Plastics Decorating - April May 2012

Page 1

Today’s decoraTing & assembly source

2012 APRIL/MAY

Decorating & Assembly TopCon Lands in Indianapolis High-Strength Adhesion Bonding UV Measurement Systems Hot Stamping and Heat Transfer Decorating


IMAGE DATA SET EDITOR

Digital Ink Jet Printing Our engineers and technicians can configure a multi- or single color ink jet printer to meet customers’ specific applications and product handling requirements.

w Quick Print Job Change Over - stores and

recalls print jobs with a touch of a button. w Print Queue - automatically transitions from one print job to another. w Color RIP - uses ICC profiles for accurate color reproduction by automatically generating process color separations. w Variable Data - create image templates containing variable data fields such as: text, barcode, logos, etc. w Production Modes - supports continuous and intermittent printing modes. w Corona / Flamer - pre-treatments for plastics and similar surfaces available as a stand-alone or in-line system. w Customized Software Solutions - can interface with an ERP system and/or integrate with existing automation work flows.

“Engineered Printing Solutions” 201 Tennis Way w East Dorset, Vermont 05253 For more detail visit us at www.padprintmachinery.com or call 1-800-272-7764


FEATURES April/May 2012

Profile page 6 DuraTech Touts Global Service with a Local Edge

A La Crosse, WI decorator with four facilities in the US and China provides screen printing, flexography and digital printing to its customers.

Technology page 14 Fluorooxidation: A Breakthrough Surface Pretreatment

Fluorooxidation surface pretreatment for three-dimensional polymeric and elastomeric products is rapidly advancing as a process method for high-strength adhesion bonding.

Focus page 18 Real-Time UV Monitoring and Measurement for Plastics Decorators

COVER STORY TopCon Comes to Indianapolis

SPE's Decorating & Assembly Division brings Innovation ‌ American Ingenuity to Indianapolis on June 5-6 with the 2012 Topical Conference.

The technology to continuously monitor UV curing not only exists, but is easy to implement and cost-effective for decorators.

Association page 26 2012 TopCon Brings Innovation ‌ American Ingenuity to Indianapolis Letter from the Chairman Solutions page 30 Atmospheric Plasma for Critical Decorating

For achieving safe and long-time stable adhesion of bondings and coatings and an immaculate appearance of paints and imprints on plastic materials, atmospheric plasma-jet technology is used in almost all industries.

Assembly page 42 NPE2012 Launch Pad for New Assembly Products

Equipment and process launches for plastics assembly are highlighted in this NPE2012 wrap-up.

Ask the Expert Heat Transfers

page 47

Hot stamping and heat transfer expert Eric Steinwachs answers questions about the advantages of heat transfers and the trends in technology.

Plastics Decorating is now available for iPad, iPhone and Android devices. Look for us in the iOs App Store and on Google Play.

16 Photo Credit: Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Page Association

DEPARTMENTS Viewpoint Product Highlights

Page 4 Page 12

Product Industry Marketplace Calendar Ad Index

Page 38 Page 50 Page 52 Page 54 Page 54

(Hot Stamping/Heat Transfers)

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 3


V

VIEWPOINT

Many people in the plastics industry were unsure of the decision to hold NPE in Orlando. Would attendees travel to Florida? Would the location be more of a distraction than an advantage? From those I talked to during and after the show, it sounds like those questions have been answered – and from my perspective, NPE has found a new home. Exhibitors were extremely pleased with the lower costs and fewer hassles associated with set-up and drayage. With the combination of a strong US attendee presence and much stronger international presence, exhibitors were very happy with the quality leads they received. And, the nice weather and relaxing location didn’t hurt either! This may be a real wake-up call to Chicago and McCormick Place. Reduced costs and a welcoming atmosphere for exhibitors are critical changes to be made, or Orlando may continue to take tradeshows away from the Windy City. I take my hat off to SPI for taking a chance on Orlando. I think it definitely paid off. This April/May issue of Plastics Decorating is full of great articles, including a Technology article on flourooxidation for surface pretreatment, a Focus on the importance of UV measurement, an Assembly article discussing new assembly equipment introduced at the recent NPE and an Ask the Expert on heat transfers. It was terrific to see so many of our readers and advertisers in Orlando. We received many positive comments on both Plastics Decorating and Plastics Decorating ENews. We appreciate the continued support from everyone!

Jeff Peterson, Editor-in-Chief, jeff@petersonpublications.com

April/May 2012

ISSN: 1536-9870 Published by: Peterson Publications, Inc.

2150 SW Westport Dr., Suite 101 Topeka, KS 66614 (785) 271-5801

Website: www.plasticsdecorating.com Email: publish@petersonpublications.com Editor-in-Chief Jeff Peterson Managing Editor Dianna Brodine Assistant Editors Jen Clark Melissa DeDonder Sales Director Gayla Peterson

Technical Editor Scott Sabreen, The Sabreen Group Art Director Eric J. Carter Graphic Artists Becky Arensdorf Cara Pederson

Plastics Decorating is published quarterly. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any manner without written consent from the publisher.

4 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012



P

PROFILE

DuraTech Touts Global Service with a Local Edge by Amy Bauer

One of DuraTech Industries’ largest customers – a medical equipment manufacturer – told suppliers at a gathering about a decade ago that global production was key to continued business with the company. DuraTech President Peter Johnson was in the audience that day and took this information to heart; he and his team began exploring expansion into China. Today, the La Crosse, WI.based company provides identification graphics to small- and medium-sized businesses and Fortune 500 companies worldwide through its facilities not only in La Crosse and in Raleigh, N.C., but also in Beijing and Shenzhen, China. These overseas operations provide screen printed and graphics products to customers throughout China and the Pacific Rim. “It’s been one of the best moves we’ve made,” Johnson said. “It’s our number one marketing piece right now. I can call on companies locally – they get local support service – and they know the quality they are going to get from DuraTech. They don’t have to start with some new printer overseas that they know nothing about.” “DuraTech’s current global presence makes it unique. There are only a handful of commercial printers who can say that. We work with US-based engineering departments on product development and prototyping and can support the production

in the US or, if required by our customers, seamlessly transfer the production to Asia,” Johnson explained. The company’s “Local presence, global service” tagline speaks to this integration. Most of what the company produces in China is sold in China, but orders typically come from US and European companies. DuraTech’s product lines include screen printed, flexographic and digitally printed products. In addition, the company offers doming, forming, metal nameplates, switches and overlays for in-mold decorating. Value-added services include suppliermanaged inventory programs and on-site technical support. Expertise DuraTech’s primary markets are OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) in the appliance, automotive, computer and electronics, general industrial and medical industries. “Appliance is the one that’s growing fastest for us now,” Johnson described, estimating that segment makes up about 20 percent of DuraTech’s business currently. The medical segment accounts for the largest portion, about 25 percent. “No one market is dominant, which is somewhat luck, somewhat planned,” Johnson said. Four direct sales employees and two representing agencies, each with four or five people, cultivate

The appliance industry makes up about 20 percent of DuraTech's business.

6 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012


DuraTech offers doming, forming, metal nameplates, switches and overlays for inmold decorating, in addition to screen printed, flexographic and digitally printed products.

business for DuraTech. Johnson credits this mix of sales efforts with helping create a diversified client base. “Everyone wants to grow sales, so they’ll migrate to expanding markets,” he said.

company, he has served as controller and chief financial officer, as well as in operations roles, before taking on the role of president for the past six years.

As for processes, Johnson said in-mold decorating is one of the company’s fastest-growing markets. “It’s been around for a while, but the appliance industry has really picked up on it,” he said. “It’s a really clean look. There’s no adhesive, and the decoration can’t be peeled off.”

The 1990s brought major investments in technology and facilities for DuraTech, and in 1999, the company began offering digital printing. In 2003, DuraTech purchased a Bangor, WI., company, creating ShortRun Solutions, a wholly owned subsidiary that specializes in small production runs of screen printed labels and MetalPhoto®.

For example, on washers and dryers where labels may collect dirt over time around the adhesive edges, or even be removed by consumers, in-mold decorated parts offer a sleek alternative. Johnson said DuraTech has developed some proprietary processes and resources to streamline its in-mold decorating. “Everybody thinks they can do it, but when you actually go to put that piece of plastic in the mold, if you don’t know what you’re doing, you have a long learning curve,” he said. His company works to balance the requirements of the injection molder and the label, which sometimes can be at odds. History and growth DuraTech’s focus was more limited in its beginnings. In 1977, a group of investors established the company as a screen printer of textiles and plastics. Within a few years, the textile portion of the business was dropped to focus on screen printing on plastics. Johnson joined the company in the late 1980s as a billing clerk in the accounting department. During his 24 years with the

A sister company, DuraColor, was added in 2004 in Racine, WI. This facility offers large-format printing to serve OEM and point-of-sale customers and holds several patented technologies, including a thin-film ink product and a unique dot formulation process. China operations were initiated in 2005 as the company established DuraTech Industrial Trade (Beijing) Company, Ltd., and in 2007, the company opened its 12,000-square-foot Beijing manufacturing facility. That same year, the company bought a North Carolina manufacturing facility in Raleigh, N.C., which does business as DuraTech Southeast and focuses on screen printing, metals finishing, doming, digital printing and flexographic printing similar to the company’s La Crosse operations. The Shenzen, China facility was opened in 2010. The La Crosse location has earned ISO 9001:2008 and ISO/ TS 16949:2009 certification, and DuraTech’s China facility is ISO 9001:2008 certified. The company also offers many

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 7


 p. 7

PROFLILE

UL (Underwriters Laboratories Inc.) and CSA (Canadian Standard Approved) approved constructions. Today, DuraTech’s locations represent 214,000 square feet of manufacturing space, and the company runs three shifts, 24 hours a day, five days a week. Worldwide sales for 2012 are projected at more than $40 million. Its diverse capabilities and locations allow it to handle every thing from five-piece orders at its ShortRun Solutions location to millions of pieces at its China locations. Johnson estimates the company’s average order remains around $1,000. Value-added services For the past 10 years, DuraTech has been offering vendormanaged inventory programs (so-called breadman programs)

PrePress equiPment, Flat & 3D Parts Printers anD Dryers

Lower Tooling Costs and Easier to Operate

For Screen & Pad Printing Decoration am-180™ and Versa-Print™

Semi-Automatic 3D Parts Printers • Print on bottles, pails, containers, tubes and more • Stroke length 14½" • Registration ±0.02"

accu-cure™ 3D

3D Parts UV Curing Unit • Variable speed and UV output • Cures up to gallon size • Cures 360° around part

cure-tex™ HD accu-Print HigH-tecH™

Semi-Automatic Graphic Printers • Upfront peel system • Flood or non-flood print mode • Timing belt drive with ball-bearing print carriage

Forced-Air Dryer for Pad Printing • Solid-state temperature control • Conveyor-speed controls • Even heat distribution

Pro-Light™ 1

Exposing Unit • Flexible rubber vacuum blanket • Focused lamps • Timer with automatic shutoff

A .W.T. World Trade, Inc.

A Division of The A.W.T. World Trade Group 773.777.7100 • www.awt-gpi.com • sales@awt-gpi.com

8 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

to some of its larger customers. Currently, the company has such programs with five of its customers. Johnson said these initiatives have all come at the request of customers, and all of the companies involved so far have other vendor-managed inventory programs in place. For DuraTech, a threshold of about $500,000 in business is typically the level at which the cost structure of implementing such a program can be justified, Johnson said. Volume of transactions tends to dictate where this system will be most helpful. A contract spells out the terms, and DuraTech owns the inventory as it sits in the customer’s warehouse. Customers are invoiced when the parts move from inventory into the work in progress. Either a DuraTech employee or a third-party logistics house manages the inventory. “These types of value-added programs reduce day-to-day business expenses, so they save our customers time and money,” Johnson said, “offering immediate access to inventory and streamlining the ordering and invoicing processes.” Another popular value-added service DuraTech offers is on-site technical support for its customers, including its half-day lunchand-learns. DuraTech sales representatives visit engineers and product development employees at current or potential customers to discuss such topics as material selection, adhesive recommendations and design guidelines for printing and in-mold decorating. Sessions are offered on-demand or once every couple of years – more frequently if a customer has high turnover in its design or engineering departments. These educational sessions are a great opportunity for DuraTech to refocus clients on the importance of label design and



 p. 8

PROFLILE

the myriad options available. In many cases, the bulk of a project’s engineering time and talent goes into the product itself, Johnson said, and labels can become an afterthought at the end. Designers and engineers who understand the options available in colors, callouts, surfaces and adhesives ensure future projects will run smoothly and meet the clients’ needs, particularly in cases where products are being updated from existing blueprints. DuraTech revamped its website – www.duratech.com – last year, and it also includes resources for designers and engineers. An “Ask the Expert” page offers a form for submission of questions, and a “Tech Lab” section offers a number of downloadable PDF documents that offer tips and instructions on processes and detailed information about DuraTech’s capabilities. Quality and supplier manuals also are available online. Digital printing Johnson reports that DuraTech’s digital department supports five percent of the company’s sales, and digital printing is available at all of its locations. “It’s definitely a technology that will continue to cannibalize the screen print side of things,” Johnson said. “For DuraTech, it doesn’t really open up a new market to us.” Digital printing is effective for his company in cases with a high mix of parts, but low volumes – for example, a company serving a number of countries that needs a part in multiple languages but small quantities of each. Whereas a three-part run to be screen printed would require multiple film positives, screens and color checks, Johnson said, the same three labels output digitally are complete in an hour and a half. Color matching has been a barrier to the growth of digital printing, however, Johnson said, and some inks, such as chromes and silvers, aren’t available in digital. Larger runs also continue to be more economical with screen printing or flexographic printing, he said. “A lot of people five years ago said screen printing was dead, but it’s hanging on pretty strong,” Johnson said. He does anticipate that DuraTech’s digital business will grow over the next few years, perhaps to 10 or 20 percent of the company’s business. “I don’t know if we’ll ever go over 50 percent, but we’ll see,” he said.

10 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

Future plans As DuraTech continues its 35th year in business, Johnson is looking ahead to future opportunities. His vision includes continued expansion into strategic geographic areas “to service our key global accounts locally,” he said. India, Mexico and South America are all areas, in addition to China, that Johnson has kept his eye on. He has an electronic file that’s his version of the world map covered in pushpins. “As I discover opportunities, I just keep building my map,” Johnson said, “and right now I have by far the most pins in Mexico.” As for growing sales, DuraTech will continue to offer its personalized, local service. The company is exploring social media opportunities, but Johnson said old-fashioned person-to-person sales relationships remain the company’s most fruitful. Buyers often move from company to company, and those that have had good relationships and experiences with DuraTech will send new business. “If they really like DuraTech, they’ll find a way to do business with us,” Johnson said. Those relationships are built through DuraTech’s lunch-andlearns, networking and close contact with some of the key decision-makers within companies. From Johnson’s perspective, there are two groups that are influential in buying decisions – the engineering department, because of technical specifications, and the purchasing department, because of best price and/or service. On-site technical support and training therefore help demonstrate DuraTech’s commitment, skill and knowledge while fostering trust. “Quality and service are taken for granted anymore,” he said, “but it’s the relationship piece that’s really key to selling.” n


Digital industrial revolution Revolutionize your business to deliver cutting-edge applications that serve Industrial and Specialty Printing clients.

u Compact, tabletop UV LED flatbed printer that is ideal for one-offs and short run production. • Precision, high resolution of 1440x1200 dpi. • 5.9” printing depth. 11.8”x 16.5” max. print area. • Expanded ink sets utilizing hard and flexible UV inks – up to 6 colors + white + primer + clear [hard ink only] • UJF-3042FX more affordable, 2” printing depth.

Utilizing low-VOC UV curable inks DYE UV

UJF-3042HG apps: promotionals, awards, plaques, ID cards, electronics skins, specialty substrates, prototypes, acrylic signage

CURABLE INK INK

u High speed, high resolution, UV curing flatbed printer for precision industrial applications. • Prints on media or items up to 5.9” thick. • 27.6”x 23.6” max. print area. 1200 x1200 dpi resolution. • Hard & flexible UV inks. CMYKlmlc + white + clear [hard ink only] UJF-706 apps: membrane switches, flexible circuits, specialty substrates, automotive, optics, prototypes, RFID, smart tags

Optional – Attachment for roll media.

ATL

888-530-3988 EMAIL

© 2012, Mimaki USA, Inc.

BOS

888-530-3986

CHI

info18@mimakiusa.com

888-530-3985

LA

888-530-3987

www.mimakiusa.com


P

PRODUCT HIGHLIGHTS Hot Stamping and Heat Transfer Equipment & Supplies

Hot stamping and heat transfer machines are used to decorate a wide range of consumer products, packaging and textiles. Eye-catching foil designs are another important component in the hot stamp/heat transfer process. Here are some of the industry’s latest developments in heat transfer and hot stamping equipment and foils. Allied Decorating Systems 440.647.5195 www.allieddecorating.com

CFC International 708.891.3456 www.cfcintl.com

The HS 01S Hotstamping System from Allied Decorating Systems, Wellington, OH, applies foil to the outer diameter of caps. The rollon machine utilizes highspeed stamping at 1,500 to 3,000 pieces per hour to decorate caps with an outer diameter of 15-55mm in lengths of 15-60mm. The HS 01S is ideal for items such as wine caps, some open-mouth bottles, closure caps, cosmetic bottle caps and some small tubes. It can be used on plastic, glass and metal.

CFC Internat iona l, Chicago Heights, IL, produces pigmented a nd meta l lic heat tra nsfer foi ls for a broad ra nge of hot sta mp plast ic decorating applications and industries. Foi ls come in a n assortment of vivid solid colors and highly polished metal appea ra nces. T hey can be used to decorate a broad range of items, including appliances; automobile battery cases, vent caps and engine covers; beverage and other plastic containers; buckets; cattle tags; electronics; packaging for items such as cosmetics, medical and food; promotional items and toys.

Cassco Machines-Cassco Automation 800.387.4600 www.casscomachines.com The HPSS Series of servopowered hot stamping and heat transfer machines from Cassco MachinesCassco Automation, Toronto, ON, Canada, prov ide a n energ y-sav ing, all-electric alternative to conventional pneumatic and hydrau lic systems. The system can be programmed to apply a specif ic pressure to a part or travel to a set distance within .001". Energy savings can be up to 90 percent, with payback on the drive in as little as six months. The removal of air from the system also makes these drives ideal for clean room applications. Control systems range from Cassco’s proprietary System Controller to most major PLC and touchscreen systems and all of Cassco’s assembly and automation accessories, turntables, slide tables, pick and place units and more.

12 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

CPS Resources, Inc. 704.882.5985 www.cpsresources.com

PVC alone does not absorb stain, but a new hot stamp foil from CPS Resouces, Inc., Indian Trail, NC, allows oil- and water-based stains and clear coats to be applied directly to PVC extrusions. Foil designs come in skeleton wood grains such as Oak, Maple and Cherry. Using these common skeleton wood grain designs, end users now can customize the PVC extrusion with their favorite stain. When oil-based, water-based or clear-coat stains are applied, it gives an authentic wood appearance. In addition, CPS offers a new automotive-grade pinhole-free black foil for backlit products, such as bezels for automotive dashboard lenses. CPS also manufactures standard and customized hot stamp equipment.


Mold in Graphic Systems 928.634.8838 www.moldingraphics.com

data capabilities for the heat transfer label process, which PI-4000/8000 uses a combination of heat,Servo pressure and dwell apply preAll Electric Hot to Stamping Press printed graphics permanently towith a part. Print Force Sensing

Mold In Graphic Systems, Clarkdale, AZ, introduces a permanent graphic for plastics applications. The iMIG graphic is a fully compatible finished graphic, ready to be applied to polyolefin products using existing hot stamp equipment. The permanent graphic can be used with injectionmolded, blow-molded, thermoformed, structural foam-molded, sheet and profile extruded and rotationally molded products. It comes in sheet or roll form and can be printed in multiple colors with rich pigments.

Webtech, Inc. 609.259.2800 www.webtech-hts.com

(Machine shown is PI-4000 with optional vacuum table for graphic arts)

Trekk Equipment Group 636.271.1391 www.trekkequipment.com The PRB hot foil stamping machine, from Trekk Equipment Group, Pacific, MO, is suited for the high-speed application of foil to small cylindrical items like round caps and closures. Parts can be banded or decorated to 360 degrees in one machine cycle. The Model PRB6 is a one-ton PLC-controlled automated peripheral that can be customized based on project specifications and sample parts. Trekk designs and integrates fully automated, custom cells for assembly, parts handling, component testing, parts separation and finishing. Trekk also offers technical advice to help boost production capabilities, reduce cycle times and increase cost-effectiveness. United Silicone 716.681.8222 www.unitedsilicone.com The PS250 0 f rom United Silicone, an ITW Decorating Company based in Lancaster, NY, is designed for decorating tapered or cylindrical parts. The machine platform incorporates a shuttle which travels under a f lat heated silicone rubber stamping die. Due to the tapered or cylindrical shape of the part, the shuttle motion traces a specific arc to apply the heat transfer label. The PS2500 offers variable

New Jersey-based Webtech offers the P-4000 Series hot stamping machine, which is rated at two tons. The mach i ne c a n be con f igured with a label photocell registration indexer and is optional on Webtech ’s complete line of decorating machines, including t he 8000 series, rated at four tons. All Webtech machines are servo motor-driven with WEBTECH, INC Robbinsville,NJ 08691 programmed controlled pressure for precise operation over the full decorating cycle. Webtech is a full-service heat transfer and hot stamp foil manufacturer. n 108 North Gold Drive

Tel:609-259-2800 Fax:609-259-9311 www.webtech-hts.com

Specialist for Inmold labeling

Custom Decorating Solutions In need of decorated graphics, call Central Decal Company Butch Kaplan • 800.869.7654 ext 247 bkaplan@centraldecal.com

Inmold Capabilities Inmold engineering/technical specialists Screen, digital & flexo products Roll or individual piece options Outdoor durable & chemical resistant Various label/ink constructions available Eco-Friendly!

Custom Solutions All In-house Hybrid labels - Screen-Flexo-Digital Domed labels - flexible/selective doming Digital Printing - short to long run Unlimited substrate options Roll to Roll outdoor products Various die-cutting solutions UL certified products/constructions

Family owned and American made since 1957 April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 13

4


T

TECHNOLOGY

Fluorooxidation:

A Breakthrough Surface Pretreatment Fluorooxidation: a breakthrough surface Pretreatment

by Scott R. Sabreen, The Sabreen Group, Inc., and Bernard D. Bauman, Inhance/Fluoro-Seal, LLC

by Scott R. Sabreen, The Sabreen Group, Inc., and Bernard D. Bauman, Inhance/Fluoro-Seal, LLC

Fluorooxidation (F/O) surface pretreatment for 3-dimensional fluorine gas and other reactive and non-reactive gases in a Fluorooxidation (“F/O�) surface pretreatment for 3-dimensional polymeric and elastomeric products rapidlyoxidation prochamber. Similar to gas phaseissurface polymeric and elastomeric products is rapidly advancing as a controlled a processhigh-strength method for yielding high-strength bonding. The fluorooxidation cesses, oxygen-containing functionalprocess groups,issuch as hydroxyl, process advancing method forasyielding adhesion bonding. adhesion carbonyl and carboxyl, created, the surface The fluorooxidation process is conducted conducted in-line at ambient conditionsin-line similar at to ambiflame, corona discharge, open airare plasma and making UV-ozone. A majorwettable and very These chemical and physical mechanisms are ent conditions similar to flame, tocorona discharge, open air surface advantage is its capability effectively treat large/small areaspolar. and complex geometries (remote/isolated necessary to achieving strong adhesion bonding. plasma and UV-ozone. advantage capability to tubes regions) ranging A in major size from capillaryistoitslarge-diameter and housings. effectively treat large/small surface areas and complex geometries (remote/isolated regions) ranging in size from capillary Table I demonstrates the results of five inherently difficult-toWhile the science of using fluorine (F2) gas for surface modification has been well understood for more than 50 to large-diameter tubes and housings. bond polymeric surfaces using F/O. In most cases, the post years and used commercially for 25 years, it has not been widely accepted primarily because of safety concerns treatment results are bond strengths greater than the substrate using fluorineofgas. The significant breakthrough in fluorooxidation a commercially materialas(reference Figureviable 1). pretreatment is the safe While the science using f luorine (F ) gas for surface 2 gas processing scale, computer-controlled electrolytic cells enable the modification has been and welleco-friendly understoodneutralization. for more than Small 50 years Fluorine gas to be used safely at low concentrations and pressures. and used commercially for 25 years, it has not been widelylowThe chemistry of the F/O process can be customized to achieve accepted primarily because of safety concerns when using specific surface functionality. For example, if a fiber is to be fluorine Unlike gas. The significant breakthrough in fluorooxidation as are treated very high rates, higherplasmas, gas concentraflame and electrical discharge pretreatments. which glowatdischarge gasthroughput phase surface oxidation a commercially pretreatment is the safetogas processing tionsRFcan enable adequate treatment an exposure time F/O is anviable oxidation process. Compared chamber-pressurized cold gas plasma treatment, F/O iswith conducted at and eco-friendly neutralization. Small-scale, computerof a few hundredths of a second. A second example is if a ambient conditions. During the F/O processing, a substrate surface is exposed to Fluorine gas and other reactive and controlled electrolytic cells enable the fluorine gas to be used polymeric powder is being treated and burning and dust exnon-reactive gases in a controlled chamber. Similar to gas phase surface oxidation processes, oxygen-containing safely at low concentrations and low pressures. plosions must be avoided, a low concentration of the reactive functional groups, such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl, are created, making the surface wettable and very polar. gases is used. Theseand chemical and discharge physical mechanisms are necessary Unlike flame electrical pretreatments, which areto achieving strong adhesion bonding glow discharge gas phase surface oxidation plasmas, F/O is an F/O is used to surface modify ultra-high molecular weight polyTable I demonstrates of five inherently F/O. In most cases, the(HDPE) oxidation process. Comparedthe to results chamber-pressurized RFdifficult-to-bond cold ethylenepolymeric (UHMWsurfaces PE) andusing high-density polyethylene post treatment results are bond strengths greater than the substrate material (reference Figure 1). gas plasma treatment, F/O is conducted at ambient conditions. powders to impart a hydrophilic (water-wettable) surface to During the F/O processing, a substrate surface is exposed to these normally hydrophobic materials (Figure 2). This change

LAP SHEAR TESTS on NON-TREATED AND TREATED SPECIMENS USING EPOXY ADHESIVE PLASTIC

Polyethylene Polypropylene Acetal Polyester Nylon

UNTREATED Lap Shear Strength (psi) 0 0 92 50 52

FAILURE

adhesive adhesive adhesive adhesive adhesive

TREATED Lap Shear Strength (psi) >500 >500 455 >500 >500

FAILURE

samples yielded samples yielded adhesive samples yielded samples yielded

Table I (Compliments of Inhance Fluoro-Seal LLC)

14 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012 The chemistry of the F/O process can be customized to achieve specific surface functionality. For example, if a


FIGURE I

F/O is used to surface modify ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW PE) and high-density polye (HDPE) powders to impart a hydrophilic (water-wettable) surface to these normally hydrophobic materials ( II). This change in compatibility, as well as adhesive bonding capability, enables these treated powders to be performance additives for use in polyurethanes, epoxies, rubbers, unsaturated polyesters and even water-born systems. Compliments of Inhance Fluoro-Seal LLC

DISPERSION & COMPATIBILITY

The bond strength of an epoxy coating on a fluoroox sample of polypropylene was measured with a DeFe PosiTest® adhesion tester. At 675 psi, the test dolly off. Note that the adhesive bond did not fail, but ins the polypropylene suffered cohesive failure. This is evidenced by the divot pulled from the sample still s to the dolly. Non-treated polyethylene particles in water do not wet or disperse

(Complements Inhance Fluoro-Seal LLC Treated polyethylene particles readily disperse in water

Figure 2. FIGURE II Figure 1. The bond strength of an epoxy coating on a fluorooxidized sample of polypropylene was measured with a DeFelsko PosiTest® adhesion tester. At 675 psi, the test dolly pulled off. NoteI in compatibility, as well as adhesive bonding capability, enables FIGURE that the adhesive bond did not fail, but instead the polypropylene these treated powders to be sold as performance additives for Superior adhesion also can imparted to polyethylene particles byhigh-density F/O. Figure III showspolyeth F/O is suffered used tocohesive surface modify weight (UHMW PE) and usepolyethylene in be polyurethanes, epoxies,powder rubbers, unsaturated polyesters a SEM failure. This isultra-high evidenced bymolecular the divot pulled photomicrograph after a tensile test on a sample made by combining non-treated UHMW PE particles with a andsurface even water-borne from the sampletostill stuck toathe dolly. (HDPE) powders impart hydrophilic (water-wettable) to thesesystems. normally hydrophobic materials (Fig

II). This change in compatibility, as well as adhesive bonding capability, enables these treated powders to be s 65 yearspolyesters of automations performance additives for use in polyurethanes, epoxies, rubbers, unsaturated and even water-borne dedicated to screen printing systems. Promotional Products: screen printing machines for printing on pens, pencils, key rings, ashtrays, and other promotional products.

DISPERSION & COMPATIBILITY

Cosmetic: screen printing machines for printing on little bottles, small pots vials, sticks, lipsticks, etc.

This year’s newest piece of equipment is the fully automatic machine model GPE/24 TT DigitAllAround equipped with a thermal transfer head. Pens and barrels can be decorated in full colour at 360°.

Packaging: screen printing machines for printing on bottles, boxes and various containers. Pharmaceutical: screen printing machines for printing on syringes, caps, test tubes, etc. Various: screen printing machines for printing on panels, knobs, plates, industrial components in general, etc.

Italian Manufacturer since 1945

GPE Ardenghi srl | The Official Agent for the USA is Sherry Stylo, LLC.

Contact Ericpolyethylene Shea Tel: 908-686-3302 sheaquill@aol.com | www.gpeardenghi.it Non-treated GPE Ardenghi srl | Via Pagazzano, 20 | 24047 Treviglio (BG),Italy | Tel:++39/0363/49796 Fax:++39/0363/301410 particles in watergpe@gpeardenghi.it do not | www.gpeardenghi.it wet or disperse Treated polyethylene particles April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 15 readily disperse in water


hesive bonding between particles and continuous polyurethane polyurethane. Note that there isisno of bonding between particles and continuous polyurethane polyurethane. polyurethane. Note Note thatthat there there no isevidence no evidence evidence of adhesive adhesive of adhesive bonding bonding between between particles particles and and continuous continuous polyurethane polyurethane hoto micrograph after a tensile test on a sample made by phase. InIncomparison, Figure IV an photo micrograph after tensile test onon sample made phase. phase. comparison, In comparison, Figure Figure IVshows IV shows shows anSEM an SEM SEM photo photo micrograph after after aa tensile a tensile test test on aasample a sample made made bybyby olecular Weight Polyethylene) particles. Note that the treated  p. 15 combining F/O-treated UHMW PE (Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene) particles. Note that the treated combining combining F/O-treated F/O-treated UHMW UHMW PEPE (Ultra-High (Ultra-High Molecular Molecular Weight Polyethylene) Polyethylene) particles. particles. Note Note thatthat thethe treated treated UHMW PE particles are torn in half. UHMW UHMW PEPE particles particles areare torntorn in half. in half.

TECHNOLOGY

TreatedParticles PU Non-Treated Non-Treated Particles Particles inin Non-Treated in PU PU PU No No Adhesion Adhesion No Adhesion Strong Adhesion

Figure 3.

Treated Treated Particles Particles in PU PU Treated Particles inin PU Strong Strong Adhesion Adhesion Strong Adhesion

Figure 4.

Figure III III to polyethylene pow- materials, and automotive, Figure Figure IVfacilitate IV to overmolding with disSuperior adhesion also can beFigure imparted Figure Figure IV III Figure IV der particles by F/O. Figure 3 shows a SEM photomicrograph similar durometer polyurethanes, including direct casting after a tensile test on a sample made by combining non-treated of polyurethane tires. Similar to gas phase surface oxidation F/O treatment is the long-lasting is long-lasting and and frequently frequently permanent. This This is because is because the the treatment treatment chemistry chemistry cancan penetrate penetrate nent. F/O This is treatment because treatment chemistry canpermanent. penetrate F/Otreatment also has difficulty treating highly fluorinated UHMW PEisparticles with a and cast polyurethane. Note that there F/O treatment long-lasting frequently permanent. This isprocesses, because the chemistry can penetrate considerably considerably deeper than than do other other surface surface preparation preparation processes. processes. TheThe longevity longevity is important is important it avoids it avoids thethe ion processes. The deeper longevity isdo important because it avoids the materials such as PTFE (Teflon®because is no evidence of adhesive bonding between particles and con). because considerably deeper than do other surface preparation processes. The longevity is important because it avoids the tinuous polyurethane phase. In comparison, Figure 4 showsto be need need toinventoried use treated treated items items quickly, quickly, enables enables treated treated substrates substrates to be inventoried inventoried forfor long long time time periods periods andand avoids avoids ubstrates totobeuse for long time periods and avoids needan toSEM use treated items quickly, treated substrates to be for long time periods and avoids as a safe photo micrograph after aenables tensile test on aadhesion sample made Theinventoried recent advancements achieved in fluorooxidation scrap/rework scrap/rework and and product product returns returns because because of adhesion of failure. failure. ion failure. by combining UHMW PE (Ultra-High Molecular scrap/rework and F/O-treated product returns because of adhesion failure. and reliable pretreatment method offers a new alternative for Weight Polyethylene) particles. Note that the treated UHMW in-line pretreatment. Robust surface preparation at the time of Contrary Contrary to common to are common of highly of highly reactive reactive chemicals chemicals is manufacture, actually is actually very very environmentally environmentally friendly. friendly. This This istoisthe longPE tornbelief, inbelief, half.useuse including pretreatments, is critical chemicals isparticles actually very environmentally friendly. This is Contrary to common belief, use of highly reactive chemicals is actually very environmentally friendly. This because because highly highly reactive reactive chemicals chemicals areare readily readily and essentially essentially quantitatively quantitatively neutralized because they areare so does reactive. soisreactive. term durability ofneutralized adhesivebecause bonds sothey that failure not occur essentially quantitatively neutralized because they areand so reactive. because highly reactive chemicals are readily and essentially quantitatively neutralized because they so reactive. F/O treatment is long-lasting and frequently permanent. This in service due to degradation. The use of are pretreatments and/ In reality, In reality, processes processes that that use use unreactive unreactive chemicals chemicals are are some some of the of the most most difficult difficult to scrub to scrub or neutralize. or neutralize. Moreover, Moreover, are someisof the most difficult to scrub orcan neutralize. because the treatment chemistry penetrate Moreover, considerably or chemical primerstodoes notor guarantee strong bond strength Inthe reality, processes that use unreactive chemicals are some of the most difficult scrub neutralize. Moreover, the spent spent solid solid state state scrubbing scrubbing medium medium used used to neutralize to neutralize thethe F/OF/O process process hashas commercial commercial value value forfor other other tralize the F/O process has commercial value for other deeper than other surface preparation processes. The longevresults. Surface pretreatments are application-specific and there themanufacturing spent solid state scrubbing medium used to neutralize the F/O process has commercial value for other manufacturing firms firms andand is sold is sold asthe aasreagent. a reagent. ity is important because it avoids need to use treated items are inherent advantages and limitations. Thus, it is important manufacturing firmstreated and issubstrates sold as a to reagent. quickly, enables be inventoried for long to carefully evaluate all product design and process methods periods and avoids scrap/rework andofproduct returns when selecting which pretreatment is as best. F/Otime F/O surface surface preparation preparation is used is used in ainvariety a variety decorating of decorating andand finishing finishing product product applications, applications, such such nylon as n nylon sporting sporting orating and finishing product applications, such as nylon sporting because of adhesion failure. F/O surface preparation is used in a variety of decorating and finishing product applications, such as nylon sporting goods, goods, to facilitate to facilitate better better overmolding overmolding processing processing with with soft-grip soft-grip materials materials andand automotive, automotive, to facilitate to facilitate overmolding overmolding with soft-grip materials and automotive, to facilitate overmolding Scott R. Sabreen is founder and president of The Sabreen goods, to facilitate better overmolding processing with soft-grip materials and automotive, to facilitate overmolding with with dissimilar dissimilar durometer durometer polyurethanes, polyurethanes, including including direct direct casting casting of polyurethane of polyurethane tires. tires. Similar Similar to gas to gas phase phase surface surface Contrary common belief, useSimilar of highly chemicals direct casting of to polyurethane tires. toreactive gas phase surface Group, Inc., a global engineering consulting firm specializing with dissimilar durometer polyurethanes, including direct casting of polyurethane tires. Similar to gas phase surface oxidation oxidation processes, processes, F/O F/O also also has has difficult difficult treating treating highly highly fluorinated fluorinated materials materials such such as PTFE as PTFE (Teflon®). (Teflon®). is actually very environmentally friendly. This is because in plastics manufacturing processes such as laser marking, highly fluorinated materials such as PTFE (Teflon®). highlyprocesses, reactive chemicals andtreating essentially quansurface materials pretreatments, digital printing and oxidation F/O alsoare hasreadily difficult highly fluorinated suchadhesion as PTFEbonding, (Teflon®). titatively neutralized because they are so reactive. In reality, decorating/finishing. For more information, 972.820.6777 TheThe recent recent advancements advancements achieved achieved in fluorooxidation in fluorooxidation as aassafe a safe andand reliable reliable pretreatment pretreatment method method offers offers acall new a new processes that use pretreatment unreactive chemicals someaofnew the most or visit www.sabreen.com or www.plasticslasermarking.com. on as a safe and reliable methodare offers alternative alternative for for in-line in-line pretreatment. pretreatment. Robust Robust surface surface preparation preparation the atreliable the time time ofpretreatment manufacture, of manufacture, including including pretreatments, pretreatments, The recent advancements achieved in fluorooxidation as a safe at and method offers a new difficult totime scrub ormanufacture, neutralize. Moreover, the spent solid preparation at the of including pretreatments, is critical is critical to the to the long-term long-term durability durability of adhesive of adhesive bonds bonds so that so that failure failure does does not not occur occur in service in service due due to degradation. to degradation. alternative for in-line pretreatment. Robust surface preparation at the timeBernard of manufacture, state scrubbing medium used to neutralize the F/O process Co-author D. Bauman including is executivepretreatments, vice president of Inonds so that failure does not occur in service due to degradation. has value for other manufacturing firms and isguarantee hance/Fluoro-Seal, LLC. Inhance/Fluor-Seal LLC, the developer of The usecommercial use of the pretreatments of pretreatments and/or and/or chemical chemical primers primers does does notthat not guarantee strong strong bond bond strength strength results. results. Surface Surface is The critical to long-term durability of adhesive bonds so failure does not occur in service due to degradation. does not guarantee strong bond strength results. Surface sold as a reagent. this technology, has been using this process at its 14 domestic pretreatments pretreatments areare application-specific application-specific andand there there aredoes are inherent inherent advantages advantages andand limitations. limitations. Thus, Thus, it isitimportant is important to to plants The use of pretreatments and/or chemical primers not guarantee strong bond strength results. Surface and several international licensee sites for 20 years. Inhance/Fluorinherent advantages and limitations. Thus, it is important to carefully carefully evaluate evaluate all all product product design design and and process process methods methods when when selecting selecting which which pretreatment pretreatment is itbest. isisbasis best. pretreatments are application-specific and there are inherent advantages and limitations. important F/O surface preparation is used in a variety of decorating and Seal pretreats products using Thus, a toll-pay or at a to customer’s methods when selecting which pretreatment is best. finishing product suchand as nylon sporting goods, For more information, visit www.inhanceproducts.com or carefully evaluate all applications, product design process methods whensite. selecting which pretreatment is best. to facilitate betterLLC., overmolding processing with soft-griphashas email bbauman@inhanceproducts.com. Inhance/Fluor-Seal Inhance/Fluor-Seal LLC., thethe developer developer of this of this technology, technology, been been using using thisthis process process at its at its 14 14 domestic domestic plants plants andand

hnology, has international been using this process at its 14 plants and several several international licensee licensee sites sites forfor 20ofdomestic 20 years. years. Inhance/Fluor-Seal Inhance/Fluor-Seal pretreats products using adomestic toll-pay basis basis or at orand aat a Inhance/Fluor-Seal LLC., the developer this technology, has beenpretreats using thisproducts process at using its a14toll-pay plants hance/Fluor-Seal pretreats products using a toll-pay basis or at a customer’s customer’s site. site. several international licensee sites for 20 years. Inhance/Fluor-Seal pretreats products using a toll-pay basis or at a customer’s site. 16 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

3 3


Proell, Inc. — Your Partner in IMD/FIM Technology, Screen and Pad Printing Inks

screen printed film

formed film

trimmed film

back molded part Mercedes-Benz S-Class climate control panel

IMD Technology / Film Insert Molding Ink System:

Substrate:

Injection Resin:

NORIPHAN® HTR NORIPHAN® N2K NORIPHAN® XWR NoriAmid Noricryl® NoriPET®

Makrofol®/Bayfol® films PC films (<125µm), PET films PC and PET films TROGAMID® TCR films PLEXIGLAS® films PET films

PC/ABS/PMMA PC/ABS PC/ABS PA/PMMA/PC/ABS PMMA/ABS ABS

All Proell IMD inks are suitable for IMD single-layer constructions and back moldable with appropriate resins. A broad range of metallic, pearlescent, mirror, rainbow and chameleon color shades is available for IMD applications.

NORIPHAN® HTR HF, NORIPHAN® XWR and NoriAmid are free of halogen. NoriPress® SMK (solventbased) and AquaPress® ME (water-based) are bonding agents for IMD/FIM technology. AquaPress® ME can be back molded with PC, ABS and PMMA, NoriPress® SMK with PA additionally. They can be used as an overprinting adhesion primer to enhance the bonding of IMD inks with various resins melting at lower temperatures, and for laminating different film types. Proell, Inc.

·

2751 Dukane Drive

·

St. Charles, IL 60174-3343 USA

·

Phone 630-587-2300

www.proell.us ·

Fax 630-587-2666

·

e-mail: info@proell.us


F

FOCUS

Real-Time UV Monitoring and Measurement for Plastics Decorators by Paul Mills and Jim Raymont, EIT Instrument Markets

“When you can measure what you are speaking about and express it in numbers, you know something about it; but when you cannot measure it, when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meager and unsatisfactory kind.” – Lord Kelvin “In God we trust, all others bring data.” – Dr. W. Edwards Deming Why do automobile designers install both oil dipsticks and dashboard oil warning lights? Wouldn’t just one of these suffice? Obviously, while these measurement devices are related, they measure different oil properties and have markedly different functions. The risk of driving a car without enough oil is important enough to merit constant vigil, and drivers obviously can’t check the dipstick while behind the wheel. On the other hand, the need for absolute oil level measurements during maintenance (like oil changes and tune ups) or to provide mechanics with a quantitative measure when diagnosing engine problems requires the dipstick.

bad parts in just hours. By the time these guys break out the belt radiometer, it’s far too late. The big three auto makers tackled this kind of problem during the 1990s when they drafted the QS-9000 standard that required process monitoring, rather than allowing parts suppliers to rely on end-of-the-line inspection alone. The auto makers realized that preventing defects, rather than fixing them after the fact, was the key to cutting costs. Fortunately, the technology to continuously monitor UV curing not only exists, but is easy to implement and cost-effective for decorators. This article will describe what to measure to safeguard the plastics decorating line and how to do it. Changes to UV output in the real world In day-to-day operation, UV lamps, particularly arc lamp systems, show a pronounced drop in irradiance over time. Like a spark plug, continuous and repeated use cuts the lamp’s life from the first time it’s fired. It’s not unusual to see a 50 percent change in output after less than 1,000 hours of use.

Despite the risks, most plastics decorators operate their UV curing systems without a warning light. Even the best-managed plastics finishing lines too often only rely on periodic checks Cleanliness of the reflector, changes in cooling and power supwith a logging radiometer as the sole means of measuring and ply problems all can impact irradiance, as can any changes in distanceand of the lamp the part or angle of the bulb that might monitoring UViscure. like driving without a warning light, curing gy Density: Time theBut, second factor critical to proper this istoreferred the potential damage that can occur by operating a line without occur from handling during maintenance. energy density. You may also hear it called “dose” even though this term is does a warning light should stop plastics accurately fit . As sun-tanners can decorators in their tracks and cause What to measure? them to the consider the value adding There are two parameters t, it’s not just intensity ofofthe UV real-time UV measurement. of UV curing that most ce that produces their glow, but users should measure sure time. few seconds in even regularly: peak irradiance HavingAworked on literally hundreds and energy density. Let’s of production lines, it’sproduce ironic thata brightest sunlight won’t take a quick look at what while almost no system designer zed body. each of these terms mean. would supply a thermal convection oven without a process thermocouple, produceI rarely properly cured see a system with products, a real-time Irradiance: In lay terms, UV sensor This isbe even more t his measu res how irradiance and installed. time must within puzzling considering that UV curing “bright” the UV lamp is. prescribed specification. often is material associated with higher-speed Irradiance can be affected most cooking recipes thatlikerequire conversion for things printing,a in a number of ways: by laminating other high-speed “increasing the wattage” in time and and temperature, UV web processes common to plastics just as can be accomulationsdecorating. usually These require minimum are applications plished by switching from ance and (energy where exposure an undetectedtime problem could a 25W to a 60W light 2 mean hundredsmeasure or even thousands of density is Joules/cmFigure bulb or by “turning up or ity). The common of energy . The energy density is 1

ally the 18 result of integrating irradiance www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012over time. In fact radiometers that measure gy density of sometimes referred to as integrating radiometers. They take periodic



certain time and temperature, UV formulations usually require minimum irradiance and exposure time (energy density). The common measure of energy density is Joules/cm2. The energy density is actually the result of integrating irradiance over time. In fact radiometers that measure  p. 18 energy density of sometimes referred to as integrating radiometers. They take periodic measurements at regular intervals and these samples are added together to produce a “dose” Clearly sample time system.calculation. The logging radiometer is the ideal toolcan down” the intensity through effect accuracy of such measurements, for thisthe purpose. a variable power supply. The common measure of irradiespecially with processes that have fast curing The latest generation of radiometers recordswith peak an ance is Watts/cm2. As UV speeds. Selecting a radiometer irradiance and energy density over a number bulbs age, it is irradiance appropriate sample rate is an important of important UV bands simultaneously. Since that begins diminishing. selection criteria for plastic decorating the belt radiometer mimics a production part, it applications. provides very useful information about the UV Energy Density: Time is exposure of production parts. the second factor critical to Figure 2 Logging Radiometers versus On-Line Sensors proper curing, and this is referred to as energy density. It also may be called “dose,” even The radiometer, like the car dipstick, provides an absolute, of cure. Its values canresponses be compared(UVA, to though this term does not accurately fit. As sun-tanners can inquantitative The sensors are available a variety evaluation of fixed spectral bandwidth the material specification as an indicator of how the process is attest, it’s not just the intensity of the UV source that produces UVB, UVC, UVV) that cover short, mid and their glow, but also exposure time. A few seconds in even the running, and it provides enormous insight when troubleshootlong wave UV. Each sensor incorporates a brightest sunlight won’t produce a bronzed body. (See Figure ing is needed. single bandwidth in the optics of the sensor. 1 on page 18.) The actual bandwidth that youBut decide use sincetothe radiometer is a data logging device, it cannot for the sensor is based upon a combination To produce properly cured products, both irradiance and time provide the continuous, real-time monitoring needed to detect that might occur between data collection runs. For must be within the prescribed material specification. most problems of things including Like formulation, lamp system, these continuous measurements, a simple sensor integrated cooking recipes that require a certain time and temperature, bulb type (mercury or mercury-additive), UV formulations usually require minimum irradiance and either into the process chamber, or installed into the UV source process window and application. An exposure time (energy density). The common measure of energy itself, provides an effective solution. with isaactually relatively steady UV density is Joules/cm2. (Figure 2.)application The energy density the result of integrating irradiance over time. In fact, radiom- These sensors provide continuous irradiance data, which – eters that measure energy density are sometimes referred to when combined with line speed monitoring and control – proas integrating radiometers. They take periodic measurements vide an added layer of process security. The prudent operator at regular intervals, and these samples are added together to will utilize both tools: a logging belt radiometer for quantitative, produce a “dose” calculation. Clearly, sample time can affect absolute data required for establishing, optimizing, maintainthe accuracy of such measurements, especially with processes ing and troubleshooting the process, and a compact, online that have fast curing speeds. Selecting a radiometer with an sensor to continuously watch for changes in UV output. Again, appropriate sample rate is an important selection criterion for these devices aren’t any more redundant than a dipstick is to plastic decorating applications. a warning light.

FOCUS

Logging radiometers versus online sensors The conventional approach to checking UV system performance (in those refreshing instances where it’s being done) usually relies on running a logging radiometer through the

20 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

Selecting and installing real-time UV monitoring Having determined that a warning light on your UV line can save time, money and perhaps some gray hair, how should this device best be designed and integrated into the system? The


Taghleef Industries LLC

4969 Centre Point Drive #203 | Charleston, SC 29418 | T: 843-747-6743 | F: 843-747-6746 | www.ti-films.com Sales Duncan Henshall duncan.henshall@ti-films.com Cell: 843-862-2032

Technical Mohamed El Shami mohamed.elshami@ti-films.com Cell: 843-329-3213

Customer Service Avril Williams avril.williams@ti-films.com Office: 843-747-6743


Logging Radiometers versus On-Line Sensors

 p.sensors 20 FOCUS The are available in a variety of fixed spectral bandwidth responses (UVA, UVB, UVC, UVV) that cover short, mid and long wave UV. Each sensor incorporates a integrates a few topics, including sensor selection, singlesolution bandwidth in the optics of the sensor. sensor placement and data handling. The actual bandwidth that you decide to use 1. Sensor design and selection for theThesensor is based upon a combination ideal UV sensor must embody a number of features. First, it must be compact enough to be located in the often in of things including formulation, lampsystem, system, close quarters, without interfering with the production process. measure asor smallmercury-additive), as 0.57" x 0.60" x 0.75" (1.45 bulb Today’s type sensors (mercury x 1.52 x 1.91 cm), making them a truly compact device. These process and application. An sensors window are available with a purge design, which allows a whisper of low-pressure nitrogen to keepsteady the sensor window application with air a or relatively UV

clean even in dirty environments where airborne contaminants might interfere with measurements. The sensors also are available in a variety of fixed spectral bandwidth responses (UVA, UVB, UVC and UVV) that cover short-, mid- and long-wave UV (Figure 3). Each sensor incorporates a single bandwidth in the optics of the sensor. The actual bandwidth that is used for the sensor is based upon a combination of things including formulation, lamp system, bulb type (mercury or mercury-additive), process window and application. An application with a relatively steady UV source can go “out of spec” because reflectors and/or quartz plates/

22 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

Figure 3

tubes get dirty and less UV is transmitted to the cure surface. In other cases, it is more important to monitor changing output conditions from the actual source. Some customers may decide to monitor the source with a long-wave sensor (UVA or UVV) and reflectors with a short-wave (UVC) sensor.


AZ Plastics USA 85x255 mm 4c_AZ Plastics USA 13.02.12 10:47 Seite 1

Extremely flexible – Low-migration printing inks canchallenges go ‘out of spec’design because reflectors and/or quartz plates/tubes get dirty and One of source the daunting to sensor is making a

unit tough enough stable enough for extreme less UV and is transmitted tothethe cureexposure surface. In other cases, it is more important to RUCO. Respecting all forms of expression. in high-intensity UV applications where extreme UV irradiance monitor changing output conditions from the actual source. Some customers may and heat are common. The compact sensor has been designed decide to monitor the of source a long wave sensor (UVA or UVV) and reflectors with to withstand thousands of hours direct with exposure to UV withoutanoticeable degradation. For example, solarization, short wave (UVC) sensor. Figure 4

950UV 945UV-MA UV screen printing ink First low-migration One of the daunting challenges to design for sensor blow moulded objects UV screen printing especially for tubes made inks for the decoration is making a unit tough and stable enough for the of PE of plastic articles

extreme exposure in high-intensity UV • Good opacity, high • Suitable for baby applications where extreme UV colour irradiance and intensity and good bottles and primary heat are common. The compact sensor has been light-fastness food packaging designed to withstand hours of direct • High reactivity • Barium-free thousands formulation of exposure to •UV without • Offersdegradation. a flexible ink film Very good flow noticeable For example, solarization, is and the •which Easy to overprint • Excellent adhesion to over-lacquer a wide range of different deterioration of optical components common with plastic substrates exposure to intense UV light has been virtually which iseliminated the deterioration optical components common in of the latest generation of with sensors. The graph above illustrates that after exposure to intense UV light, has been virtually eliminated in exposure there is negligible change in the 8,000 hours of continuous high-irradiance the latest generation of sensors. Figure 4 illustrates that after response of these compact UV sensors. 8,000 hours of continuous high-irradiance exposure there isThe sensors supply an analog output signal, negligible change in the to response of these UV sensors. proportional the UV lightcompact exposure to an electronic interface. The sensors supply an analog output signal, proportional to the UV light exposure to an electronic interface.

Impressive Opportunities. Impressive Colours.

2. Sensor location While the compact and rugged design of the sensor provides a great deal of flexibility in where the sensor can be mounted, some locations make more sense than others. Locating the sensor near or in the lamp itself has several advantages, since it provides the most direct measurement of the light source. The sensors have a narrow field of view and, on multi-lamp systems, individual sensors can supply data for each lamp without the confusing effects of exposure to several lamps at a Sensor Location: time. But great care should be taken with mounting a sensor in the lamp housing, and the lamp manufacturer needs to be consulted. The sensor should notand interfere withdesign the proper While the compact rugged of or the sensor provides a great deal of flexibility in safe operation of the lamp. where the sensor can be mounted,

some locations make more sense than others.

Fortunately, a few lamp manufacturers are now warming to the idea of installing these sensors in the lamp during construction. The relatively small incremental cost of this valuable feature makes sense and more lamps with built-in monitoring are expected in the future. Sensors can be installed in many locations (see Figure 5 on page 24), provided that the temperature is below 100°C. Typically, a sensor just a few inches from the lamp will provide suitable conditions. Adjusting the sensor so that it “looks at” the reflected

Locating the sensor near or in the lamp itself has several advantages, since it provides the most direct measurement of the light source. The sensors have a narrow field of

www.rucousa.com


Sensor Location:

FOCUS While the compact and rugged design of the sensor provides a great deal where the sensor can provide the capability of setting a refsome locations make Sensor Locations erence point, typically the 100 percent output level of a new lamp. The digital than others. readout shown on the panel-mounted

 p. 23

unit then can provide a continuous “percent-of-power” reading that compares the current conditions to the UV conditions when the bulb was new and the reflectors were clean. A user-settable, low-threshold limit also can be programmed into the module, which will provide both a visual warning light and activate a relay closure so that additional actions can be triggered when the lamp is not operating within the process window. These simple pre-assembled panel mount modules are easily integrated into any existing system and engineered to be easily installed in the system electrical enclosure.

Locating the sensor n lamp itself has severa since it provides the measurement of the The sensors have a n

1. Behind reflector

4. Under system and/or quartz plate

2. Behind reflector look at bulb and reflected energy

5. From end of lamp housing

3. Looking up at bulb and reflector from below

6. Through filter material/rod

light and not directly at the bulb provides useful data, since the condition and efficiency of the reflector can account for a significant proportion of the UV available for curing (and is directly proportional to the direct output of the bulb anyway). Alternatively, the compact sensor can be installed in the process chamber where it observes either the lamp or reflected light. Recall that with online monitoring we are more concerned with relative, minute-to-minute changes in measured UV rather than in the value of the absolute reading itself. This premise allows greater latitude in locating sensors. 3. Data handling and integration Assuming the right sensor has been chosen and properly positioned to monitor the lamps, the only remaining question is what to do with the sensor output. The sensor provides an analog signal that varies proportionally with the incident UV light. Sensors can be connected directly to a self-contained, pre-engineered interface which provides a real-time read out, alarms and other features, or connected to a standard DIN rail signal processing transceiver module that converts the signals into a standard 0-10 volt signal that can be utilized by industrial PC or PLC control systems. The standardized sensor output, converted by the transceiver, opens up a wide range of possibilities for monitoring. For instance, among the simplest UV intensity display options is a straightforward digital display of a single lamp’s status. The module can

24 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

More sophisticated, multi-lamp versions of the panel mount display allow simultaneous monitoring of multiple UV sensors. A user-selectable dial on the interface allows the percentage of full power of any of the four sensors to be displayed, as well as quick visual monitoring of the status of all four lamps with audible and LED alarms and relay closures. Standard fully assembled units that are self contained and supplied in a standard 19’ rack mount enclosure are available and the user can supply the signal to any other PLC for display purposes. The basic building blocks of sensors and transceivers provide complete flexibility for a plant to customize its own solution. A sophisticated system provides a colorful line chart showing the value of each sensor relative to pre-programmed thresholds. More sophisticated options such as programmable warm-up times, hour meters, predicative maintenance, online technical procedures and password protection are easy to implement with such PC-based controls. Alarms show up as easy-to-read messages, and the computer controller can contact the engineering staff by email or text message as soon as an alarm is detected. This ability to receive instant, intelligent and potentially profit-saving information 24/7 is transforming the way plastics decorators think about UV system monitoring and maintenance. PC-based systems also allow remote access to the UV monitoring system over the internet so that measurements can be made, alarms acknowledged and settings made from any computer with web access. In the earlier car analogy, such powerful systems are the OnStar® equivalent of safeguarding the plastics finishing line. n For more information, contact Paul Mills at pmillsoh@aol.com or 440.570.5228.


Webtech, Inc. www.webtechhts.com


A

ASSOCIATION

a m e r i c a n

i n g e n u i t y

2012 TopCon Brings Innovation … American Ingenuity to Indianapolis The SPE Decorating & Assembly Division 2012 Topical Conference (TopCon) will take place June 5-6, 2012, in Indianapolis, IN. The conference, Innovation … American Ingenuity, will provide two days of papers covering the latest advances in plastic decoration and assembly, including fiber laser marking, surface pretreatment, in-mold labeling and decorating, UV digital inkjet, ultrasonic welding of biocomposites, electromagnetic welding, laser welding advancements and much more. TopCon 2012 also includes a full Supplier Trade Fair where attendees will have the opportunity to visit table top displays set up by a variety of suppliers to the plastics decorating and assembly industry. Schedule

Monday, June 4 2:00 – 6:00 pm - Registration 6:00 – 8:00 pm - Welcome Reception

11:15 – 11:45 am - CoverForm®: Scratch and Chemical Resistant Surfaces in One Integrated Molding Process – Lawrence Gabriel, Evonik Cyro LLC 11:45 – 12:15 am - Dynamic Print – Expanding the Value of In-Mold Decoration with Digital Imaging Technologies – Bob Travis, InkWorks Printing LLC

Assembly Breakout Session 10:45 – 11:15 am - InfraWeld®, Through-Beam Welding at the IR Spectrum – Kyle Harvey, Extol Inc. 11:15 – 11:45 am - Laser Etching as an Absorber for Laser Transmission – Paul Rooney, Branson Ultrasonics Corp 11:45 – 12:15 pm - Industrial Bonding of Plastics – Andrew Scott, Henkel Corporation 12:15 – 1:45 pm - Buffet Lunch and Supplier Trade Fair

Tuesday, June 5

1:45 – 2:15 pm - “Smart” Laser Marking – Faster Speed, Better Quality – Scott R. Sabreen, The Sabreen Group, Inc.

7:30 – 8:30 am - Registration 7:30 – 9:00 am - Continental Breakfast

2:15 – 2:45 pm - Choosing the Right Decorating Process – John Kaverman, Pad Print Pros

8:30 – 9:00 am - The Interaction of Polymer Formulation and Molding Conditions on Optimum Surface Treatment – R. Giles Dillingham, Brighton Technologies Group, Inc.

2:45 – 3:15 pm - New Power Delivery Methods for Solving Difficult-to-Join Applications Using Electromagnetic Welding – Steve Chookazian, Emabond Solutions LLC

9:00 – 9:30 am - Wireless Devices Decorated Using NonConductive Vacuum Metallization (NCVM) Techniques: Considerations and Common Failure Modes – Dwayne Wasylyshyn, Research In Motion Limited

3:15 – 3:30 pm - Break 3:30 – 4:00 pm - Plastic Part Design – Optimization and Visual Enhancement – Jack Lawson, Catalyst, PDG

9:30 – 10:00 am - Recent Advancements in Plastic Joining – Jeff Frantz, Branson Ultrasonics Corp.

4:00 – 4:30 pm - Innovative Adhesive Bonding Technology: Improving Product Quality, Lowering Production Costs – Karen Brock Amoah, IPS Corporation

10:00 – 10:30 am - Controlling Adhesion of UV Inkjet Decorating Techniques – Rory A. Wolf, Enercon Industries Corporation

4:30 – 6:00 pm - Networking Reception (Hors d’oeuvres and Cocktails) and Supplier Trade Fair

10:30 – 10:45 am - Break

Decorating Breakout Session In-Mold Decorating Processes Sponsored by the In-Mold Decorating Association 10:45 – 11:15 am - Design for IMD (Film Insert Molding) of Durable Products – Paul O’Hearn, Serigraph Inc.

26 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

Wednesday, June 6 7:30 – 9:00 am - Continental Breakfast 8:00 – 8:30 am - Transfer Efficiency v. Coating Waste Reduction – Ken Eyestone, Exel 8:30 – 9:00 am - Servo-Driven Ultrasonic Welding of Biocomposites – Sean Flowers, Edison Welding Institute


To make hotel reservations, call 888.627.8186. Ask for the SPE Decorating & Assembly TopCon 2012 group rate. To guarantee the discounted room rate, reservations must be made by May 12, 2012. Single/Double Occupancy: $123/night, which includes in-room internet and discounted self-parking rates of $12/day. Letter from the Chairman

I was recently asked about the next big thing we should be working on to provide value to our customers and to add profit to our bottom line. It was a way of asking what the next styling trend is and what technology is the best for us to provide this appearance and performance to our customers. It is a question we all face in the plastics industry. Most often, the best answer comes from combining several emerging technologies in innovative ways.

9:00 – 9:30 am - Adhesion Promotion Using Flame Plasma Surface Treatment – A Viable and Green Alternative to Conventional Methods – Joseph DiGiacomo, Flynn Burner Corporation 9:30 – 10:00 am - Fiber Lasers – Breaking Down the Barriers to Laser Marking, Welding and Cutting of Polymers – Tony Hoult, IPG Photonics 10:00 – 10:15 am - Break 10:15 – 10:45 am - UV Cure Digital Inkjet Printing – Paul McGovern, Mimaki USA 10:45 – 11:15 am - The Growth of Laser Welding of Plastics – Sean Flowers, Edison Welding Institute 11:15 – 11:45 am - UV Cure Systems – Ed McGhee, Nordson Corporation 11:45 – 12:15 pm - Optimization of Weld Results for Ultrasonic Welding – Jeff Frantz, Branson Ultrasonics Corp. TopCon Registration Fees for SPE Members are $355 per attendee with early bird registration, $405 after deadline. Non-SPE Member fees are $455 per attendee with early bird registration, $505 after deadline. Attendees can register online at www.plasticsdecorating.com. Early bird registration discounts end May 18th. Hotel Information Sheraton Indianapolis City Centre 31 W. Ohio St. Indianapolis, IN 46204 888.627.8186

Where can we learn about the latest advances and meet people who can help us understand and implement them? Many of us have just attended the NPE exposition and SPE ANTEC 2012. The exposition was great and the Decoration and Assembly Division provided two sessions and 11 papers on the latest advances in digital decoration, UV materials, physical vapor deposition, plastic bonding and improving coating application processes. It was a terrific opportunity to learn and to develop contacts in all fields of plastic engineering. If you were unable to attend, the Decoration and Assembly Division of SPE has another, more expanded opportunity for you to learn about the most recent trends and techniques, as well as meet others working in the fields of plastic decoration and assembly. The Decoration and Assembly Division Topical Conference (TopCon) will be held June 5 and 6 in Indianapolis, IN. Papers will include such topics as the interaction of polymer formulation and molding conditions on surface treatment, nonconductive bright chrome finishes by physical vapor deposition, controlling the adhesion of inks applied by digital printing, in-mold applied hard coats, and joining by lasers, ultrasonic, adhesives and heat. Techniques such as improving the transfer efficiency in coating processes and the latest in UV curing technologies also will be covered. This will be a great opportunity to see the latest technologies and meet the leaders in their fields. Finally, I would encourage you to join SPE and the Decoration and Assembly Division. In addition to reducing the cost of attending ANTEC and TopCon, membership gives you access to the extensive SPE library and many other benefits. You can learn more at the Society of Plastics Engineers website, www.4spe.org, or by emailing paul.a.uglum@delphi.com. Paul Uglum Delphi Electronics and Safety

Chair, SPE Decorating & Assembly Division

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 27


THE

GAME

CHANGER

ANOTHER

INKCUPS NOW

INNOVATION The XJET is the world’s first industrial UV LED inkjet printer designed for both short-run and long-run production printing.

REVOLUTIONARY FEATURES • Fast: prints 500 x 600mm in 90 seconds! • Flexible: handles parts up to 6” tall • Automation-ready: has a conveyor and a loading system

• Highly opaque white: one-pass printing on dark substrates • InkcupCare: Expert Tech Support and Complete Warranty • Industrial construction: 1500lbs

LEADING SUPPLIER FOR: PAD PRINTING • APPAREL TAG PRINTING • SCREEN PRINTING INKJET PRINTING • LASER ENGRAVING • LASER PLATE MAKING


INKCUPS.COM

DIRECT SALES OFFICES

United States: MA, NY, GA, IA, CA, AZ International: Canada, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico info@inkcups.com | 978.646.8980


S

SOLUTIONS

Atmospheric Plasma for Critical Decorating by Andy Stecher, Plasmatreat North America

For achieving safe and long-term stable adhesion of coatings and an immaculate appearance of paints and imprints on plastic materials, the surface is pretreated with atmospheric pressure plasma. Invisible fine dust particles, electrostatic charges and incompatible materials lead over and over again to problems with the adhesive bonding, painting or imprinting of plastic materials. That’s where atmospheric pressure plasma technology comes to the rescue. The more technologies conform to one another, the more important visual appearance becomes in the purchase decision. Attractive design elements, high-quality imprints and immaculate surfaces are distinguishing features which are assuming an increasing importance to the consumer. Whether it’s a light switch or a mobile phone housing, a cosmetic tube or a plastic folding box – the plastics industry has squared up to the requirements and is spending exponentially rising sums on advancing its decorating processes. In recognition of the growing demands for high quality, design innovation, reduced weight and environmental protection, the plastics industry constantly increases its efforts to improve

30 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

adhesive bonding, painting and imprinting. The decisive factor during these operations is the pretreatment of the material surface before it undergoes further processing. Treatment methods range from ionization, flame impingement, power washing or primer application through to mechanical cleaning with ostrich feathers. In spite of all efforts, the production wastage rate caused by dust particles exceeds 10 percent in many cases. Electrostatic charges of the surface, tiny but intolerable remainders of fine dust particles in deeper lying areas and environmental pollution are among the most common concerns. For achieving safe and long-term stable adhesion of bondings and coatings and an immaculate appearance of paints and imprints on plastic materials, atmospheric plasma-jet technology is used in almost all industries. It not only completely eliminates the above concerns, but also replaces environmentally detrimental or cost-intensive cleaning processes. The technology is equally suited for cleaning surfaces to a microfine level or for improving adhesion.



ď ´ p. 30

SOLUTIONS

Figure 1. Plasma technology does not stop the gaseous state of matter. If, by means of electronic discharge, additional energy can be fed into the material, then the electrons gain more kinetic energy and leave their atomic shells. The plasma state of matter Plasma is based on a simple physical principle. By supplying energy, the states of matter change: from solid to liquid and from liquid to gaseous. If further energy is added to a gas, it becomes ionized (i.e., the electrons gain more kinetic energy and leave their atomic shells). Free electrons, ions and molecular fragments are formed, and the gas turns into a plasma state, which also is known as the “4th state of matter� (Figure 1).

32 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

This state, however, was rarely used in industrial production at normal pressure because of its instability. Usage increased when an atmospheric pressure plasma-jet technology by the name of Openair-Plasma was developed by the German plasma system manufacturer Plasmatreat. By inventing and using special plasma nozzles, it became possible for the first time to integrate in-line what was an almost never


used state of matter for industrial production processes. Consequently, plasma was made usable for large-scale pretreatment of material surfaces in a normal atmosphere. Atmospheric jet-plasma is eco-friendly and, unlike gas-flame treatment, there is no risk of explosion or overheating substrates due to complex component geometries. The nozzles are solely operated with air and high voltage. The green technology also is cost efficient. The process brings about the following effects on the material’s surface: Cleaning: Contrary to flame treatment, the plasma flowing with almost ultrasonic speed onto the surface brings about microfine cleaning (Figure 2). The cleaning effects exceed those of conventional systems by far. This effect is additionally promoted by the extremely high emission speed as a result of which loosely adhering particles are effectively removed from the surface. Chemical or manual precleaning processes can be entirely omitted. Activation: Secure adhesion of a coating is conditional on the surface energy of the solid material being greater than the

ď ľ

Figure 2. Electrostatic effects are the principal cause for the adhesion of dust. Atmospheric plasma-jet treatment allows extremely efficient cleaning before decorating.


 p. 33

SOLUTIONS Surface energy after Openair® plasma treatment

Figure 3. The figure shows a non-polar plastic surface that was pretreated as a function of distance and speed with plasma. Treatment renders the surface polar, and the surface energy rises to >72 dyne with a large process window.

specializing in decorating your durable products All graphics have a function. To warn. To sell. To track. Romo Durable Graphics is continually challenged to produce functional graphics for our customers. We: • Decorate products that are outside in sun, rain & snow for years. • Print barcode tracking decals for containers that are commercially washed 300+ times. • Resurface furniture and surfaces with graffiti-resistant decals.

We manufacture decals with a lasting impression. Call us today!

DURABLE•GRAPHICS

(920) 712 -4090 www.romoinc.com

In-mold Graphic Solutions is a division of Romo Durable Graphics

34 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

surface tension of the liquid adhesive or paint. Without the high degree of activation received in the plasma process, for instance by a non-polar plastic such as polypropylene, wetting problems would arise and make coating impossible. Dr. Alexander Knospe, head of R&D at the Plasmatreat headquarters in Germany, explains the chemical processes: “Plasma pretreatment strongly increases the surface energy of the plastic material since polar groups, such as hydroxyl functions, are formed on the surface. In this application, not only complete surface wetting with a given paint or adhesive is improved, but also the creation of a covalent bond, which is a very stable atomic bond, is made possible on the surface.” In general, plastics have a low surface energy, usually between < 28 and 40 dyne. Experience has shown that good prerequisites for adhesion are first achieved with surface energies greater than 38 to 42 dyne. With plasma treatment, the surface energy can be increased significantly. Trials have demonstrated that energy values of over 72 dynes on many plastic substrates are achievable (Figure 3). Extended plasma system features Potential-free plasma: In technical terms, a plasma state is described as an electrically conductive gas. A particular feature with the Openair process is that the emergent plasma beam is potential-free and, as a result, applications are greatly extended and simplified. Due to a patented specific nozzle-head design, the treatment space above the substrate surface remains electrically neutral. When the zero-potential plasma beam bombards the surface, the electrical charge carriers on the electrostatically


charged workpiece can dissipate to earth. This way the surface is electrostatically discharged. Power and Speed: The intensity of the plasma in the above mentioned process is so high that treatment speeds of several 100 m/min can be achieved when using stationary nozzles. Through the use of patented rotary nozzles, an operating width of up to 130mm per nozzle at treatment speeds of up to 40m/min can be achieved. The rotating feature ensures that the bottom of a component and its side walls are activated at the same time. Besides individual nozzles, complete rotary systems also are available for pretreating large areas. Surfaces up to 3000mm wide can be treated in a single pass in a continuous, in-line production line, which allows for the first time the solvent-free pretreatment of large composite panels made from unpolar resins such as PP and PVC. Typical rises in temperature of a plastic surface during treatment amount to ∆T < 30 °C. Coating: Until just recently, plasma polymerisation was a process that could only be carried out in vacuum. However, in close cooperation with the respected Fraunhofer Institute IFAM, Plasmatreat developed and patented an atmospheric pressure plasma coating process. The principle of this method is based on the fact that an organosilicon compound is admixed with the atmospheric-pressure plasma to produce a layer. Due to the high-energy excitation in the plasma, this compound is fragmented and deposited as a vitreous layer on the surface to be treated. Brought to large industrial use at TRW Automotive in 2007, the process allows selective nanocoating and individual functionalization of surfaces according to the requirements of the product properties needed later. AP-jet plasma in the printing process Atmospheric plasma jet technology can be used as part of all the common printing processes like pad printing or flexography, screen, offset and other printing. It ensures full wettability, even on difficult to wet plastics such as PP, and thus the durable adhesion of the imprint (Figure 4, on page 36). Compared to the often-applied corona treatment, AP-jet plasma reaches not only higher activation dyne levels and allows additionally for ultrafine cleaning, but it also emits no ozone at all. Its efficiency makes it possible to significantly increase machine speeds. When tubs or tubes are printed, an increase in processing speeds of up to 30 percent can be achieved. The pretreatment process makes print adhesion of solvent-free inks possible, as well as secures long-term adhesion when printing difficult surfaces like polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE), polyamide (PA), polycarbonate (PC), glass and metals. Conclusion Atmospheric pressure plasma technology is finding application in all areas that place high demands on quality, productivity,

ď ľ


ď ´ p. 35

SOLUTIONS Figure 4. Atmospheric plasma-jet technology can be used as part of all the common printing processes. It ensures full wettability, even on difficult to wet plastics such as PP. The effect is an impeccable image and a durable adhesion of the imprint.

environmental compatibility, precision and flexibility. Practically all substrate materials can be treated by means of this process and the nozzle systems can be easily integrated into a new or already existing production line. Additional pretreatment by means of primers or brushing and rinsing surfaces can be dispensed with completely. Emissions of VOCs are furthermore avoided from the outset. Treatment is extremely uniform. Because of its broad application potential, atmospheric plasma technology is one of the key technologies with which innovative long-term solutions can be developed in almost all areas. n

36 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

Plasmatreat is headquartered in Germany. In close cooperation with international research institutes and universities, the company has advanced and patented a large number of research projects and processes in atmospheric plasma-jet technology. The manufacturer has leading innovation engineering centers located in Germany, the United States, Canada, Japan and China, as well as subsidiaries and sales offices in more than 20 countries. For more information, visit www.plasmatreat.com.



P

PRODUCT

Pad Print Machinery Grows EAZY INKPRINT Series Pad Print Machinery of Vermont, East Dorset, VT, has added the EAZY90 to its line of EAZY INKPRINT pad printers. The EAZY90 is a table top printer for textile printing and general print production that features easy set-up and operation with high productivity and reliability. The control panel allows the operator to set speed, pick and print strokes and continuous and/or single cycle in the pneumatic device. The machine offers printing uniformity, and the 90mmdiameter sealed inking system enables quick color changes. For more information, visit www.padprintmachinery.com, call 800.272.7764 or email sales@ppmovt.com. Inkcups Now Introduces Small-Format High-Speed Screen Printer Da nvers , M A-ba sed Inkcups Now has developed the first industrial UV LED inkjet printer designed for both short-run and longrun industrial printing. The XJET inkjet printer produces single- and multicolor images on light or dark products with minimal set-up time. It is very fast, printing a 500x600mm area in less than two minutes. This machine features six print heads (CMYKWW), LED curing and uni- or bi-directional printing. The staggered white print head enables simultaneous white and color printing in one pass. The XJET has variable dot settings for extremely high print resolution, resulting in smooth gradations without banding. The XJET can accommodate parts up to 5.75" in height and prints on flat, as well as slightly curved or uneven surfaces. For more information, visit www.inkcups.com, call 978.646.8980 or email info@inkcups.com. Webtech Develops Hot Stamping Foil for Exterior Use A newly developed hot stamping foil technique from Robbinsville, NJ-based Webtech, Inc. allows application to exterior products such as windows, siding, decking and fencing. True Color is a dry transfer hot stamp process that is VOC-free. It features fast turnaround times and eliminates the need for painting. It can be used to decorate interior and exterior profiles with wood grains and multiple custom colors. True Color also exceeds industry standards for exterior weathering. In addition, WebTech is offering a foil-decorating solution for PET and glass

38 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

bottles, and custom laminating foil for a variety of substrates up to 15" wide. For more information, contact Bob Miller at bmiller@webtech-hts.com. Adhesive Solution Offers Strength and Reliability IPS Corporation, Durham, N.C., has developed a methacrylate adhesive technology that rivals traditional two-part epoxy adhesives. The SCIGRIPR SG5000 produces high performance structural bonding for composites and metals that resist corrosion. It can be used to bond polyester, vinyl ester, epoxy and gel-coated composites, as well as most metals and thermoplastics with little or no surface preparation or priming. The adhesive/activator mix is applied at a 1:1 ratio and can be dispensed manually with cartridges or with meter-mix equipment. For more information, visit www.scigrip.com or call 919.598.2400. Screen Printing Attachment Available Systematic Automation Inc., Farming ton, CT, has developed an optional attachment for the company’s Model F1 and Model 810 screen printing machines. The new print head allows printing in a single direction without f lood i ng bec au se t he squeegees alternate with each print cycle. It is ideal for special ink applications, such as back-lit signs. For more information, call 860.67736400 or visit www.sysauto.com. Cylindrical Part Printer Boasts High Production Rates Apex Machine Company, Oakland Park, FL, has introduced a high-speed C-90 fully automated cylindrical part printer that can be integrated with a vision inspection system and bagger. The C-90 can be configured for a variety of product sizes with quick changeover speed. It prints in high-quality multi-color using either dry offset, FlexApex™ or a combination of these printing technologies. It also boasts production rates of up to 600 parts per minute. For more information, visit www. apexmachine.com, email enquiries@apexmachine.com or call 954.566.1572. Compact Drying Machine Designed For Pad Printing Chicago-based A.W.T. World Trade, Inc., has designed its Cure-Tex™ HD dryers with the same components found on larger infrared dryers. Engineered for top production speeds,


NEW For more than 4 decades, Sonics has been working with customers to assess applications and provide cost-effective welding solutions. Call today to speak with one of our assembly experts.

ULTRASONIC PLASTICS WELDER WITH TOUCH SCREEN CONTROL Color touch-panel technology for 40, 20 and 15 kHz ultrasonic welding systems brings user-friendly navigation and intuitive command flow to the welding process. Including digital time, energy and distance-based welding modes, this microprocessor-driven system’s vivid display highlights multiple menus designed for maximum weld control, monitoring and versatility.

SmartPress+ SmartControl =SmartSystem Plus a Full Product Line of Systems for: • Ultrasonic Welding, Staking & Inserting • Vibration Welding • Ultrasonic OEM Kits and Components • Spin Welding

WELD SMARTER, CONTACT SONICS TODAY

800.745.1105

www.sonics.com

Visit us at Booth # 1249 (North Hall)

Green Pad Prinitng Equipment Kent’s global teams of engineers work together to aggressively design new technology in pad printing. This Technology is designed to enhance your success. The advances in the G-Turbo350 make it simpler to work with your pad printing machine while utilizing state of the art components and technology. By using raw materials like granite and servo motors instead of cylinders this equipment offers a very low impact to our environment. The G-Turbo 350 is an amazingly versatile machine, which allows complex jobs to be completed with ease.

Green Ink Cups

With a reusable liner inside, this new sealed ink cup system is able to reduce up to 90% of ink solvent and cleaning solvent.

G-TURBO 350

Green Prinitng Plates

Using low cost, environmentally friendly laser engraveable printing plates eliminates the need for chemicals in the plate making process. Water wash plates still use film, but only water is needed to etch the material.

Ple a

se NP visit Bo E 20 us a oth t 1 #4 2 24 2


UTIONS = MANUFACTURING EXCELLE L O S L NCE TOTA

The Sabreen Group is an engineering consulting company specializing in secondary plastics manufacturing operations. Now in our 20th year, we have solved critical problems for over 350 companies in 18 countries. We have earned a reputation of excellence for our rapid response and detailed problem-solving. Many of today’s most recognizable products are manufactured using The Sabreen Group’s advanced technology processes.

• Surface Pretreatments • Adhesion Bonding & Joining • Digital Printing

• Decorating & Finishing • Laser Marking, Laser Welding • Product Security

Introducing VectorJet ® Laser Marking Technology

972-820-6777

email: engineering@sabreen.com www.sabreen.com www.plasticslasermarking.com

www.adhesionbonding.com

6999 Siena Pl., Suite 311 • The Colony, TX 75056


 p. 38

PRODUCT

with the ability to d r y hu nd red s of pieces per hour depending on size, all Cure-Tex HD units feature top-down airf low pattern for uniform heat distribution without scorching and a Fiberlon™ conveyor belt to withstand temperatures up to 500°F. The unit has a double-walled heat chamber insulated for further heat retenution provides foodenergy marketersefficiency with a new environmentally friendly and strong packaging solution, and cost effective operation. For those m brands using the in-mold labeling (IML) process. printers with increased drying needs, the Cure-Tex HD II has method a dual heat chamber with a longer conveyor. For more inforods require mation, a printed film stock membrane or foil sealedemail directly to the tub flange, and then or visit www.awt-gpi.com, sales@awt-gpi.com jection molded lid. The graphics are limited to the membrane, direct printed over cap, or seccall 773.777.7100. on the cap: none of which have high quality graphic standards.

Lid Technology

Spartech Introduces Environmentally-Friendly Packaging Solution A new in-mold Lid labeled lidding system from Spartech Corporation, St. Louis, MO, eliminates the need for an additional foil seal or film membrane, providing food marketers with a strong, Membrane environmentally-friendly packaging solution. The 1-Seal ™ technology allows a container to be capped and sealed without the need for Tuban additional foil seal or membrane because it leaves a portion of the in-mold label surface exposed inside the lid. This streamlines the sealing process while reducing waste due to membrane failures and membrane scrap. For more information, email Jeffrey Best at jeffrey.best@spartech. com or call 314.569.7466.

es one component manufactured in one process that can be capped and sealed to your a portion of the label surface exposed inside the lid. Additionally our lidding system is one ecyclable. New Labeling Technology has Anti-Counterfeit Properties

Inland Label, South La Crosse, WI, together with CBW Automation and Te c h Mold I nc . , have collaborated to develop a new label technolog y for high-volume, low-SKU products. Roll-fed injection in-mold labeling provides the same photoquality graphics and durability as traditional IML, but can offer up to 30 percent in cost savings for the right application, such as the pharmaceutical market, because the technology exhibits effective anti-counterfeit properties. Cost savings come since the labels are supplied in roll form, unlike traditional IML which is cut and stack. Roll-fed labels are cut in place on the production line, reducing the amount of raw materials used and lowering manufacturing costs. For more information, visit www.inlandlabel.com or call 800.657.4413.

New Guide Available For Plastics Decorators Germany based-Kurz, the coating specialist, has published a comprehensive guide on surface finishing by hot stamping and related technologies. The ‘Kurz Plastics Decoration Guide’ supports practitioners throughout the planning and implementation phases of decoration projects. Included in the work are decoration solutions for a wide range of items, each imposing different requirements with respect to the substrate, part geometry and surface design. In addition to in-depth information about the characteristics of the various decoration processes, the book also includes a chapter on stamping dies and machines. The guide, available in both German and English, can be purchased from Kurz. For more information, email sales@kurzusa.com. n Plasmatreat_decorating_ad_final.qxp:Layout 2

1/27/12

Photo Realistic Printing on Plastic

Highest Quality Printing Details and Images • Nano-level Cleaning • Better Ink Bonding • Safer Work Environment

Scan code for additional information.

• Eco-friendly Technology Plasmatreat North America Phone: 847-783-0622 infoptna@plasmatreat.com www.plasmatreat.com

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 41

12:16


A

ASSEMBLY

NPE2012 Launch Pad for New Assembly Products

by Dianna Brodine

In the first five days of April, NPE2012 enjoyed the sunny skies of Orlando, FL, with attendees streaming into town from all corners of the globe. With more than 1,900 exhibitors covering nearly one million square feet of floor space (a 23 percent increase from 2009) and over 55,000 attendees from more than 19,000 companies, moving NPE to Orlando proved to be a solid bet. “There was far more plastics processing equipment operating on the exhibit floor than in 2009, much greater attendance at the co-located conferences and a larger and more exciting program of special events,” said William R. (Bill) Carteaux, president and CEO of SPI. “In addition, both exhibitors and visitors gave SPI overwhelmingly positive feedback on the new venue in Orlando, supporting our decision to schedule both the 2012 and 2015 NPEs there.” Equipment and process launches were the talk of the show. This article discusses new technology in plastics assembly. Sonics & Materials, Inc., Newtown, CT, introduced its new SmartSystem ultrasonic welder with touch-panel technology, bringing user-friendly navigation and intuitive command flow to the welding process. The

42 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

microprocessor-driven SmartSystem is available for 40, 20 and 15 kHz ultrasonic welding systems and includes digital time-, energy- and distance-based welding modes. The SmartSystem consists of a SmartPress and a SmartControl power supply featuring full-color touchscreen menus designed for maximum weld control, monitoring and versatility. The SmartControl power supply is available at power levels ranging from 400 to 4500 watts, depending upon system frequency and configuration. Standard features include automatic frequency tuning; digital amplitude, pressure and flow control; digital force triggering; digital stack wattSonics & Materials age and frequency displays; good part/bad introduced its part output signal; upper and lower weld new SmartSystem mode limit settings; power output display; Ultrasonic Welder. and weld cycle graph chart screen. The SmartPress is a pneumatic benchtop press with a single piece rigid cast aluminum machine base and hub with direct in-line air cylinder. Additional features include single rail linear motion slide, adjustable fine thread positive stop and rigid mount high efficiency converter. Brian Gourley, technical services manager for Sonics & Materials, was pleased with both the product launch and the NPE show: “To my mind, this show was better


Branson Ultrasonics premiered its new Clean Vibration Technology.

attended and more productive than the last couple of NPEs, perhaps due to a few factors, including the new April date instead of June, which is traditionally a busier month; curiosity about the new location and facilities; and an improving economy. We had a good number of leads generated and already have a couple of jobs in process from the show.” Branson Ultrasonics Corp., a subsidiary of Emerson, Danbury, CT, introduced its new Clean Vibration Technology (CVT) to the North American and Asian markets, enabling product designers and engineers in automotive, medical and other industries to make parts that are virtually particulate-free with aesthetically clean weld lines. Responding to the latest industry trends that have raised the standards for plastic weld joints, Branson developed the new CVT technology that adds infrared (IR) preheating to the familiar clean vibration technology to produce welds that are free of dust particulates or “angel hair,” Apr12_Trekk_Ad_final 4/17/12 3:22 PM Page 1 stringy excess plastic left on a part.

B r a n s o n’s C V T c l e a n - j o i n i n g technology avoids particulates and contaminants in air, fuel, oil and water reservoirs and conduits. It is ideally suited for clean, precision joining of automobile taillights, fluid reservoirs, medical and consumer filtration products, and other parts and products requiring a clean weld that maximizes aesthetics, integrity or functionality. The CVT uses medium-wave metal foil IR emitters that are closely matched to the absorption characteristics of most plastic resins. This produces a more efficient melt process, saving both time and energy. The reduction in plastic dust particulates of this process also benefits the environment. “The move to Orlando for NPE 2012 allowed Branson to use our resources, typically reserved for auxiliary costs, in other areas,” explained Crystal Rumph, manager, marketing communications for Branson Ultrasonics. “This offered us the ability to create a booth space that was illustrative of the approach that we take with our customers – to really understand their needs and requirements, presenting them with a process neutral solution,

CALL: (636) 271-1391 or TOLL FREE: (855) 800-TREKK EMAIL: trekksales@trekkequipment.com

HOT STAMP & HEAT TRANSFER AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT

Watch videos and see our complete line at www.trekkequipment.com!

Model A2001 Series (1-ton to 5-ton press capacity)

Automated CD12 System

ENGINEERED RIGHT

BUILT RIGHT

Model PRB Automated With Vision System

PRICED RIGHT

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 43


Celebrating

20

years of Creativity, Innovation & Beyond

JUNE 19-21, 2012 Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, NYC

HBA Global is celebrating 20 years! To mark this very special year, HBA will provide a variety of new onsite activities, pavilions and tools to assist you and your needs in an ever changing competitive marketplace, which include:

• NEW online appointment making feature for exhibitors and attendees! • Enhanced New Product Showcase in prime location on HBA Global’s show floor. • New SPLASH! Pavilion showcasing the best in emerging brands. • Innovation Pavilions, showcasing suppliers, education, networking opportunities all in one area! • Design Hot Spots — a new area for inspiration, innovating materials to further develop creativity and ideas.

Celebrate with us and register for your complimentary Exhibits Hall Pass at www.hbaexpo.com/register with priority code: PDMT

For more information and updates visit us online at

www.hbaexpo.com


 p. 43

ASSEMBLY Dukane launched the iQ Advanced Servo Welder.

and thereby enabling them to get new products to market quickly and with less expense.” Dukane Intelligent Assembly Solutions, St. Charles, IL, focused on the new Ultrasonic Servo welder product with patented Melt-Match ® technology. The iQ Advanced Servo Welder is the next step in the evolution of ultrasonic welding technology, combining the efficiency and reliability of a 100-percent digitally controlled Multi-Core iQ Series power supply with the precision of an advanced servo press. The Dukane Advanced iQ Servo Welder delivers repeatability, accuracy and reliability to the ultrasonic bonding process with dynamic servo motion control, robust rigid mount construction, reliable

validation and calibration and superior data acquisition. In addition, Dukane launched a free thermoplastic welding processing guide app for mobile devices. Currently available on Google Play and coming soon in Apple’s IOS App Store, the app features a booster ratio calculator, allowing users to enter frequency, amplitude and gain factor to calculate the booster ratio required for an application. In addition, users can view the properties, amplitude and compatitbility of resins, as well as get guidelines and initial starting points for force and trigger settings. The Orange County Convention Center will host NPE2015 from March 22 to 26, 2015. n

Largent Sales Group, L.L.C. dba. allied decorating systems 46620 state route 162 • po box 99 Wellington, ohio 44090 (440) 647-5195 office www.allieddecosystems.com

New, USed & RebUiLt eqUipmeNt FoR ALL YoUR deCoRAtiNG NeedS

screen printing

Allied dUAL dryer - (2) 400 wpi lamps, 10” L, vertically mounted.

hot stamping

cure 7” diameter plastic & glassware. tri-power controls, dual exhaust. no tooling needed.

pad printing offset printing uv curing systems labeling equipment foil banding equipment automation tooling

Allied SA-102 UV automatic & unscrambler. allied feeder modules - link units for multi-color or single-color.

tech service

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 45


Indulge Yourself in Imaging The industry’s most innovative marketplace is back in Vegas to offer the SGIA community the best spot for wide-format, graphic applications, garment decoration, screen, digital and more.

Expert Advice Zones

Expo Marketplace

Network & Socialize

Our fabulous Zones speak for themselves with industry leaders sharing their expertise.

Experience the most exciting and beneficial marketplace for your business.

Meet up with friends and colleagues in Vegas, baby, at the 2012 SGIA Expo.

Sign Up to Be Notified When Registration Opens at SGIA.org, Keyword: 2012Expo


A

ASK THE EXPERT Plastics Decorating is pleased to feature this section in our magazine in which you (our readers) can ask industry experts specific questions about plastics decorating. To ask one of our columnists a question, send an email to QA@petersonpublications.com.

Heat Heat Transfers by Eric Steinwachs, United Silicone

Question: What is the difference between heat transfer and hot stamping? Hot stamping and heat transfers both require heat, pressure and dwell (time) to apply an image to a part. However, heat transfers are pre-printed images using silk screened, gravure, flexography or digital printing methods on a release paper or film; whereas, hot stamp images are created by the art in the die. Heat transfers can be one-color or multicolored images, while hot stamping is generally one color. Question: Can existing hot stamp equipment be used to apply a heat transfer? No. The equipment is similar, but applying a heat transfer requires an eye mark registration system. A “Webtrak� or heat transfer indexer uses a photo eye system to locate the image under the stamping head. After each image is applied to a part, the indexer advances the web to move a new image into place. This locates the image in the left-toright position, while the front-to-back registration is controlled by the web tracking with guide rollers. The tonnage required to apply a heat transfer is another equipment consideration. As a rule, 500 lbs. per square inch of die contact area is used to figure out the correct tonnage required to apply a heat transfer. For example, a 2x4" image area results in eight square inches of die contact or (8x500 = 4,000 / 2000) a two-ton machine. However, a hot stamp image of the same size would require less than one-ton. Also, at some point the image area becomes too large to vertically transfer so a roll-on style machine would be required to avoid air entrapment. Question: What are the advantages of heat transfers? The major advantage of heat transfer decorating is that it is a dry process. There are no storage problems with flammable

materials or strong odors, no ink mixing and no messy cleanup. The decorated part also is ready to be handled or packaged directly after printing. Printing and registration of the artwork is done on high-tech presses where multiple colors are printed in registration to each other. The image quality, along with the art registration, is inspected prior to the application process, thus minimizing scrap. In addition, all of the colors are transferred in one step, reducing the number of hits or passes required to apply a multi-color graphic. Changing the image on the same part only requires a roll change, resulting in a reduction in the set-up time between jobs. In addition, heat transfers are engineered to meet precise customer requirements and specifications. Formulas specific to the individual product include chemical and abrasion resistance, UV stability, adhesion specifications and other requirements depending on the product being decorated.

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 47

ď ľ


Photo credit: Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association; visitIndy.com

a m e r i c a n

i n g e n u i t y

SPE Decorating & Assembly Division Topical Conference June 5-6, 2012 • Indianapolis, IN

Join the SPE Decorating & Assembly Division for two days featuring more than 20 papers on the latest advancements in decorating and assembly technologies from industry experts. • Decorating papers on laser marking, in-mold decorating, UV digital inkjet, pad printing and more • Assembly papers on welding biocomposites, electromagnetic welding, laser welding and more

Special Discount Available for SPE Members

• Supplier Trade Fair with tabletop displays from leading decorating and assembly suppliers

For a full schedule and registration details, visit www.plasticsdecorating.com/topcon or call 785.271.5801.


 p. 47

ASK THE EXPERT

Finally, heat transfers are versatile and can be used on a wide range of plastics in production today, as well as glass, metal, wood, painted surfaces, paper and fabrics. Question: In what industries are heat transfers being used to decorate plastics? Because heat transfers work on most substrates, they are seen in all industries. For example, United Silicone has worked on applications in the appliance, automotive, personal care, industrial container, cosmetics, sporting goods, ad specialty, medical and apparel industries. With heat transfers, the possibilities are endless because of the wide range of spot colors and the use of process colors (CMYK+W), along with a variety of finishes. In addition to all of the color options, bold and fine graphics can be combined within the same print, along with the ability to print variable data. This is very attractive in many markets. Question: What technology advancements have occurred in heat transfers? I have seen advances in heat transfers regarding both the transfers and the application equipment. Heat transfer formulations improve continuously to keep up with ever-increasing substrate changes. Closer tolerances of color-to-color within the image

and more accurate image placement on the part have met or exceeded customer demands. The application cycle and faster machinery have increased with better part handling and shorter dwell (time) required to apply the transfer. The capability of variable data (such as barcodes or lot numbers) has opened the door to applications that were not feasible in the past. The heat transfer web now can be laser or diecut, enabling raised or recessed areas on a part to be decorated. In the past, a part with a recessed or raised area would cause the web to wrinkle, creating a defect in the print. With the versatility in colors – including a new line of metallic inks, chrome-look inks and brushed-metal-appearance inks – and the ability to add decorations with a tactile sensation, I foresee a big marketing push to bring heat transfer decorating to a new level. n Eric Steinwachs, United Silicone’s national sales manager, has more than 20 years of experience in the hot stamp and heat transfer industries. United Silicone, an ITW Decorating Company, specializes in the design and production of hot stamp and heat transfer equipment, while also providing a complete range of silicone rubber supplies and tooling. Steinwachs can be reached at 630.817.5227 or esteinwachs@unitedsilicone.com. More information also can be obtained at United Silicone’s website: www.unitedsilicone.com.

Scan QR code with your smart phone to go to CFC’s website for more information.

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 49


I

INDUSTRY

Taghleef to Acquire Applied Extrusion Technologies Taghleef Industries, headquartered in Dubai, a manufacturer of biaxially-oriented polypropylene, NATIVIA™ and cast polypropylene films for food packaging, labeling and adhesive tapes, will acquire Wilmington, DE-based Applied Extrusion Technologies, Inc. (AET Films). AET Films is a leading supplier of specialized oriented polypropylene films in North America. The transaction, which is subject to regulatory approval, has been approved by the board of directors for both companies and should take effect by the end of the second quarter of 2012. Houlihan Lokey is serving as the exclusive financial advisor to AET Films and its shareholders in this transaction. For more information, visit www.ti-films.com or www.aetfilms.com. A.W.T. World Trade Group Acquires Saturn Rack An acquisition in January created one of the world’s largest and most diversified providers of industrial racks and drying applications in the storage and drying rack industry. Chicagobased A.W.T. World Trade Group acquired The Saturn Rack Company, formerly Atlas Rack, a company with a 40-year history in the market. A large number of drying and storage rack applications are available for use in a myriad of capacities from heavy duty industrial to mid-range. Where space is limited, A.W.T.’s line of specialty racks furnishes the solution for drying and storage. For more information, call 773.777.7100 or visit www.awt-gpi.com. Pantone Offers Two New On-Trend Collections

Pantone LLC, an X-Rite company in Carlstadt, N.J., is offering two new PANTONE® Plastic Standard Chips Collections: PANTONE Plastic Chips Color Collection Volume 1 and PANTONE VIEW inspiration for interiors 2013 design set. Developed using on-trend colors for product design and manufacturing, the PANTONE Plastic Standard Chips Color Collection Volume 1 contains 154 of Pantone’s most sought-after colors that are popular in various markets, including toys, consumer electronics, home furnishings, appliances and accessories.

50 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012

The PANTONE VIEW inspiration for interiors 2013 design set includes large-format plastic chips in 73 forecasted colors from the recently announced PANTONE VIEW home + interiors 2013 forecast. Both sets are available at www.pantone.com/ plasticcollections, through PANTONE retailers worldwide or by calling 888-PANTONE. Judges Announced for 2012 IMDA Awards Rob Krebs, Clare G old s b er r y a nd Yolanda Simonsis have been chosen to judge the 2012 In-Mold Decorating Association Awards competition. Krebs is director of market innovations for the American Chemistry Council (ACC) Plastics Division; Goldsberry is senior editor of Modern Plastics Worldwide and Simonsis is president and publisher of Paper, Film & Foil Converter. The competition will recognize the industry’s best in-mold labeled packaging and in-mold decorated durable products. The winning entries are chosen based on creativity in design, engineering and innovation in seven categories. Award winners will be honored at the IMDA Awards Ceremony at Pack Expo International 2012, Oct. 30, at McCormick Place, Chicago, IL. The award winners will be announced in the October 2012 issue of Package Design Magazine. For more information, visit www.imdassociation.com. Nazdar Adds to Staff in Kansas, Chicago Nazdar SourceOne, Shawnee, KS, a distributor of screen and digital printing inks, equipment and supplies celebrating its 90th anniversary, has added Glenn Shull, Mary Strafuss, Patrick Campbell and Kevin Dooley to positions within the company. Glenn Shull has joined Nazdar SourceOne as product manager for digital equipment. He has nearly 30 years of marketing and sales experience in the screen and digital printing industries. Strafuss, product manager for graphic inks, will develop and manage an extensive portfolio of Nazdar-manufactured graphic and digital ink products. Campbell is an account executive who will be responsible for developing new prospects and partnering with existing customers to improve their businesses in Kansas City and the surrounding areas. Strafuss and Campbell will work from offices in Shawnee, KS. Dooley is a digital equipment specialist based out of the Chicago office. He is charged with developing and increasing digital equipment sales opportunities within the Midwest Region. For more information, visit www.nazdar.com. Laser Magic, Accumark Honored For Work with Community Organizations The Hudson, WI Chamber of Commerce recently recognized Laser Magic, Inc. and Accumark, Inc. as the 2011 Large Business of the Year. The award was presented during the


chamber’s annual banquet in early 2012. Laser Magic/Accumark President Ted Bauer said the company and its employees have taken active rolls in community organizations in the Hudson and greater St. Croix Valley since 1986. Laser Magic serves the promotional products industry with full-service design to fulfillment including laser engraving, YAG laser marking, sublimation and multi-color pad and screen printing. Sister company Accumark was founded in 1987 and serves the medical and industrial OEM industries. For more information, visit www.lasermagic.com or www.accumark.com. Kortec Expands for Future Growth in Packaging Industry Kortec, Inc. has moved its headquarters to a new location in Rowley, MA. The new Rowley headquarters, only 3.5 miles north of Kortec’s current location in Ipswich, MA, provided the company with the additional space it needed to support current and future growth, according to Russell Bennett, Kortec’s vice president of sales and marketing. “We are growing and the increase we’ve seen in business recently, particularly in the barrier thin-wall packaging technology area, has driven the need for more space,” he said. The new headquarters has additional capacity to accommodate engineering, mold assembly and

Branson Makes It Possible

research and development activities, with a 30 percent in space over the previous building. Kortec is a supplier of turnkey coinjection systems to the plastics and packaging industries. The company’s systems are used throughout the world to produce high-barrier multi-layer containers featuring three-layer construction that optimizes clarity and strength while maximizing the shelf life of the end-use products. For more information, call (978) 238-7100 or visit www.kortec.com. Inkcups Now Opens Locations in Mexico, Guatemala Inkcups Now Corp., with headquarters in Danvers, MA, has opened two new locations in Latin America: ICN-Guatemala and ICN-Mexico. Johann Arango leads Central America sales and Jesus Ambriz Galvez handles sales in Mexico. Arango has more than seven years of experience in the textile industry in the Central and South American region. Ambriz Gálvez has over 20 years of experience in sales and market development in the apparel industry. He had worked for the largest heat transfer label maker in the US, collaborating with US sales teams and deploying integrated labeling and identification programs for the most recognized brands in the USA. For more information, visit www.inkcups.com. n

The World’s Premier Resource for Materials Joining Technologies. Branson offers the broadest range of plastics joining, metal welding and precision cleaning technologies, to ensure the very best solution for your product and process challenges. With more than 60 years of experience, our unsurpassed industry knowledge helps you get to market quickly, with quality products manufactured with the highest efficiencies. Plus, we have the global resources and local presence to rapidly provide the support you require, anywhere in the world. Branson is a division of Emerson, a global technology leader whose forward thinking and dedication to customer service inspire us to continually develop new and better ways to serve your needs.

For more information: bransonultrasonics.com 203-796-0400

© Branson Ultrasonics Corporation 2012. 2011. The Emerson logo is a trademark and service mark of Emerson Electric Co.

Global Technologies. Local Solutions.

165040_Ultrasonics_hlfpg_PDM.indd 1

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 1/18/12 11:34:5651 AM


MARKETPLACE

Website Packed with information, from finding quality decorating/assembly suppliers to an archive of Plastics Decorating articles by subject or issue.

Digital Magazine Found on the website, a fully interactive digital magazine with direct links to additional content and advertisers' websites.

Plastics Decorating ENews Published bi-monthly and providing updates on current decorating/ assembly products and events, as well as helpful decorating/assembly Q&A.

DIGITAL CHOICES Visit plasticsdecorating.com for details and to subscribe to PD ENews. 52 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012


For Marketplace advertising, email gayla@petersonpublications.com.

April/May 2012 www.plasticsdecorating.com 53


C

CALENDAR

June

September

• SPE's Decorating & Assembly Division's Topical Conference, June 5-6, Indianapolis, IN, www.plasticsdecorating.com

• Labelexpo Americas 2012, September 11-13, Rosemont, IL, www.labelexpo-americas.com

• HBA Global Expo, June 19-21, New York City, NY, www.hbaexpo.com

October • SGIA EXPO, October 18-20, Las Vegas, NV, www.sgia.org • Pack Expo, October 28-31, Chicago, IL, www.packexpo.com

AD INDEX A.W.T. World Trade, Inc. .................................................................................. www.awt-gpi.com ............................................................................................... 8 Branson Ultrasonics .......................................................................................... www.bransonultrasonics.com ......................................................................... 51 CDigital Markets LLC ....................................................................................... www.grafixx.com ................................................................................................ 9 Central Decal ..................................................................................................... www.centraldecal.com ..................................................................................... 13 CFC International - an ITW Company .......................................................... www.cfcintl.com ............................................................................................... 49 Comdec, Inc. (Ruco) ......................................................................................... www.comdecinc.com ....................................................................................... 37 CPS Resources, Inc. ........................................................................................... www.cpsresourcesusa.com ................................................................back cover Die Stampco Inc. ............................................................................................... www.diestampco.com ...................................................................................... 35 Diversified Printing Techniques ...................................................................... www.diverprint.com ........................................................................................ 39 Extol, Inc. ............................................................................................................ www.extolinc.com ............................................................................................ 22 GPE Ardenghi .................................................................................................... www.gpeardenghi.it ......................................................................................... 15 HBA Global ........................................................................................................ www.hbaexpo.com ........................................................................................... 44 In-mold Graphic Solutions (Romo Durable Graphics)................................ www.romoinc.com ........................................................................................... 34 Industrial Pad Printing Supplies...................................................................... www.indpad.com or www.kentmexico.com ................................................. 31 Inkcups Now ...................................................................................................... www.inkcups.com ......................................................................................28, 29 Inland Label ....................................................................................................... www.inlandlabel.com ...................................................................................... 33 Innovative Digital Systems ............................................................................... www.innovativedigitalsystems.com .................................................back cover Largent Sales Group, LLC................................................................................. www.allieddecosystems.com .......................................................................... 45 Marabu North America .................................................................................... www.marabu-northamerica.com ................................................................... 25 Mimaki................................................................................................................ www.mimakiusa.com ...................................................................................... 11 Mold In Graphic Systems ................................................................................. www.tattooyourplastic.com .................................................. inside back cover OMSO North America, Inc.............................................................................. www.omso.com ................................................................................................ 32 Pad Print Machinery of Vermont .................................................................... www.padprintmachinery.com ..............................................inside front cover Pad Print Pros .................................................................................................... www.padprintpros.com ..................................................................................... 4 Pad Printers.com (Innovative Marking Systems).......................................... www.padprinters.com ...................................................................................... 19 Plasmatreat North America ............................................................................. www.plasmatreat.com ...................................................................................... 41 Proell, Inc............................................................................................................ www.proell.us ................................................................................................... 17 Ruco USA ........................................................................................................... www.rucousa.com ............................................................................................ 23 Sabreen Group, Inc. ........................................................................................... www.sabreen.com ............................................................................................ 40 Schwerdtle, Inc. .................................................................................................. www.schwerdtle.com ....................................................................................... 20 SGIA EXPO ........................................................................................................ www.SGIA.org ................................................................................................... 46 Sonics & Materials, Inc. .................................................................................... www.sonics.com ............................................................................................... 39 Standard Machines, Inc. (Comdec, Inc.) ........................................................ www.comdecinc.com ....................................................................................... 36 Taghleef Industries LLC.................................................................................... www.ti-films.com ............................................................................................. 21 TopCon ............................................................................................................... www.plasticsdecorating.com .......................................................................... 48 Trekk Equipment Group .................................................................................. www.trekkequipment.com .............................................................................. 43 United Silicone................................................................................................... www.unitedsilicone.com ................................................................................... 5 Webtech, Inc....................................................................................................... www.webtech-hts.com ..................................................................................... 25

54 www.plasticsdecorating.com April/May 2012