Guide Pad Print Machinery of Vermont 201 Tennis Way East Dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (802) 562-0858 www.padprintmachinery.com Manual, Rotary, Sealed Cup Printa systems, inc. 127 10th st. s. Kirkland, Wa 98033 (800) 601-6240 Fax: (425) 828-8956 www.printa.com Manual, Open Ink Well Tampoprint international corporation 1400 26th st. Vero beach, Fl 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Rotary, Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well

Pad Printing Supplies a.W.T. World Trade, inc. 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.awt-gpi.com automated industrial systems 4238 W. 12th st. erie, Pa 16505 (814) 838-2270 Fax: (814) 833-5661 www.padmark.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates autoroll Print Technologies 11 river st. middleton, ma 01949 (978) 777-2160 www.autoroll.com Inks/Thinners, Pads Comdec Inc. 25 Hale St. Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 462-3399 Fax: (978) 462-3443 www.rucousa.com Inks/Thinners Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Laser ClichĂŠ Etching, Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/Plates Diversified Decorating Sales, Inc. PO Box 386 Peterborough, NH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates diversified Printing Techniques 13336 south ridge dr. charlotte, nc 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 wwwdiverprint.com Green Cup, Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/Plates HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Pads, Ink Cups, Inks/Thinners, Cliches/ Plates

industrial Pad Printing supplies 2212 radford st. el Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com/www.kentmexico.com Pads, Ink Cups, Inks/Thinners, Cliches/ Plates Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 www.inkcups.com Ceramic Rings, Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/Plates Innovative Marking Systems, Inc. 240 Smith St. Lowell, MA 01851 (978) 459-6533 Fax: (978) 459-2220 www.padprinters.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4473 www.itwtranstech.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates Pad Print machinery of Vermont 201 Tennis Way east dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (802) 562-0858 www.padprintmachinery.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates Proell, Inc. 2751 Dukane Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-2300 Fax: (630) 587-2666 www.proell.us Inks/Thinners Tampoprint international corporation 1400 26th st. Vero beach, Fl 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates

Paints/Coatings

ruco usa 915 n. central ave. Wood dale, il 60191 (866) 373-7912 Fax: (800) 894-0715 www.rucousa.com UV Curable

Fusion UV Systems, Inc. 910 Clopper Rd. Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (301) 527-2660 Fax: (301) 527-2661 www.fusionuv.com UV Curing Equipment

screenworks supply corporation 1900 n. austin ave. chicago, il 60639 (800) 551-5524 Fax: (773) 836-0950 www.screenworkssupply.com Powder Coating, UV Curable

graphic Parts international, inc. 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 725-4900 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.gpiparts.com Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers, Squeegees

Xser coatings, llc. 9 Handy st. new brunswick, nJ 08901 (732) 754-9887 Fax: (732) 745-7468 www.xsercoatings.com UV Curable

Plating on Plastic MPC Plating 1859 E. 63rd St. Cleveland, OH 44103 (216) 881-7220 Fax: (216) 881-7324 www.mpcplating.com Nickel & Chrome Decorative Electroplating

Screen Printing Equipment/Supplies a.W.T. World Trade, inc. 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.awt-gpi.com Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers advanced screen Technologies, inc. 619 s. Hacienda dr. #2 Tempe, aZ 85281 (480) 858-9804 Fax: (480) 858-0358 www.advancedscreen.com Inks, Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers american screen Printing equipment 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.screenprintmachinery.com

advanced screen Technologies, inc. 619 s. Hacienda dr. #2 Tempe, aZ 85281 (480) 858-9804 Fax: (480) 858-0358 www.advancedscreen.com Solvent-based, UV Curable

autoroll Print Technologies 11 river st. middleton, ma 01949 (978) 777-2160 www.autoroll.com Inks

akzo nobel/soliant 1872 Highway 9 bypass lancaster, sc 29721 (800) 288-9401 Fax: (803) 313-8227 www.akzonobel.com/sp Water-based, Solvent-based, UV Curable

Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Dryers, Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Inks

apex machine company 3000 ne 12th Terr. Ft. lauderdale, Fl 33334 (954) 566-1572 Fax: (954) 563-2844 www.apexmachine.com Water-based, Solvent-based, UV Curable

diversified Printing Techniques 13336 south ridge dr. charlotte, nc 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 wwwdiverprint.com

nazdar 8501 Hedge lane Terr. shawnee, Ks 66227 (913) 422-1888 Fax: (913) 422-2296 www.nazdar.com Inks, Solvent-based, UV Curable

dubuit of america 70 monaco dr. roselle, il 60172 (630) 894-9500 Fax: (630) 894-9600 www.dubuitgroup.com Tooling, Inks, Dryers

22 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Inks, Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers industrial Pad Printing supplies 2212 radford st. el Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com/www.kentmexico.com Inks, Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 www.inkcups.com Tooling, Dryers, Inks miller Process coating company 850 Watercrest Way cheswick, Pa 15024 (724) 274-5880 Fax: (724) 274-5882 www.millerprocess.com Dryers, Tooling nor-cote international, inc. 506 lafayette ave. crawfordsville, in 47933 (800) 488-9180 Fax: (765) 364-5408 www.norcote.com Chemicals, Emulsions, Mesh, Squeegees, Inks Printa systems, inc. 127 10th st. s. Kirkland, Wa 98033 (800) 601-6240 Fax: (425) 828-8956 www.printa.com Inks, Dryers Proell, Inc. 2751 Dukane Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-2300 Fax: (630) 587-2666 www.proell.us Inks ruco usa 915 n. central ave. Wood dale, il 60191 (866) 373-7912 Fax: (800) 894-0715 www.rucousa.com Inks saati Print 247 route 100 somers, ny 10589 (914) 232-7781 Fax: (914) 232-4004 www.saatiamericas.com Emulsions, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers, Inks


Screenworks Supply Corporation 1900 N. Austin Ave. Chicago, IL 60639 (800) 551-5524 Fax: (773) 836-0950 www.screenworkssupply.com Color Matching, Tooling, Screens/ Screen Making Equipment, Dryers, Inks sun chemical corporation 2445 Production dr. st. charles, il 60174 (630) 587-5216 Fax: (630) 587-5226 www.sunchemical.com Inks

Screen Printing Presses a.W.T. World Trade, inc. 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.awt-gpi.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D Advanced Screen Technologies, Inc. 619 S. Hacienda Dr. #2 Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 858-9804 Fax: (480) 858-0358 www.advancedscreen.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D american screen Printing equipment 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.screenprintmachinery.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D burnett bros. engineering, inc. Po box 1224 Fullerton, ca 92836 (714) 526-2448 Fax: (714) 526-4961 www.burnettbros.com Containers/3D

Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 www.inkcups.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D Kammann USA 65 Parker St. Newburyport, MA 01950 (630) 513-8091 www.kammann.com Web, Containers/3D miller Process coating company 850 Watercrest Way cheswick, Pa 15024 (724) 274-5880 Fax: (724) 274-5882 www.millerprocess.com Containers/3D OMSO North America, Inc. 1420 Jamike Ave. Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 282-6676 Fax: (859) 282-9976 www.omso.com Closures, Containers/3D screenworks supply corporation 1900 n. austin ave. chicago, il 60639 (800) 551-5524 Fax: (773) 836-0950 www.screenworkssupply.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D

Static Control Systems simco 2257 n. Penn rd Hatfield, Pa 19440 (215) 822-6401 Fax: (215) 822-3795 www.simco-static.com

Surface Treatment Equipment

ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4473 www.itwtranstech.com Chemical, Flame, Corona, Cold Gas Plasma Pad Print machinery of Vermont 201 Tennis Way east dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (802) 562-0858 www.padprintmachinery.com Flame, Corona Plasmatreat North America 2541 Technology Dr. Elgin, IL 60124 (847) 783-0622 Fax: (847) 783-0991 www.plasmatreat.com Atmospheric Plasma, Cold Gas Plasma, Corona Tampoprint international corporation 1400 26th st. Vero beach, Fl 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Flame, Corona

Used Equipment a.W.T. World Trade, inc. 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.awt-gpi.com Screen Printing

Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Electronics, Flat Sheet, Containers/3D diversified Printing Techniques 13336 south ridge dr. charlotte, nc 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 wwwdiverprint.com

Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Flame, Corona, Chemical

automated industrial systems 4238 W. 12th st. erie, Pa 16505 (814) 838-2270 Fax: (814) 833-5661 www.padmark.com Pad Printing

diversified Printing Techniques 13336 south ridge dr. charlotte, nc 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 wwwdiverprint.com Flame, Corona

graphic Parts international, inc. 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 725-4900 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.gpiparts.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D

burnett bros. engineering, inc. Po box 1224 Fullerton, ca 92836 (714) 526-2448 Fax: (714) 526-4961 www.burnettbros.com Screen Printing

HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Flame, Air Plasma, Corona

HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D

industrial Pad Printing supplies 2212 radford st. el Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com/www.kentmexico.com Flame, Cold Gas Plasma, Corona

cPs resources, inc. 2000 innovation dr. indian Trail, nc 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (208) 247-2392 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Hot Stamping

dubuit america 70 monaco dr. roselle, il 60172 (630) 894-9500 Fax: (630) 894-9600 www.dubuitgroup.com Containers/3D

industrial Pad Printing supplies 2212 radford st. el Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com/www.kentmexico.com Flat Sheet

dukane corporation 2900 dukane dr. st. charles, il 60174 (630) 797-4900 Fax: (630) 797-4949 www.dukane.com/us Assembly graphic Parts international, inc. 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 725-4900 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.gpiparts.com Screen Printing HotstampandPadprint.com 128 augusta Trail cullman, al 35057 (256) 566-1342 www.hotstampandpadprint.com Pad Printing, Hot Stamping, Screen Printing industrial Pad Printing supplies 2212 radford st. el Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com/www.kentmexico.com Pad Printing, Hot Stamping, Screen Printing ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4473 www.itwtranstech.com Pad Printing

accusonics, inc. 5401 Patton dr., unit 113 lisle, il 60532 (630) 769-1886 Fax: (630) 769-1887 www.accusonics.com Assembly

apex machine company 3000 ne 12th Terr. Ft. lauderdale, Fl 33334 (954) 566-1572 Fax: (954) 563-2844 www.apexmachine.com Flame, Corona

die stampco, inc. 1301 n. lincoln st. bay city, mi 48708 (989) 893-7790 Fax: (989) 893-7741 www.diestampco.com Hot Stamping

american screen Printing equipment 4321 n. Knox ave. chicago, il 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.screenprintmachinery.com

miller Process coating company 850 Watercrest Way cheswick, Pa 15024 (724) 274-5880 Fax: (724) 274-5882 www.millerprocess.com Screen Printing Plasmatreat North America 2541 Technology Dr. Elgin, IL 60124 (847) 783-0622 Fax: (847) 783-0991 www.plasmatreat.com Atmospheric Plasma Tampoprint international corporation 1400 26th st. Vero beach, Fl 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Pad Printing Tooltex, inc. 6160 seeds rd. grove city, oH 43123 (614) 539-3222 Fax: (614) 539-3223 www.tooltex.com Assembly, Hot Stamping

UV Curing Equipment

Deco Technology Group 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Pad Printing, Hot Stamping, Screen Printing

Nordson Corporation 300 Nordson Dr. Amherst, OH 44001 (440) 985-4000 www.nordson.com

Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 23


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PRODUCT FOCUS Pad Printing Equipment/Supplies

Inkcups Now Corporation 978.646.8980 www.inkcups.com Inkcups Now Corp. has introduced the B150 pad printer – a compact industrial grade single-color pad printer for large images, geared to high-volume production. The 150mm patented VersaCup ink cup assembly prints images of up to 140mm in diameter. The powerful compression capability of 779 lbs allows for easy handling of large, hard print pads, which enables the highest quality images on tagless garments, drinkware, injection-molded housings, bezels and other products up to 5.5” in height (including fixture). Unlike most competitors’ pad printers of a similar size, the B150 features the ability to program variable pad delays (both over the plate and the part), print speed and double print function, which gives the operator complete control over the printing cycle and print opacity. The B150 can be used as a benchtop unit or mounted onto a base cabinet. Tool-less setup allows for rapid job changeover and an illuminated plate system provides visibility to the work area. All these features make the ICN-B150 perhaps the most versatile and cost effective benchtop printer for large images available to the pad printing industry. Autoroll Print Technologies 800.786.6598 www.autoroll.com Autoroll Print Technologies offers the Marabu Color Dispenser – a quality color mixing system designed for use with Marabu solvent-based pad printing inks, as well as its full line of Marabu UV inks. The system is used in conjunction with the Marabu standard MCM software and has a test accuracy of 0.04 – 0.05 grams. It includes 18-station ink canisters and the ink can be stirred right in the canisters. The dispenser valves are cleaned automatically after each use. Automated Industrial Systems Inc. 814.838.2270 www.padmark.com PadMark pad printers are engineered for the reliability, ease-ofuse and flexibility required to meet the high standards of the plastics decorating industry. The one- and two-color models can be used individually or docked together in any

26 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

combination to achieve the required number of colors. The optional automatic pad cleaner and viscosity controller provide the highest quality marks every time. A quick-change inking system and PLC control easily accommodate multiple applications. Customized part fixtures and part handling equipment also are available to provide the proper level of automation needed for the most cost-efficient production. Tampoprint 800.810-8896 www.tampoprintusa.com The Linear Module 2010 pad printing machine features up to six interchangeable “plug and play” (no tools requires) sealed ink cup doctoring units with a choice of 90mm, 130mm or 210mm diameter sealed ink cups; a high-speed, servo-driven, linear indexer for X-axis part-conveying using a single nesting fixture (with rotation and/or Y-axis) and easy programming/recall using touch screen controls. Pads actuate independently for printing, so there is no interference. Automatic pad cleaning is available, as is the capability to replace any one of the six stations with a Tampoprint laser marking system. The system can operate at up to 250 parts per hour, depending on the required number of colors and/or sides of the parts being processed. Comdec 800.445.9176 www.comdecinc.com Comdec’s machine division SMI offers highly advanced pad printing equipment with several unique features. The HD printer has a programmable pad shuttle for up to five colors. The pads move to the part being printed, located over the front center of the machine, which reduces flexing and print distortion dramatically. The HD printer can be equipped with 180mm ink cups down to 60mm ink cups. The cliché table is variable as well. SMI offers servo drive models and vision systems designed for the customer’s specific needs for the most cost effective way of pad printing. Proell, Inc. (630) 587-2300 www.proell.us Proell, Inc.’s NoriProp N high-gloss one-component pad printing ink is an excellent choice for untreated and pre-treated polypropylene. The ink demonstrates comparatively good


resistance toward hand perspiration and creams. Due to these advantages, NoriProp N is suitable for decorating hand-held devices and instruments made from polypropylene. The ink also is easily processed, regardless of whether the machine is equipped with an open well or a closed cup and is available in a wide range of color shades from stock. Diversified Printing Techniques 704.583.9433 www.diverprint.com Diversified Printing Techniques is the full solution company for all decorating needs. Whether in the promotional or manufacturing industries, Diversified can provide the pad printing equipment needed from simple single-color to complex multi-color jobs. A wide range of inks, a large variety of pads and many different styles of plates, including long-life laser plates are available. Diversified offers green solutions that save money while reducing environmental impact. Its staff of knowledgeable engineers and technicians combined with its friendly customer service provides customers with innovative solutions with ease for all their printing and decorating applications. Pad Print Machinery of Vermont 800.272.7764 www.padprintmachinery.com Pad Print Machinery of Vermont has introduced the new high-speed servodriven KV09 compact pad printer – excellent for the integration into existing automation production lines. The touch screen control panel can be assembled in the front or back of the machine head. Features include a programmable pad cleaning system, speeds up to 3,500 cycles

per hour, 110mm diameter sealed cup, and a cliché size of 120x250mm. Pad Print Machinery of Vermont offers custom solutions, standard pad printers, industrial digital ink-jet, consumables and other auxiliary equipment. Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 915.875.1020 www.indpad.com Industrial Pad Printing Supplies and Kent International formally introduce a brand new perception in pad printing, “Green Pad Printing” an environmentally friendly printing process developed to reduce the use of chemicals in the pad printing industry. With 5 basic elements: green ink cup, green plate, KCTP-F20, green ink (UV), and green pad printer, Industrial Pad Printing is the first agent to formally introduce this concept to all its customers. To learn more on green pad printing and request a free copy of the “Go Green Pad Printing” (written by Mr. David Ho, Kent’s International founder), visit www.kentmexico.com. In Mexico, call +52-656-617-6789. The book is available in English or Spanish (while supplies last). Printa Systems (800) 601-6240 www.printa.com Printa Systems offers the 990 series versatile pad printing system with the ability to decorate a wide range of irregularly shaped items such as coffee cups, sports bottles, pocket knives, golf balls, calculators and more. The system can be converted from a pad printer to a cylindrical screen printer in a matter of minutes, and the changeover is as simple as removing the three pad printing components and replacing them with the three cylindrical attachments. Printa Systems also offers accessories, supplies, training, product sourcing help and technical support. Full training and lifetime warranty are included with every start-up package. n

Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 27


FOCUS

Greener Solutions for Pad Printing

By John Kaverman, Tampoprint International Corporation

Advancements in the pad printing industry have helped companies reduce their environmental footprint in a number of ways. The utilization of electro-mechanical drive systems in modern pad printing machines and accessories has significantly reduced utility costs. Advancements in laser-engraved clichĂŠ materials have largely replaced older, chemically-intensive film and clichĂŠ developing processes. UV (ultraviolet)-cure inks are rapidly gaining popularity over conventional, solvent-based ink systems in a number of industries due to their lack of an operational pot-life. This article will discuss the impact of electro-mechanical drive systems, laser engraved clichĂŠ materials and UV-curable inks. Electromechanical Drive Benefits The majority of pad printing machines feature electronically controlled pneumatic drive systems. Because compressed air is one of the most expensive sources of mechanical energy in the industrial setting, it is more energy efficient, and therefore less expensive, to use pad printing machines that feature an electromechanical drive. While compressed air is a versatile tool, running air compressors uses more energy than any other equipment. Air compressor efficiency is the ratio of energy input to energy output. Many air compressors may be running at efficiencies as low as 10 percent. Consider the cost of the electricity used to generate the compressed air. The average cost for electricity in the United States in 2009 was $ 0.1002 per kWh1. This example utilizes a Tampoprint Model SIC 90 machine with a compressed air consumption of 2.7 NL (normal liters) per cycle. If the machine is working at an average rate of 1,000 cycles per hour, it will require 2,700 NL (about 950 cubic feet per hour) at 6 bar (90 p.s.i). Maintaining that pressure at the machine with an oil injected rotary screw compressor would require, on average2 , about 15 kW. By comparison, an electromechanically driven machine (such as the Tampoprint Model Hermetic 911) consumes a mere 1 kW in performing the same amount of work.

28 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

If the air delivery system was 100-percent efficient, and cost was calculated using the average industrial cost of electricity, the electromechanical machine would save $2,024.00 per year. If the air delivery system is only 25-percent efficient, the electromechanical machine becomes $ 3,650.00 less expensive to operate annually. Increasing Compressed Air Delivery System Efficiency If switching to electromechanical machines is not an immediate option, a lot can be done to increase the efficiency of the compressed air delivery system. Four aspects of compressed air systems are crucial to efficiency: Storage tank. Choose a storage tank that can accommodate the needs of the system and prevent pressure from dropping below the minimum. This is especially important when there is peak demand in production, such as when running continuously and when running several machines off the same compressor. The common response to machine malfunctions due to a decrease in air pressure is simply to increase the system pressure. The energy wasted by increasing the system pressure could be saved by increasing the size of the storage tank or by installing smaller accumulating tanks near the pad printers themselves.


Air delivery system layout. Delivery lines that are too long, too narrow and have too many sharp turns are inefficient because they result in significant pressure loss. The solution is to place the compressor and/or storage tank closer to the pad printers, use larger diameter delivery lines and avoid sharp turns and loops whenever possible. Air intake temperature. Cooler air requires far less energy to compress than does warmer air. Reducing the temperature of intake air by moving the compressor air intake outside (in cooler climates) or using an intake air chiller can substantially reduce the amount of energy required for compression. Maintenance. Maintenance can have the most significant impact on efficiency. The number one source of energy loss in a compressed air delivery system is leakage. Although leaks often are very small, significant amounts of air can be lost. The graph on page 28 illustrates the amount of air lost through different orifice sizes. Finally, it is important to include the replacement of compressed air delivery system filtration media in a preventive maintenance program.

Pad Printing & Laser Engraving Equipment & Supplies

Laser Engraved Clichés Laser technology is rapidly replacing the cliché etching and engraving processes of the past. As a result, it is no longer necessary to handle and dispose of the hazardous chemicals necessary to coat, develop and etch steel and photopolymer clichés. For example, in order to etch a steel cliché the steel must first be coated with a lacquer-based photo-resist. After exposure, the unexposed resist is removed in a developing process. After developing, a second “spot” application of photo-resist is applied as a “touch-up” to non-image areas. Etching is accomplished by running the cliché through a carefully controlled bath of ferric chloride, or in some cases acid. Finally, the photo-resist is removed with acetone. Photopolymer clichés may be developed in distilled water or denatured ethyl alcohol; however, as is true with steel clichés, it is still recommended that an ortho-chromatic film be utilized as the carrier for the image being exposed. While the developer is commonly recycled to remove silver halides, there are still environmental considerations for disposal. Aside from the inherent liabilities involved in working with these chemicals and the amount of ventilation and personal

ORIGINAL R R

www.tampoprintusa.com

Focus on Automation. We’ve been creating automated pad printing, laser marking and assembly solutions for over 50 years, with a focus on the futures of our valued customers. With over 150 patents, more than 100,000 machines installed around the world, and the most experienced network of dealers in the industry, we’re confident that when the question is one of automation, we’ve got the answer.

Tampoprint International Corporation

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Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 29


 p. 29

FOCUS

protection required to keep employees safe, one also must contend with costs associated with recycling and/or disposal. CO2 and YAG Lasers Relatively new to pad printing, CO2 and YAG lasers can engrave exposed photopolymer, hardened and un-hardened steel, aluminum oxide, ceramic and numerous proprietary cliché materials. Laser systems take a graphic image directly from a computer-based graphics program such as Adobe Illustrator or CorelDraw, convert it using proprietary RIP (routing information protocol) software and engrave it directly into the cliché surface. The only by-product generated is fumes, which are filtered out before the air is returned to the operating environment. While the capital investment required to obtain a properly designed laser for cliché etching may seem sizeable, it is easily justified by the amount of money that is saved on labor alone, not to mention the costs associated with shipping, handling and disposal of the chemistry required to etch or engrave the “old way”.

specializing in decorating your durable products All graphics have a function. To warn. To sell. To track. Romo Durable Graphics is continually challenged to produce functional graphics for our customers. We: • Decorate products that are outside in sun, rain & snow for years. • Print barcode tracking decals for containers that are commercially washed 300+ times. • Resurface furniture and surfaces with graffiti-resistant decals.

We manufacture decals with a lasting impression. Call us today!

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In-mold Graphic Solutions is a division of Romo Durable Graphics

30 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

UV Curable Inks UV pad printing inks have unique rheology requirements. During the pad printing cycle, the ink must be able to rapidly change/increase viscosity in order to be efficiently transferred. Conventional solvent-based pad printing inks contain 60 to 70percent solvent. It is the evaporation of the solvent that allows the ink to rapidly change viscosity for efficient transfer. UV inks, by comparison, contain about 30-percent solvent. This reduced solvent content means lower VOC (volatile organic compound) emissions, which is better for the environment. UV inks also have an indefinite pot life, meaning that the unused ink does not have to be discarded once pot life has expired, as is the case with conventional two-component (ink + hardener) pad printing inks. UV curing equipment requires approximately 20 percent of the energy required to run a heat (IR) tunnel4; therefore, electricity, or natural gas (assuming you’re using a gas dryer), is saved. UV curing equipment also requires less floor space and less time, so the building doesn’t have to be as large and more work can be accomplished in less time, which translates to lower overall utility costs. While UV inks are not yet ready to replace conventional solvent-based pad printing inks in all applications, they are still worth considering, especially if working with highly automated systems and clear or lighter colored substrates. Companies that truly wish to remain competitive in today’s global economy realize the importance of actively seeking out and implementing “greener” manufacturing solutions. Hopefully this article will serve to initiate discussion as to how pad printing operations in the United States and beyond can be fine-tuned in an effort to create a better environment for future generations. n References U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly. January, 2010. 1

Don’t Err with Compressed Air, David M. McCulloch, Chemical Processing, 2008.

2

Energy Efficiency in Air Compressors, N.C. Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance, January 2004. 3

4

UV Curing comes to Pad Printing. UVEXS Corporation, www.

uvexs.com.

John Kaverman is national sales manager for Tampoprint International Corporation. He holds a degree in printing from Ferris State University and has over twenty years of plastics decorating experience in capacities including production, process and applications engineering, sales and management. He may be reached via email at padprintpro@gmail.com. For information on Tampoprint products, visit www.tampoprintusa.com.


NoriProp N

Pad printing ink for untreated polypropylene

NoriProp N is a glossy one-component pad printing ink for untreated and pre-treated polypropylene. NoriProp N shows comparatively good resistances to hand perspiration and creams.

– thinner addition up to 25 % – addition of hardener (Hardener PUR®-ZK No. 2) is possible to improve chemical and mechanical resistances

Applications: – medical instruments (syringes and bags) – office supplies, writing instruments – advertising material

Basic Colors for the Proell Matching System

Substrates: – untreated PP – pre-treated PP and PE – coated substrates Ink adhesion and resistance tests are always recommended, due to the many various types of PP and PE.

093 Colorless

467 Pink Transparent

102 Citron

472 Violet

104 Yellow

566 Blue Transparent

207 Orange

669 Green Transparent

312 Red

945 White

368 Red Transparent

948 Black

429 Red Violet

Properties: – glossy – high grade pigments, free of heavy metals, with excellent light fastness – suitable for decorating toys (DIN EN 71, part 3) – good resistances to hand perspiration and creams – depending on material composition and thickness of the ink film, it may take a few days to achieve final adhesion – shelf life 4 years

Standard Colors 209 Orange

523 Blue Dark

315 Red Medium

628 Green Light

520 Ultra Blue

944 White Opaque

522 Marine Blue

746/002 Silver

Process Inks

Processing: The ink is easily processable, regardless of whether the machine is equipped with an open well or closed cup. Conventional pads and clichés can be used. – excellent printability and reproduction of detail

157 Process Yellow

948 Black

358 Process Magenta

093 Colorless

559 Process Cyan

www.proell.us Proell, Inc.

·

2751 Dukane Drive

·

St. Charles, IL 60174-3343 USA

·

Phone 630-587-2300

·

Fax 630-587-2666

·

e-mail: info@proell.us


ASSEMBLY

Julius Vogel and David Grewell, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University

With the growing demand for environmentally friendly biorenewable resources, there has been a parallel growth in the development of bioplastics. These include commercially available starch-derived plastics and plastics derived from renewable oil and proteins. As with any plastic, these new materials often must be joined to produce final products. This article reviews impulse and ultrasonic welding of PLA as well as friction welding of plant protein-based plastics. It was found that each of these plastics can be welded with weld strengths matching the parent material strengths. Bioplastics are currently defined by the BioPreferred for semidurable plastic films with a minimum content level of 45 percent and disposable cutlery of 48 percent of renewable feedstock. While the materials that meet this minimum requirement may help offset the negative impacts of petrochemical plastics, plastics that are 100 percent renewable represent more environmentally friendly plastics. The reason for the ambiguity on the environmental impact is the ongoing studies on the life cycle analysis that define the impact of any product on the environment. Because it is commonly reported that many of the materials such as PLA (polylactic acid) and plant protein plastics result in less green house gas production and energy usage, this article reviews the welding of these materials for assembly of commercial products. Polylactic acid is a biodegradable polymer derived from the monomer lactic acid. It is made from 100-percent renewable resources such as sugar beets, wheat, corn or other starch-rich crops. During the production, the corn (or other feedstocks) is initially milled, then slurried in water and heated – a process called mashing. This process separates the starch from the hulls of the corn, sterilizes the corn and swells the starch granules for depolymerization into lower molecular-weight molecules sugars. The starch is then further depolymerised to simple fermentable sugars through an enzymatic reaction called saccharification. The sugar molecules (dextrose or glucose) are then converted to lactic acid through fermentation. The lactic acid is then polymerized, either through a condensation reaction or through a ring opening process. Condensation polymerization involves the removal of water through condensation and the use of a solvent under a high temperature in vacuum. Condensation polymerization in a high-boiling-point solvent results in a high molecularweight PLA, while the condensation polymerization at lower

32 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

temperatures generally produces lower molecular-weight polymers, which can be additionally treated with coupling reagents to produce high molecular PLA. In addition to converting starch into polymers, other researchers have studied the use of plant proteins, a natural polymerized amino acid, as plastics. These polymers have the advantage of being renewable, biodegradable and not linked to depleting fossil fuels. The thermo-mechanical and water-absorption properties of soy protein-based plastics depend heavily on the plasticizers used (e.g., glycerol, ethylene glycerol, butanediol, sorghum wax and sorbitol), addition of cross-linking agents (e.g., zinc sulfate, acedic anhydride, formaldehyde) and processing parameters (e.g., extrusion pressure and temperature and initial moisture content). These polymers can be engineered for structural applications by incorporating nanoscale reinforcements, such as biocompatible nanoclays, to create a composite. The addition of the nanoclay also lowers the overall cost. Another, cost effective matrix material is defatted soy flour (which contains approximately 53-percent protein), which historically has inferior mechanical properties to the already low cost soy protein isolate (ca. 92-percent protein). Because of its low cost, soy protein-based plastics in particular have the potential to replace traditional plastics in applications ranging from packaging to disposable road signs to drug delivery.

Figure 1. Fracture surfaces of (A) strong weld, (B) intermediate strength weld (C) and weak weld

Because most applications cannot be molded as a single part, joining of sub-components is often required. While there are a number of methods for joining plastics, it is common to use


ultrasonic, vibration, hot plate and impulse welding to join films and sealing applications. Researchers have shown that while hot plate welding is not effective in joining plant protein plastics, vibration welding can produce welds with near parent material strengths. Figure 1 shows photographs of various fracture surfaces of the vibration welded lap joints. It is seen in sample (A), where a relatively strong weld was noted (0.45 MPa (66 psi)), that there is evidence of significant material shearing pull out at the faying surface. This suggests that the weld is actually near the parent material strength. In contrast, samples with (B) intermediate (0.4 MPa (58 psi)) and (C) weak weld strengths (0.3 MPa) show some shearing and pull out and very little shear and pull out, respectively. Other work has studied the welding of PLA with impulse and ultrasonic welding. The results showed that relatively high weld strengths could be achieved with impulse welding over a relatively wide range of parameters. In addition, ultrasonic welding produced samples of relatively high strength. However, while this process can be used with faster cycle times, it was less robust. In detail, ultrasonic-welded samples of a thickness of 254 μm that were welded with a cycle time of 0.25 s had an average strength of approximately 160 N (36 lbs), while the results showed a standard deviation up to 50 N (11 lbs), see Figure 2 (on previous page).

Figure 2. Tensile strength at increasing weld time, weld force = 445 N, weld amplitude = 64 μmp-p, base material strength shown for 0s weld time

In impulse welding, samples of 100 μm thickness welded at 2 and 3 s had a strength of approximately 75 N (17 lbs), while the deviation was approximately 3 or 4 N (0.7 or 0.9 lbs), see Figure 3. It also was seen that sample thickness affected the optimized welding parameters as well as ultimate strength. A thickness of 305 μm had a weld strength of 80 N (18 lbs) while the strength was 25-30 N (5.6 to 6.7 lbs) at a thickness of 200 and 254 μm.

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 p. 33

ASSEMBLY

the samples. This allows the welding cycle to be completed within a relatively short period of time (<3-5 s). With thicker samples and in order to further reduce the cycle time, it is common to utilize a duel heating head where two heating elements are placed on both sides of the films.

Figure 3. Tensile test results of impulse welded films, base material strength is shown for 0 s weld time

In this work, ultrasonic welding of PLA was further studied. Ultrasonic welding is an important process in the industry because it is fast, economical and has a high repeatability to produce high-quality joints. While it can be used to join crystalline materials, it is mostly used for joining amorphous materials, such as polystyrene. Examples of ultrasonic-welded applications are electrical switches, vacuum and pressure valves, floats and aerosol containers. During ultrasonic welding, mechanical vibrations at high frequencies of 20 – 40 kHz at a low amplitude (usually between 20 – 100 μmp-p) are applied to the parts to be joined. The heat generated by the cyclical deformation of the thermoplastic material is highest at the interface of the parts because of surface asperities resulting in intermolecular friction to melt and fusion-bond the plastics. Typical joint designs include energy directors and shear joints for rigid components. However for welding films, it is common not to incorporate a joint design and rely on asperity peaks and interfacial heating.

To read this article in its entirety, including experimental data and references, visit the Plastics Decorating website: www.plasticsdecorating.com. In impulse welding, one or more electrically heated bars/ elements are pressed against the surfaces of the films to be welded until they melt and bond at the faying surfaces. Temperature, time and pressure are the main process parameters. Most impulse equipment include a nichrom heating element with a small thermal mass that is heated quickly with electrical current (~<2 s). Once the element(s) apply sufficient heat to promote bonding, the energy is discontinued and the residual heat is quickly absorbed via thermal conduction by the thermal mass of the welding head so as to quickly cool

34 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

While there are a wide range of welding processes, this work evaluated the use of vibration and hot plate welding to join soybean protein-based nano-composite polymers that were exfoliated with high-powered ultrasonics. Vibration welding is a well-established process that can create large, sealed, mechanically strong weld seams with cycle times of only a few seconds. It is mainly used when short cycle times are demanded and the part is too large for the use of ultrasonic welding. Often, vibration welding is preferable to heated-tool welding due to its relatively short cycle times. In vibration welding, the two parts to be joined are clamped together under a relatively high force. At a preset force, one part is vibrated relative to the second, usually with a displacement between 0.5 and 1.5 mm. The motion results in frictional heating. This heat results in the joining surfaces melting and fusing together. Hot plate welding is one of the most popular methods for joining thermoplastics because it is a simple, reliable and economical way of producing strong welds. Hot plate welding works by placing the two components to be welded against or near a heated tool. The weld surface is then heated by conduction, convection, and radiation to promote melting. Once a certain amount of melt is built up at the faying surfaces, the heat source is removed and the two surfaces are brought together. Usually there is a certain amount of squeeze flow in order to assure proper fusion and help remove any contamination. The interface is then allowed to solidify resulting in a weld. While bioplastics have only made a marginal impact in displacing petrochemical plastics, their use will certainly grow. This growth will only be possible by a better understanding of these materials, including processing and secondary operations such as welding, sealing and cutting. Researchers are currently developing this knowledge for a wide range of processes, including heated tool, impulse, vibration and ultrasonic welding. Some of this work is imperial while some of it is also fundamental in nature. For example, researchers are developing models to predict weld strength based on molecular diffusion and activation energy. The knowledge gained from this work will promote the use of bioplastics as it reduces the risks of adopting new materials. While bioplastics are not truly carbon natural, their adoption is important in reducing dependence on petrochemical feedstock, as well as reducing production of green house gases. n


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© 2011, Mimaki USA, Inc. • 150 Satellite Blvd., NE, Suwanee, GA 30024-7128, USA Fax: 678-730-0200. Outside the USA: Mimaki Engineering Co., Ltd. • www.mimaki.co.jp


S

STRATEGIES

Tax Credits for Small-Business Health-Care Costs in 2010

What is the Definition of a “Small Business”? One of the first provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to go into effect is a health-care tax credit for small businesses and tax-exempt organizations. This credit is effective for tax years 2010 through 2013 and is designed to encourage small businesses and certain tax-exempt organizations to begin providing health-care coverage for their employees or continue the coverage they currently have. So, is the definition of a small business the same as we have heard described for other tax incentives and disincentives? Well, of course, the devil is in the details. Small businesses and qualified tax-exempt organizations that qualify for the maximum credit are defined as employers having 10 or fewer full-time-equivalent employees (FTEs) with average wages of less than $25,000. The credit is phased out for employers with more than 10 but fewer than 25 FTEs and average wages between $25,000 and $50,000. The number of FTEs is determined by dividing the total hours for which the employer pays wages, but not greater than 2,080 per employee, by 2080. Average annual wages

are determined by dividing total wages paid by the employer to employees during the year by the number of the employer’s FTEs. Since the credit is based on full-time equivalents, it is possible for an employer with more than 50 employees to qualify for the credit if many of its employees are part-time help. Business owners, including partners in a partnership, sole proprietors (and 2 percent or more shareholders in an S Corporation) and its family members do not count as employees; therefore, their wages and hours are not included in the limitation. The credit is based on a percentage of the premiums employers pay for their employees and is capped by the average premium of the small-group market in a state determined by the Department of Health and Human Services and published by the IRS. The employer must pay for over 50 percent of the cost of coverage in order to qualify, and can take a credit for 35 percent of the actual premiums paid by the employer. The amount of the credit reduces the deduction that the employer takes for insurance premiums, thereby changing a deduction into a credit. Tax-exempt organizations can claim a credit for 25 percent of the premiums paid but cannot exceed the total amount of income and medical tax (both employee and employer share) for the employee. For an example of how to calculate the credit, go to http://www.blackmankallick.com/articles/2010/11/calculation-of-health-care-tax-credit/. The credit is claimed on the employer’s 2010 tax return and can offset both regular tax and alternative minimum tax. The IRS will provide future guidance on how a tax-exempt employer claims the credit, which is refundable. For qualified small businesses, the credit is a general business credit, and if the credit exceeds the amount of tax for the year, the unused credit may be carried back one year, or forward twenty. For 2010, the credit is only allowed to be carried forward, since you cannot carry back the credit to a year before the credit was effective. This credit is the first of many changes that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will create. It was intended to promote health-care coverage for small businesses that employ low- and moderate-income workers. If you have been considering offering health insurance for your employees, and you qualify for this credit, this may be a great incentive to start offering health insurance. n Acknowledgement This article was taken from the Blackman Kallick Tax Highlights, November 4, 2010. For further questions or comments, contact Bailey Maenner at 312.980.3248 or Teri Newman at 312.980.2926 with Blackman Kallick. For more information, visit www.blackmankallick.com.

36 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011


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A

ASSOCIATION

Letter from the Chairman They’re coming…innovative products that are introducing biopolymers for increasing sustainable content, reducing weight and/or cutting the environmental burden of processes which manufacture automobiles, medical devices and electronics. In the auto industry, this drive aims to increase sustainable content and to reduce material weight because of an increasing focus on emissions reduction and increased fuel economy. This trend has opened up an array of opportunities for plastics, including high-performance materials, in the automotive industry. Currently, plastics account for a share of around 20 percent by weight among the materials that are being used in passenger vehicles. However, the evolution of new electric models and the increasing focus on designing vehicles efficiently have compelled material designers and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to look beyond traditional plastics. This in turn has propelled plastics manufacturers to focus on product innovation and also to evaluate opportunities for high-performance renewable plastics in a wider arena of automotive applications. From a decorating and assembly perspective, these materials also must process favorably with paints, coatings and adhesives. DuPont Performance Polymers, for example, has recently introduced a number of renewably sourced biopolymer products that are made, in whole or in part, from renewable agricultural feedstocks such as corn, castor beans and non-food biomass, rather than petroleum, to help these industries reduce dependence on depleteable petroleum-based products. Polycon Industries, a division of Magna International, recently introduced car bumpers made with a 50-percent soy polyol blend.

Polycon developed the bumpers through a partnership with Dow Automotive, using a Reaction Injection Molded (RIM) fascia. In order to pass all automotive physical and paint adhesion test requirements, surface preparation and paint formulation are key starting points. Automotive paints and coating formulations are being tested under standard principles whereby latex particles of linear polymer chains are dispersed in an aqueous solvent. As the solvent evaporates, the latex particles coalesce and the polymer chains interdiffuse a distance equal to their radius of gyration to obtain a good film strength. Additional reactions, such as photo-curing or oxidation, to promote light cross-linking may be needed to improve the creep distance of the paint or coating. Bio-based polymers and materials will be fully launched into the market once the general conditions have changed to the extent that they are more advantageous than petrochemical plastics. It will take several more years before large numbers of end users will be able to test these bio-based polymers and materials in special prototypes and product scenarios. But, they’re coming. If you want to be ahead of the curve on technologies in plastics decorating and assembly, please consider joining the SPE Decorating & Assembly Division by contacting SPE at www.4spe.org or me directly at rwolf@enerconmail.com. Rory A. Wolf Enercon Industries Corporation Chair, SPE Decorating & Assembly Division

Laser Welding Webinar Scheduled for February The SPE Decorating & Assembly Division and Plastics Decorating magazine will continue its series of webinars with its first 2011 e-event entitled “Thermoplastic Laser Welding – Innovative Methods Emerge” scheduled for February 22nd at 10:00 a.m. CST. The speaker, Jerry Zybko of Leister Technologies, will discuss how laser welding has continued to evolve and cover such topics as the most receptive types of polymers, proper clamping for optimum laser welding, feasible cycle times obtainable and part design recommendations. To learn more or to register for this webinar, visit www.plasticsdecorating.com and click on Webinars. If you are unable to attend the webinar but would like to access it at a later date, call Plastics Decorating at 785.271.5801.

38 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011


Decorating & Assembly Division Presents at ANTEC™ 2011 The SPE Decorating & Assembly Division plans a strong presence at ANTEC ™ 2011, May 1-5, Boston, MA, with three technical sessions on advancements in decorating and assembly processes: Session One (May 2, 2011, afternoon) will be a joint session with the SPE Flexible Packaging Division. The keynote paper will be on advances in inkjet decoration on plastics. Papers in the session will cover the following: • • • •

UV curable coatings for paint and PVD applications Practical plasma surface pre-treatment Robust soft touch coatings Spray application and fluid delivery system selection

Session Two (May 3, 2011, afternoon) will kick off with a keynote paper on advances in IMD and the importance of films and foils. Papers in this session will cover the following: • Surface modification: cleaning, adhesion and functionalization • New technology for the measurement of surface energy • Advances in laser marking • Thermoformable bright films for TPO applications • Thermally induced wrinkling in decorative films • Wear testing • Six Sigma troubleshooting Session Three (May 4, 2011, morning), a joint session with the Joining of Plastics and Composites SIG, will focus on the adhesive bonding of plastics. Papers will cover the following: • Structural bonding alternatives for plastics • Effects of atmospheric pressure plasma on adhesion • Modeling the aging process on thermoplastic surfaces after plasma treatment • Bonding polyolefin-based plastics • Innovative degree of cure detection in light-cured acrylic adhesives For information and complete programming for ANTEC™ 2011, visit www.4spe.org or call 203.775.0471. n


TECHNOLOGY

High-Performance Waterborne Coatings By Scott R. Sabreen, The Sabreen Group, Inc.

Decorative waterborne coatings provide exceptional appearance, functionality, value and are environmentally friendly. Waterborne coating is a fast-developing technology using water as the means to transfer the coating to the plastic surface and is becoming the new standard, replacing many of its solvent-based counterparts. Today’s waterborne chemistries can offer equal to or better cosmetic and physical performance properties than solventborne for many applications. This is the first in a two-part series of waterborne coatings. This article will focus on basic single-component, air-dry technology. Part two will present alternative waterborne resin applications using acrylics, epoxies and urethanes. Many of today’s paints and coatings contribute substantial quantities of VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds) and HAPs (Hazardous Air Pollutants) which create poor air quality. The Clean Air Act of 1990 mandates significant reductions in the VOC and HAP levels generated by users of paints and coatings. Further, the California Air Resources Board (ARB) adopted a suggested control measure (SCM) for coatings in October 2005. The purpose of the SCM is to improve consistency and enforceability among air district rules and to achieve VOC emissions reductions beginning in 2009. The SCM serves as a model that each air district may adopt to meet the state implementation plan and California Clean Air Act requirements. In many cases this will require users to switch from solventborne coatings to alternative compliant coatings, such as waterborne.

Today's waterborne chemistries can offer equal to or better cosmetic and physical performance properties.

40 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

Advantages of Waterborne Coatings •

Excellent appearance, high-gloss retention and non-yellowing film

Low to zero VOC and HAP emissions, reduces toxicity and odor, improved worker safety

High durability, chemical, corrosion, dirt, and scratch-rub resistance

Excellent freeze/thaw stability

High dry film-build capability

Application ease, minimal gun nozzle clogging

Dip coating can be an application process

Simple clean-up using water

Minimizes or eliminates disposal of hazardous waste Table 1

High-performance waterborne coatings achieve ultrahigh decorative finish standards and are rapidly taking hold in many painting and coating market sectors. (For this article the words “paints” and “coatings” are used interchangeably.) Waterborne coatings are environmentally “green” and meet aggressive emissions regulations, whereby manufacturers have been able to change from solventborne paint systems in many applications. Waterborne coatings are less toxic, have low VOC levels and are less flammable. Their use will reduce air emissions and improve worker health and safety. Waterborne coatings are available in different curing mechanisms including a) evaporation, b) oven bake and c) UV-curable. In recent years, industries comprising the automotive, marine and architectural OEMs have dramatically increased their usage of pigmented and clearcoat (topcoat) waterborne coatings. Table 1 summarizes some of the many advantages for using waterborne coatings.


Decorative and Functional Pigmented and Metallic Foils CFC is the go-to-source when you need heat transfer foils for hot stamp plastic decorating. Our pigmented and metallic foils are both decorative and functional; and feature such functional characteristics as resistance to abrasion, fade, heat distortion, scratch, moisture, mar and chemical resistance. With CFC, you get:

• Efficiency - Foils feature easy release and can be applied inline on the extruder • Variety - Foils availabe in vivid solid colors to highly polished metal appearances • Versatility - Foils provide superior coverage on broad areas, banding and very fine detail parts • Adaptability - Foils can be used to decorate a wide variety of consumer and industrial products • Availability - Stock items on hand, in a variety of colors, ready to ship • Flexibility - Need small quantities, contact CFC Foils Direct at 1-800-393-4505 • Opportunity - We offer custom color matching, and innovative solutions for specialty projects • Reliability - We provide customer-focused solutions for all your hot stamp plastic decorating needs

Need a sample, a quote, or help with your next project, contact us today at: CFC International Corporation, An ITW Company 500 State Street • Chicago Heights, IL 60411 • Phone: 708-891-3456 • Fax: 708-758-5989 • E-mail: salesinfo@cfcintl.com

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• Borosilicate reflectors – The industry’s only five-year warranty on both workmanship

and reflectivity. This is what a warranty should be. • Dichroic coatings – 20-25% less heat than polished aluminum reflectors with no oxidation. Included with all CoolWave systems. • Optional internal blower – eliminates the need for ducting and noisy external blowers. • Easy operator interface – Simple, powerful control over your UV curing systems. Constant feedback of system status. • Enhanced diagnostics – Monitor system temperatures and air flow pressures automatically.

For a free line trial, contact us today at 1.800.524.1322 or visit www.nordsonuv.com © Nordson Corporation 2011

nordson.com

+1.440.985.4000


 p. 40

TECHNOLOGY

Basics of Waterborne Coating In solventborne coatings, the fluidizing medium is an organic solvent or blend of organic solvents (MEK, MIBK, xylene, toluene, etc.). To be classified as a “waterborne” coating, water must be an important or major fluidizing medium. Most coatings that qualify as waterborne coatings also contain some organic co-solvents in the fluidizing media. These tend to be low-molecular weight polar ketones, alcohols and esters. Typical chemical composition is approximately 50-percent water, 45-percent solids and 5-percent co-solvents (can range from 2-20 percent of the fluidizing medium).

Wet Paint

Partially Dry Paint

Figure 1

Completely Dry Film

In order to understand the different methods of drying singlecomponent waterborne coatings, it is necessary to understand the chemistry on how the water is removed from the coating itself. The water and co-solvents are removed from the surface of the paint coating via evaporation (physical drying or baking, without chemical cross-linking). The water below the surface migrates to the surface at a speed based upon the rate of diffusion of the coating. This process continues until all of the water has risen to the surface and is evaporated. The time in which the water is evaporated and the coating is dry is based upon the amount of water to be removed (i.e., thickness of coating and percentage of water in the paint) and the evaporation rate. The evaporation rate is dependent upon the vapor pressure difference between the water in the coating and the air being

42 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

circulated over the surface of the part. The vapor pressure difference is a function of the humidity ratio (i.e., temperature and relative humidity of the circulating air) and to a smaller degree, the velocity of the air across the substrate. Air-dry and oven-bake waterborne chemistries cure in the sequence shown in Figure 1. The organic co-solvent evaporates, water evaporates and the resin particles coalesce to form a continuous coating film. Process Application – Conventional application processes can be used with waterborne coatings, including all of the various spray methods and dip coating. This gives waterborne processes an advantage over high-solid paints which cannot be dip coated due to their higher viscosities. Spraying methods include traditional air atomization, HVLP, airless and air-assisted airless. Paint guns can be cleaned with water or water-based solutions rather than paint thinner or acetone. Drying Considerations – The curing time for waterborne coatings is much longer than their solventborne counterparts. Adequate flash-off time between the spray booth and oven is necessary when force drying or baking the coating, otherwise solvent popping may result. It also is necessary to ensure that the surface temperature of the part is greater than the dew point to prevent condensation from forming. While this is generally not a problem during warmer months, it can be a concern during colder months. Warmer weather when the humidity is high can extend flash-off and dry times. If the humidity is high, the water vapor released during drying has no place to go, and the film will not cure. By providing moderate air flow and increased temperature, a continuous supply of fresh air can be provided to the coating to give the air more capacity to hold moisture. All water must be removed from the coating before parts are exposed to freezing temperatures. Failure to do so may result in a loss of adhesion, as the remaining water will expand upon freezing. Relative humidity (%) 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 10 20 30 40 50 Temperature (°C)

Recommended conditions during application and drying Application and drying possible Application not recommended 60

Figure 2


During the application of waterborne coatings, it is important to have tightly controlled temperature, humidity and ventilation (see Figure 2, page 42). Ideal conditions (area highlighted in green) for optimal “spraying” operations are 40 to 60 percent relative humidity and temperature between 10-25ºC. For “drying”, the optimal conditions are relative humidity less than 60 percent, temperature between 10-40ºC. Excellent ventilation is equally important. The larger yellow highlighted area represents the extreme limits for humidity and temperature in which spraying and drying are possible but less than optimal. Each product application is unique so that the ideal ambient conditions must be determined and tightly controlled. Preventing Paint Failures – Many waterborne and solventborne coating failures result from inadequate surface preparation. These include both cosmetic defects and performance defects. The degree of cleanliness and higher surface energy required for waterborne coatings is greater than that necessary for most solventborne coatings due to the low solvent content. Solventborne coatings are more forgiving of residue because the solvents contained in the coatings may dissolve some surface oils and contaminates. Even though waterborne coatings typically contain “co-solvents,” they still contain much less organic solvent than solventborne coatings. A major contributing factor to these problems, particularly robust adhesion, is that many plastics are chemically inert, nonporous with low surface energy. That is, most plastics are hydrophobic and are not naturally wettable. As a general rule, acceptable bonding adhesion is achieved when the surface energy of the substrate (measured in dynes/cm) is approximately 8-10 dynes/cm greater than the surface tension of the liquid. In this situation, the liquid is said to “wet out” or adhere to the surface. Surface pretreatments are used to increase surface energy and improve the wetting and adhesive properties of polymer materials. A variety of gas-phase surface oxidation pretreatment processes are used including low pressure cold gas plasma (RF or microwave), electrical (corona discharge), and flame plasma. Each method is application-specific and possesses unique advantages and potential limitations. The use of chemical primers (chlorinated polyolefins) also can be used alone or in conjunction with a gas-phase pretreatment. Considerations As with most applications and technologies there are advantages, potential limitations and process challenges also exist. First, consider whether waterborne coating is the best choice relative to conventional solventborne coatings, high-solids solvent coatings or another alternative. Within the category of waterborne coatings there are several types of “binders” to consider including epoxies, polyesters and urethanes. Binders are chosen based on the physical and chemical properties

 43


 p. 43

TECHNOLOGY

required of the finished film. Single-component and twocomponent chemistries are available if cross-linking is required. Waterborne coating processes are much less forgiving than solventborne and they are very sensitive to workplace environment fluctuations. A common mispractice of curing waterborne coatings when issues arise is to simply increase temperature and airflow velocity. However, re-circulating “humid” air during curing actually decreases the vapor pressure differential and increases cure time. Surface pretreatment, whether chemical or oxidative, is almost always needed to prevent application flow (sagging) and achieve robust dry film coating adhesion. In conclusion, one of the most compelling reasons for using waterborne coatings is their environmentally friendly low to zero-VOC content. Waterborne coating chemistries can offer equal to or better cosmetic and physical performance properties than solventborne for many applications, including clear topcoat applications. Due to regulatory pressures, solventborne

44 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

coatings are being phased out whenever possible. Significant research and development is rapidly increasing to introduce new and improved waterborne coatings. n Acknowledgements Waterborne Coatings Design Considerations – American Coatings Conference, Ivan Tyre, Alberdingk Boley & Tim December, BASF Marine and Protective Coatings, Jotun Group Industrial Painting, Norman Roobol Surface Wetting and Pretreatment Methods, Plastics Decorating magazine, Scott R. Sabreen, The Sabreen Group, Inc. Scott R. Sabreen is founder and president of The Sabreen Group, Inc. – a global engineering and consulting company specializing in secondary plastics manufacturing processes – surface pretreatments, adhesion bonding, decorating and finishing, laser marking, and product security. For more information, call 888.SABREEN or visit www.sabreen.com or www.plasticslasermarking.com.


P

PRODUCT

XD070 Digital Inkjet Printers Pad Pr i nt Machinery of Vermont, East Dorset, V T, of fers the XD070 digital inkjet printer idea l ly suited for multi-color printing on f lat and semi-flat surfaces. Features include continuous multi-color printing in a single pass, variable image data capabilities, high-quality CMYK images using grey scale technology, fine lines and detail at 16 inches per second/360 dpi and drop-on-demand InstaCure UV ink. For more information on Pad Print Machinery of Vermont’s full line of inkjet printers and other decorating equipment, visit www.padprintmachinery.com or call 800.272.7764. Marbach Launches Unique In-Mold Labeling Automation System Marbach Werkzeugbau GmbH, Düsseldorf, Germany, a leading global supplier of injection molding and thermoforming tooling and related automation for the packaging industry, has unveiled one of the first in-mold labeling (IML) automation systems for thermoformed PP containers. The technology gives packagers and food companies a new high-output, low-cost alternative to injection molding IML. Marbach’s new Zapod2 automation and advanced label handling system is for tilt molds on trimin-place thermoformers. It consists of a linear-drive robot with one high-speed swivel head that approaches the mold from the side, placing the label in the cavity. A second robot system with an ultra-light vacuum plate drives into position while the forming process is taking place. Once the mold opens, the vacuum plate transports the finished product from the mold and moves it upward to another robot for placement on the conveyor. By reducing the time for part removal and label placement and improving the forming time, the Marbach system is capable of speeds which are unachievable by competitive T-IML systems. For more information, visit www.marbach.com. Yupo Offers Serious Label Security Yupo, Chesapeake, VA, has introduced a new security product for the label market: YUPO Security Grade. As the world’s leading IML substrate provider, Yupo’s tamper-evident label substrate can help brand managers and product developers gain advantage over competitors in the marketplace. For anti-

counterfeit and anti-shoplift labels, tamper-proof applications or even non-reproducible couponing options, YUPO Security Grade gives makers more additional flexibility. The way the label functions is that a top layer is de-laminated when the label is peeled-off and a printed image layer remains on the surface of the product. Chief among YUPO Security Grade’s advantages is its design-free construction that allows printing on both sides. The product is non-sticky after it’s peeled-off and won’t allow re-application once removed. Reverse printed images will appear on the remaining layer after the top section is removed, yet the remaining layer itself is not easily removed. For more information on this new product, contact Yupo Customer Care at www.yupousa.com or call 888.873.9876. Comdec Offers Safe Ruco Hardener Comdec, Inc., Newburyport, MA, introduces Ruco’s new 100-VR-1431 hardener that has been formulated without the Xylene or Methoxpropylactrate chemicals. Xylene has been a concern with health- and safety-related issues. Many of the pad printing, screen printing ink and ink-related products need to follow the new safety and environmental policies forthcoming. Ruco is determined to stay ahead of regulations being set by European and U.S. agencies, taking pride in being the industry leader in safety, environment and quality standards. For more information on Ruco’s new 100-VR-1431 hardener, visit www.comdecinc.com. Mimaki Offers Small Inkjet Printer for Big Ideas Mima k i USA, Inc., Schaumburg, IL, offers the Mimaki UJF-3042 tabletop inkjet printer that is small in size but big in performance. This compact UV LED printer is ideal for industrial short run applications where highly detailed, precise and brilliant images are required, even on non-coated and heat-sensitive substrates. Applications include packaging, labels and stickers, nameplates, electronic covers, POP and POS, awards, plastic cards and promotional imprints. The UJF-3042 also prints on glass, wood and metals; is environmentally friendly because it requires less energy to run and utilizes Mimaki‘s Spray Supressor System. All of this at an affordable price makes this inkjet a small printer for big ideas. For more details, call 888.530.3988 or visit www.mimakiusa.com.

 Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 45


TIONS = MANUFACTURING EXCELLE U L O S NCE TM L TOTA

The Sabreen Group, Inc. is an engineering and consulting company specializing in secondary plastics manufacturing. Now in our 19th year, we have provided expert solutions for over 350 international companies. We have earned a reputation of excellence for our rapid response problem-solving and innovative solutions. Many of today’s most recognizable products are manufactured using The Sabreen Group’s advanced technology processes.

• Surface Pretreatments • Adhesion Bonding & Joining • Digital Printing

• Decorating & Finishing • Laser Marking, Laser Welding • Product Security

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email: engineering@sabreen.com 5837 Wavertree Lane , Plano, TX USA 75093

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www.plasticslasermarking.com


 p. 45

PRODUCT

Static Control System for Cleaner Parts Simco, Hatfield, PA, offers the PerforMAX® IQ modular, plug-n-play static control system designed to optimize static neutralization on all plastic part molding and decorating operations. Three different IQ bars are available to neutralize static charges at distances up to 30 inches away on moving parts. The IQ’s high-voltage power supply processes all system data to maintain constant static control while displaying system status at a glance. An optional PerforMAX IQ communication module creates a plug-n-play interface with the operator’s PLC or PC for remote monitoring and integrated system control. Operators also can carry a portable IQ monitor that displays real-time key operating conditions. Simco, now the world’s largest supplier of industrial static control solutions, also supplies

advanced charging systems for use in IML applications. To learn more, visit www.simco-static.com or call 215.822.6401. Flexible, Energy-Efficient Ultrasonic Welding Technology Herrmann Ultrasonics, Bartlett, IL, introduces the new HiQ line of welding machinery – the next generation of flexible, energy-efficient ultrasonic welding technology. Because every welding application is different, the HiQ line adapts to all requirements with modular flexibility. Thanks to intelligent output and equipment classifications, users now can configure welding applications in a more targeted and individual manner. Visualization of the welding process is accomplished in a user-friendly touch screen display. The machines are equipped with proportional valve technology and a position measuring system as standards. The newly redesigned ultrasonic generator works with an extremely high degree of efficiency over 80 percent when powered. The new HMC (High Motion Control) drive concept helps the user realize faster production. The closed-loop control module combines the benefits of pneumatic technology with the speed of an electric drive. To learn more, visit www.herrmannultrasonics.com. n

A tradition of dedication to the print decorating industry and your complete source for all Marabu printing inks. UVGL: UV screen ink specially developed for Glass, Ceramic, and Metal substrates. No post oven baking! TPR/TPU/TPT/TPL/TPY/TPC: Versatile solvent base and UV pad printing inks.

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Jan/Feb 2011 www.plasticsdecorating.com 47


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C

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

February • PLASTEC West, MD&M West, ATX Automation Technology Expo, West Pack, Pacific Design & Mfg. West, Green Mfg. Expo, February 8-10, Anaheim, CA, 310.445.4200, www.plastecwest.com

March • PLASTEC South, MD&M South, ATX Automation Technology Expo, South Pack, Green Mfg. Expo, Aerocon, Design & Mfg. South, March 16-17, Orlando, FL, 310.445.4200, www.plastecsouth.com • “ABC of IML: A Basic Course”, March 31, 2011, Skokie, IL, 480.473.0301, www.rbstechnologies.com

April • amerimold™, April 13-14, Rosemont, IL, 800.950.8020, www.amerimoldexpo.com

May • SPE ANTEC 2011, May 1-5, Boston, MA, 203.775.0471, www.4spe.org

June • PLASTEC East, MD&M East, Automation Technology Expo, East Pack, Atlantic Design & Mfg. East, Green Mfg. Expo, June 7-9, New York, NY, 310.445.4200, www.plasteceast.com

Update Your Plastics Decorating Subscription! To confirm and update your subscription or for new subscriptions, take a moment and go online. Simply visit www.plasticsdecorating. com/subscribe. It will take less than 3 minutes to guarantee your continued or new FREE subscription to Plastics Decorating magazine. (It is recommended that current subscribers update their subscription if they have not done so in the last 6-8 months.)

50 www.plasticsdecorating.com Jan/Feb 2011

AD INDEX A.W.T. World Trade, Inc. / www.awt-gpi.com ......................................... 4 Autoroll Print Technologies / www.autoroll.com.................................. 47 CDigital Markets LLC / www.grafixx.com ............................................. 11 Central Decal / www.centraldecal.com .................................................. 16 CFC International - an ITW Company / www.cfcintl.com ................. 41 Color Path Technologies / www.colorpathtechnologies.com .............. 17 Comdec(Ruco) / www.comdecinc.com .................................................. 13 CPS Resources, Inc. / www.cpsresourcesusa.com ...................back cover Custom Foils Company / www.customfoilscompany.com .................. 36 Die Stampco Inc. / www.diestampco.com.............................................. 39 Digitran / www.comdecinc.com .............................................................. 12 Diversified Printing Techniques / www.diverprint.com ........................ 8 Extol / www.extolinc.com ........................................................................ 33 Industrial Pad Printing Supplies / www.indpad.com ........................... 18 Inkcups Now / www.inkcups.com.....................................................24, 25 In-mold Graphic Solutions (Romo Durable Graphics) / www.romoinc.com ............................ 30 Mimaki / www.mimakiusa.com .............................................................. 35 Nordson / www.nordson.com.................................................................. 41 Pad Print Machinery of Vermont / www.padprintmachinery.com .................................inside front cover PLASTEC South / www.plastecsouth.com................... inside back cover Proell, Inc. / www.proell.us ...................................................................... 31 Ruco USA / www.rucousa.com ............................................................... 43 Sabreen Group, The / www.sabreen.com................................................ 46 Schwerdtle, Inc. / www.schwerdtle.com ................................................. 27 Simco / www.simco-static.com................................................................ 37 Standard Machines / www.comdecinc.com ........................................... 12 Tampoprint / www.tampoprintusa.com ................................................. 29 Trekk Equipment Group / www.trekkequipment.com......................... 44 United Silicone / www.unitedsilicone.com .............................................. 5 Webtech, Inc. / www.webtech-hts.com..................................................... 9 Yupo / www.yupousa.com ........................................................................ 37


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