Plastics Decorating - January February 2010

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Today’s Decorating & Assembly Source

2010 JANUARY/FEBRUARY

Enduring Impressions from Gold Bond Inc. 2010 Buyers Guide Edition Cold Gas Plasma Surface Treatment Tips On Used Assembly Equipment

Celebrating

10 Years



COVER STORY Decorator’s Profile Page 26 Gold Bold Inc. – Marking a Reputation for Loyalty

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2010

As a decorator of plastics in the ad specialty market for over six decades, Gold Bond Inc., Chattanooga, Tenn., has utilized the power of loyalty to build customer, vendor, and employee relationships that endure – even in turbulent times.

FEATURES Technology Feature Page 6 Cold Gas Plasma Surface Modification – Optimize Plastics Binding Adhesion

Low pressure cold gas plasma surface modification is one type of process that can resolve many three-dimensional bonding problems through plasma chemical surface activation and functionalization.

2010 Plastics Decorating Buyers Guide Page 13 Complete listing of plastics decorating/assembly equipment and supplies for the industry. Ask the Expert Page 24 • What new U.S. regulations should be considered when selecting pad printing ink? • What steps should be taken when mixing pad printing inks? • How should pad printing inks be stored? Assembly Update New v. Used – Points to Ponder

Page 33

A spectrum of new, near-new, reconditioned, running-used, and bone-yard assembly equipment exists in the marketplace, and sorting through it all can be something of a challenge.

Association News Page 38 • Letter from the Chairman • Topical Conference Programming Best Ever! Special Report Plastics Markets: The Road Ahead

Page 39

As we slowly, tentatively emerge from this economic downturn, embarking upon a new year and a new decade, plastics industry participants are scanning the horizon for markets that can help them regain their former growth dynamic.

DEPARTMENTS Editor’s Desk Product Highlights

Page 4 Page 20

Industry Insights Product Developments Marketplace

Page 31 Page 36 Page 41

Calendar of Events Advertiser Index

Page 42 Page 42

(Pad Print Machinery/Supplies)

(Decorating Services)

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E

EDITOR’S DESK

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t is simply hard to believe we are starting our 10-year anniversary publishing Plastics Decorating. So much has changed over the last decade: having a presence on the Internet wasn’t a thought nor was creating an interactive website that coincides with the magazine. We certainly have learned the importance of integrating our magazine, website, and e-newsletters (Plastics Decorating EForum). Ten years ago, little discussion (or machinery) existed on digital ink-jet printing of 3D parts and very little information was available on in-mold decorating and in-mold labels. Most of the emphasis was on secondary processes and how to automate decorating and assembly, which still remain important topics today. Through the years, I have met many people and created so many valued friendships along the way. One of those dear friends, Keith Hillestad, passed away this past month (see Memoriam on page 31). Keith was such a great icon in the plastics decorating community, especially in the hot stamping arena. I had worked with him since my days in the hot stamping foil business over 20 years ago and had proudly served with him on the SPE Decorating & Assembly Division Board of Directors for the past 10 years. Keith also was a regular contributor to Plastics Decorating. He will be dearly missed. As we begin a new decade of Plastics Decorating, the landscape continues to change. What will not change is our commitment to covering the most up-to-date information and technological breakthroughs within the plastics decorating and assembly industries. You also might notice a new masthead and fresh look to the magazine. We always appreciate your comments and ideas and look forward to seeing you at upcoming events. Please mark your calendar for the 2010 SPE Decorating & Assembly Topical Conference (TopCon), June 15-16, Nashville, Tenn. (details on page 38). I want to thank everyone for the fun ride these first 10 years and look forward to an improved economy and the challenges that lie ahead. Managing Editor, jeff@petersonpublications.com

beauty is in the eye of the beholder There’s more to decorating than aesthetics. Barcodes, instructions, and warnings are functional graphics that can be in molded and protected for years. Decals that are pretty useful. Enhance your product performance, manufacturing process, and product appearance with Romo Durable Graphics.

DURABLE•GRAPHICS

ISSN: 1536-9870

January/February 2010

Published by: Peterson Publications, Inc.

2150 SW Westport Dr., Suite 101 Topeka, KS 66614 (785) 271-5801 (785) 271-6404 (fax)

Website: www.plasticsdecorating.com Email: publish@petersonpublications.com

Publisher/Managing Editor Jeff Peterson Assistant Editor Kym Conis Contributing Editors Dianna Brodine Renée Varella

Art Director Eric J. Carter Graphic Artist Becky Collins Sales Director Gayla Peterson

(920) 712 -4090 www.romoinc.com

In-mold Graphic Solutions is a division of Romo Durable Graphics.

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Plastics Decorating is published quarterly. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any manner without written consent from the publisher.


NoriCure® MPF

is a new high glossy, deep-drawable UV curing screen printing ink Area of applications: NoriCure® MPF is a versatile UV screen ink, which is suitable for printing signs and displays, to be formed afterwards by deep drawing. Briefcases, ring binders or banners can be decorated as well.

Finishing: – excellent formability – deep drawable (350 % without color variation, depending on ink film thickness) – die cutting, trimming, folding – can be overprinted with solvent-based screen inks and vice versa

Substrates: NoriCure® MPF shows good adhesion to a wide range of substrates such as PVC self-adhesive films, rigid PVC, polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC) and pre-treated polyester (PET). The suitability for printing on PMMA and polypropylene (PP) must be tested.

Basic Colors for the Pröll Matching System

Properties: – highly flexible ink film, extremely deep drawable – excellent ink adhesion to many substrates – medium outdoor resistance – pigments with high light fastness – fast curing (only low UV doses of 180 to 350 mJ/cm2 are required, depending on color shade and ink film thickness) – constant viscosity of color shades – NVP-free – shelf life 1 year

092 Blending Lacquer Colorless

467 Pink Transparent

109 Citron

472 Violet

112 Yellow

570 Deep Blue

171 Yellow Transparent

669 Green Transparent

213 Orange

945 White

312 Red

948 Black

318 Red Transparent Please ask for samples to conduct individual test prints.

Processing: – press-ready – excellent printability when printing fine details – high blocking resistance

350 %

sheet size DIN A4

www.proell.us Proell, Inc.

·

2751 Dukane Drive

·

St. Charles, IL 60174-3343 USA

·

Phone 630-587-2300

·

Fax 630-587-2666

·

e-mail: info@proell.us


T

TECHNOLOGY FEATURE

Cold Gas Plasma Surface Modification Optimize Plastics Bonding Adhesion By Scott R. Sabreen, The Sabreen Group, Inc.

P

olymeric and elastomeric substrates often can be extremely challenging to achieve robust bonding adhesion strength to like or dissimilar materials. Bonding applications are not limited to only adhesives, but include printing inks, paints and coatings, encapsulant and potting compounds, metallization and more. This article describes “Low Pressure Cold Gas Plasma” surface modification as one type of process that can resolve many three-dimensional bonding problems through plasma chemical surface activation and functionalization. The science of well known “atmospheric or air” surface modification processes will be compared. Particularly notorious tough-to-bond substrates include silicone and rubber elastomers and engineering thermoplastics including acetals, fluropolymers, polyolefins, nylons, polycarbonates, polyesters, styrenics, and more. The underlying reasons why many plastics and elastomers are difficult to bond are that they are hydrophobic non-polar materials, chemically inert, and possess poor surface wettability (i.e., low surface energy).

What Is Plasma? Plasmas can be conceptualized as a fourth state of matter. As energy is supplied, solids melt into liquids, liquids vaporize into gases, and gases ionize into “plasmas” – an extremely reactive gas. Free electrons, ions, metastables, radicals, and UV generated in the plasma can impact a surface with energies sufficient to break the molecular bonds on the surface of most polymeric substrates. This creates very reactive free radicals on the polymer surface which, in turn, can form, cross-link, or – in the presence of oxygen – react rapidly to form various chemical functional groups on the substrate surface. Polar functional groups that can form and enhance bondability include carbonyl (C=O), carboxyl (HOOC), hydroperoxide (HOO-), and hydroxyl (HO-) groups. Even small amounts of reactive functional groups incorporated into polymers can be highly beneficial to improving surface chemical functionality and wettability. Cold Gas Plasma Surface Modification In comparison to atmospheric (air) surface pretreatment methods, “low pressure cold gas plasma” surface modification is conducted in an enclosed evacuated chamber. Industrial-grade oxygen gas (O2) commonly is used in plastics pretreatment applications. Other oxidizing and noble gases include argon,

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nitrogen, ammonia NH3, fluorine, and combinations thereof. The selected gas to be ionized into the reactive gas plasma is released into the chamber under a partial vacuum and subjected to an electrical field (RF or MW). It is the response of the highly reactive species generated with the polymers placed in the plasma field, on inner conductive electrode aluminum shelves or cage, breaking molecular bonds that results in chemical/physical surface modifications without affecting the bulk substrate properties. Cold gas plasma process modifies non-wettable hydrophobic surfaces to bondable hydrophilic wettable surfaces via chemical and physical mechanisms. See Diagram 1. Micro nano-scale roughened surfaces can be selectively altered in the plasma environment either by a bombarding effect of ions accelerated toward the surface, or by a chemical etch process. Roughened surfaces have higher surface areas (peaks and valleys), equating to a higher number of binding sites that improve bonding adhesion. See Diagram 2. Unique to the cold gas plasma is that it successfully can pretreat PTFE. Further, polymer coatings can be grown on surfaces through a process called plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Coatings are highly conformal with thickness (≈2µ) dependant on process time. Examples of coatings include SiO2-like and Diamond-like. A key application is to coat the insides of plastic and glass tubes and containers

Diagram 1. Chemical and physical cleaning, surface oxidation, and trace by-product volatiles


Diagram 2. Surface roughening by kinetically knocking contaminants from the surface, increasing surface area topography

e.g., threaded polypropylene baby diaper fabric, is treated continuously within the chamber. Based upon the inside chamber dimensions, cold gas plasma processes can treat high-volume small and large parts. While manufacturing process operations can be most efficiently performed in-line, many product assemblies are conducted in batch or cell manufacturing.

Gas-Phase Surface Oxidation Pretreatments Surface oxidation modification vis-à-vis surface pretreatments is used to improve the wettability and bondability of polymers and elastomers both chemically and physically. Well known with a quartz-like material that acts as a barrier to leachables process methods are electrical (corona discharge) and flame plasma. Historically, low pressure cold gas plasma has been and prevents breakage1. less practiced and discussed for the pretreatment of threedimensional parts, due in part to misnomers of the process. Equipment System Set-Up Low pressure cold gas plasma system equipment consists of a In the science of chemistry and physics, electrical, flame, and vacuum chamber made of aluminum with a hinged door for cold gas plasma are all “Gas-Phase Surface Oxidation Processes” loading and unloading parts. All systems have similar impor- characterized by their ability to generate a “gas plasma.” The tant component features including vacuum pump, RF generator, mechanism of how the plasmas are generated is a distinguishMFC (Mass Flow Controller), and microprocessor controller. ing factor. Each method can be application-specific and each possesses advantages and limitations. The parts to be cleaned are simply placed on the inner electrodes which are removable shelves or a cage. The parts/shelves subsequently are loaded into the reaction chamber in which the process begins by first pumping down to a vacuum. The process gas then may flow through the system at a regulated pressure while pumping continues. The RF generator supplies excitation power. At the end of the plasma process the closed vacuum chamber returns to ambient pressure, whereby the treated parts are removed and ready for bonding. Most systems allow for automatic control of process variables including (typically) pressure, power, gas flow, temperature, and cycle times (intermediary stage and total elapsed time). See Diagram 3. Processing Control Parameters Operating process parameters are based upon specific manufacturer model system specifications. Thus, it is important to understand the application requirements for improved bondability, production throughput, and downstream manufacturing processes to maintain the treatment shelf-life (aging) and contamination sources within the work environment. As general guidelines, total cold gas plasma treatment time will range between 5-10 minutes; gas flow 100-500 sccm; pressure 300-1000 mTorr, RF power 200-1000 Watts; and low temperature heat during processing 75-125°F. Misnomers of Cold Gas Plasma Pretreatment It is frequently cited that cold gas plasma treatment is an “inefficient” method, limited to only off-line batch processing, compared to atmospheric plasma methods. This is false. Reel-to-reel continuous treatment of woven polymeric fabric web materials,

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TECHNOLOGY FEATURE

Atmospheric Surface Modification Systems In contrast to cold gas plasma, which is conducted in a low pressure vacuum chamber, flame treatment and electrical (corona discharge) pretreatment processes are conducted at atmospheric conditions. Electrical treatments are further distinguished as “blown air” plasma and “blown ion.” Atmospheric processes can be used in both batch and continuous line production. In terms of nomenclature it is important to understand the science of each process. Flame Plasma Treatment uses the highly reactive species present in the combustion of air and hydrocarbon gas (to create the plasma). Flame treatment is exothermic; however, heat does not create the chemical functionality and improved surface wetting. Flaming will clean dirt, debris, and some hydrocarbons from the substrate. Flaming will not remove silicones, mold releases, and slip agents. Flame treatment can impart higher wetting, oxidation, and shelf-life than electrical pretreatments due to its relative shallower depth of treatment from the surface, 5-10nm. Ozone is not produced2.

RF Power Supply

Load Match

MFC

Ground

Vacuum Pump

O2 Vacuum Chamber

Shelf Electrodes

Diagram 3. Cold Gas Plasma Schematic

a counter electrode at potential zero, and a dielectric used as a barrier. That is, high frequency-high voltage discharge (step up transformer) creating a potential difference between two points requiring earth ground 35+kV and 20-25kHz. This pretreatment process has virtually no cleaning capabilities. Ozone (NOx) is produced.

Electrical “Air Plasma” is Corona discharge spot treatment (also termed blown air plasma/forced air corona/blown arc). This treatment head consists of two hook electrodes in close proximity to each other connected to a high voltage transClassical Electrical Corona Discharge is obtained using a former generating an electric arc of approximately 7-12 kV, generator and electrode(s) connected to a high voltage source, lower frequency 50-60 cycles/sec (relative to electrical corona discharge). Then using forced air, a continuous electric arc produces a corona discharge, “plasma.” No positive ground needed. This pretreatment process has virtually no cleaning capabilities. Ozone is produced. Electrical Blown ion plasma also is termed Focused Corona plasma/Potential-free plasma. This treatment utilizes a single narrow nozzle electrode, powered by an electrical generator and step-up transformer and high pressurized air in which an intense focused plasma is generated within the treatment head and streams outward. Since the process is potential-free, it can be used to pretreat conductive products. This pretreatment process can clean dirt, debris, and some hydrocarbons from the substrate but not most silicones and slip agents. New research indicates that fine etching of the surface can create new topographies for increased mechanical bonding. Ozone is not a byproduct. UV radiation/Ozone pretreatment and chemical primers also are performed at atmospheric conditions. These pretreatment methods will be discussed in a future article. Factors Influencing Adhesion and Aging The degree or quality of pretreatment for strong adhesion strength is affected by the cleanliness of the plastic/elastomeric surfaces. Contamination sources on product surfaces that inhibit treatment include dirt, dust, grease, and oil. Low molecular weight materials such as silicones, mold release, and anti-slip agents are particularly deleterious for bonding. Further, certain soluble or nonsoluble compound agents used in pigment

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TECHNOLOGY FEATURE

and dye colorants can adversely affect adhesion. Exposure of treated surfaces to elevated temperatures increases molecular chain mobility. The higher the chain mobility is, the faster the aging of the pretreatment. Plasma-treated surfaces age at different rates and to varying extents relative to factors with the surrounding environment. Aging characteristics and their storage shelf-life are essential to manufacturing process operations. Activated surfaces may have a shelf-life of hours, days, months, or longer. The cold gas plasma process demonstrates significantly extended activation lifetimes3 and more uniform treatment compared to atmospheric methods4. It is recommended to bond, coat, paint, or decorate products as soon as possible following pretreatment. The global need to achieve robust bonding adhesion on plastic and elastomeric products demands surface modification “activation” pretreatments. Chemical and physical functionality and surface roughening, via gas phase surface oxidation processes, can resolve most adhesion problems. Each method can be application-specific and may possess unique advantages and/or limitations. Plasma-oxidized surfaces can deleteriously affect downstream assembly processes, such as poor heat sealing/welding, when overtreatment occurs. While cold gas

plasma is the most expensive method, in some applications it has the capability to yield the most robust results. Atmospheric treatments are lower cost. However in some cases, day-to-day humidity variation can affect the treatment uniformity. Careful evaluation of all process factors and an understanding of the alternative surface modification technologies are important. n References: 1. Demetrius Chrysostomou, PVATepla, March 2009 2. Scott R. Sabreen, Joe Digiacomo, Plastics Decorating Magazine 3. Edward M. Liston, GaSonics International, Journal of Adhesion 1988 4. Dori & Kushner, University of Illinois and 3M Scott R. Sabreen is founder and president of The Sabreen Group, Inc. (TSG). TSG is a global engineering company specializing in secondary plastics manufacturing processes – surface pretreatments, bonding, decorating and finishing, laser marking, and product security. For more information, call (888) SABREEN or visit www. sabreen.com or www.plasticslasermarking.com.

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PIGMENTED and METALLIC FOILS

CFC produces pigmented and metallic heat transfer foils for a broad range of hot stamp plastic decorating applications and industries where consistency in color, appearance and workability are essential. Decorative and functional, these foils come in a wide assortment of vivid solid colors and highly polished metal appearances and can be used to decorate everything from: • Appliances and electronics • Automobile applications (i.e., dashboards, license frames, emblems, etc.) • Battery cases • Beverage and other plastic containers • Cattle tags • Cosmetic containers • Picture frames and toys • And much more

In addition, we also offer a full line of hot stamp foils that have the look of real wood, marbles, granites, solid colors and geometric patterns that can be applied to either wood or plastic substrates. Contact us today for all your hot stamp decorating needs at: (800) 323-3399.

For small quantities of pigmented and metallic foils contact:

CFC Foils Direct

Phone: 1-800-393-4505 E-mail: info@cfcfoilsdirect.com

CFC International Corporation An ITW Company 500 State Street – Chicago Heights, IL 60411 Phone: (708)891-3456 - Fax: (708)758-5989 E-mail: salesinfo@cfcintl.com

www.cfcintl.com


2010 PLASTICS DECORATING BUYERS GUIDE Assembly Equipment Air Hydraulics Co. 6074 Baumgartner Industrial Dr. St. Louis, MO 63129 (314) 487-9100 Fax: (314) 487-9228 www.airhydraulicsco.com

Service Tectonics, Inc. 2827 Treat St. Adrian, MI 49221 (517) 263-0758 Fax: (517) 263-4145 www.padprinting.net Ultra-Sonic Welding, Hot Plate Welding, Staking

Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Screenprinting, Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

Branson Ultrasonics Corporation 41 Eagle Rd. Danbury, CT 06813 (203) 796-0400 Fax: (203) 796-9838 www.branson-plasticsjoin.com Thermal Welding Infrared, Laser Welding, Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking, Ultra-Sonic Welding

Sonics & Materials, Inc. 53 Church Hill Rd. Newtown, CT 06470 (203) 270-4600 Fax: (203) 270-4610 www.sonics.com Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking, Ultra-Sonic Welding

Die Stampco, Inc. 1301 N. Lincoln St. Bay City, MI 48708 (989) 893-7790 Fax: (989) 893-7741 www.diestampco.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

Cassco Machines - Cassco Automation 37 Prince Andrew Pl. Toronto ON, Canada M3C 2H2 (800) 387-4600 Fax: (416) 445-3790 www.casscomachines.com Hot Plate Welding, Spin Welding, Staking

Specialized Assembly Systems, LLC 7685 Hawthorne Pl. Livermore, CA 94550 (925) 606-7100 Fax: (925) 215-2187 www.sasusa.com Staking

Dukane Corporation 2900 Dukane Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 797-4900 Fax: (630) 797-4949 www.dukane.com/us Ultra-Sonic Welding, Laser Welding, Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking

Tooltex, Inc. 6160 Seeds Rd. Grove City, OH 43123 (614) 539-3222 Fax: (614) 539-3223 www.tooltex.com Ultra-Sonic Welding, Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking

Emabond Solutions, LLC 49 Walnut St. Norwood, NJ 07648 (201) 767-7400 Fax: (201) 767-3608 www.emabond.com Electromagnetic

Trekk Equipment Group 70 Midwest Dr. Pacific, MO 63069 (636) 271-1391 Fax: (636) 257-3908 www.trekkequipment.com

Extol, Inc. 651 Case Karsten Dr. Zeeland, MI 49464 (616) 748-9955 Fax: (616) 748-0555 www.extolinc.com Hot Plate Welding, Spin Welding, Staking, Ultra-Sonic Welding, I.R. Welding Forward Technology 260 Jenks Ave. Cokato, MN 55321 (320) 286-2578 Fax: (320) 286-2467 www.forwardtech.com I.R. Welding, Laser Welding, Ultra-Sonic Welding, Hot Plate Welding, Vibration Welding, Spin Welding, Staking Herrmann Ultrasonics, Inc. 1261 Hardt Cir. Bartlett, IL 60103 (630) 626-1626 Fax: (630) 626-1627 www.herrmannultrasonics.com Ultra-Sonic Welding Leister Technologies, LLC 1253 Hamilton Pkwy. Itasca, IL 60143 (630) 760-1000 Fax: (630) 760-1001 www.leisterlaser.com Laser Welding of Plastics Schwerdtle, Inc. 166 Elm St. Bridgeport, CT 06604 (800) 535-0004 / (203) 330-2750 Fax: (203) 330-2760 www.schwerdtle.com Tooling, Wheels

Contract Decorating Cassco Machines - Cassco Automation 37 Prince Andrew Pl. Toronto ON, Canada M3C 2H2 (800) 387-4600 Fax: (416) 445-3790 www.casscomachines.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers Central Decal Company, Inc. 6901 High Grove Blvd. Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (630) 325-9892 Fax: (630) 325-9860 www.centraldecal.com Doming, In-Mold Decorating, Screenprinting Comdec, Inc. 25 Hale St. Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 462-3399 Fax: (978) 462-3443 www.comdecinc.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers, Screenprinting, Pad Printing CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (704) 882-5986 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers, Screenprinting, Pad Printing Custom Imprint 19573 Progress Dr. Cleveland, OH 44149 (440) 238-4488 Fax: (440) 238-4484 www.customimprint.com Screenprinting, Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

DuraTech Industries 3216 Commerce St. La Crosse, WI 54603 (608) 781-2570 Fax: (608) 781-2540 www.duratech.com In-Mold Decorating, Screenprinting Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers, Screenprinting, Pad Printing MEPCO, Inc. 545 N. Arlington Ave. East Orange, NJ 07017 (973) 676-2951 Fax: (973) 676-4464 www.mepco.us Screenprinting, Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers MPC Plating 1859 E. 63rd St. Cleveland, OH 44103 (216) 881-7220 Fax: (216) 881-7324 www.mpcplating.com Plating on Plastic Pad Print USA, LLC 12544 Kirkham Ct., Ste. 15 Poway, CA 92064 (858) 748-3467 Fax: (858) 748-5794 www.padprintusa.com Digital Printing, Pad Printing Pad Printing Technology Corp. 2803 62nd Ave. E. Bradenton, FL 34203 (941) 739-8667 Fax: (941) 751-3612 www.pad-printing.com Surface Treatment, Assembly, Laser Marking, Pad Printing Serigraph, Inc. 3801 E. Decorah Rd. West Bend, WI 53095 (262) 335-7200 Fax: (262) 335-7699 www.serigraph.com Digital Printing, Offset Printing, Screenprinting Service Tectonics, Inc. 2827 Treat St. Adrian, MI 49221 (517) 263-0758 Fax: (517) 263-4145 www.padprinting.net Pad Printing, Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers Specialized Assembly Systems, LLC 7685 Hawthorne Pl. Livermore, CA 94550 (925) 606-7100 Fax: (925) 215-2187 www.sasusa.com Pad Printing

Tooltex, Inc. 6160 Seeds Rd. Grove City, OH 43123 (614) 539-3222 Fax: (614) 539-3223 www.tooltex.com Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers

Decorating/Assembly Design & Engineering Sabreen Group, Inc., The 5837 Wavertree Ln. Plano, TX 75093 (972) 250-4664 Fax: (972) 250-3760 www.sabreen.com

Digital Ink-Jet Cassco Machines - Cassco Automation 37 Prince Andrew Pl. Toronto ON, Canada M3C 2H2 (800) 387-4600 Fax: (416) 445-3790 www.casscomachines.com Systems Integration, Equipment, Inks CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (704) 882-5986 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Equipment Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Inks, Textile, Systems Integration, Equipment Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St. Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 Fax: (978) 646-8981 www.inkcups.com Equipment, Inks ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4460 www.itwtranstech.com Systems Integration, Equipment, Inks Nazdar 8501 Hedge Lane Terr. Shawnee, KS 66227 (800) 677-4657 / (913) 422-1888 Fax: (913) 422-2295 www.nazdar.com Inks Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, Inc. 201 Tennis Way East Dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (800) 242-1415 www.padprintmachinery.com Systems Integration, Equipment, Inks Pad Print USA, LLC 12544 Kirkham Ct., Ste. 15 Poway, CA 92064 (858) 748-3467 Fax: (858) 748-5794 www.padprintusa.com Print Service, Equipment Sawgrass Technologies 2233 Highway 17 N. Mt. Pleasant, SC 29466 (843) 884-1575 Fax: (843) 849-3847 www.sawgrassink.com Inks

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2010 PLASTICS DECORATING BUYERS GUIDE

Sun Chemical 2445 Production Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-5216 Fax: (630) 587-5226 www.sunchemical.com Inks

Flexography Printing Presses OMSO North America, Inc. 1420 Jamike Ave. Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 282-6676 Fax: (859) 282-9976 www.omso.com Flexible Tubes

Heat Transfers Cassco Machines - Cassco Automation 37 Prince Andrew Pl. Toronto ON, Canada M3C 2H2 (800) 387-4600 Fax: (416) 445-3790 www.casscomachines.com Digital, Roto-gravure, Flexographic, Screenprinted CDigital Markets, Grafixx Division 2529 Washington Blvd. Baltimore, MD 21230 (866) 237-7468 Fax: (410) 646-7786 www.grafixx.com Digital Print CFC International Corporation, An ITW Company 500 State St. Chicago Heights, IL 60411 (708) 891-3456 Fax: (708) 758-5989 www.cfcintl.com Roto-gravure Comdec, Inc. 25 Hale St. Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 462-3399 Fax: (978) 462-3443 www.comdecinc.com Digital CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (704) 882-5986 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Digital Print, Roto-gravure Crown Roll Leaf 91 Illinois Ave. Paterson, NJ 07503 (973) 742-4000 Fax: (973) 742-0219 www.crownrollleaf.com Roto-gravure Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Digital, Screenprinted Diversified Decorating Sales, Inc. PO Box 386 Peterborough, NH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Screenprinted Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com Screenprinted

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ITW Graphics 375 New State Rd. Manchester, CT 06042 (860) 646-8153 Fax: (860) 533-0236 www.itwgraphicsusa.com Screenprinted Sawgrass Technologies 2233 Highway 17 N. Mt. Pleasant, SC 29466 (843) 884-1575 Fax: (843) 849-3847 www.sawgrassink.com Sublimation Webtech, Inc. 108 N. Gold Dr. Robbinsville, NJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com Flexographic, Screenprinted, Roto-gravure

Hot Stamping Dies Cassco Machines - Cassco Automation 37 Prince Andrew Pl. Toronto ON, Canada M3C 2H2 (800) 387-4600 Fax: (416) 445-3790 www.casscomachines.com Steel, Magnesium, Tooling, Silicone Rubber CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (704) 882-5986 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Silicone Rubber, Tooling Die Stampco, Inc. 1301 N. Lincoln St. Bay City, MI 48708 (989) 893-7790 Fax: (989) 893-7741 www.diestampco.com Brass, Copper, Steel, Tooling, Magnesium, Silicone Rubber Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com Silicone Rubber Schwerdtle, Inc. 166 Elm St. Bridgeport, CT 06604 (800) 535-0004 / (203) 330-2750 Fax: (203) 330-2760 www.schwerdtle.com Steel, Tooling, Copper, Magnesium, Silicone Rubber Trekk Equipment Group 70 Midwest Dr. Pacific, MO 63069 (636) 271-1391 Fax: (636) 257-3908 www.trekkequipment.com Tooling, Magnesium, Silicone Rubber United Silicone an ITW Decorating Co. 4471 Walden Ave. Lancaster, NY 14086 (716) 681-8222 Fax: (716) 681-8789 www.unitedsilicone.com Universal Engraving, Inc. - A UEI Group Company 9090 Nieman Rd. Overland Park, KS 66214 (800) 221-9059 / (913) 541-0503 Fax: (913) 541-8172 www.ueigroup.com Copper

Webtech, Inc. 108 N. Gold Dr. Robbinsville, NJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com Silicone Rubber

Hot Stamping Foils CDigital Markets, Grafixx Division 2529 Washington Blvd. Baltimore, MD 21230 (866) 237-7468 Fax: (410) 646-7786 www.grafixx.com Multi-colored CFC International Corporation, An ITW Company 500 State St. Chicago Heights, IL 60411 (708) 891-3456 Fax: (708) 758-5989 www.cfcintl.com Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (704) 882-5986 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic, Holographic Crown Roll Leaf 91 Illinois Ave. Paterson, NJ 07503 (973) 742-4000 Fax: (973) 742-0219 www.crownrollleaf.com Holographic, Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic Custom Foils Company 185 Foundry St. Newwark, NJ 07105 (973) 344-1434 Fax: (973) 589-1617 www.customfoilscompany.com Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic Infinity Foils, Inc.- A UEI Group Company PO Box 14275 Lenexa, KS 66285 (877) 932-3645 / (913) 888-7340 Fax: (913) 888-7397 www.infinityfoils.com Holographic, Metallic, Matte Pigment Nakai International Corporation 770-4 Broadway Ave. Holbrook, NY 11741 (631) 563-0888 Fax: (631) 563-1320 www.nakaiintl.com Gloss Pigment, Metallic United Silicone an ITW Decorating Co. 4471 Walden Ave. Lancaster, NY 14086 (716) 681-8222 Fax: (716) 681-8789 www.unitedsilicone.com Webtech, Inc. 108 N. Gold Dr. Robbinsville, NJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com Holographic, Multi-colored, Matte Pigment, Gloss Pigment, Metallic

Hot Stamping/Heat Transfer Presses Air Hydraulics Co. 6074 Baumgartner Industrial Dr. St. Louis, MO 63129 (314) 487-9100 Fax: (314) 487-9228 www.airhydraulicsco.com Roll-on, Vertical, Custom, Peripheral Cassco Machines - Cassco Automation 37 Prince Andrew Pl. Toronto ON, Canada M3C 2H2 (800) 387-4600 Fax: (416) 445-3790 www.casscomachines.com Roll-on, Peripheral, Vertical CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (704) 882-5986 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical, Custom Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Digital, Textile, Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical Diversified Decorating Sales, Inc. PO Box 386 Peterborough, NH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com Vertical Tooltex, Inc. 6160 Seeds Rd. Grove City, OH 43123 (614) 539-3222 Fax: (614) 539-3223 www.tooltex.com Vertical Trekk Equipment Group 70 Midwest Dr. Pacific, MO 63069 (636) 271-1391 Fax: (636) 257-3908 www.trekkequipment.com Custom Decorating Equipment, Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical United Silicone an ITW Decorating Co. 4471 Walden Ave. Lancaster, NY 14086 (716) 681-8222 Fax: (716) 681-8789 www.unitedsilicone.com Webtech, Inc. 108 N. Gold Dr. Robbinsville, NJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com Peripheral, Roll-on, Vertical

In-Mold Decorating Equipment Central Decal Company, Inc. 6901 High Grove Blvd. Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (630) 325-9892 Fax: (630) 325-9860 www.centraldecal.com In-Mold Inserts, In-Mold Labels


Chicago Decal Company 101 Tower Dr. Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (630) 850-2122 Fax: (630) 850-7177 www.chicagodecal.com In-Mold Inserts, In-Mold Labels

Romo Durable Graphics 800 Heritage Rd. DePere, WI 54115 (920) 712-4090 Fax: (920) 336-5171 www.romodurablegraphics.com In-Mold Labels

CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (704) 882-5986 www.cpsresourcesusa.com In-Mold Labels

Schober USA, Inc. 4690 Industry Dr. Fairfield, OH 45014 (513) 489-7393 Fax: (513) 489-7485 www.schoberusa.com Label Diecutter, Rotary Punching Equipment

DuraTech Industries 3216 Commerce St. La Crosse, WI 54603 (608) 781-2570 Fax: (608) 781-2540 www.duratech.com In-Mold Labels Fiberlok, Inc. 811 Stockton Ave. Fort Collins, CO 80524 (970) 221-1200 x220 Fax: (970) 221-0200 www.lextrainmold.com Lextra Flock, In-Mold Transfers IML Solutions LLC PO Box 385876 Bloomington, MN 55438 (952) 838-5099 Fax: (952) 941-6528 www.iml-solutions.com Consulting, In-Mold Labels Industramarkâ„¢, a Standard Register business unit 600 Albany St. Dayton, OH 45417 (800) 755-6405 Fax: (937) 221-1239 www.industramark.com In-Mold Labels ITW Graphics 375 New State Rd. Manchester, CT 06042 (860) 646-8153 Fax: (860) 533-0236 www.itwgraphicsusa.com In-Mold Inserts, In-Mold Transfers, In-Mold Labels Meech Static Eliminators USA, Inc. 2915 Newpark Dr. Norton, OH 44203 (330) 564-2000 Fax: (330) 564-2005 www.meech.com Static Control MKS ION Industrial 1750 N. Loop Rd., Ste. 100 Alameda, CA 94502 (800) 367-2452 Fax: (860) 292-6807 www.mksinst.com/ion-industrial Electrostatic Pinning Systems Nazdar 8501 Hedge Lane Terr. Shawnee, KS 66227 (800) 677-4657 / (913) 422-1888 Fax: (913) 422-2295 www.nazdar.com Inks Proell, Inc. 2751 Dukane Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-2300 Fax: (630) 587-2666 www.proell.us Inks, Thinners, Adhesives

Serigraph, Inc. 3801 E. Decorah Rd. West Bend, WI 53095 (262) 335-7200 Fax: (262) 335-7699 www.serigraph.com In-Mold Inserts, In-Mold Labels

Pad Printing Presses Comdec, Inc. 25 Hale St. Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 462-3399 Fax: (978) 462-3443 www.comdecinc.com Sealed Cup Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Automation, Rotary, Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well

Service Tectonics, Inc. 2827 Treat St. Adrian, MI 49221 (517) 263-0758 Fax: (517) 263-4145 www.padprinting.net Manual, Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well Tampoprint International Corporation 1400 26th St. Vero Beach, FL 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Rotary, Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well

Pad Printing Supplies

Diversified Decorating Sales, Inc. PO Box 386 Peterborough, NH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Sealed Cup

Autoroll Print Technologies 11 River St. Middleton, MA 01949 (978) 777-2160 Fax: (978) 777-7940 www.autoroll.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates

Diversified Printing Techniques, Inc. 13336 South Ridge Dr. Charlotte, NC 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 www.diverprint.com Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well

Comdec, Inc. 25 Hale St. Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 462-3399 Fax: (978) 462-3443 www.comdecinc.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups

Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com Manual, Rotary, Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well

Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Ecocleaner, Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/Plates

Diversified Decorating Sales, Inc. PO Box 386 Peterborough, NH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Plates

Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St. Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 Fax: (978) 646-8981 www.inkcups.com Semi-Automatic, Sealed Cup

Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St. Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 Fax: (978) 646-8981 www.inkcups.com Paint & Laser, Direct Marking, Plate Making

Innovative Marking Systems, Inc. 240 Smith St. Lowell, MA 01851 (978) 459-6533 Fax: (978) 459-2220 www.padprinters.com Rotary, Sealed Cup, Open Ink Well

Diversified Decorating Sales, Inc. PO Box 386 Peterborough, NH 03458 (603) 532-4557 Fax: (603) 532-7702 www.diversifiedecorating.com Pad Designs, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates

Sun Chemical 2445 Production Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-5216 Fax: (630) 587-5226 www.sunchemical.com Inks Webtech, Inc. 108 N. Gold Dr. Robbinsville, NJ 08691 (609) 259-2800 Fax: (609) 259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com In-Mold Inserts, In-Mold Transfers, In-Mold Labels

Laser Etching Equipment

ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4460 www.itwtranstech.com Direct Marking Tampoprint International Corporation 1400 26th St. Vero Beach, FL 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Direct Marking

Offset Printing Presses OMSO North America, Inc. 1420 Jamike Ave. Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 282-6676 Fax: (859) 282-9976 www.omso.com Dry Offset

ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4460 www.itwtranstech.com Open Ink Well, Rotary, Sealed Cup Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, Inc. 201 Tennis Way East Dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (800) 242-1415 www.padprintmachinery.com Automated Systems, Manual, Rotary, Sealed Cup Pentex Print Master Industries, Inc. 6-931 Progress Ave. Toronto, ON, Canada M1G 3V5 (416) 438-3901 Fax: (416) 438-3902 www.inkflexx.com Manual, Sealed Cup Printa Systems, Inc. 127 10th St. S. Kirkland, WA 98033 (800) 601-6240 Fax: (425) 828-8956 www.printa.com Manual, Open Ink Well

Diversified Printing Techniques, Inc. 13336 South Ridge Dr. Charlotte, NC 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 www.diverprint.com Automated Systems, Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/Plates Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St. Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 Fax: (978) 646-8981 www.inkcups.com Ceramic Rings, Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/Plates Innovative Marking Systems, Inc. 240 Smith St. Lowell, MA 01851 (978) 459-6533 Fax: (978) 459-2220 www.padprinters.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates

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2010 PLASTICS DECORATING BUYERS GUIDE

ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4460 www.itwtranstech.com Retooling, Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/Plates Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, Inc. 201 Tennis Way East Dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (800) 242-1415 www.padprintmachinery.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates Pentex Print Master Industries, Inc. 6-931 Progress Ave. Toronto, ON, Canada M1G 3V5 (416) 438-3901 Fax: (416) 438-3902 www.inkflexx.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates Proell, Inc. 2751 Dukane Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-2300 Fax: (630) 587-2666 www.proell.us Inks/Thinners Service Tectonics, Inc. 2827 Treat St. Adrian, MI 49221 (517) 263-0758 Fax: (517) 263-4145 www.padprinting.net Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates Tampoprint International Corporation 1400 26th St. Vero Beach, FL 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Inks/Thinners, Ink Cups, Pads, Cliches/ Plates

Paints/Coatings Plasmatech, inc 1895 Airport Exchange, #190 Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 647-0730 Fax: (859) 647-0737 www.plasmatechnology.com PECVD/thinFilm Screenworks Supply Corporation 1900 N Austin Ave. Chicago, IL 60639 (800) 551-5524 Fax: (773) 836-0950 www.screenworkssupply.com Water-based, UV Curable, Solvent-based Sun Chemical 2445 Production Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-5216 Fax: (630) 587-5226 www.sunchemical.com UV Curable, Solvent-based XSER Coatings, LLC 9 Handy St. New Brunswck, NJ 08901 (732) 745-7468 Fax: (732) 745-7468 www.xsercoatings.com UV Curable

16

Plating On Plastic MPC Plating 1859 E. 63rd St. Cleveland, OH 44103 (216) 881-7220 Fax: (216) 881-7324 www.mpcplating.com Nickel & Chrome Decorative Electroplating

Rapid Prototyping ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4460 www.itwtranstech.com

Screenprinting Equipment/ Supplies A.W.T. World Trade, Inc. 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.awt-gpi.com Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers American Screen Printing Equipment 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.screenprintmachinery.com Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers Autoroll Print Technologies 11 River St. Middleton, MA 01949 (978) 777-2160 Fax: (978) 777-7940 www.autoroll.com Inks Comdec, Inc. 25 Hale St. Newburyport, MA 01950 (978) 462-3399 Fax: (978) 462-3443 www.comdecinc.com Inks Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Dryers, Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Inks Diversified Printing Techniques, Inc. 13336 South Ridge Dr. Charlotte, NC 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 www.diverprint.com Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers, Inks Fusion UV Systems, Inc. 910 Clopper Rd. Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (301) 527-2660 Fax: (301) 527-2661 www.fusionuv.com UV Curing Graphic Parts International, Inc. 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 725-4900 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.gpiparts.com Tooling, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers

Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com Inks, Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St. Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 Fax: (978) 646-8981 www.inkcups.com Tooling, Dryers, Inks Nazdar 8501 Hedge Lane Terr. Shawnee, KS 66227 (800) 677-4657 / (913) 422-1888 Fax: (913) 422-2295 www.nazdar.com Inks Nor-Cote International, Inc. 506 Lafayette Ave. Crawfordsville, IN 47933 (800) 488-9180 / (765) 362-9180 Fax: (765) 364-5408 www.norcote.com Chemicals, Emulsions, Mesh, Squeegees, Inks Pentex Print Master Industries, Inc. 6-931 Progress Ave. Toronto, ON, Canada M1G 3V5 (416) 438-3901 Fax: (416) 438-3902 www.inkflexx.com Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers Printa Systems, Inc. 127 10th St. S. Kirkland, WA 98033 (800) 601-6240 Fax: (425) 828-8956 www.printa.com Inks, Dryers Proell, Inc. 2751 Dukane Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-2300 Fax: (630) 587-2666 www.proell.us Inks Screenworks Supply Corporation 1900 N Austin Ave. Chicago, IL 60639 (800) 551-5524 Fax: (773) 836-0950 www.screenworkssupply.com Color Matching, Tooling, Screens/ Screen Making Equipment, Dryers, Inks Sun Chemical 2445 Production Dr. St. Charles, IL 60174 (630) 587-5216 Fax: (630) 587-5226 www.sunchemical.com Screens/Screen Making Equipment, Dryers, Inks

Screenprinting Presses A.W.T. World Trade, Inc. 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.awt-gpi.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D American Screen Printing Equipment 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.screenprintmachinery.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D

Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Automation, Flat Sheet, Containers/3D Graphic Parts International, Inc. 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 725-4900 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.gpiparts.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D Inkcups Now Corporation 20 Locust St. Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 646-8980 Fax: (978) 646-8981 www.inkcups.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D OMSO North America, Inc. 1420 Jamike Ave. Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 282-6676 Fax: (859) 282-9976 www.omso.com Containers/3D Pentex Print Master Industries, Inc. 6-931 Progress Ave. Toronto, ON, Canada M1G 3V5 (416) 438-3901 Fax: (416) 438-3902 www.inkflexx.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D Screenworks Supply Corporation 1900 N Austin Ave. Chicago, IL 60639 (800) 551-5524 Fax: (773) 836-0950 www.screenworkssupply.com Flat Sheet, Containers/3D

Surface Treatment Equipment Cassco Machines - Cassco Automation 37 Prince Andrew Pl. Toronto ON, Canada M3C 2H2 (800) 387-4600 Fax: (416) 445-3790 www.casscomachines.com Flame Corotec Corporation 145 Hyde Rd. Farmington, CT 06032 (860) 678-0038 Fax: (860) 674-5229 www.corotec.com Cold Gas Plasma, Corona Deco Technology Group, Inc. 749 N. Main St. Orange, CA 92868 (714) 639-3326 Fax: (714) 639-2261 www.decotechgroup.com Flame, Corona, Cold Gas Plasma, Chemical Diversified Printing Techniques, Inc. 13336 South Ridge Dr. Charlotte, NC 28273 (704) 583-9433 Fax: (704) 583-9439 www.diverprint.com Chemical, Flame, Corona Enercon Industries W140 N9572 Fountain Blvd. Menomonee Falls, WI 53051 (262) 255-6070 Fax: (262) 255-7784 www.enerconind.com/treating Chemical, Cold Gas Plasma, Flame, Corona


Industrial Pad Printing Supplies 2212 Radford St. El Paso, TX 79903 (915) 875-1020 Fax: (915) 566-4578 www.indpad.com Flame, Corona

Plasmatech, inc 1895 Airport Exchange, #190 Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 647-0730 Fax: (859) 647-0737 www.plasmatechnology.com Contract Services, Cold Gas Plasma

American Screen Printing Equipment 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.screenprintmachinery.com Screenprinting

ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4460 www.itwtranstech.com Pad Printing

ITW Trans Tech 475 N. Gary Ave. Carol Stream, IL 60188 (630) 752-4000 Fax: (630) 752-4460 www.itwtranstech.com Chemical, Flame, Corona, Cold Gas Plasma

Tampoprint International Corporation 1400 26th St. Vero Beach, FL 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Chemical, Flame, Corona

Cassco Machines - Cassco Automation 37 Prince Andrew Pl. Toronto ON, Canada M3C 2H2 (800) 387-4600 Fax: (416) 445-3790 www.casscomachines.com Assembly, Hot Stamping, Pad Printing

Specialized Assembly Systems, LLC 7685 Hawthorne Pl. Livermore, CA 94550 (925) 606-7100 Fax: (925) 215-2187 www.sasusa.com Assembly

CPS Resources, Inc. 2000 Innovation Dr. Indian Trail, NC 28079 (704) 882-5985 Fax: (704) 882-5986 www.cpsresourcesusa.com Hot Stamping

Tampoprint International Corporation 1400 26th St. Vero Beach, FL 32960 (800) 810-8896 Fax: (800) 587-5332 www.tampoprintusa.com Pad Printing

Die Stampco, Inc. 1301 N. Lincoln St. Bay City, MI 48708 (989) 893-7790 Fax: (989) 893-7741 www.diestampco.com Hot Stamping

Tooltex, Inc. 6160 Seeds Rd. Grove City, OH 43123 (614) 539-3222 Fax: (614) 539-3223 www.tooltex.com Assembly, Hot Stamping

Graphic Parts International, Inc. 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 725-4900 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.gpiparts.com Screenprinting

Trekk Equipment Group 70 Midwest Dr. Pacific, MO 63069 (636) 271-1391 Fax: (636) 257-3908 www.trekkequipment.com Assembly, Hot Stamping

Meech Static Eliminators USA, Inc. 2915 Newpark Dr. Norton, OH 44203 (330) 564-2000 Fax: (330) 564-2005 www.meech.com Static Control Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, Inc. 201 Tennis Way East Dorset, VT 05253 (800) 272-7764 Fax: (800) 242-1415 www.padprintmachinery.com Chemical, Flame, Corona Pentex Print Master Industries, Inc. 6-931 Progress Ave. Toronto, ON, Canada M1G 3V5 (416) 438-3901 Fax: (416) 438-3902 www.inkflexx.com Flame, Corona

Test Equipment Diversified Enterprises 101 Mulberry St., Ste 2N Claremont, NH 03743 (603) 543-0038 Fax: (603) 543-1334 www.dynesonline.com TABER Industries 455 Bryant St. North Tonawanda, NY 14120 (716) 694-4000 Fax: (716) 694-1450 www.taberindustries.com

Used Equipment A.W.T. World Trade, Inc. 4321 N. Knox Ave. Chicago, IL 60641 (773) 777-7100 Fax: (773) 777-0909 www.awt-gpi.com Screenprinting

Webtech, Inc. www.webtechhts.com

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P

PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS Pad Print Machinery/Supplies

ITW Trans Tech (630) 752-4000 www.itwtranstech.com ITW Trans Tech, Carol Stream, Ill., offers standard, custom, and fully automated pad printing equipment, digital inkjet solutions, supplies, re-tooling, rapid prototyping, and superior technical support. Equipment is available in rotary, desktop, stand-alone, tabletop, flatbed, in-line, wide format, and automated systems. Auxiliary equipment includes robotic part handling conveyors, pretreatment (flame, plasma, and Corona), vision systems, part curing stations, and anti-static stations. Supplies include inks, pads, plates, cleaners, thinners, ink cups, SpaceFrames™, and ExpressLiners™. Industrial Pad Printing (915) 875-1020 www.indpad.com Industrial Pad Printing Supplies, Mexico, and Kent Pad Printer Canada Inc. introduce the Green Pad Printing concept. This system incorporates a number of novel features working

or continuous print; separate on/off switches; variable speed controls in all axes of motion; electronic parts counter for all modes; automation interface for communication with PLC; and height-adjustable X-Y table. They are available in three sizes with choice of 60, 90, or 130mm ink cups. Options are available. Inkcups Now (978) 646-8980 www.inkcups.com Inkcups Now Corporation, Danvers, Mass., offers a complete line of products for pad printing including inks, photopolymer and laser-engravable plates, 1- to 6-color pad printers, laser plate-makers and exposure units, printing pads, accessories, and expert technical support in English and Spanish for the decoration of promotional products, tagless garments, and more. Sapphire Series is exceptional quality pad printing ink, compliant with heavy-metal and phthalate regulations, including CPSIA and California Proposition 65. Inkcups Now manufactures five laser plate materials specifically designed for YAG or CO2 systems and capable of handling the full spectrum of graphics. Comdec (800) 445-9176 www.comdecinc.com

together for an efficient and environmentally friendly pad printing process. Features include the patented sealed ink cup design, laser-engraved clichés, and UV curing ink technology. The process serves to eliminate the use of 75 percent solvents and produces a fast drying process. Tampoprint (800) 810-8896 www.tampoprintusa.com Tampoprint International Corporation, Vero Beach, Fla., introduces the new sealed ink cup 60-E, 90-E, and 130-E. These new machines are electronically controlled versions of the popular pneumatic-driven sealed ink cup machines that were first introduced in 1994. Updated control features include selector switch for single, double, triple,

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Comdec, Inc., Newburyport, Mass., presents its machine division SMI – offering advanced pad printing equipment. The newest technology gives customers the highest level of efficiency and quality for specific applications. Innovations such as vision systems, pretreatment, post-cure, loading, unloading, stacking, and even assembly can be combined within a single workstation. Servo-driven pad printers with tracking systems hold extreme accuracy. Comdec also is the North American distributor of RUCO inks with high opacity and all safety and compliance certifications. Proell, Inc. (630) 587-2300 www.proell.us Proell, Inc., St. Charles, Ill., introduces NoriProp N, a highgloss one-component pad printing ink for untreated and pre-


treated polypropylene. The ink demonstrates comparatively good resistance toward hand perspiration and creams. Due to these advantages, NoriProp N is suitable for decorating handheld devices and instruments made from polypropylene. Only high-grade pigments with excellent light fastness are used. The ink is easily processed, regardless of whether the machine is equipped with an open well or a closed cup and is available in a wide range of color shades from stock. Pad Print Machinery of Vermont (800) 272-7764 www.padprintmachinery.com Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, East Dorset, Vt., presents the latest version of the XP 05 one- and twocolor pad printing systems. This latest version, referred to as the KP series, combines the concept of a fixed cupmoving cliché with a moving pad to allow a machine that can be fed/loaded without concern for the pad vertical position, as the machine stops with the pad over the cliché area, leaving the loading and fixture area completely clear. The new design allows for immediate cleaning after a print cycle and zero waste of cycle time under certain print conditions. The unit produces 2,000 cycles per hour (1,700 cycles per hour in two-color mode) and is available with two 70mm cups in the two-color version and with either a 90mm cup or 60mm cup in the one-color.

Printa Systems (800) 601-6240 www.printa.com Printa Systems, Kirkland, Wash., offers the 990 series versatile pad printing system with the ability to decorate a wide range of irregularly shaped items such as coffee cups, sport bottles, pocket knives, golf balls, calculators, and more. The system can be converted from pad printer to cylindrical screenprinter in a matter of minutes, and the changeover is as simple as removing the three pad printing components and replacing them with the three cylindrical attachments. Printa Systems also offers accessories, supplies, training, product sourcing help, and technical support. Full training and lifetime warranty is included with every start-up package. n

Pentex (416) 438-3901 www.inkflexx.com Pentex Print Master Industries Inc., Ontario, Canada, presents InkFlexx pad printing inks and additives that offer optimum ink transfer, quick drying, and excellent adhesion to a wide variety of substrates. An extensive range of colors and a series of complimentary additives allow the solving of many challenging print jobs. InkFlexx products are phthalate- and heavy metalfree and meet the safety requirements of Prop. 65 and RoHS. Diversified Printing Techniques (704) 583-9433 www.diverprint.com Diversified Printing Techniques, Charlotte, N.C., announces that it is going green. New solutions are available for pad printing that are better for the environment. To learn more about going green and saving money, or for information on pad printing and screenprinting equipment and supplies, contact Diversified Printing Techniques – where calls are welcomed by a knowledgable person.

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ASK THE EXPERT Plastics Decorating is pleased to feature this section in our magazine in which you (our readers) can ask industry experts specific questions about plastics decorating. To ask one of our columnists a question, send an email to QA@petersonpublications.com.

Pad Printing Inks

By Benjamin Adner, Inkcups Now Corporation

What new U.S. regulations should be considered when selecting pad printing ink? Two recent legislative updates exist that apply to pad printing inks: the CPSIA 2008 and California Proposition 65. The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (CPSIA) restricts lead content in surface-coating materials (including inks) used in consumer products, as well as lead and phthalate content in products intended for children. Because of serious health side-effects observed, severe penalties in the case of incompliance, and the fact that the Consumer Products Safety Commission is working on amending the regulations (which may result in further bans), many consumer product manufacturing and private labeling companies are choosing to comply preemptively and exclude phthalates from any consumer products, whether specifically intended for children or not. Early compliance also sends a good marketing message and provides a competitive advantage in today’s health-concerned market. Phthalates are additives that make products flexible. Historically, plastisol-type inks have contained phthalates. However, phthalate-free ink product lines have been developed for the pad printing and screenprinting markets. Ask your ink manufacturer for corresponding certificates. Lead in Inks Section 101 of the CPSIA demands that after August 14, 2009, paint and surface-coating materials used in consumer products have lead content reduced from 600 to 90 ppm (parts per million. For more information visit www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/ sect101.html. Your ink supplier must provide test results from an independent lab certifying that the lead limits are met. Phthalates and Lead in Children’s Products Section 108 of the CPSIA demands that in toys intended for children 12 years old or younger and in child care articles

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intended for children 3 years old or younger, three phthalates (DEHP, DBP, and BBP) not be contained in concentration of more than 0.1 percent. Three additional phthalates (DINP, DIDP, and DnOP) have been prohibited pending further study and review by a group of outside experts and the Commission (www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/faq/108faq.html). The lead content for the same category of products, per section 101 of the CPSIA, has been, and continues to be, phased-out as follows: • February 10, 2009, the lead limit will be 600 ppm of total lead content by weight for any part of the product. • August 14, 2009, the lead limit will be 300 ppm. • August 14, 2011, the level will be 100 ppm if technologically feasible. The Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act (better known as California Proposition 65) lists chemicals that are believed to cause cancer, birth defects, or other reproductive harm. The Act demands that businesses operating in the state of California provide a “clear and reasonable” warning before knowingly and intentionally exposing anyone to a listed chemical in the quantities exceeding safe levels. This warning can be given by a variety of ways such as labeling a consumer product. Effectively it means that the ink you intend to use in the state of California for, say, promotional products probably should not contain listed chemicals (or at least contain them within safe levels). Otherwise your marketing message may need to include a cancer or “reproductive harm” warning. Your ink supplier should provide certification to this standard. The complete Proposition 65 list of chemicals is available at www.oehha.org/prop65/prop65_list/files/P65single121809.pdf. To find a list of safe levels of toxic chemicals, visit www.oehha. ca.gov/prop65/pdf/2009FebruaryStat.pdf.


What steps should be taken when mixing pad printing inks? Ink mixing is a basic but very important step to achieve quality imaging with pad printing or other printing processes. If it is not done properly, the entire printing process can get very frustrating and, in turn, may cause a loss of production and a waste of valuable time, energy, and supplies. Before starting, it is essential that the proper equipment is used. Unlined mixing cups (no wax), mixing sticks, and a quality electronic scale with an accuracy of .1 grams are all very important. Without these items, ink mixing becomes guesswork, causing the quality and precision of the print to suffer. The following are some general step-by-step suggestions for ink mixing: 1. Zero or tare out the scale (make sure it is on a level surface). 2. Add the ink to a mixing cup. Try not to use less than 40 grams as it will not flow well in the cup or inkwell once mixed.

opened and color mixed, provided that the containers are promptly and hermetically re-sealed to prevent airflow. You can buy reusable plastic covers that suit most pad printing ink cans available on the market. • To prevent ink from contamination while mixing it, make sure that mixing sticks and containers are made of metal, wood, or polyethylene and that they are clean. • Once you mix ink with hardener and/or thinner, it will last for up to approximately 10-14 hours in a sealed container. It applies to an ink cup tightly covered with a printing plate. However, it is not recommended to leave ink in the ink cup after production because if the cup is not cleaned in time, it may be permanently damaged. n Benjamin Adner is president of Inkcups Now Corporation. Inkcups Now provides pad printing and screenprinting equipment and supplies, laser engravers, and inkjet printers. For information on Inkcups Now’s full line of equipment, supplies, and services, call (978) 646-8980, email info@inkcups.com, or visit www.inkcups.com.

3. Add appropriate hardener ratio (consult with your ink supplier). 4. Mix these two ingredients completely. Note that once mixed with hardener, the ink has a limited pot-life, normally 8-10 hours. 5. Begin adding thinner at an appropriate ratio (consult with your ink supplier); then re-mix. 6. Continue to add thinner at a drop-by-drop rate until a working viscosity is achieved. Adding all the thinner at once tends to “shock” the ink. Remember, it is easier to add than to take away. How should pad printing inks be stored? Pad printing inks contain solvents, which evaporate when exposed to the air, causing the ink to dry. When pad printing, the evaporation of solvents makes ink surface tacky and ensures ink transfer from printing plate to the printing pad and finally to the end product. The chemical composition of pad printing ink has the following implications for storage and handling: • Pad printing ink should always be stored in hermetically sealed containers (metal or polyethylene), at room temperature, and away from direct sunlight and sources of heat. • The shelf-life of pad printing ink is about 2-3 years. It applies to unopened containers as well as ink that has been

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D

DECORATOR’S PROFILE

By Kym Conis

Marking a Reputation for Loyalty

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n today’s struggling climate where price can dictate a purchase over quality and service, many would argue that loyalty, particularly customer loyalty, is fast becoming a luxury of the past. While this may be true to some extent, others – such as Gold Bond Inc. – are proving the contrary. As a decorator of plastics in the ad specialty market for over six decades, Gold Bond Inc., Chattanooga, Tenn., has utilized the power of loyalty to build customer, vendor, and employee relationships that endure – even in turbulent times. With an acute commitment to the day-in/day-out process of building loyalty, the company endeavors to exceed customer requirements for quality, fast turnarounds at fair prices. From pad printing and screenprinting to a host of other decorative processes, Gold Bond continues to underscore its reputation in the industry with bold, indelible marks. Making Its Mark Originally founded as Kingston Pencil Corporation by Johnny Kingston in 1946, the company entered the ad specialty market by decorating items such as wooden nickels, rulers, yardsticks, and other like products. Eventually, the company added plastics to the line and foil stamping became the primary method of decoration. In 1979, Johnny Kingston sold the company to Don Godsey. With very little experience in the industry (but a whole lot of enthusiasm), Godsey took the helm and renamed the company Gold Bond Inc.

Gold Bond pressman makereadies the press for a screenprint order.

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Under Godsey’s visionary leadership, the company grew to new heights over the next three decades. One of the most immediate actions was to bring injection and blow molding in-house in order to produce some of its own products such as key tags, cups, ice scrapers, and plastic bottles. At about the same time, Gold Bond added screenprinting capabilities, which allowed the company to greatly expand its core product lines. When pad printing came into play in 1994 with its first onehead, single-color machine, the doors opened wide to a world of new markets. According to Plant Manager John Brotton, before pad printing, the company was unable to decorate items that were round or that had divots (such as golf balls). “Now with greater flexibility, we were able to decorate some really unique items such as desk accessories, stress balls, and computer mouses,” he said. Today, with 35 pad printing machines in operation, Gold Bond is strategically set to corner the short-run market – making 99 percent of its own jigs, tools, and dies. “Having in-house capabilities in these areas allows us to customize any project with speed and accuracy,” said Brotton. “Our processes are pretty lean and efficient so that we can do that. Of course we won’t turn down a million-piece order, but our specialty is one- and two-day service.” As the addition of pad printing continued to open new markets, Gold Bond made the decision to concentrate its efforts on the decorating end of the business and, in order to stay competitive, sold its molding capabilities. A few years later, Gold Bond added laser etching to the mix, thereby offering a more permanent decorating solution on higher-end products. “One of the first products we etched was carabiners for rock climbing; then we went into ink pens. Now we do everything from knives to glass – laser etching wood, glass, metal, and plastic,” said Brotton. “Laser etching provides the advantage of permanency. The decoration lasts for the life of the product and offers a higher perceived value.” Depending on the product being decorated, some of the presses are extremely versatile while others are specially designed to run long runs of just one product, such as the company’s screenprinting presses from Italy. Customized to run pens, these presses decorate large orders with the ability


Loyalty Is a Two-Way Street Gold Bond believes in the power of forming partnerships with its customers, vendors, and employees, and draws upon the strength that such unions offer in its day-to-day operations. Key to the company’s continued growth has been its steadfast commitment to loyalty which, in turn, has produced repeat orders – a supplier/customer relationship built on quality, consistency, and on-time delivery.

to run between 20,000 and 25,000 parts in an eight-hour shift. “Some of the tooling for our screenprint jobs can get quite complicated, so we source this from our machine supplier in Italy as well. It costs a bit more but to guarantee that the job will run correctly right out of the gate is worth every penny,” Brotton explained. From one-color to semi-automatic multi-color presses, Gold Bond operates some 60 screenprinting presses from its 160,000-square-foot facility in Chattanooga. Whether screenprinting, pad printing, offset printing, debossing, laser engraving, doming, heat transfer/foil stamping, or assembly, Gold Bond’s 300 employees run three shifts per day, seven days per week in order to keep up with customer needs. “Truly, the key to our tradition of excellent service starts with our employees,” Brotton emphasized. “I may make the decisions, but I’m not out there on the production floor printing, packing, and shipping. They deserve all the credit.” Now under the leadership of new owners and long-time Gold Bond veterans Mark Godsey (Don’s son) and Mitch Henderson, along with a talented executive staff and management team, Gold Bond continues in its long-established traditions while moving into new directions of growth with an energy and vivacity that won’t be deterred.

“2009 was a tough year,” Brotton admitted. “What we saw was that the people we were doing repeat business with were our true partners. Especially in this economy, we were able to weed out the competition that was nipping at our heels.” Winning the PPAI (Promotional Products Association International) Star Supplier award for 2010, as well as the ASI (Advertising Specialty Institute) 2010 Supplier of the Year Award (ASI’s highest honor) and the ASI Distributor Choice Award for golf accessories (for the eighth year in a row) is testament to Gold Bond’s emphasis on customer service. Brotton explained that Gold Bond stands 100 percent behind its products and services and operates under an internal mantra that states ‘if it’s not right, we’ll fix it – no hassles.’ “This goes to show that even though sales were down (in 2009), we were still able to service our customers. They appreciate our efforts in this economy – they appreciate us.” To help solidify customer return, Gold Bond places great merit in ‘face time’ and exhibits in all the big ad specialty tradeshows throughout the year. “It’s good to put a face with the customer orders,” said Brotton. “It may seem like just another pen order, but each job is someone else’s big day. Whether celebrating a company anniversary, tradeshow, or grand opening, our product is part of that special event. Meeting customers face to face keeps our perspective focused.” Brotton further explained that vendor loyalty and forming partnerships is an integral factor underlying Gold Bond’s ability to service its customers. “We believe in consistency and continuity

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DECORATOR’S PROFILE

with presses. You’re not creating any type of loyalty with your vendors if you buy here and there. For instance, we buy our pad printing equipment from Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, or screenprinting equipment from GPE Ardenghi of Italy, and our lasers are Electrox out of the UK.” However, high expectations accompany this vendor loyalty, as Gold Bond enters into a true business partnership with each. “If a machine goes down, I expect my vendor to be there,” said Brotton. “Our niche is fastturnarounds and there can be no compromise on service. In order to do this, we expect the same from our vendors.” In the end, Gold Bond attributes its success in customer service and support to its employees. “One thing that this economy has done is that we have a great core of employees who really want to work,” said Brotton. The company spent time this past year to further train and cross-train its employees and strengthen its core group. A strong team of frontline managers is imperative to communicating the company culture and at Gold Bond, that team is right on the mark. “We expect managers to walk the floor and say good morning every day, just as Mark Godsey and I do each and every morning. We have an open door policy where any employee can come straight to me. We listen to what our employees have to say, good or bad,” said Brotton.

Screen mesh is stretched to attach to screen frames, supplying Gold Bond’s 60 screenprinting presses in daily operation.

Communication goes both ways and Gold Bond lets its employees know how important they are to the overall success of the organization. Brotton explained that it’s easy to lose track out on the production floor. “I’ve been there and done those jobs. So it’s up to us (the executive and management team) to relay the customer comments.” In appreciation for work well done or extra time put in, the company will buy pizzas, cater in BBQ, or pass along customer gifts to those who worked the jobs – little things throughout the year to demonstrate the

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DECORATOR’S PROFILE

company’s loyalty to its employees. On a larger scale, Gold Bond gives recognition to employees for outstanding work through Employee and Manager of the Year awards, presented at the annual Christmas party. The internal atmosphere at Gold Bond is fun and creative yet extremely focused. All employees are willing to work any hours or shift to get the job done, as they realize they have a great reputation in the industry for doing just that. According to Brotton, it’s a sense of pride with most of the employees in being the best… and staying the best. “We (the management staff) are mostly in our mid-30s and early 40s. We are all very similar in our backgrounds and mindsets; and we’re all very competitive, which makes for some interesting staff meetings,” said Brotton. “There’s a certain energy, a cohesion that leaves no room for politics – just a focus on getting the job done right!” Giving back to the community is another example of the company’s long-established tradition of loyalty. Instead of hiring temps, Gold Bond farms its temporary work out to a local organization that helps place special needs individuals in jobs and careers. “They take great pride in what they do at the Orange Grove Center and they do a very good job,” said Brotton. Gold Bond also donates products such as pencils and pens to local

Custom dual-head heat transfer

ENGINEERED 30

area schools and contributes the use of its facility/parking lot for fundraising events, such as car washes and the like. Forward through the Fairway On the continual search for new decorating technologies, Gold Bond’s golf accessory line has catapulted the company into a new realm of high-end products. Since it sells a lot of golf bags and related products such as towels and gloves, Gold Bond is considering embroidery as its next decorating venture to complement the high-end line. “Embroidery adds a higher perceived value,” said Brotton. “You have to be very smart with where you spend your money. Embroidery seems to fit into where we want to go with our new line. We continually have to look forward.” And looking forward it has! Through straight fairways and ones a bit trickier in nature, Gold Bond continues to seek opportunities and new technologies – while still maintaining the tried and true practices that have earned the company its stellar reputation for customer service in the industry. Gold Bond Inc.’s commitment to its customers, vendors, employees, and community has produced a sense of loyalty – both given and received – that has created a bold, indelible mark proven to withstand the test of time. n

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INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

RBS Technologies Offers In-Mold Labeling Seminar RBS Technologies, Inc., Scottsdale, Ariz., is offering the “ABC’s of IML: A Basic Course” seminar that will be presented March 25, 2010, at the Doubletree Hotel & Conference Center Chicago North Shore, Skokie, Ill. Offered annually since 1989, this seminar is an introductory in-mold labeling (IML) and in-mold decorating (IMD) course designed for those considering entry into the IML and IMD market as well as a refresher course for more experienced participants in the field. The seminar provides a basic grounding in IML and IMD as well as the fundamentals of extrusion blow molding, injection IML, the in-mold process, production of in-mold labels, current markets, functions across the IML value chain, and future growth opportunities. For more information and registration information call (800) 473-0301 or visit www.rbstechnologies.com/imlabcs.html. Lectro Engineering Celebrates 50-Year Anniversary Lectro Engineering Co., St. Louis, Mo., has announced 50 years of service as a leader in three-dimensional plastic surface treating equipment. Established in 1960, Lectro has grown from a small regional company to a corporation that has hundreds of customers on all continents. The rapid expansion started in 1983, with new leadership and a variety of products for a wide range of industries, which led to sales in Europe, Asia, and other countries. In 2001, the company acquired assets from MTM Systems and merged with Automation Technology Inc. to become a “one stop shop” for companies needing secondary equipment for plastic production lines. For more information, call (314) 567-3100 or visit www.lectroengineering.com. Plastics Decorating’s Gone Digital Plastics Decorating magazine also is available online in a digital version. Formatted exactly like the printed version, the digital version is easy to navigate from page to page and has specific links from websites that are referenced within the editorial copy or within an advertisement. Pages also can be easily saved or printed for future reference. “We all know that the world is changing – especially the younger generation, which gets much of its information online,” stated Plastics Decorating Editor Kym Conis. “Having both a printed and digital version will provide more exposure for our advertisers and increase overall circulation of the magazine.” To access the digital version, simply visit the Plastics Decorating website at www.plasticsdecorating.com. Additive Manufacturing Gets a Universal Language A collaboration between the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and ASTM International has produced a universal name and language – additive manufacturing – for what has been called rapid technology, rapid prototyping, and layered manufacturing. To eliminate the confusion over terminology, design, testing methods, materials, and processing differences, SME’s Rapid Technologies and Additive Manufacturing (RTAM) community approached ASTM to develop the industry’s first-ever standards. The initial result is the publication

In Memory of Industry Veteran Keith J. Hillestad, 1947-2010 Keith Hillestad of Lancaster, N.Y., passed away of a sudden illness on January 18, 2010. Keith was a longtime veteran of the plastics decorating industry who spent over 35 years contributing his knowledge and expertise in the areas of decorating equipment and supplies. Keith began his plastics career with Service Plastics, where he spent eight years in set-up and maintenance for all types of decorating and assembly equipment. Following a two-year period selling foil and foil stamping supplies, Keith became an independent manufacturers’ representative for pad print, hot stamp, silk screen equipment, and more. During this five-year period, Keith began his working relationship with ITW United Silicone and in December of 1990, moved from Chicago to Buffalo to become a sales manager with the organization. This move marked the beginning of a 20-year career with United Silicone, where Keith worked in sales and in sales management throughout the U.S. During his tenure at United Silicone, Keith traveled to Germany, Italy, and France working with its sister companies. Keith presented many technical papers over his lifetime career, speaking at multiple SPE ANTECs, SPE Decorating & Assembly Division TopCons, and multiple regional conferences. As a senior member of the Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE member since 1984) and a current board member of the SPE Decorating & Assembly Division, Keith was an instrumental part of the growth and education of the plastics decorating industry at large. He will always be remembered for his willingness to step in and help, his vast industry knowledge, and his friendship and laughter. He will be greatly missed. Keith is survived by wife Nancy, children Tammy and Brian, and grandchildren Alexander, Joshua, and Henry.

“Standard Terminology for Additive Manufacturing Technologies,” now available for purchase online. The terminology standards will help clarify communications especially in industries like medical manufacturing and aerospace where consistency is a must. To purchase a copy of this new standard, visit the SME Online Store at www.spe.org/store, click on the ASTM button, and type “additive manufacturing” in the search field to locate F 2792-09. Herrmann Ultrasonics Commemorates 20 Years Herrmann Ultrasonics Inc., Bartlett, Ill., a company of the Herrmann Group, announces the celebration of its 20th anniversary in North America. In 1990, the company was established in Schaumburg, Ill., by Thomas Herrmann. Throughout its 20year history, continuous growth in different market segments

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has allowed the company to establish Technology Centers in the Northeast, on the West Coast, in the Caribbean, and in Mexico. The latest milestone recently occurred in 2006 with the opening of a new 20,000-square-foot facility in Bartlett, Ill. For more information call (630) 626-1626 or visit www.herrmannultrasonics.com. IMDA Announces 2010 Awards Competition The In-Mold Decorating Association, Scottsdale, Ariz., is now accepting entries for the Fourth Annual IMDA Awards Competition. The 2010 Competition will recognize the industry’s best in-mold labeled packaging and in-mold decorated durable products. The winning entries are chosen based on creativity in design, engineering, and innovation in the following 3D aD - Larger Primary categories: Best Part Quantities Design, Best Thin Wall Packaging, Best Date: 01/29/10 Injection Mold Part, Best Blow Mold Part, Best IMD Durable FiLe:\\adv\advertising\ads\master_aDs\ Product, Best Label Design, and Best Product Family. Entries aWt\1160_3D-Lrgr_Qty\1160_3D-lrgr_qty.indd must be received at IMDA by June 1, 2010. Award winners siZe: 1/4 page, at 3-3/4” W X 4-7/8” H (3.75 x 10, 4.875) will be recognized IMLCON10 and IMDCON SeptemPart #: aDDis-1160 ber 29-30, 2010, in Miami, Fla. For more information, visit VenDOr: Plastics Decorating magazine www.imdassociation.com or call (480) 473-0301. n COLOr: 4-color FOrmat: inDesign

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ASSEMBLY UPDATE

Points to Ponder

By Tom Kirkland, www.tributek.biz

T

here are those who say nothing used is as good as the same thing new. Then there are those who say buying certain things new, especially big-ticket items, is throwing away money. Who is right? A spectrum of new, near-new, reconditioned, running-used, and bone-yard equipment exists in the marketplace, and sorting through it all can be something of a challenge. When buying equipment new, especially when buying something familiar, the buyer has the greatest confidence about exactly what he is getting. The sale comes with the equipment supplier’s attention in correcting after-sale issues, and the buyer has some legal recourse through the warranty if things go wrong. Since equipment generally has gotten more precise and capable over time, a buyer is probably, though not always, buying recent generation technology when buying new. Assembly and decorating equipment suppliers generally also supply tooling for the machines they make, so a buyer can have a single-responsibility vendor to call when things go bump in the night. Having been the custom tooling manager for a machinery company, I can assure you that while we tried very hard to treat all customers alike, human nature dictated that we had a lot more incentive to do more for the customer if there was machinery on the order as well.

the machine can be expected to deliver nearly new reliability and performance. Getting tooling from the machinery manufacturer or having existing tooling and parts shipped there is important. Also, the buyer should expect to see it running on the machine that is being purchased before it ships. Used equipment also can be purchased from used equipment dealers. Dealer types vary and can cover a wide range: • Specialists in process or even brand of equipment who also provide tooling • Manufacturer’s representatives who also deal in new machines • Dealers who buy auction equipment and warehouse it until sold

But during ebbs in the business cycle, used equipment sings a sweeter song than in times of roaring prosperity. Plant closures and underutilized capacity means there is more used equipment out there, and often in good condition and relatively new. Company cash flows also may be running low and jump-starting some new business with a good used machine might be a wise move. Used Equipment Comes in All Shapes and Sizes Used equipment may be purchased from the manufacturer as a demo system, or occasionally as a surplus machine built for another customer who didn’t follow through and take delivery. Sometimes demo machines have had light use and a lot of storage time, while other machines may have had hard use and have traveled extensively. Before making a decision, the buyer should find out as much as possible about such a machine’s history and, in any case, negotiate some kind of warranty. ‘Reconditioned’ can mean a lot of things and before purchasing, certain items should be verified such as whether the machine has been cleaned, inspected, repaired, wear parts that are near end of life replaced, and above all, that the machine has been tested to new machine specifications. The buyer is not paying for a new machine, but he is paying for the manufacturer’s assurance that

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ASSEMBLY UPDATE

• Scavengers who buy and sell equipment they really know almost nothing about The lines can be a little blurred here, so it is paramount that the buyer understands what he is getting into if he doesn’t want to risk wasting a lot of money. Most business people are honest, but sometimes the buyer may need to walk away if it just doesn’t feel right. A plane ticket and a hotel stay can go a long way toward avoiding a lot of headaches down the road, so it is important that the buyer visit the facility and see what he is buying and from whom he is buying. The seller also should be willing to run off parts and tooling on the machine that is being considered for purchase and provide some kind of warranty. As above, the seller has more incentive to please if the seller is both building the tooling and selling the machine. I have seen many cases where machinery bought at auction was dropped into trouble-free production. However, this has always required the expertise of a manufacturing engineer who, through his confidence and proven track record with the type of equipment in question, would be able to physically check out the machinery and make it work. A buyer who is not capable of being so bold should not swim in that pool.

Once in a while, a situation occurs where a used machine can be bought directly from the company that has used it in the past. Keeping in mind the company’s motivation to be rid of it, the buyer should try to find a manufacturing or process engineer who is personally familiar with the specific machine (sometimes this is very difficult or impossible to do) and have a “known issues” discussion. Many times companies will prefer to sell off lightly used equipment directly to capture as much value as they can for accounting purposes, and these machines can be a tremendous value buy. Maintaining a Used Equipment Purchase Another point that bears mentioning is that buyers of used equipment often are not in much of a position to know the kind of use a machine has seen. For example, if a person is knowledgeable about cars, he can sometimes pick up on signs that a used car has been driven hard and under-maintained by its previous owner. This can be much more difficult to assess when buying used equipment, especially when not very familiar with the make, model, or even type of machine being purchased. Remember the old Russian expression: “Trust, but verify.” If in doubt, it may be wise to pay more and either buy from somebody who will provide a warranty on a reconditioned machine, or just bite the bullet and buy new.

Tips for Buying Used Assembly Equipment 1) All types of assembly and decorating equipment that have some kind of slide are subject to side loads to a greater or lesser degree. Extend slides and wiggle them to check for slop. 2) Many machines have a C-frame type of structure. If tooling slides or skitters away from the frame when under load, understand that it may indicate a stressed, sprung, or cracked frame component. 3) Recognize that a layer of dust on electronics holds in heat like a blanket and greatly reduces component life. 4) Look for evidence of poor maintenance, like air lines that are dirty on the inside downstream of a filter, or pitting and scarring of ways or other bearing surfaces. 5) Carefully test intrusion guarding and any other safety systems on any used piece of equipment. Bypassed safety sys-

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tems sometimes can be hard to restore to working order. 6) Look into component obsolescence issues, the availability of factory or replacement custom parts, and whether a factory service operation exists for the machine being considered. 7) Machines that produce heat such as heat stakers, hot stampers, and hot plate welders are hard on things like bearings, fittings, valves, and cylinder seals that are near the heat. Check for discoloration, brittleness, or other signs of heat stress. 8) Spin welders often operate at high speeds with unbalanced loads. Check that the head rotates true and quietly without undue vibration. 9) Ultrasonic converters/transducers that make a rattling noise when shaken are definitely damaged and are one of the more expensive components to re-

place. A converter/transducer assembled to a booster should run quietly and with minimal heating after a 15-second test. If possible, run parts and tooling on the machine being considered for purchase. 10) Vibration welders have several components that can harbor small cracks that don’t cause problems until the equipment is mechanically and acoustically loaded up. The best defense is to ask to see the machine actually weld some parts, preferably yours. 11) Power lasers have definite lifetimes and are expensive to replace. Make sure you know what to expect from a used laser, and what a replacement will cost. 12) For all types of equipment, there may be spare parts and supplies in maintenance storage somewhere that will only fit the machine you are buying. You may be able to negotiate for them along with the machine at a very low cost.


As machinery ages, bearings and cylinder seals can wear, insulation on wires can crack, wires subject to frequent flexing can break, switches or membrane panels can wear out, displays can burn out, valves can get sticky, relays can burn out…and the list continues. This is of particular concern if buying an “orphan” machine – that is, the original builder has gone out of business. Sometimes spare parts and manuals will be available from an authorized source; sometimes the buyer can find direct replacement components himself. Some companies make replacement parts and sometimes, unfortunately, what breaks can’t be replaced or repaired at all. Even if the original manufacturer is still in business, it can be difficult to obtain some manuals and spare parts, and impossible to obtain others. Few industries have changed as rapidly as electronics over the last three or four decades. Component obsolescence is a big problem for equipment manufacturers as they attempt to support an installed base of equipment that may stretch back 40 or more years. Certain generations of circuit boards may become impossible to make, and it is not unusual to have restrictions about which version of board works with which version of another board or which version of installed firmware or software. If older CRT tubes or other types of displays die, the machine may not be repairable in its present form. Some older machines may not be upgradable either.

3

Component obsolescence is a big problem for equipment manufacturers.

The tough realities of today’s manufacturing world has manufacturers trying to make value decisions in an environment where “just-in-time” is the rock and “do more with less” is the hard place. There is room for both new and used assembly equipment in such value decisions. But there are no quick and easy answers, no one-size-fits-all solution. The buyer must do the homework and ultimately make the decision that is most likely to produce the best financial outcome in the end. n Tom Kirkland originally trained in industrial/manufacturing engineering and worked as a project engineer whose responsibility was to purchase and implement assembly and decorating equipment and tooling. He has since spent over 20 years supplying assembly equipment and parts to the industry. Holding numerous board positions with many industry-related associations, he has authored numerous articles and papers, is a renowned trainer, and is a recognized expert in plastics joining. For information on Tom Kirkland’s consulting and machinery parts business, visit www.tributek.biz.

A new machine is much more than used, but costs a lot less than the sum of its parts. If I went to the local Chevy dealer’s parts desk and ordered all of the parts to build a brand new Corvette, would it cost me more or less than a new one from the factory? The same is true with machinery. How about trying to obtain parts for a 30-year-old car? Same with machinery, though perhaps less severe. Even with significant prices for service parts, a machinery manufacturer runs a parts and service operation primarily to benefit its own direct customers. Would it be surprising to learn that buying used machinery from a third party most likely will not come with free copies of manuals, service bulletins, free training, and phone support as would be the case with buying a machine new? Buying equipment and tooling is not like buying a sculpture or even like buying a car. Equipment isn’t bought to admire its lovely lines and cool paint job and graphics. The buyer is actually buying a set of capabilities – the ability to produce product and, one hopes, reliability. An older vehicle, for example, may be a great bargain, but anyone who has ever operated a fleet of trucks (or even one) is familiar with the concept of “dispatch reliability.” That is to say: “If I have a mission to accomplish today, what is the likelihood that the mission will get accomplished given the equipment with which I have to work?” The older a machine gets, the lower dispatch reliability tends to be, even with good maintenance.

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P

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENTS

Extol Introduces New InfraStake Module Extol, Inc., Zeeland, Mich., introduces the new 20mm InfraStake module. The smaller diameter module is ideally suited for PC board-type assembly and limited access/ tight centerline plastic staking applications. The application of intensely focused infrared light energy is at the core of these processes. The InfraStake and InfraWeld processes are complemented by Extol’s servo-driven spin welder and high-speed, hot-plate welder product lines. For more information, call (616) 748-9955, email sales@extolinc.com, or visit www.extolinc.com. Inkcups Now Introduces Cobalt 300 Inkcups Now, Danvers, Mass., introduces a laser engraver designed to produce high resolution pad printing plates, etch various substrates, and cut fixtures. The Cobalt 300 uses CO2 laser technology and specially designed Acculaze and Imperial plate materials to produce pad printing clichés directly from the computer. The CO2 laser engraver has a software package for quick positioning, modifying, and printing multiple graphics to the laser. It also is equipped with a servo-driven motor, which enables the maximum etching speed of 110 inches per second. The XY motion of the laser print head allows etching of images up to 12"x24". For more information, call (978) 646-8980 or visit www.inkcups.com. Bayer Presents Cold-Formable Chrome-Effect Film Product Bayer Material Science LLC, New Orleans, La., now offers Makrofol® 3D metallic FG film that eliminates the need for electroplating. The chrome-colored polycarbonate film provides an alternative to the traditional screenprinted mirror finish for films and the electroplating of plastic moldings. The Makrofol film can be cold-formed in a high-pressure forming process without losing its metallic gloss and can be overmolded and back-injected and printed on both sides with good graphic quality. For more information, call (412) 777-3983 or visit www.bayermaterialsciencenafta.com. Versatile Foils from United Silicone United Silicone, Lancaster, N.Y., announces the availability of various hot stamp foils to be used in conjunction with an assortment of substrates and materials. United Silicone’s pigmented and metallic foils offer the quality and durability required for

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today’s hot stamping applications. In addition to foils, United Silicone provides hot stamping and heat transfer equipment, tooling, and supplies for product decorating and labeling applications. For more information, call (716) 681-8222 or visit www. unitedsilicone.com. Dukane Introduces Servo-Controlled Ultrasonic Welder Dukane Corp.’s Ultrasonics Division, St. Charles, Ill., has introduced a servo-controlled ultrasonic welding system for medical applications and other high-value components. The novel iQ servo-controlled welder is based on the company’s new Melt Match technology, which delivers greater repeatability, stronger welds, easier validation calibration, and lower manufacturing cost v. standard pneumatic welders. For more information, call (630) 797-4902 or visit www.dukane.com/us. Herrmann Offers Traceability in Ultrasonic Welding Herrma nn U lt rasonics, Bartlett, Ill., offers a barcode scanner with specially developed software to accomplish the task of the Unique Device Identification (UDI) system. The FDA signed into law the UDI system in order to improve patient safety (on medical devices). Diligent process documentation is becoming increasingly important in the industry and has been a must for safety-critical parts for a long time. Today’s sophisticated traceability systems enable advanced manufacturing companies to optimize production processes, record complex data, and attain quality assurance in all stages of production. The system is suitable for the DIALOG series machine, and traceability is available for each individual weld process. Functions like part and batch identifications as well as linking to previously stored weld parameters (memory


selection) simplify machine operations. The flexible barcode system also can be used in production for weld process release, long-term archiving of process data, and verification of part presence. For more information, call (630) 626-1626 or visit www.herrmannultrasonics.com.

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Kammann, Newburyport, Mass., has introduced the K15-CNC, a family of newly designed rotary indexing screenprinters with up to eight printing heads. The rotary indexing screenprinters are used for the decoration of cylindrical, conical, oval, flat plastic, glass bottles, and more with a speed of 5,400 cycles per hour. Variable article and screen movements are controlled by servo motors and CNC-axis. Data input of article-related parameters via modern touch panels allows the automatic adjustment of screen stroke, article rotation, and squeegee movement. All data can be stored for repeat orders. The K15-CNC series allows for 360 degrees all around printing of rounds, ovals, and threedimensional shapes as well. The small footprint, extremely short changeover times, and inexpensive tooling costs make the K15 series a very efficient and versatile screenprinting machine with almost unlimited printing possibilities and guarantee for fast return of investment. For more information call (630) 513-8091 or visit www.kammann.com.

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In-Mold Labels Stay in Place without Vacuum MKS Ion Industrial, Alameda, Calif., is introducing electrostatic charging to enhance label placement in in-mold labeling applications and to reduce mold-making costs. Electrostatic charging systems from MKS ION Industrial can be retrofitted to work with existing IML equipment to invisibly pin labels to mold surface, eliminating the need for costly mold vacuum ports. The compact 7020 charging generator is capable of delivering 20,000 volt output at 1.5mA regardless of ambient humidity or other environment conditions. For more information, call (888) 310-3334 or visit www.mksinst.com/ion-industrial. n

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A

ASSOCIATION NEWS

Letter from the Chairman Where do you get information on the latest technological developments in the plastics industry? More to the point, where can you network with academia and industry professionals to align a new decorating and/or assembly technique to your product development efforts? The genesis of innumerable competitive advantages in plastics decorating and assembly occur at the SPE ANTEC, set this year for May 16-20, 2010, at the Orlando World Center Marriott Resort & Convention Center. The SPE Decorating & Assembly Division has finalized an insightful line-up of world-class papers which will be presented during a day-long session on Wednesday, May 19th. The following is an advance sampling of the soon-to-beannounced Decorating & Assembly Division program: • Decorating Methods for Injection Molded Parts • Prototype Tooling Benefits for IMD • Structural Bonding of Plastics • In-Line v. Off-Line Decorating & Printing • Synergistic Approach to Improving Adhesive Adhesion to Styrenic Copolymers & TPEs • Welding of Bioplastics • Instant Bonding of Plastics • Assembling Hard-to-Bond Plastics

Topical Conference Programming Best Ever! The 2010 SPE Decorating & Assembly Division Topical Conference (TopCon), set for June 15-16 in Nashville, Tenn., is full of new programming to provide attendees with a wealth of information on the latest technologies in plastics decorating and assembly. This year’s event – Tune into Innovation – will feature over 22 papers during the two-day event. “We believe that this will be our strongest program yet,” stated TopCon Committee Chair Jeff Peterson (Plastics Decorating magazine). “We are excited about the line-up of papers, as well as the conference destination located in Nashville – a central location for those traveling in and a great destination to visit.” Papers that attendees can expect to hear include the following: • Surface Modification of Inks, Coatings, and Adhesives – The Interfacial Effects – Rory Wolf, Enercon • Greener Solutions for Pad Printing, John Kaverman, Tampoprint • In-mold Decorating with Injection Molding, Tom Robinson, Nissha • Laser Marking and Product Security, Scott Sabreen, The Sabreen Group • PVD – An Alternative for Chrome Plating, Jennifer Smith, Red Spot Paint

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The Decorating & Assembly Division has recruited the most respected, industry-leading experts in each of these fields to present and be on-hand to discuss your application-specific challenges. For more specific information about the upcoming Decorating & Assembly program papers, feel free to contact me directly at rwolf@enerconmail.com. Lastly, many of you knew Keith Hillestad, our Division’s vice chair and an industry-recognized expert in foil stamping for United Silicone/ITW. We very recently lost Keith to a sudden illness. Keith was one of those highly respected peers who comes around only once in a lifetime. He unselfishly shared his time, talents, and experience so that others could grow and succeed in life – a hero to all who knew him. Our prayers are with his family, friends, and colleagues. Rory A. Wolf Enercon Industries Corporation Chair, SPE Decorating & Assembly Division

• Automotive Plastics Case Radio with Insert Molded EMC Shielding, Paul Uglum, Delphi Corp. • Plastics Painting Methods and Machinery, Dominic Zerilli, Thierica Corp. • Welding of Bio-Plastics, David Grewell, Iowa State Univ. • Benefits of Force Profiling, Sophie Morneau, Branson • Evaluation of Ultrasonic Welding Results Using Microscopy, Ken Holt, Herrmann Ultrasonics • Advancements in Electromagnetic Welding, Steve Chookazian, Emabond This is just a portion of what will be presented during the 2010 TopCon. In addition to the new technology papers, the first day will include a Supplier Trade Fair where attendees can visit and network with many of the top suppliers of decorating and assembly equipment and supplies in the industry. TopCon will take place at the Franklin Marriott Cool Springs. To make reservations, call (888) 403-6772 and be sure to mention the SPE Decorating & Assembly TopCon to receive the group discount. For complete programming, registration, and hotel information, visit www.plasticsdecorating.com or www.4spe. org. Questions? Call Jeff Peterson at (785) 271-5801. n


S

SPECIAL REPORT

Plastics Markets: The Road Ahead By Dr. Peter J. Mooney, Plastics Custom Research Services

O

ver the past few years, the U.S. economy has encountered the most serious downturn in overall economic activity since the Great Depression, resulting in destructive repercussions throughout Wall Street and Main Street. As we tentatively emerge from this cathartic experience, embarking upon a new year and a new decade, plastics industry participants – resin, additive, and machinery manufacturers; plastics processors; compounders; tool-makers; et al. – are scanning the horizon for markets that can help them regain their former growth dynamic. Should they rely on traditional markets or instead explore new niche markets, those driven by recent material and processing innovations? As these companies strategize, it behooves them to briefly look back before attempting to visualize what is ahead. The past is not necessarily prologue to the future. Nonetheless, it can confirm where we’ve been and provide insight as to where we may be heading. Over the past decade the major markets for U.S. plastics processors have been those portrayed in the graphic below. Packaging constitutes 33 percent of the total market. Packaging is unique insofar as it is relatively recession-resistant. Industrial production may rise and fall, yet the demand for plastic material (e.g., blow molded bottles, extruded film bags, thermoformed clam-shells) used in packaging food and nonfood products hardly fluctuates. The same is true of medical equipment, which is subsumed in the ‘all other’ category. By contrast, the demand for durable manufactured goods (e.g., automobiles, electronic equipment, residential and office furniture) tends to correlate closely with the upswings and downswings of the business cycle. How have these markets fared over the recent past, and how are they likely to fare in the near-term future? In December 2009, I published a new multi-client report covering the North American profile extrusion business. As part of that research program, I gathered data from industry associations tracking developments in the major markets served by these processors. These organizations have collected and disseminated data relating to the trend in the volume of output in their respective markets over the time period 2004-2008. Some also have generated forecasts for 2009, 2010, and in some cases 2011. I extrapolated from their data and projections to extend the time frame out to 2014 in the table on page 40.

Obviously, many other plastics processors – injection molders, compression molders, rotomolders, industrial blow molders, industrial thermoformers, et al. – have customers in these structural part markets. Thus there are two averages at the bottom of the table – Average I weighted by market shares specific to profile extruders and Average II where each market is accorded the same weight (12.5 percent). This table can be read to project the length of time required for profile extruders and other structural plastic part processors to regain the volume of output attained in their major markets in 2004. Some of these markets (e.g., medical equipment, other) will have experienced sustained growth over this entire 10year period. Others (e.g., signs and displays, furniture) experienced relatively moderate pullbacks in 2008 and 2009, and full recovery is anticipated by 2011 or 2012. Still others (e.g., automotive, building and construction, and marine products) suffered deep demand erosion as a result of the recession, and they will only regain their 2004 volume of output by 2014. For structural plastics processors as a whole this exercise suggests that overall recovery will be regained by 2013. At first blush the scenario portrayed in this table is daunting. However, facts (i.e., the data for 2004-2008) are stubborn things. As the late, great Senator from the state of New York, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, once intoned, “Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts.” The fact of the matter is that the volume of output of this composite of markets served by profile extruders and other structural plastic

The Distribution of Major Markets for Plastics

Source: American Chemistry Council

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 p. 39

SPECIAL REPORT

part processors declined for 3-4 years (from 2005-2006 to 2009). It is entirely plausible that full recovery may take 3-5 years. The chairman of the Federal Reserve Board alluded to this prospect, recently suggesting full recovery in the U.S. labor market may take 5-6 years. The chief economist at DuPont also concurs; he believes recent data relating to U.S. output and employment do not imply a rapid return to pre-recession peaks. How about new niche markets? To what extent can they supplement lost sales in traditional structural plastic part markets? In the presentation I made to the MAPP Benchmarking & Best Practices Conference in October 2009, I alluded to several recent breakthrough technologies in plastic materials and processing – namely bioplastics, inherently conductive plastics, in-mold labeling and micro-molding, nanotechnology, and fully-automated rotational molding.

Notes: 1. Average I uses weights related to profile extrusion market shares whereas Average II uses the same weight (12.5 percent) for each market. 2. Data are in volume terms except for those for furniture and signs which relate to the value of sales. Sources: • Appliances: 2004-2008, large appliance shipments from the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers; 2009-2014, PCRS projections • Automotive: 2004-2010, car and light truck production from Wardsauto; 2011-2014, PCRS projections • Building: 2004-2011, single- and multi-family housing starts from the National Association of Home Builders; 2012-2014, PCRS projections • Furniture: 2004-2010, sales of office furniture from the Business & Institutional Furniture Manufacturer’s Association International; 2011-2014, PCRS projections • Marine: 2004-2008, new boat sales from the National Marine Manufacturers Association; 20092014, PCRS projections • Medical: 2004-2008, PCRS estimates of medical device production; 2009-2014, PCRS projections • Signs: 2004-2009, sales of profile extruders specializing in the production of signs and displays; 2010-2014, PCRS projections • Other: 2004-2009, U.S. GDP growth through the 3rd quarter of 2009 from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis; 2010-2014, PCRS assumes 2.5% average annual U.S. GDP growth

I also alluded to markets ripe for plastic material and processing innovations – alternative energy, electric vehicles, mass transit, and medical devices. So the plastics industry doesn’t lack for opportunities to recharge its former growth dynamic.

At the conclusion of my presentation, I indicated that as a cardcarrying economist I am frequently asked whether the recovery of the U.S. economy will be V-shaped, W-shaped, U-shaped, or L-shaped. I noted that one year ago we were all afraid that the future path of the economy would be I-shaped – that is, straight down! Those fears are by now completely dispelled. U.S. real GDP rose at an annual 2.8 percent rate in the third quarter of 2009, and the consensus expectation among economists inside and outside of government is that growth in the fourth quarter will be 3.5 percent or higher. Manufacturing industry output has been growing since August 2009, according to the Institute for Supply Management (ISM). These data point to the inherent recuperative powers of the U.S. economy (if only the federal government and Congress can resist strangling it through excessive regulation and costly healthcare reform). Yet this is no time for plastics industry participants to stand idly by, waiting for the rising tide to “lift all boats.” The business mantra of the moment is innovation. It is axiomatic for both countries and companies that the only way to build wealth and create jobs is through productivity improvements that come from investment and innovation.

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As we enter the new decade, plastics processors need to review every aspect of their internal operations. They need to spend time not only reconnecting with existing customers in traditional markets, but also exploring new markets. They need to be risk-takers. They need to re-evaluate their business models to ensure they are appropriate for the “new normal” economy of the future. They need to consider diversifying their processing capabilities so if a customer brings a part that really should be blow molded or injection molded or rotomolded or thermoformed, they can supply that part. Above all they need to devote the time and resources required to track innovations, emanating from any and every quarter, that can improve their operations. The stage of cost-cutting is over. It will be the truly innovative, risk-taking processors that will survive and thrive in the reset economy of the future. n Editor’s Note: This article has been printed as appeared in the Winter 2010 edition of Plastics Business magazine, the official publication of MAPP (Manufacturers Association for Plastics Processors). Dr. Peter J. Mooney is president of Plastics Custom Research Services of Advance, N.C., and one of the plastics industry’s foremost economic research experts on evolving domestic and global plastics industry market opportunities. Visit the Plastics Custom Research Services website at www.plasres.com.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

February • MD&M West, Plastec West, Pacific Design & Mfg. Show, West Pack, Electronics West, Green Mfg. Expo, February 9-11, Anaheim, Calif., (310) 445-4200, www.canontradeshows.com

March • Adhesion to Plastics Webinar – The Chemical Bonding Effects by Atmospheric Plasma, March 2, (785) 271-5801, www.plasticsdecorating.com • ABC’s of IML: A Basic Course, March 25, Skokie, Ill., (800) 473-0301, www.rbstechnologies.com

ADVERTISER INDEX A.W.T. World Trade, Inc. / www.awt-gpi.com..................................32 Autoroll Print Technologies / www.autoroll.com..............................9 CDigital Markets LLC / www.grafixx.com........................................11 Central Decal / www.centraldecal.com.............................................21 CFC International - an ITW Company / www.cfcintl.com............12 Chicago Decal Company / www.chicagodecal.com..........................8 Comdec Incorporated / www.comdecinc.com.................................18

May

CPS Resources, Inc. / www.cpsresourcesusa.com............. back cover

• SPE ANTEC 2010, May 16-20, Orlando, Fla., (203) 775-0471, www.4spe.org

Custom Foils / www.customfoilscompany.com.................................7

June • MD&M East, Plastec East, Atlantic Design & Mfg. Show, East Pack, Green Mfg. Expo, ATX Automation, June 8-10, New York, N.Y., (310) 445-4200, www.canontradeshows.com • SPE Decorating & Assembly Division TopCon 2010, June 15-16, Cool Springs (Nashville), Tenn., (785) 271-5801, www.plasticsdecorating.com

Die Stampco Inc. / www.diestampco.com.........................................32 Digitran / www.comdecinc.com.........................................................18 Diversified Printing Techniques / www.diverprint.com.................37 Enercon / www.enerconind.com........................................................25 Extol / www.extolinc.com...................................................... 33, 35, 37 Industrial Pad Printing Supplies / www.indpad.com......................29 In-mold Graphic Solutions (Romo Durable Graphics) / www.romoinc.com...........................................................................4 Inkcups Now / www.inkcups.com.............................................. 22, 23 ITW Transtech / www.itwtranstech.com............... inside front cover MKS Ion Industrial / www.mksinst.com/ion-industrial.................28 Pad Print Machinery of Vermont / www.padprintmachinery.com......................................................42 Plastec South / www.plastecsouth.com...................inside back cover Proell, Inc. / www.proell.us.com...........................................................5 Ruco USA / www.comdecinc.com.....................................................19 Sabreen Group, The / www.sabreen.com..........................................41 Schwerdtle, Inc. / www.schwerdtle.com............................................27 Standard Machines / www.comdecinc.com......................................19 Taber Industries / www.taberindustries.com......................................9 Tampoprint / www.tampoprintusa.com............................................10 Trekk Equipment Group / www.trekkequipment.com....................30 United Silicone / www.unitedsilicone.com.......................................12 Webtech, Inc. / www.webtech-hts.com..............................................17

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Are You Ready for What’s Next in Plastics Processing?

April 28–29, 2010 Charlotte Convention Center • Charlotte, NC

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