__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


ALL

ALMOST?

OR

GET CLEANING POWER EVERYWHERE...

NOT JUST HERE AND THERE.

ASACLEAN Purging Compound with POWER in Every Pellet

ORDINARY Purging Compounds with Isolated Active Ingredients

Make a COMMITMENT TO CLEANING your injection molding and extruders! The true diamond is ASACLEAN, the purging compound where 100% of the product is a true purging agent. When searching for a happy ending to cleaner machines, choose ASACLEAN for POWER IN EVERY PELLET. Visit www.asaclean.com or call 1(800) 787-4348 for a FREE sample

Power in every pellet Scan this code to watch “ASACLEAN – the Movie”

ASACLEAN is manufactured by Sun Plastech Inc., a subsidiary of Asahi Kasei Chemicals Corporation. Phone: (973)257-1999 • Email: sales@asaclean.com • Website: www.asaclean.com


Plastics Business

Strategies for Today’s Plastics Processors

Contents

profile

10

trends

strategies

18

36

features profile An American-Made Story at Intertech Plastics .................................... 10 trends Bringing STEM to Local Schools .......................................................... 18 solutions Simple Solutions with Auxiliary Equipment Solve Problems and Increase Productivity .................................................................... 26 industry Wage Survey Results Released for Plastics Processing Industry .......... 31 strategies Improving Machine and Process Efficiencies with Chemical Purge Compounds .............................................................................. 36 production The View from 30 Feet: Creating Accountable Teams .......................... 42 management The Real Truth about Safety: Creating a Culture of Buy-In ................... 43

departments director’s letter ..................6 product ............................16 association .......................32 advertisers .......................46

MAPP Benchmarking and Best Practices Conference ........................8

plasticsbusinessmag.com

4 | plastics business • summer 2013


Direct-Flo Gold Hot Runner Systems TM

I Proven Performance

SoftGate® Valve Pin Velocity Control I Unitized, Leak-Proof Reliability I Multi Zone Dual Heater Performance I Over 25 Gating Options I Exclusive Opti-Flo® Manifold Technology

INCOE® Hot Runner Systems DF Gold Systems offer proven performance advantages, reliability and cost effectiveness in the most demanding applications. With more than 50 years of in-field experience, our technology is supported globally with responsive technical expertise. That's INCOE® Hot Runner Performance. North America | Europe | Asia | South America INCOE® Corporation 1740 East Maple Road Troy, Michigan 48083 USA T: +1 (248) 616-0220 F: +1 (248) 616-0225 E: info@incoe.com

www.incoe.com


director’s letter

The $1,000 or $100,000 or $1,000,000 Idea – Are You Taking the Opportunity to Find It? Maria, my seventeen-year-old daughter, recently borrowed her grandfather’s bright yellow Volkswagen Beetle to go to a movie with her friends. Shortly after leaving, she returned home as the passenger window malfunctioned in the “down” position and thunderstorms were on the way. As she continually demonstrated to me, pushing the power window button produced a great deal of noise, but no window. Like most of the projects I tackle at home, my time guesstimate to solve this problem (about two hours) turned into a day-long event. Adding extra time and frustration were the facts that I did not have the correct tools to work on a German-engineered automobile and it was the first time that I had ever replaced a window regulator (at least I correctly diagnosed the problem)! After removing the door panel and all of the ancillary items like the car speakers, power door lock switch, lighting and other connectors, I found the tangle of twisted wires, broken nylon pulleys and other destroyed elements of the regulator. After three hours of trying to attach a small out-of-reach electrical connector, I was ready to throw in the proverbial towel. Maria hesitantly asked if I had tried to find a YouTube video on how to fix the problem. As I am sure many can imagine, her question was met with a tremendous lack of enthusiasm and a great bit of sarcasm. Seconds later, my seventeen-year-old began running a slowmotion video on her smartphone showing a mechanic reinstalling a window regulator on a Volkswagen Beetle. Simply unbelievable! Once seeing this, I was able to successfully install the connector and complete the project. Pushing the button now operates the window! Viewing the YouTube video saved me hours of time and energy and helped me to avoid the use of a mechanic, which significantly reduced my financial investment in the project – all from one simple idea! Innovation, new products, improved efficiencies and the successful reduction of waste are the end results of implementing new ideas. However, new ideas don’t “just happen.” Leading business executives understand that establishing a culture and allowing the time for new ideas to be generated are essential parts of improving profitability.

Manufacturers Association for Plastics Processors, Inc. (MAPP) 7321 Shadeland Station Way, Suite 285 Indianapolis, IN 46256 phone 317.913.2440 • fax 317.913.2445 www.mappinc.com MAPP Board of Directors President Kelly Goodsel, Viking Plastics Bill Bartlett, First American Plastics/Quad, Inc. Tom Boyd, Blow Molded Specialties Dan Cunningham, Parish Manufacturing Norm Forest, Dymotek Molding Technologies Matt Groleau, RJG, Inc. Lindsey Hahn, Metro Plastics Technologies Laurie Harbour, Harbour Results, Inc. Ben Harp, Polymer Conversions, Inc. Bob Holbrook, Viking Plastics James Krause, Microplastics, Inc. John Passanisi, PRD, Inc. Eric Paules, Crescent Industries Jeff Randa, PolyOne Distribution Alan Rothenbuecher, ICE Miller LLP Scott Titzer, Infinity CleanRoom Solutions Mike Walter, MET Plastics, Inc. Rick Walters, DeKalb Molded Plastics Roger Williams, Royer Corp.

Plastics Business

Strategies for Today’s Plastics Processors

Published by:

Over the last month, I’ve been contacted by MAPP Member company executives who’ve explained how their companies have positively changed because of ideas obtained from MAPP’s last benchmarking conference. One company actually implemented the 2-second lean program, a concept shared by Paul Akers of FastCap, resulting in a significant reduction in waste and an outburst of employee involvement in the company. Since new ideas generate from exchanging thoughts, experiences and “what if” scenarios with coworkers and industry peers, I can’t help but invite you to find your own $1,000,000 idea at MAPP’s upcoming Benchmarking and Best Practices Conference on Oct. 17-18 in Indianapolis, IN. With polymer processing executives from across the US in attendance, I will guarantee that teams of professionals will leave with great ideas and opportunities to improve their businesses. The ultimate question: What’s a great idea worth to you? Be assured that on the 17th and 18th of October, over 400 industry executives already will have answered that question by investing the time to attend the industry’s leading idea generation conference. They will be there to ensure that when they Push Play, something great really happens! See you in Indianapolis in October!

Troy Nix, Executive Director

6 | plastics business • summer 2013

Peterson Publications, Inc. 2150 SW Westport Dr., Suite 101 Topeka, KS 66614 phone 785.271.5801 www.plasticsbusinessmag.com Editor in Chief Jeff Peterson

Advertising/Sales Janet Dunnichay

Managing Editor Dianna Brodine

Contributing Editors Jen Clark Melissa DeDonder

Art Director Eric J. Carter

Circulation Manager Brenda Schell


Solutions that stick. Training that sticks. From the Leaders in Scientific Molding.

Mold Smart www.rjginc.com/training


psusssh

verb to thrust forward, to move beyond or expand

DAY ONE - October 17: 7:30 a.m.

Registration and Check-in

8:00 a.m.

PUSH PLAY Kick-off

8:30 a.m.

The Real Truth about Success: What the Top 1% Do Differently

9:30 a.m.

Grow Sales. Motivate Staff. Improve the Bottom-line.

11:00 a.m.

Industry Benchmarks and Trends Discussion

12:00 p.m.

Lunch

1:30 p.m.

In-Depth Rotating IGNITE Sessions

3:00 p.m.

Waste Reduction Forum

4:00 p.m.

Building a Culture that Exceeds the Present and Outlasts the Employees

5:00 p.m.

Networking Reception

DAY TWO - October 18: 8:00 a.m.

Peer-to-Peer Breakfast and Discussion

9:45 a.m.

Top 5 Operational Practices Your Company Must Adopt

10:30 a.m.

Manufacturing Today: Sustainability, Environmental Stewardship, and Lean Manufacturing

11:15 a.m.

Don’t Be a Statistic...BE THE CHANGE!

12:00 p.m.

2013 Benchmarking Conference Adjourned

FEATURED SPEAKERS: Garrison Wynn helps people make the jump from being great at what they do to developing the qualities it takes to be consistently chosen for the job. He gets them to understand why their products, services or leadership styles—or those of their competitors— are selected. As he says, “If the world agreed on what’s best, everybody would choose the best and nothing else would be considered. Decision making doesn’t work that way.” His presentations help people become more influential regardless of the circumstances. Tom Easterday is the Executive Vice President at Subaru of Indiana Automotive, Inc. (SIA) and serves as a member of the Board of Directors. SIA was the first automotive assembly plant in the U.S. to be ISO 14001 certified. Through innovative programs, SIA then achieved zero landfill status in May, 2004. In addition, SIA’s entire 832-acre site has been designated a Backyard Wildlife Habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. Tom will discuss trends in business management and what he feels small to mid-sized companies should be doing to enhance the profitability of their operations. “Reduce” is a key action word he will use to define opportunities in energy management, materials, and consumables.

Scan for more information or visit: www.benchmarkingconference.com

MA

Manufacturers Assoc


UNIQUE THIS YEAR: Learning from the successes of other manufacturing executives is one of the quickest methods of positively impacting your own operation. Improving on the success of the IGNITE sessions that were launched last year, attendees will have a unique opportunity this year to spend time rotating through a selection of IGNITE presentations that will be held simultaneously. These rapid fire exchange sessions delivered from your manufacturing peer group will cover a variety of different topics including but not limited to Building Waste Reduction Cultures, Wellness Plans to Reduce Insurance Costs, Business Continuity Planning for Emergencies, Lean and Employee Engagement Tactics, and more. During this quick hitting session, multiple presentations will be made in short bursts and immediately followed up by discussions to learn more. Attendees will have the opportunity to hear multiple presentations during this informative segment of the conference. ADDITIONALLY, attendees from past conferences have asked for more networking time. NEW this year is Peer-to-Peer Breakfast and Discussion, where attendees can share a meal with other individuals who are in their functional area while discussing key topics/issues.

Attend the Industry’s ONLY TRUE CONFERENCE for PROCESSORS Members $695/person Non-Members $995/person Register: www.benchmarkingconference.com or 317-913-2440

APP

Conference Information: JW Marriott Indianapolis 10 S. West Street Indianapolis, IN 46240 877-303-0104 $170 per person/per night

ciation for Plastics Processors

Space is limited - make reservations today!

Sponsored by:

pslsasy

noun the state of being active, operative, or relevant


profile

Intertech’s business model is based on providing turnkey solutions, believing that customers are looking for more than just molded parts – they are looking for products that are assembled, packaged, warehoused and distributed. by Dianna Brodine

T

his is, above all things, the story of American manufacturing. It’s a biography of an owner who believes in the resurgence of the manufacturing industry and who is eager to promote it in every sector at any time. It’s the tale of a company with employees who walk away from the plant each day believing that “I made that” is a reason to be proud. It’s an article about a man who grew up around people who made things and knew from an early age that he wanted that for his own life. This is the story of Intertech Plastics in Denver, CO.

Intertech Plastics, Inc. originally was founded as Container Industries by Noel Ginsburg in 1980. “My dad was in the food manufacturing business,” Ginsburg recalled, “so from the time I was five or six, I had worked in a factory setting.” Ginsburg anticipated a career in his father’s business, but when he was in college, his dad sold the business to Kellogg. “It was the right thing for him to do,” said Ginsburg, “but it’s also why I ended up in the plastics business and not the food manufacturing business!” At around the same time, while Ginsburg was attending the University of Denver and in his junior year, a local container molding plant was preparing to close. “I did a business plan as part of an extra credit class I was taking,” he said, “and I decided it had promise.”

10 | plastics business • summer 2013


profile

“When we bought the assets of this company,” said Ginsburg, “it only had 12 employees, and I didn’t know anything about molding. It was a heavy learning curve!” Because he grew up in a family that was involved in production, Ginsburg had general manufacturing knowledge, and a mentor helped him through the challenges of the first year. Still, ownership as a young Intertech was a stop on US Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker’s nationwide listening tour 20-something wasn’t easy. The container in July. The Secretary met with business and thought leaders, entrepreneurs and academics. industry changed rapidly as many of the company’s customers were bought out or moved out of the state. “In order to survive, we had to for fast food chain suppliers, a Traypak line of products still in diversify, which is how we got into custom molding,” Ginsburg production today. Further expansion into the consumer plastics explained. industry led Intertech to its current status as a high-volume producer of products such as totes, laundry baskets, plastic Expanding the product line drawer systems, baby products and mobile device cases. Container Industries originally produced four- and five-gallon paint and food containers. Expansion was on the menu with the The company is one of the largest molding and manufacturing development and addition of a one-gallon mayonnaise container companies in the Rocky Mountain region, with more than page 12 u

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 11


profile t page 11 200 employees and 50 presses, from 33 to 1,500 tons. Still, Ginsburg saw an additional opportunity to grow, and Intertech Plastics recently moved into the medical device market with the acquisition of Image Molding. “The company was a very well-run molder doing business with the big brands in the medical device industry,” Ginsburg explained. “It had brilliant engineering capabilities, but lacked some of the support systems that we already had in place, such as IT systems, sales staff and management personnel.” Although consumer products and medical devices Intertech offers decorating solutions, including pad printing, in-mold decorating, would not appear to be symbiotic, merging the two painting and part labeling. production types under one corporate umbrella has not been difficult. “The basic principles are the same,” he said. overall concentration both from a customer and an industry “The decoupled molding process and lean manufacturing perspective.” process applies through both facilities.” Ginsburg also is quick to point out that both production plants bring value to Providing solutions, not molded parts Intertech. “It’s not that we’re de-focusing on the industrial and Intertech’s business model is based on providing turn-key consumer product side of our business,” he said, “but it’s high- solutions, believing that customers are looking for more than volume, low-margin production. We wanted to diversify our just molded parts – they are looking for products that are assembled, packaged, warehoused and distributed. “So many of our value-added services, such as pad printing, assembly and fulfillment, are part of our vision to provide whole product solutions, rather than just plastic components,” explained Tim Nakari, senior account manager and marketing director at Intertech Plastics. Ginsburg elaborated, saying Intertech’s turn-key solution business model has been in development for more than a decade, but it just recently became a business focus. “It’s been driven by the reshoring of product from Asia,” he said. “Customers are telling us they’d like to bring production back from overseas, but they don’t have the systems in place to manage the supply chain anymore. If we’re able to supply an assembled plastic part that is decorated, packaged and ready for distribution, we can enter their supply chain at a time when China is losing its competitiveness. By providing a fully integrated solution, we become a vendor of choice.” Intertech plans to continue its aggressive approach, pursuing its competitive advantage as more US companies look to bring production back to American soil. “Many US molders can make the part, but they aren’t in a position to complete the package,” Ginsburg said. As major OEMs and entrepreneurs alike are realizing that their total cost of production no longer is lower when outsourcing overseas, Intertech has expanded capabilities with a variety of value-add methods including pad printing, assembly,

12 | plastics business • summer 2013

page 14 u


in•san•i•ty Doing the same thing over and over again, expecting different results. –Albert Einstein

Same precision molds, processes and machines giving you the same problems? Then stop the insanity and insist on MeltFlipper® for faster startups, higher productivity and lower cost.

Guaranteed.

Beaumontinc.com or (814) 899-6390.


profile t page 12

As major OEMs and entrepreneurs alike are realizing that their total cost of production no longer is lower when outsourcing overseas, Intertech has expanded capabilities with a variety of value-add methods including pad printing, assembly, packaging design, fulfillment, managed inventories and direct sales distribution. packaging design, fulfillment, managed inventories and direct sales distribution. “In fact, today, consumers are buying products online from Amazon.com and those products are shipping right out of Intertech Plastics,” said Ginsburg. This has provided the company with skill sets in packaging, sales and marketing that can be used in support of its customers while the company works to position itself for what Ginsburg believes is a bright future in manufacturing. “I was at the CGI America (Clinton Global Initiative) event in Chicago in June,” said Ginsburg, “and I was listening to a panel where one panel member said the US will be totally energyindependent within seven or eight years. That is a huge competitive advantage, and it means the macroeconomics in our industry are shifting.” Ginsburg cited a reshoring example that indicates others are seeing the shift: “One of the largest technology product manufacturers in the world is looking to build a new facility, and it’s looking to do it in the US. The company is doing it for a lot of reasons – to be closer to the market, certainly – but wouldn’t be doing it if the economics didn’t make sense.”

We made that

As part of its drive to succeed, Intertech Plastics currently is deploying lean manufacturing methods within its facilities. “It’s not a program,” Ginsburg said. “Instead, it changes the DNA of your business. It changes everything you do.” With process implementation beginning earlier this year, Ginsburg is convinced lean manufacturing can be a key factor in creating more jobs and strengthening US manufacturing. “I heard the head of the Toyota group speak about how if US manufacturers had embraced lean manufacturing 20 years ago, business never would have gone offshore at all,” he said. “Our future for the next 30 years really is up to us. We will create jobs, not just in manufacturing, but also in all the support systems that go along with it.” Ginsburg continued, “If there’s one thing this country needs, it’s good jobs.”

14 | plastics business • summer 2013

At Intertech Plastics, the goal is to be an efficient manufacturer that is responsible to its customers and its employees. “I think a big message to our stakeholders is that we can be competitive – we are competitive – and if we deploy scientific molding and lean manufacturing methods in our facilities, we will dominate,” Ginsburg said.

The company blog, written by Nakari and posted to the Intertech website, echoes the belief that American manufacturing is rising in strength. A recent entry goes further, encouraging its employees’ and customers’ pride in US-made products. “…what’s really special is to be a part of something here at Intertech Plastics. We can talk all day about the numbers behind why programs are moving back to the US, and we can speculate about all of the risks with sourcing in China – all reasons that compel us to mold and manufacture here in the States. However, it’s quite another thing to actually see it happening – the ability to see the tools, touch the products and speak to the people actually working on the programs – and then walk through a store in the midst of all the madein-China products and be able to say, ‘Hey, see that part? We made that. In Denver.’ This reshoring thing you keep reading about is real, and seeing it first-hand really is something to be proud of.” “Our employees have a tremendous amount of pride in the products they produce,” said Ginsburg. “There are three passions we talk about relative to our mission of molding a better world, and we share them with all employees regularly. First is passion for our customers’ products; second is passion for sustained economic growth and third is our passion for community and employee development.” For Ginsburg, it’s important that Intertech’s employees understand how their efforts in the plant lead to better products in stores and in hospitals, which will, in turn, enrich someone’s life – and their own. “Their involvement in the production process enables them to support and grow their own family, in a career path they can build upon,” said Ginsburg. “When we talk about our mission of molding a better world, it’s one part, one person and one community at a time. Being able to say, ‘We made that’, or ‘We built that’ is a big motivator.”


profile

Community involvement coincides with marketing and mission

This commitment to employee and community growth is core to the values of Intertech Plastics. Over the years, Intertech has been involved in outreach initiatives with at-risk or rehabilitation programs and more formal charities such as United Way. “We’re actively involved in the community,” said Ginsburg, “which is an important part of our values and also has a side benefit of marketing our company.” He cited a longterm involvement working within the classrooms at local schools and his chairmanship of the United Way campaign. “These efforts not only benefit the area in which we live, but also expose Intertech to a lot of companies, both locally and nationally,” he said. Recently, Ginsburg was involved in the creation of the Colorado Advanced Manufacturing Alliance to modernize manufacturing, become more competitive and create jobs in the state. As a result, Intertech was a stop on US Secretary

of Commerce Penny Pritzker’s nationwide listening tour in July. The Secretary met with business and thought leaders, entrepreneurs, academics and Department of Commerce employees, according to a press release, to hear about their priorities, concerns and ideas on how the public and private sectors can work together to strengthen the economy and create American jobs. “I view these things as our industry responsibility,” said Ginsburg, “but as a result of Secretary Prizker’s visit, we had 12 to 15 hits in newspapers and trade magazines. The side benefit of doing the right things for our community and for the manufacturing industry is that the visibility we receive as a result builds our credibility and our brand, which makes us a stronger company.” Intertech has created a business model where products can be produced competitively in the United States while employing American workers. “The cool thing about manufacturing is at the end of the day, we made something,” said Ginsburg. “We make stuff that makes a difference and in the process, we create good jobs. I think that’s our responsibility for our community and our country.” n

How the Best Injection Molders Make Money

Get our latest eye-opening DVD that will reveal the insider secrets of the top 20% injection molders in the country. Youʼll learn the TRUE cost of a reject part (more than you think), what just one extra second of cycle time really costs you and the real costs of unplanned downtime. Call today for your FREE DVD.

Learn more at paulsontraining.com

800.826.1901

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 15


product

IQMS Amplifies MES Offerings, Adds Mobile Options A new Process Monitoring Interface Unit (PMIU) Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) from IQMS, a software developer in Paso Robles, CA, controls or monitors process variables on the shop floor. A multitude of sensors are available on the PMIU88 OEM PLC, including thermocouples, pressure transducers and linear potentiometers and digital inputs that communicate directly to the IQMS RealTime™ Process Monitoring system for control and SPC analysis. It is shipped complete with i-TRiLOGI ladder + BASIC software and a built-in Ethernet port with onboard web server. Additionally, IQMS has delivered extended ERP and MES functionality to mobile platforms. Six new mobile apps have been released as part of the initiative. The mobile apps are compatible on all Android devices, such as tablets and smartphones, as well as IQMS’ proprietary shop floor control device, the RTStation. The Mobile Application Manager allows customers to track, assign and organize their app licenses for any IQMS-supported device, then freely reorganize them when different needs arise. The new mobile applications are compatible with the EnterpriseIQ 2012 SP1 release and later. For more information, call 805.227.1122 or visit www.iqms.com.

Stratasys to Provide 3D Printers to UPS Stores The Stratasys uPrint SE Plus system, from Stratasys Ltd., Minneapolis, MN, has been chosen for a pilot program at the UPS Store, making UPS Store the first national retailer in the US to offer 3D printing service to entrepreneurs, architects, startups and other retail customers. This service will enable UPS Store customers to have their 3D design printed on-site. Stratasys 3D printers can create on-demand, custom objects of virtually any complexity in a fast and simple process. While the program is aimed at small businesses, it is open to anyone interested in trying out 3D printing services. Following the launch of the test, retail customers will be able to bring a Computer Aided Design (CAD) file to participating UPS Store locations and have their 3D design printed on-site. The UPS Store is installing the printers in six test locations, beginning in San Diego. For more information, call 877.489.9449 or visit www.stratasys.com.

New Portable Chillers from Conair Include More Standard Features Two new lines of portable chillers from The Conair Group, Cranberry Township, PA, deliver precise temperature control for plastics processing applications. They also include standard features such as microprocessor control boards with lifetime exchange programs; long-life micro switches in place of bubble switches; insulated polyethylene reservoirs with removable tops for easy cleaning; cleanable shell-and-tube condensers on water-cooled models; process-water Y-strainers that protect against evaporator contamination; and heavy-duty cabinet enclosures and casters. Designed and built for use with non-ozonedepleting refrigerants, these new EarthSmart™ chillers are environmentally friendly. EP1 Series portable chillers are designed for oneto three-ton applications, while the EP2 Series includes chillers from four- to 43-tons. Both ranges include air-cooled, water-cooled and remote-condenser models. The water circuits on both models, including evaporator, pump, reservoir and piping, are made of non-ferrous materials to resist corrosion. Optional PLC controls have a touch-sensitive operator interface with system information and alarms presented in clear descriptive text instead of lights and codes. Built-in help screens always are available for troubleshooting. For more information, call 724.584.5500 or visit www.conairgroup.com.

16 | plastics business • summer 2013


product

Husky Expands Altanium Family with Launch of Delta3 Husky Injection Molding Systems, Bolton, Ontario, Canada, has added the Altanium Delta3™ to its line of hot runner temperature controllers. Bridging the gap between the functionality of the existing Neo2™ and Matrix™ controllers, Delta3 offers an integrated, intelligent platform for two- to 128-zones of control and helps customers achieve increased part quality and improved uptime. It is equipped with a variety of enhanced features to improve operational efficiency. With its more intelligent, intuitive feature set, Delta3 has advanced monitoring capability to further eliminate the risk of bad parts entering the downstream process. Husky’s fully integrated line of Altanium™ temperature controllers are recognized throughout the industry for accuracy, ease-of-use and flexibility. All Altanium controllers use Active Reasoning Technology, providing optimized control for greater shot-to-shot and cavity-to-cavity consistency and repeatability. For more information, call 905.951.5000 or visit www.husky.ca.

IMS Company Introduces Air-Cooled Circulator The IMS Hydra Air-Cooled Circulator from IMS Company, Chagrin Falls, OH, doesn’t require an external water source, making it mobile, efficient and cost-effective for companies with a limited or expensive water supply. Its cost-saving features include eliminating external water, sewer and cooling tower costs. The circulator uses a copper and aluminum finned tube heat exchanger with a large fan to cool a circulated water and glycol mixture. The use of glycol eliminates corrosion to expensive tools and molds. It has a stainless steel pump, heating element and tank. In addition, it comes with an automatic low fluid level electrical shut-off capability to protect the pump and heater, a solid state PID temperature controller that enables accuracy up to ±1° F and an 11-gauge, welded, 12-gallon stainless steel reservoir. Equipped with a 9kW heating element, the new circulator is available in 230/60/3 or 460/60/3. For more information, call 800.537.5375 or visit www.imscompany.com.

CPT Now Offers WETEC Products Cincinnati Process Technologies, a Cincinnati, OH, supplier of machinery, parts and services to the plastics molding industry, now offers a full line of part-extracting, insertloading and material-handling robots, as well as sprue pickers, PET cooling and in-mold labeling systems from We-Technology Automation Company of Taiwan. WETEC products are designed to improve efficiency and reduce labor by precisely performing repetitive tasks. WETEC uses recognized global component manufacturers (THK bearings, Delta servo motors) to ensure reliability and reduce maintenance. CPT is the sole North American distributor of WETEC’s line of robots and automation systems, but also sells and services the Asian Plastic Machinery line of injection molding equipment and provides service, parts and retrofits for most other injection molding machines. For more information, call 513.405.7240 or visit www.cincprotech.com/machinery/robotics. n

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 17


Micro Mold Co., Inc. and Plastikos, Inc. of Erie, PA, are committed to encouraging and developing student interest in the high-tech manufacturing trades.

An influx of youth with a passion for making things is needed, and three MAPP Member companies are working with their local school systems to make it happen.

T

he plastics industry news has been filled with dire predictions about the future of manufacturing without large-scale investments into the education of skilled labor to replace the aging boomer generation. Countless articles have decried the lackluster attitude of young people – and, just as important, that of their parents and school counselors – toward manufacturing as a career path. Yet, an influx of youth with a passion for making things is needed, and three MAPP Member companies are working with their local school systems to make it happen.

Educating the future of Erie Plastikos, Inc. and its sister company, Micro Mold Co., Inc., Erie, PA, are watching as a long-extinct program is slowly coming to life. In years past, tool and die programs existed at both Central Tech and the local County Skill Center/Vocational Training Center. Both schools saw those programs cancelled for a few years due to lack of enrollment, but the help of local manufacturing companies has stirred life into the curriculum, with the County program re-starting a few years ago and the Central Tech program beginning just this year. Students involved with the manufacturing programs have the opportunity to learn blueprint reading, measurement techniques and machine safety. The County program also incorporates on the job experience with a co-op program that is available to the students in their senior year. During the co-op experience, students take classes at the high school in the morning and work in an industry for three hours a day each afternoon. Ryan Katen, general manager of Micro Mold, is on the advisory board for the County program, along with representatives from up to 10 different companies. The advisory committee works to steer the curriculum and help the instructors understand the challenges of the manufacturing community. By working together, the program hopes to set students on a path to lifelong success. “The trades serve an important purpose in setting students up for a successful career,” he said. “Whether they become plumbers, electricians or tool makers, they will have the chance to earn a nice wage.” “Enrollment still is a challenge, especially at the County school,” Katen explained.

by Dianna Brodine A lack of excitement about the machining trade caused the schools to focus on the technology, such as CNC machines, to increase attendance. Katen believes that focus

18 | plastics business • summer 2013

page 20 u


To

NT PP OU MA SC / DI om R s .c BE Doc EM g M olin

“Before ToolingDocs came in, we averaged 15 unscheduled mold stops per week. Now we’re down to about 8. In six months that saves us around $25,000 in mold downtime. This has been a solid improvement for productivity.” Chris Gedwed Operations Manager CSI, Oxnard, CA

Call to discuss how our proven training system allows you to: ■ Improve overall tool cavity efficiency ■ Reduce unscheduled mold stoppages ■ Reduce spare component inventory

Mold Maintenance Principles I & II

Toolroom Manager Certification

Component Repair Certification

ToolingDocs Video Tour Available

From beginners to veterans, a standardized training curriculum to develop effective, systematized mold maintenance skills.

Learn the latest approaches for shop floor layout, documentation advancement, cleaning technology selection and staff development.

Learn the latest methods for reworking common tool component issues utilizing techniques such as Laser and TIG Welding, Brazing, and more.

Learn from ToolingDocs’ Attendees how Certification Training can help streamline mold maintenance processes and increase efficiencies.

www.toolingdocs.com

1-800-257-8369


trends t page 18 has hurt the student and the local manufacturing community. “It’s difficult to train these students to meet everyone’s needs,” he said, “but by focusing on the technology, the students aren’t learning some of the skill sets that are needed.” Still, Katen said, Plastikos and Micro Mold are committed to keeping the programs afloat. “Whenever there’s a new class, we’ve given tours of both companies. I try to show them the cool things that are going on in the shop and that we have a nice environment with good technology. It’s good for them to see the equipment being used in the real world.” In addition, Katen’s dad will be working with the city school this coming year. “The city school has more than 20 students in the class, so he’ll be working with the instructor one or two days a week to help out with their labs,” he said. “Dad likes teaching people how to be a toolmaker.” Micro Mold has seen the beginnings of positive results, particularly in the form of a student who graduated from the County program and now is installed as an apprentice at Micro Mold. “I hope we can add to the program by helping to place students,” Katen explained. “We need young people, and the industry needs young people. The tooling industry is aging, and in 10-15 years, there will be a critical need.”

Bright students in Buffalo In Orchard Park, NY, a Buffalo suburb, a national organization called Academy of Finance (AoF) provides an opportunity to introduce manufacturing and engineering to a group of the region’s brightest students. Polymer Conversions, Inc. has been involved with AoF for five years, coming to the program after a board member approached Ben Harp, COO for Polymer Conversions.

“so I review resumes and then my staff and I – usually three of us – sit in a room and interview the students. It starts polishing some of those skills.” Once the interview process is complete, the students rank the companies in order of their preferences for internship, and the companies rank the students as well. Two students are matched to each company for a two-week internship. The students begin their internships in mid-July, and prior to their arrival, Harp meets with Polymer Conversions’ directors to create an internship experience that meets the minimum requirements. “We allow for basic intern functions, like filing and other administrative tasks, but I don’t allow more than 20 percent of their time to be taken with tasks like those,” explained Harp. “We try to actively engage them in ongoing projects that have real value for the company.” At Polymer Conversions, the AoF interns are involved in projects that can range from event set-up and marketing activities to mold cleaning and tool room organization. Interns often are invited to sit in on planning discussions and attend off-site meetings at customer facilities. Providing a meaningful experience for the interns has been key to the success of the program at Polymer Conversions, which frequently finds itself ranked as one of the top internship experiences by the students. “Is it always easy to make the time for junior students in high school? No,” Harp said. “The only negative thing about the program is taking the time to set up the structure to pull it off the right way, but we’ve found that engaging the students fully and making them part of providing a solution has been favorable all around.”

“In March of every year, I attend an orientation at the high school for about 40 participating juniors,” Harp explained. “These students elect to go into the program their freshman year, which specifies a certain curriculum and additional activities that must be accomplished each year.” These activities include resume preparation and 100+ hours of internship during their junior year.

Because the internship program can be time-intensive for the employees who work directly with the students, Harp admits that employee buy-in initially was an issue. “The first year, I could feel the resistance with employees, but I insisted we do it,” he said. “Once the employees were working with the kids directly, they realized that the interns were very passionate about adding value and learning from them. People, in general, like to mentor someone else, and my employees quickly saw the satisfaction in helping cultivate someone else’s growth.”

At the March orientation, 20 companies introduce their organizations to the AoF students and discuss the internship experience. The students then introduce themselves to company representatives and an interview process begins. As a part of developing their professional skills, the students are required to interview with three companies. “Part of the process is preparing these kids for their professional lives,” said Harp,

Of the 10 interns that Polymer Conversions has hosted, all were offered an opportunity to remain at the company to complete additional projects or production work. Nine have taken advantage of that offer, and six of those students currently are working at Polymer Conversions while attending college. Several of the students have chosen curriculum paths that will lead them into engineering or the medical field.

20 | plastics business • summer 2013


“The program is designed to build business leaders,” Harp said, “and exposing them to our industry early in their careerdecision process has yielded positive results for Polymer Conversions.”

Challenging the youth of Chicago With President Paul Ziegenhorn at the helm, Matrix Tooling, Inc./Matrix Plastic Products, Wood Dale, IL, has been working to advance education in STEM at the high school for years. “I’ve been on a number of advisory councils with area high schools,” Ziegenhorn explained. “You get to meet the teachers, administrators and students, and you have an opportunity to weigh in and refute the ‘push’ against manufacturing.” As part of those efforts, Ziegenhorn and Matrix have partnered with the local technical high school to introduce the tooling trade to a new generation. According to the school’s website, Austin Polytechnical Academy was founded by the Chicago Manufacturing Renaissance Council in 2007 to educate the next generation of leaders in advanced manufacturing. Students learn about careers in all aspects of the industry, from skilled production and engineering to management and company ownership – plus related sectors like intellectual property law. Matrix is one of 60 companies that signed on to support the school. Erica Swinney is the program director for Manufacturing Renaissance, a 501(c)3 organization formed to look at manufacturing’s viability and its importance in community development, and has been instrumental in setting up the program at Austin PolyTech. “In 2005, the Chicago Manufacturing Renaissance Council brought together business, labor, local government and education. We needed to find a way to reconnect the education system to these career pathways in advanced manufacturing. Educators and manufacturers were brought together to design what a high school would need to look like, and the result has been Austin Polytech.” Bill Vogel, industrial coordinator at Austin Polytechnical Academy, explained that, among other curriculums, the school facilitates a 10-week course of study in Manufacturing Science, a work-based learning program where the student has the opportunity to apply theory learned in math class to a real object in the machine shop. “We’re giving the individual student the opportunity to actually make something,” said Vogel, “and also providing a mentoring experience that puts young people in touch one on one with an adult who has experience in manufacturing.” page 22 u


trends

Proven Cool

Leadership Advanced Cooling System Internet Monitoring • Reduced downtime and maintenance • Real-time service and troubleshooting • Powerful remote control of a full array of systems

Learn more at

www.frigel.com/na 847.540.0160

WE PROVIDE PRACTICAL ADVICE TO THE PLASTICS INDUSTRY. Your goals are our top priority, which is why Ice Miller attorneys with plastics industry experience can meet your greatest legal challenges. For more information, contact H. Alan Rothenbuecher at 216-394-5075 or har@icemiller.com. Chicago ∙ Cleveland ∙ Columbus DuPage County, Ill. ∙ Indianapolis ∙ Washington, D.C. www.icemiller.com

22 | plastics business • summer 2013

t page 21 Ziegenhorn believes the school makes a positive impact simply by exposing students to an alternative path in education. “Not every kid is cut out for a four-year degree, but they may be gifted mechanically,” he said. “This school is on the west side of Chicago in a neighborhood where the kids are coming from homes that may not be ideal grounds for learning. The public/ private partnership to get manufacturing and other programs off the ground has been instrumental in exposing these kids to a career option that they might not have been exposed to otherwise.” Swinney and Ziegenhorn both pointed out that working within a large school system has challenges, especially when trying to implement curriculum changes. “This career program was made possible because before the school, there was a coalition of people who were passionate about manufacturing and teaching the new generation. It was critical to removing obstacles,” said Swinney. Austin Polytech recently graduated its third class, with 30 students in the manufacturing program. Ziegenhorn and one of his business partners attended the graduation and a reception that was held for the program partners. “The administrators and faculty talked about what Matrix and the other manufacturing companies had accomplished by supporting the program, and it was nice to meet some of the graduates, too,” he said. “We are in the process of replicating the Manufacturing Renaissance Council in other areas,” explained Swinney, “including New York, Detroit, Baltimore, Mobile and the San Francisco Bay Area. The challenge is finding the right mix of advocates. The school is impossible unless you have leadership from the highest levels of education, manufacturing and labor. You need champions who see that this is more than skills training. It’s also about leadership development.” Matrix also has thrown its support behind other programs to help the trade. “The Tooling and Manufacturing Association (TMA) has a manufacturing summer camp – two weeks for eight hours a day – and students spend the mornings in class gaining skills for NIMS credentials,” explained Ziegenhorn. “The camp includes a tour of a member company’s facilities, and we have 30 kids coming through here each summer.” Ziegenhorn said the tour begins in the design area to give the students an idea of what products are made at Matrix, and then the students tour the tooling, molding and inspection areas. “It’s a good interaction between the student and the working world,” he said, “and if it nets them a job afterwards, that’s not something everyone their age can say. As a matter of fact, we’ve hired a couple of apprentices that way.”


trends

Advancing the STEM Agenda The manufacturing industry is not alone in its interest in promoting STEM to youth; the educational community also has taken note of the need. In June, a conference on STEM education convened on the campus of Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, MI. The event was sponsored by the university’s Seymour and Esther Padnos College of Engineering and Computing and the ASQ (American Society for Quality) Education Division.

According to the event website: The need for more scientists and engineers in the workplace has never been greater for increasing innovation and economic growth. This need is driving the intense interest in the Advancing the STEM Agenda. If you are involved with STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) initiatives to increase interest and prepare high school students for college STEM majors, to recruit and retain students as STEM majors or mentor them into their STEM careers as scientists, STEM technicians and engineers, plan to attend this conference. You will have time to network and participate in the discussion of ideas for improving engineering and STEM education. You will have the opportunity to take back to your schools, colleges and universities, communities and corporations the latest ideas on improving STEM initiatives and implementing successful collaboration among stakeholders. Our conference is unique: its objective is to network and blend ideas on quality and continuous improvement with the latest research and best practices related to STEM initiatives. Cindy Veenstra, Ph.D., was the conference co-chair for the event. “I am the immediate past chair for the ASQ Education Division,” she explained. “Our membership includes K-12 educators, faculty, professors and deans in universities and also people in industry who either are really interested in supporting education outreach efforts or are involved in workforce development.” The conference has had four tracks – K-12 STEM, which focuses on preparing students to be STEM majors; a higher education track that aims to improve teaching and learning at the university level; a track on developing partnerships in industry; and track that works to find ways to get more students into the STEM pipeline, particularly women and minorities.

“The 2013 conference was themed around collaboration with industry,” said Veenstra. “We wanted to discuss success stories, particularly co-ops and internships, as well as K-12 outreach.” Conference sessions included a panel discussion on industry initiatives to prepare STEM professionals, with participation from Dow Chemical, NASA Johnson Space Center, GE Aviation Systems and others; presentations base on peer-reviewed papers on teaching lean Six Sigma, aviation-themed camps to engage middle school girls, promoting STEM education through the Ford High School science and technology programs; and a discussion on balancing the needs of industry and academia. Veenstra believes that many schools today are looking for industry partners, and that the benefits are numerous for the students and the company. “If we want students to have more 21st century skills, companies need to develop a relationship with the local school system so work situations can be brought into the school. Inspiring and keeping students in the pipeline is a process, so inspiring them with classroom discussion in middle and high school is essential, but we also need to provide internships to keep students inspired and engaged into their college years. In return, students return to their studies more motivated and may become future employees.” Veenstra suggested steps as simple as volunteering engineers to participate in a career day, which most schools have even at the elementary level. Engineers also could come into science classes at the high school level to discuss college coursework and career options. She added, “A more involved approach could include working with a group of teachers on an industrybased project that could be brought into the classroom.” Quoting the 2012 President’s Council of Advisors in Science and Technology report, “Engage to Excel,” Veenstra said that in the next 10 years, one million more STEM graduates will be needed. “That sets up a very broad image of how serious this problem is,” she said. “Industry wants to see more college graduates with 21st century workforce development skills, including better communication, teamwork approaches, adaptability and problem-solving. The conference was designed to take a step toward addressing those needs.” All 30 of the peer-reviewed papers presented at the conference are available online to interested readers. Follow the QR code. n

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 23


Industry Insight. World-Class Laboratories. Exceptional Value. You have change-over challenges. We have proven LusinÂŽ purge compounds that utilize a completely new approach: They release the bond of colors and residues at a molecular level, far superior to currently available chemical or mechanical purges that are less effective and may damage equipment. Our purge compounds safely and effectively remove color, residue and carbonization build-up for an efficient transition to a new material or color and longer periods of trouble-free operation. Each year, we spend thousands of hours on the floors of thermoplastic processing shops, giving our technical and manufacturing experts unmatched insight into the toughest production challenges. In our world-class, industry-dedicated laboratories, we apply this insight to developing solutions that improve your operational efficiency.


Our products make it a solution. Our insight and technical knowledge make it a value.


solutions

Simple Solutions with Auxiliary Equipment Solve Problems and Increase Productivity I

n today’s challenging economic climate, you probably are looking for ways to improve productivity, save energy and solve problems. Well, there are plenty of companies out there – Conair included – that have new equipment and new technology available to make your plant the model of modern efficiency. But what if you don’t have the budget to say, “Out with the old and in with the new?” Aren’t there ways to make significant improvements without spending a lot of money? The answer is a definite “yes.” Here are several ideas for getting big results with a minimal investment. SITUATION: We’ve added new equipment, including additional vacuum receivers. Now, however, our vacuum pumps seem to be running constantly and still they can’t keep all the receivers filled. Machines sometimes are shutting down for lack of material. Do I need to expand or replace my material-handling system? What’s my simplest option? SOLUTION: Switch some or all of your older, smaller receivers to larger-capacity receivers (Figure 1). Your central vacuum pumps won’t have to cycle as often to refill the larger receivers. This will increase capacity and save wear and tear on your pump, too. For instance, if you have a 5hp pump conveying to 0.5-ft3 (14-liter) receivers

by Doug Brewster The Conair Group Doug Brewster is the conveying product manager for The Conair Group. He joined Conair in 1987 as a systems engineer and has held a series of progressively more responsible positions, including bulk-system product manager, project manager, national accounts manager, regional manager and national sales manager. For more information, call 724.584.5425, email dbrewster@conairgroup.com, or visit www.conairgroup.com.

Figure 1

over a maximum of 100ft (30.5m), your system will have a maximum conveying capacity of 3,600lb/hr (1,636kg/hr). However, if you had 1.0-ft3 (28-liter) receivers, your system (with the same pump and other equipment) would have a conveying capacity of 4,400 lb/hr (2,000 kg/hr)… a 22-percent increase. So, if you need a little more capacity and don’t want to invest in another pump, dust collector and all the other controls and equipment needed to expand an existing system into two separate systems, consider getting a few larger receivers and gain capacity that way. While you are at it, consider buying a valve for the pumps (such as an Idle Mode Valve or Vacuum Relief Valve) so they won’t need to be shut down completely between loading cycles, which saves energy (Figure 2 on page 27). When a pump starts, it

26 | plastics business • summer 2013


solutions

SITUATION: Lately, we’ve been running a lot more regrind. Re-using product scrap allows greater material utilization and incorporating post-consumer scrap helps us meet environmental responsibility objectives. But the lighter weight regrind can be difficult to handle and the dust forces us to do a lot more loader maintenance.

draws far more current than is required to keep it running. By allowing the pump to continue running between loading cycles, the high in-rush current demand is eliminated, which reduces energy costs; wear and tear on the starter, motor and blower are reduced, which extends service life; and the instantaneous conveying rate is improved by eliminating start-up time.

SOLUTION: Consider purchasing applicationspecific loaders designed for conveying dusty regrind (Figure 3 on page 28). Conventional loaders with screens work very well with virgin pellets, but when conveying regrind, they can become laden with accumulated dust, decreasFigure 2 ing the performance of your conveying system. A filterless loader uses a patented continuous reversal of vacuum air that provides dramatic air/material separation without relying on screen filtration, so it can handle all types of materials, including regrind. Filterless loaders can convey dusty materials and free-flowing powder larger than 100 microns in diameter. page 28 u

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 27


solutions t page 27 If you are using fluffy film scrap and combining it with virgin pellets in a blender, consider retrofitting one of the blender hoppers with a flow-inducing auger. Lightweight film and sheet flake can bridge in the hopper so that none drops into the weigh bin and the regrind hopper acts as if it were empty even though it is not. The flow inducer keeps material moving while the blender is metering, ensuring consistent flow of material and less down time. SITUATION: Most of our material is delivered in bulk via railcar or truck, and we have a chronic problem with long, thin threads of plastic that gum up the filters in our loaders. Would filterless loaders help in this situation?

Figure 3

To make sure you are getting the proper ratio of regrind to virgin, consider purchasing a ratio valve with an independent control that can be retrofit to any loader even if your existing control does not have a ratio-loading feature.

Fingerprints can’t touch it

Mold Shield Rust Peventive. Goes on dry. Immediate, 2-year protection. Won’t bleed out at startup. And, of course, it neutralizes fingerprint acids. Get a free trial sample at www.slideproducts.com

©2012 Slide Products Inc.

Get trial samples at www.SlideProducts.com 1-800-323-6433

28 | plastics business • summer 2013

SOLUTION: Filterless loaders might help, but you don’t want to have to replace all your conventional receivers, do you? What you are referring to is called “angel hair” and it is created when plastic is conveyed at high speeds from one location to another. This even can occur in the plastics manufacturing plant, before it is shipped to you. As the plastic travels through conveying lines, pellets smear onto the walls of the tubing. They build up and eventually break off, creating small streamers that look like strands of hair. You can install an angel hair remover or trap that filters them out as pellets are conveyed from the silo, but the best idea is to prevent it from forming in the first place. When material is re- Figure 4 ceived, limit railcar/ truck unloading pressures to 6.5psi maximum (Figure 4). It’s a good idea to place a sign at the connection point on the silo warning personnel not to exceed the maximum 6.5psi unloading pressure from the bulk trucks. You also can use conveying tubes with spiral grooves or “rifling,” which greatly reduce or eliminate the creation of streamers. Use high-wear elbows in the bends of the tubing to eliminate streamer buildup in these areas. SITUATION: We’ve been running higher throughputs on some of our molding machines, and some of our drying hoppers aren’t big enough to allow the residence time recommended by the material supplier. That may be why we occasionally have


solutions

quality problems that seem to be moisture-related. Do we need to buy new dryers? SOLUTION: If it is only a matter of residence time and the existing dryer has enough airflow to handle the higher volumes, you simply need a bigger hopper. And an easy and inexpensive way to increase capacity is to add an extension on the top of your existing hopper (Figure 5). If, on the other hand, you also are limited by the airflow capacity of the dryer itself, you may need to try something else. If there is a spare dryer, why not consider Figure 5

to check the next loader, and the next and so on. If the loader on your blender bin is not quite ready to request material when the system queries its control, it will move on to query other loaders on the system. Let’s say that, coincidentally, there are 10 other loaders on the circuit that request material before the controller can again query the loader on your blender. It may be five or 10 minutes before the system gets back to your blender loader. That’s more than enough time for the loader and blender bin to empty completely and for the blender to alarm for lack of material. This really can be maddening because it only happens when multiple loaders on the system call for material after the loader on the blender has been polled. There are control systems that allow you to give priority to certain loaders over others, but a simple solution is to add a high-hat extension between the loader and the blender bin. The bin now holds more material so, when the loader calls for a refill, there will be more material remaining in the blender and it will have the capacity to continue feeding even if it has to wait a long time to be filled again.

using it to pre-dry the material for a couple of hours before you convey it into the primary dryer? Running the two dryers in tandem (Figure 6) can provide added capacity in a pinch.

SITUATION: Occasionally, our vacuum system overfills a receiver and material backs up into the flex hoses at the machine. Why does this happen and what can we do to prevent this situation?

SITUATION: Every once in a while, some of our blenders will alarm for lack of material, even though they have been properly sized for the application and are connected to a central loading system that we know is operating properly. There doesn’t seem to be any rhyme or reason to it. It just seems to happen sometimes and not others.

SOLUTION: It sounds like the vacuum pump is running longer than is necessary to fill the receiver, and this can happen occasionally when the control of the pump is time-based. This can happen if an operator incorrectly sets the pump to run too long, but it also can happen by mistake when you change material sources. Some materials, like urethanes, are more difficult to convey and so the pump needs to run longer to fill the receiver. Then, if you switch to a material that flows more easily and don’t reset the fill time, the pump could overfill the receiver. The same thing can happen if you switch from material stored in an outdoor silo to material in a gaylord near the machine. Because of the distance between the silo and the receiver, you may need a fill time of 25 seconds. However, since the gaylord is right next to the machine, a fill time of seven seconds may be all that is needed. If you don’t change the pump timer when you begin drawing material from the gaylord, the pump will continue to run for 25 seconds and overfill the receiver.

SOLUTION: Your problem probably is not in your blender, but in the loader on top of whatever bin is alarming and in the central loading system control. Most of these loading systems are designed to poll each loader on the pump circuit sequentially. When a loader indicates it requires filling, the system will convey material to that loader before moving on

The solution is simple: make sure to reset the pump timer every time you change material sources. Or, if you don’t want to have to worry about that, you can add a fill sensor to your receivers. When the sensor recognizes that the receiver is full, it overrides the time-based control and signals the pump to stop conveying. n

Figure 6


Amco Polymers

Providing Resin Solutions Since 1955

www.amcopolymers.com

Amalloy® clear & specialty polymers Color Concentrates Dry Color Anti Microbial Compounds Anti Counterfeiting Compounds Track & Trace Technology

DuraStar® Injection Copolyesters Eastar® Injection/Extrusion Copolyesters Tritan® Copolyesters Provista® Flexible Extrusion Copolyesters Eastalloy® Cristal®

Acrylite® Acrylic Compounds Acrylite Plus® Impact Acrylic Compounds Cyrex® Super Impact PC/Acrylic Cyrovu HP2® Acrylic Compounds XT Polymer® Medical Acrylic ECHO ® Recycled Polypropylene ECHO ® Recycled Polyethylene ECHO ® Recycled Filled PP HYBRID PC Alloys HYLAC ® ABS HYLEX Polycarbonate HYLON ® Nylon 6 HYLON ® Nylon 66 HYLOX PBT HYRIL SAN HYSUN ® ASA

Ultrason® Polysulfone / Polyethersulfone Ultramid® Nylon 6 & 66 Ultradur® PBT Ultraform® ACETAL

Iupilon® Polycarbonate Iupital® Copolymer Acetal Iupiace® Modified PPE

Luran® SAN Luran S® ASA, ASA/PC Styrolux® Clear SBS Copolymer Terblend N® ABS / Nylon Blend Terluran® ABS Terlux® Clear ABS (MABS) NAS® Acrylic Copolymer STYROSUN® UV Resistant PS ZYLAR® Impact Modified NAS

Technyl® FR Polyamide Technyl A® Nylon 66 Polyamide Technyl B® Nylon 66/6 Polyamide Technyl C® Nylon 6 Polyamide Technyl Star® High Flow Nylon

CaCO3 Calcium Carbonate concentrates Siloxane® Masterbatch Enviroplas Compounds

HPPP Copylene ™ CPPP Copylene ™ RCPP Copylene ™ Sarlink® Thermoplastic Elastomer Tekbond ® Thermoplastic Elastomer Monprene ® Thermoplastic Elastomer Elexar ® Thermoplastic Elastomer Telcar ® Thermoplastic Elastomer

Apec® Heat Resistant PC Bayblend® PC/ABS Desmopan Polyurethane Makroblend® PC/PET Makrolon® Polycarbonate Texin® TPU

Polypropylene Polystyrene Polyethylene

HiFill™ Compounds / Concentrates Elastoblend® Impact Modified Compound Electrablend® EMI/RFI Electrically Active Lubriblend® Lubricated Compounds Magnablend® Magnetic Compounds Plastiblend® Alloys & Blends Statiblend® Static Dissipative Compounds

All Logos and brand names are property of their respective trademark owners © 2013 Amco.

1900 Summit Tower Blvd. Orlando, FL 32810 800-262-6685

Emarex® Nylon 6 / 66 Naxaloy® Polycarbonate Blends Naxell® Polycarbonate

Avantra® Ignition Resistant HIPS, PP, ABS ZYNTAR Ignition Resistant PS

Rigid PVC Flexible PVC

NOVAPOL® Polyethylene SCLAIR® Polyethylene

Distribution – Compounding – Blending

Safoam® Foaming Agents August 2013


industry

Wage Survey Results Released for Plastics Processing Industry

by Marcella Kates, MAPP, Inc.

MAPP recently completed the 2013 Wage and Salary Report, which has evolved over the last ten years and remains one of the very few reports completely devoted to the polymer manufacturing industry. This year’s company participation grew by 20 percent over the 2011 Wage and Salary report. It contains a comprehensive analysis of more than 50 different job classifications from plastics and rubber manufacturing-related firms which serve a variety of end-use markets. These classifications represent well over 16,500 hourly and salaried employees from over 200 US polymer manufacturing companies located in 30 states across America. This year, MAPP was able to provide customized regional reports in addition to the full report. The largest respondent manufacturing process category was injection molding, which accounted for nearly 68 percent of the total responses. The extrusion process, transfer/compression molding sector and other processes rounded out the rest of the respondents.

diemakers, quality inspectors, machinist/CNC operators, production/shift supervisors, production schedulers, set-up technicians and TS/ISO/QS coordinators. MAPP found that executives from 170 organizations (81 percent of the respondents) reported that they plan on hiring new employees in the next 12 months. These new hires are more likely to work in a plastics or rubber manufacturing company that provides the following benefits: • Medical insurance to its employees (92 percent of the surveyed population); • Medical insurance to its dependents (85 percent of the surveyed population); • Life insurance (81 percent of the surveyed population); and • Dental care (74 percent of the surveyed population). MAPP has collected Wage and Salary information since 2003, so it now is possible to measure wage progressions/digressions of specific job classifications. As an example, a general manager’s 2003 median salary was $84,536. By applying the US inflationary rates for the last 10 years, plus cost of living, in today’s dollar a general manager’s median salary would equate to $106,832.83 – making the rate for this salary increase approximately 26.4 percent. (See chart below.)

In summary, the overall data showed a wage and salary increase in almost every job category across the board. A total of 89 percent of the job descriptions analyzed in this report showed this expansion of compensation. More importantly, 55 percent of the job descriptions examined experienced these compensation increases ahead of the twoyear inflationary rate. The job descriptions that experienced the largest growth in wages and salary over the last two years (15 percent or above) included certified machine operators, plant managers, chief inspectors, marketing managers/directors and sales account managers. There were some job titles that were reported as experiencing negative growth or growth below inflationary rates in the last two years. These titles included the following: chief financial officers, delivery drivers, financial controllers, injection mold/

The MAPP Wage and Salary Report now can be purchased online at www.mappinc.com or by calling the MAPP office at 317.913.2440. MAPP Members can obtain this report or a regional report at a discounted rate. Non-members may purchase the full report online. n Source: US Inflation Calculator is a part of the CoinNews family of websites.

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 31


association

Benchmarking Conference Goes Mobile Register now for the 2013 Benchmarking Conference in Indianapolis, Oct. 17-18 at the JW Marriott in downtown Indianapolis. The Benchmarking and Best Practices Conference is a no-nonsense business exchange designed to provide profitimpacting information to senior executives in the plastics and rubber manufacturing industries. New this year is the addition of our Benchmarking Conference mobile app, sponsored by Yushin America, Inc. This app will allow attendees to network in real time, right in the palm of their hand with fellow attendees! Plus, you can chat with those already registered today! In addition, conference speakers will be interacting with the audience through live polling questions during the sessions. Attendees also will receive up-to-the-minute updates about the conference and can access the full agenda, speaker information (including links to the presentations during the days of the event) and learn about the conference’s key sponsors who assist in making the Benchmarking Conference the best of the year for the industry. Get connected now and download the Benchmarking Conference app at www.benchmarkingconference.com or use the QR code with a smartphone app.

Featured speakers: Garrison Wynn helps people make the jump from being great at what they do to developing the qualities it takes to be consistently chosen for the job. He gets them to understand why their products, services or leadership styles – or those of their competitors – are selected. As he says, “If the world agreed on what’s best, everybody would choose the best and nothing else would be considered. Decision-making doesn’t work that way.” His presentations help people become more influential regardless of the circumstances. Tom Easterday is the executive vice president at Subaru of Indiana Automotive, Inc. (SIA) and serves as a member of

32 | plastics business • summer 2013

the Board of Directors. SIA was the first automotive assembly plant in the US to be ISO 14001-certified. Through innovative programs, SIA then achieved zero landfill status in May 2004. In addition, SIA’s entire 832-acre site has been designated a Backyard Wildlife Habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. Easterday will discuss trends in business management and what he feels small- to mid-sized companies should be doing to enhance the profitability of their operations. “Reduce” is a key action word he will use to define opportunities in energy management, materials and consumables. For more information on all of the speakers scheduled this year, visit www.benchmarkingconference.com.

New Cost Reduction Programs Added There are many aspects and partnerships that enable companies to be successful, and MAPP’s leadership team recognizes that finding solid and reliable partners is not always easy. Therefore, MAPP has worked on behalf of the membership to develop partnerships that enhance opportunities for business development. MAPP is pleased to announce the addition of the following new cost reduction programs for our Members. RJG is the leading provider of training and technology that allow injection molders to implement systematic or scientific molding techniques to improve quality, productivity and profitability. If you are an injection molder, RJG has tools to help you on your path to success. RJG has enhanced its current offering to Members to now include: • One free seat in RJG’s Injection Molding Essentials eLearning course OR 50 percent off one seat in a Systematic Molding class per company. • 10 percent off any RJG training (travel and expenses not included) • 50 percent off eDART System™ training at your facility with the purchase of your first eDART System (minimum of two days, travel and expenses not included) SIGMA uses a worldwide network of industrial and scientific partners to the benefit of its customers. As a Corporate Partner of MAPP, SIGMA is pleased to offer a 50-percent discount off the SIGMASOFT training classes (a $2,500 value per person). SIGMASOFT provides facts and clarification of cause and effect. Those at SIGMA understand the challenges in detecting


and understanding opportunities and ventures by using virtual simulation. SIGMA also is offering MAPP Members a discount off of engineering projects in order to experience the SIGMASOFT technology and realize its capabilities. Stratasys manufactures 3D printers and materials that create prototypes and manufactured goods directly from 3D CAD files or other 3D content. The company’s 3D printers are based on patented FDMŽ and PolyJetŽ technologies. Stratasys systems are used by manufacturers to create models and prototypes to aid in the new product design process. They are becoming widely used for production of finished goods in low-volume manufacturing. Stratasys is offering special discount pricing for MAPP Members. Harbour Results, Inc. is the expert at helping small- to mid-sized plastics processors flex their

business in order to achieve higher throughput, implement best practices and determine profitable business strategies. Harbour is offering one day of free consulting to review this challenge and provide input on how to improve in that specific area of the business to any new client of Harbour Results, Inc. Harbour also continues to offer its Continuous Improvement assessment at a discounted rate for MAPP Members, which is a savings of over $4,500. Plus, RJG has agreed to subsidize half of the cost of the assessment, a value of $3,000. Yushin America, Inc. specializes in the area of robots, end-of-arm tooling and complete flexible manufacturing cells; its robots are the most reliable in the industry. Yushin provides its customers with innovative automation solutions that can maximize savings, minimize risks and offer support for the life of the investment. Yushin America will offer 50 percent off of Flex Training Classes for up to three additional seats with the purchase of one seat at regular price or an additional one-year warranty. page 34 u

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 33


association t page 33 Conair is the leading producer of auxiliary equipment for plastics processing in the world. Conair and MAPP have teamed up to bring you a new customer program through MAPP. As a MAPP Member and new Conair customer, Members are eligible for the First-Time Buyer Discount Program, which means you save 10 percent on your first order. Conair also offers a five-percent discount to all MAPP Members one time in the calendar year on a single Conair part purchase. (This offer cannot be combined with other offers or discounts.) Routsis Training offers the absolute fastest, most effective way to train one employee or your entire production workforce. By offering complete on-site set-up and implementation by plastics industry experts, Routsis Training provides everything you need to get going and succeed. The RightStart™ process is the critical factor to the

Plastics Industry Expertise Select Investment Banking Transactions

Sell Side Advisor

Sell Side Advisor

Sell Side Advisor

Sell Side Advisor

Sell Side Advisor

Financial Advisor

Mergers & Acquisitions

nn

Capital Raising

nn

Strategic Advisory

Michael D. Benson David M. Evatz mbenson@srr.com devatz@srr.com +1.248.432.1229 +1.312.752.3328 www.srr.com SRR is a trade name for Stout Risius Ross, Inc. and Stout Risius Ross Advisors, LLC, a FINRA registered broker-dealer and SIPC member firm.

34 | plastics business • summer 2013

development, improvement and maintenance of your employees’ skills. Routsis Training is providing several benefits to MAPP Members, from free reference guides and a free 30-day trial for all of your employees to a 40-percent online discount. With the new GHS (Global Harmonized Standards) replacing MSDS, it’s imperative that Members know what needs to be completed and the time frame in which to comply with OSHA guidelines. Therefore, MAPP has established a cost reduction program with SiteHawk to improve chemical data management and meet the new HazCom Standard requirements. MAPP Members will receive a 20-percent discount off of all standard services. For more information on these programs, as well as information on other MAPP Member cost-saving programs and how you can get them started in your facility, log in to the MAPP website at www.mappinc.com.

Resin Benchmarking Analysis Released The leadership of MAPP understands the importance of benchmarking information. As part of this focus, MAPP has undertaken the largest collection of raw material data from the membership to help members better understand the raw materials marketplace. Recently, MAPP completed this comprehensive resin benchmarking survey that will provide participants with an in-depth analysis on market trends, feedstocks and other drivers that will impact cost and short-term availability. In addition, MAPP provided raw data segmented by resin types so that members could better understand the price ranges, packaging options and vending providers associated with each resin consumed. MAPP is very excited about the large response received from this survey collection and how the improved method of data collection increased participation. With this new system for input, the Board is looking to increase the frequency by which the MAPP organization collects data to report on the state of the raw material sector. MAPP Members who participated in the survey will receive additional information with instructions on accessing the completed report. n


strategies

Improving Machine and Process Efficiencies with Chemical Purge Compounds

M

More efficient color or material change long has been the benefit to companies that incorporate commercial purging compounds into their thermoplastics processing operations.

ore efficient color or material change long has been the benefit to companies that incorporate commercial purging compounds into their thermoplastics processing operations. And, while these products can substantially reduce scrap and machine downtime that eat into profits, many processors would rather be subjected to a time-share presentation or join a pyramid scheme than discuss a cost savings project with a new purge compound supplier. Over the years, technicians have used everything from soda pop and laundry detergent to popcorn kernels to clean their machines, rather than using commercially available purging compounds. Were these the best solutions? Certainly not, but they were cheap on the front end. More conventional methods of purging color-to-color that simply use the next resin or regrind to make the transition lack the efficacy of a commercial purging compound (CPC). CPC producers formulate products for specific polymer types, processes, equipment and operating temperatures to ensure the most effective removal of color, material and carbon encrustations.

Cleaning mechanisms explained Commercial purge compounds incorporate cleaning mechanisms and, therefore, outperform production resins for purging. This might seem like an obvious statement, but there are plenty of processors today who primarily use the next resin to purge from color to color. In many cases, the results for a given color change are satisfactory, and certainly for light to dark color changes this is the industry norm. Over time, the layers of contamination build up and begin to bleed into production parts or degrade, causing black spots. At this point, there is a need for a better solution.

by Tony Schoendorff Mechanical purge compounds contain abrasive fillers that are intended to “push and Chem-Trend L.P. scrub” contamination from the screw and barrel. This is considerably more effective at Tony Schoendorff is the industry specialist – Thermoplastics for Chem-Trend L.P., the maker of Lusin® brand purge compounds and mold maintenance products. For more information, call 800.746.4773 or visit www.chemtrend.com.

removing contamination than an unfilled polymer, yet there are limitations to what a purely mechanical product can achieve. Chemical purge compounds contain additives that initiate a chemical reaction at processing temperatures and penetrate into the layers of contamination. In the case of Lusin® purging compounds, the additives break the molecular bonds to release and separate deposits from the metal. Since chemical purge compounds are non-abrasive, they do not contribute to wear and tear, making them safe for use in hot runner systems. Many chemical purge compounds can be molded into parts, which generate pressure within the hot runner system for more effective cleaning as material is forced into potential dead zones. Molding also allows the operator or technician to remove purge from the press more easily (often utilizing robots).

36 | plastics business • summer 2013

page 38 u


“WE ARE CHANGING HOW WE GROW OUR BUSINESS”

"We've been using simulation for 20 years and only in the last year since installing SIGMASOFT have we been able to realize these significant changes to our business. SIGMASOFT is more than just an engineering tool, it's proven to be a complete business tool for us. It helps us to quickly understand very complex problems and find solutions." —Eric Frearson,

Contact us to further explore: Exactly how process simulation can consider the entire process as well as mold material behaviors How SIGMASOFT® is the only simulation tool that can reliably predict mold temperature That other materials (low viscosity, PIM, Elastomer, LSR, and thermoset) can be accurately simulated with the actual mold temperature Why SIGMASOFT® can be operated by process engineers

Vice President of Engineering & China Operations TESSY PLASTICS CORPORATION

SIGMA Plastic Services Inc. 10 N. Martingale Road, Suite 425 Schaumburg, IL 60173, USA phone: 847 558 5600 email: contact@3dsigma.com www.3dsigma.com

ACCURATE–COMPREHENSIVE–EASY TO USE

Use your smartphone to scan the QR code or use this link to check out SIGMA news http://bit.ly/SIGMAnews


strategies t page 36 A third classification of purge compounds simply is a combination of the chemical and mechanical technologies. While this would seem to be the best of both worlds, the added filler content could cause the material to be unsuitable for hot runner cleaning. This is a key benefit to using chemical purge technology. Due to the fact that – by definition – abrasive compounds need to be in motion to clean, purge consumption generally is higher with mechanical type products. Some mechanical purge compounds are marketed as safe for hot runner cleaning. If this is the case for a product that is intended to be evaluated, particulate size and suitability for molding parts should be confirmed with the supplier.

Realistic performance expectations In ideal conditions, plastics processors would have the opportunity to skin the inside of hot runner systems with natural material during the inaugural run and then purge with an effective commercial purge compound from that point forward. In other words, processors would prefer to prepare the tool properly in the beginning and maintain the cleanliness without fail. Unfortunately, production demands, inherited tools and prior use of purge materials not suitable for running

through the tool may have left the processor with buildup or carbonization to deal with. It is reasonable to expect that a tool/ press combination that is heavily contaminated will take a bit longer to get clean than one that has been well maintained. While a bit cliché, it really is like keeping house. Purge compounds are not magic. While removing all the contamination in one application would be preferred, it should be considered that the color and carbon layers that have accumulated may take a bit of time to remove. These deposits can be bonded very tightly to the metal surface, so even a chemical purge compound that is designed to penetrate into the surface of these residues may need a couple of applications to get the system truly clean. There are many times when black spots, for example, get worse before they get better. However, once the metal surfaces are rid of the deposits, regular application for color change or maintenance cleaning will keep things in check. An overnight or holiday shut-down can provide a great opportunity to fill the system with a chemical purge compound to allow for deep cleaning. Once such a program is implemented, processors will find that production should run quite a bit more smoothly.

Is your organization experiencing unprecedented growth? Is your business in need of additional capacity? Are you working harder without increasing profitability? Harbour can help you flex your business - achieve higher throughput to meet increasing production - implement best practice capacity planning tools - determine a profitable business strategy - develop the right mix for your operation

Harbour Results has a proven track record of assisting organizations to rapidly improve performance. Challenge us to challenge you.

38 | plastics business • summer 2013

page 40 u


CONCERNED ABOUT COLOR CHANGES DURING PRODUCTION? Let Ultra Purge do the work for you!

Using Ultra Purge can typically reduce your downtime and scrap by 50-70% for dark to light color changes. Ultra Purge is effective at purging dark colors from all types of thermoplastic processing machines. Our customers use 2-3 times less Ultra Purge for their color changes compared to mechanical purge compounds.

877.884.3129 www.ultrapurge.com Don’t just purge...ULTRA PURGE! TM


strategies t page 38 Innovation Like any market in today’s global economy, there is a great deal of competition in the purge compound industry. This competition drives innovation and development of new products addressing the direct needs of customers. For example, chemical purge compounds no longer need to be considered as ammoniaproducing products that generate noxious fumes and smoke. The new technologies are both highly effective and environmentally friendly, allowing processors to take advantage of the superior cleaning effect without sacrificing operator safety. There are many new products that have been introduced to the market over the last few years, including purge compounds for clear PC and acrylic. For years, processors of these materials struggled with color and material changes, as well as black spots. Unlike opaque materials, clear polymers show even the black spots that are buried beneath the surface. Until recently, use of a commercial purge compound meant milky traces that could take hours to eliminate from the system. Transition from clear PC to clear PMMA, or vice versa, presented similar results. Consequently, processors often elected to remove the screw and clean the system manually. If a hot runner was utilized, this further complicated matters. The solutions,

which were developed by Chem-Trend, are products based on clear carrier resins. These new formulations are completely miscible with the production materials, safe for hot runners, highly effective and expelled from the system quickly. This is a huge step forward for processors of clear polycarbonate and acrylic.

Conclusion The use of commercial purge compounds increases overall efficiency and lowers costs by reducing downtime between color and/or material changeovers. These products also extend the life of processing equipment and reduce waste. Many articles address the cost savings available through the use of commercial purge compounds and the bottom line is this: the best solution is the product that delivers the lowest cost-per-purge, which will be the lowest combined cost of machine downtime, material and rejects. Exceeding cost savings of 50 percent is possible, regardless of the unit price of the material, even when the incumbent product is another CPC. This represents tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars to a processor’s bottom line, depending on the size of their operation. A simple cost savings analysis (CSA) can be completed by the purge compound supplier following the evaluation. n

Too Busy To Protect Your Business? Even the best businesses can have claims. Contact your local Federated representative to learn more about risk management resources, like a distracted driving program, designed to help keep your business on the right road. Visit www.federatedinsurance.com to find a representative near you. Federated Mutual Insurance Company • Federated Service Insurance Company* • Federated Life Insurance Company Owatonna, Minnesota 55060 • Phone: (507) 455-5200 • www.federatedinsurance.com *Not licensed in the states of NH, NJ, RI, and VT.

© 2013 Federated Mutual Insurance Company

40 | plastics business • summer 2013


production

The View from 30 Feet:

Creating Accountable Teams Business gurus often talk about the view from 30,000 feet – the big picture that provides a look at overall operations. Perhaps, however, the focus should be on the view from 30 feet – a close-up of specific processes and procedures that make an impact now. Manufacturing has changed dramatically since Nicolet Plastics was founded in the mid-1980s. That was especially true in 2009 as the American economy faltered and many multi-national firms started moving high-volume production offshore to avoid rising costs. During this time, Nicolet, a Mountain, WI-based custom injector molder, used a system called Quick Response Manufacturing to improve business at every level and target the low- to moderate-volume companies that remained stateside. QRM was developed by Rajan Suri, emeritus professor of industrial engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Bob MacIntosh, Nicolet’s president and CEO, said the creation of accountable teams was part of the QRM philosophy. The goal of the program is to reduce lead time in all aspects of a company’s operation. QRM cells (teams) have ownership of the entire delivery process within their cells. Nicolet has 63 employees and operates 16 machines. It offers 246 combinations of materials ranging from consumer-grade plastics to high-end engineering materials. “We work five days a week, three shifts per day,” MacIntosh said. “Our primary teams are our production teams that staff each of those shifts. Each shift has 12 individuals assigned to it. From there, we branch out to the various support units – maintenance, shipping/receiving, production support center, engineering and administration.” The primary goal is “to be fast, fluid and flexible,” he said. “To be successful, we need to increase our manufacturing velocity. We are using our skills matrix, cross training and accountability to drive those results.” Nicolet used written and practical testing to determine skill levels and establish training necessary to create an ideal shift. Employees were rewarded for technical abilities and willingness to learn new production- and process-related skills. New pay ranges were defined at each skill level, so as employees began to handle

42 | plastics business • summer 2013

more complex issues, value to the company increased and so did wages. “Each team is responsible for successfully executing the orders that are listed on our dispatch list,” MacIntosh explained. “The dispatch list shows them what needs to be done, but not how. That’s up to them. Every day and every shift is different – people call in sick or go to meetings; there are drop-ins or rush jobs; and qualifications all challenge their ability to execute successfully.” With the change in philosophy came a few struggles. “The challenges were twofold,” MacIntosh said. “First was getting employees to believe in what we were trying to accomplish and how it would improve the work environment,” he said. “Second, we needed everyone to understand that they and the team had the power to make a difference. Getting management to relinquish control was an important part of the challenge.” Since Nicolet implemented the QRM strategy, sales have doubled and the company’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization quadrupled between 2009 and 2012. Nicolet recently was named the Small Manufacturer of the Year at the 9th annual Manufacturing Leadership 100 Awards for its business practices and was the recipient of the Workplace Excellence Award from the New North. In addition, Nicolet was a finalist in two categories – Workplace Development and Manufacturing Excellence – for the Wisconsin Manufacturer of the Year award. n


management

MAPP BenchMArking conference SPeAker

The Real Truth about Safety: Creating a Culture of Buy-In K

nowing that safety is important clearly is not enough to create (or even put a dent in creating) incident-free environments. Most of us have heard the messages “Safety First” and “Target Zero.” I’ve even heard one earnest, dedicated guy in rural Louisiana put it this way: “We ain’t toleratin’ any more dead dudes!” As powerful and eloquent as these messages might be, they haven’t produced the buy-in for which we might have hoped. Frankly, it’s not hard to imagine some skepticism arising in response to these messages. When I hear “Safety First,” I wonder: Are you paying me to do my job or to not get hurt while attempting to do my job? The motto “Target Zero” seems to ignore the fact that some industries will have recordable incidents and fatalities, regardless of huge improvements in equipment and environment. Even at a site with the latest technology and safest equipment, some human factor is involved that cannot fully be anticipated. Just because there always is some idiot who thinks that Jägermeister and welding are a great combo, does that really mean we have failed at safety? Overall, the improvement in safety implementation is tremendous. In the past 25 years, we have managed to do very well, and people are much safer on the job than ever before. But it seems that the complacency that causes some accidents actually can be created by having a great safety record. After all, if you have no recordable incidents for a year and terrific improvement has been seen, what’s next? Well, your most conscientious employee might be winding down his 366th uneventful shift, but while walking and texting (neither of which he does well), he slips and injures his back. Complacency can be dangerous. Similarly, people on the job often “check out” because they feel overworked or undervalued. Sometimes, supervisors or bosses are grossly ineffective. Poor communication can create lack of awareness. These are just a few human elements that can throw a wrench in the argument that safe systems plus watertight procedures will equate to zero incidents. Any of these factors can foster huge issues, even in places with the most impeccable safety environment. page 45 u

by Garrison Wynn, CSP Garrison Wynn is a nationally known speaker and consultant, the author of the Amazon.com bestseller The Real Truth about Success and the CEO of Wynn Solutions. He will be a featured speaker at the MAPP Benchmarking Conference, to be held Oct. 16-17 in Indianapolis, IN. For more information, visit www.benchmarkingconference.com.

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 43


INJECTYOUR

PROCESS with innovation and inspiration!

October 15–16, 2013 Reliant Center Houston, TX

Industry Peers

New Technologies

T

E

X

A

Thought Leaders

S

Ideas and Inspiration

Connections like these cannot be made at your desk!

26211_TX_PL13

Leave your office behind and expand your skill set at PLASTEC Texas this October. Increase your knowledge and your network by engaging with like-minded peers and industry thought leaders. Meet face-to-face with plastics professionals and find networking opportunities you won’t get in the office. Test drive the technologies of tomorrow. Interact with world-class suppliers to create custom solutions that are nowhere to be found online. Engineer fresh ideas from stimulating sources and face-to-face discussions.

Sponsored by:

Register today at:

PLASTECTexas.com

Please use Promo code: AA


management t page 43

With a little thought, we can further blur the “fault line” between incidents caused by human error and those attributable to systems/environments. If an employee is emotionally distracted, worn out, under the weather or feeling unappreciated by the boss, he or she might create, build or set up something that doesn’t work very well. All of a sudden, it’s the system that’s the problem – not the human. Simply stated, where safety is concerned, the human factor and the environment both are important. There’s much interplay. While systems and equipment require significant investment and tight controls (which should be crucial elements of the safety approach anyway), the human side of the equation can be greatly – and somewhat easily – improved by creating a culture of safety. The only successful way to change a culture is to get an extremely high level of repeatable buy-in. That means the message from leadership must be very clear and simple to implement. It also means that we have to be realistic about what’s working. Have you noticed that the job site with the best safety record typically is the one where the boss makes everyone feel valuable, the people seem to trust one another and everyone gets along well? Most research confirms that when people feel valuable, they make fewer mistakes. They are more loyal, and they watch out for each other. They are consistently willing to do more of what they are asked to do. All of that results in dramatically fewer incidents and a true culture of safety. But how do you make that happen in your organization or at your location? Here are seven ways to make sure your environment is positioned to reduce incidents: 1. Beware of mixed messages. “Hey, be safe, but hurry up! Don’t be so safe that we can’t make any money!” The real message should be “Let’s get it done before 5 p.m. – but if you get outside the safety guidelines, rethink it.” 2. Make sure the people around you understand that you have their back. They will be more likely to have yours. Watch your behavior and treat others with respect. Very few people rush back into a burning building to save the guy that nobody likes. Don’t be that guy. 3. Be realistic about how people feel about safety procedures. If you have a process or situation that everyone makes fun of or complains about, look into it and make adjustments. Nothing is more dangerous than expecting people to be protected by things they obviously don’t believe in.

4. Remember that many accidents happen indoors in office environments. Approximately 76,000 people each year are hospitalized because they put their feet on their desks and leaned back in a chair. Acting like a big shot not only is obnoxious; it’s apparently dangerous! 5. Communication skills are the foundation of safety. Let people talk about what’s important to them before you tell them your opinions. People who feel heard are much more likely to listen to you. To make safety happen, you need to have a level of influence that enables your words to create action in others. If people see their input in your safety solution, they are much more likely to have buy-in and much less likely to be injured. 6. Don’t tell young coworkers how brave you were “back in the day” before modern safety equipment. We are our brothers’ and sisters’ keepers, and that especially means our younger brothers and sisters. On a job site, I once heard a guy in his 50s say to group of people in their 20s, “You young guys have all this protective clothing and special tools! In the ’70s, we were down in there naked with a Q-tip!” Challenging someone’s manhood makes you part of the problem. 7. Make sure you can clearly explain the value of a safety procedure or policy in 30 seconds. People buy into what they quickly understand. The leading addiction on the planet is not drugs or alcohol; it’s convenience. People will consistently abandon a safe process that’s complicated for an unsafe one that’s not. Keep it simple. It does not matter how smart you are if nobody knows what you’re talking about! Whether you are a leader who is driving safety forward or just a person on the job trying to be good at what you do without being hurt, influence is required. Are you influential enough to make safety happen around you? Do you have the trust and the relationships in place to help safety concepts and procedures remain effective? For some of you, it may be hard to buy into how important it is for people to have a supportive environment. You might think that it’s all “charm school BS” or that people should just do what they are supposed to do and be safe. But in reality, the overwhelming success of this approach is kind of like listening to NASCAR on the radio – you personally may not believe it makes any sense, but for some strange reason it’s still happening! n

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 45


advertisers

Amco Polymers........................................................................................................www.amcopolymers.com .............................................................................................. 30 ASACLEAN/Sun Plastech Inc. ...............................................................................www.thebestpurge.com........................................................................Inside Front Cover Beaumont Technologies, Inc. ..................................................................................www.beaumontinc.com ................................................................................................. 13 Chase Plastics...........................................................................................................www.chaseplastics.com ................................................................................................. 35 Chem-Trend .............................................................................................................www.chemtrend.com ............................................................................................... 24, 25 Cincinnati Process Technologies .............................................................................www.cinprotech.com ..................................................................................................... 33 Cold Jet ....................................................................................................................www.coldjet.com ........................................................................................................... 21 Conair.......................................................................................................................www.conairgroup.com .................................................................................... Back Cover Federated Insurance .................................................................................................www.federatedinsurance.com ........................................................................................ 40 Frigel ........................................................................................................................www.frigel.com ............................................................................................................. 22 Global Plastics Summit ............................................................................................www.globalplasticssummit.com .................................................................................... 41 Harbour Results, Inc. ...............................................................................................www.harbourresults.com ............................................................................................... 38 Ice Miller LLP..........................................................................................................www.icemiller.com ........................................................................................................ 22 INCOE Corporation .................................................................................................www.incoe.com ............................................................................................................... 5 IQMS........................................................................................................................www.iqms.com ................................................................................................................ 3 Jade Group International ..........................................................................................www.jademolds.com............................................................................ Inside Back Cover M. Holland ...............................................................................................................www.mholland.com ....................................................................................................... 27 MAPP (Manufacturers Association for Plastics Processors) ...................................www.mappinc.com ........................................................................................................ 46 Paulson Training Programs, Inc...............................................................................www.paulsontraining.com ............................................................................................. 15 PLASTEC Texas......................................................................................................www.plastectexas.com................................................................................................... 44 PolySource ...............................................................................................................www.polysource.net ...................................................................................................... 41 RJG, Inc. ..................................................................................................................www.rjginc.com/training ................................................................................................. 7 SIGMA Plastics Services, Inc. .................................................................................www.3dsigma.com ........................................................................................................ 37 Slide Products, Inc. ..................................................................................................www.slideproducts.com................................................................................................. 28 Stout Risius Ross (SRR) ..........................................................................................www.srr.com .................................................................................................................. 34 Strategic Marketing Partners (SMP) ........................................................................www.smp4mfg.com ....................................................................................................... 12 ToolingDocs ............................................................................................................www.toolingdocs.com ................................................................................................... 19 Ultra Purge/Moulds Plus International ....................................................................www.ultrapurge.com...................................................................................................... 39 Yushin America, Inc. ...............................................................................................www.yushinamerica.com............................................................................................... 30

46 | plastics business • summer 2013


WE WANT YOU TO WIN MORE BUSINESS

Easy start-to-finish communication with our experienced American mold designers Quality molds built to your high standards Quick delivery times – up to 6 weeks faster Savings of up to 50% on all injection molds Your strength is molding parts. Ours is building high-quality molds that save your business time, money and headaches. Jade works closely with your management, procurement and engineering teams to build exactly what you need to win more jobs. Partner with Jade to build your molds and let us help you win. Visit our website to learn more about Jade and take advantage of our free mold analysis offer. No purchase necessary.* Some conditions may apply.

Quality molds & savings without compromise.

Email: sales@jademolds.com Contact our VP of Sales, Anthony Stewart directly: 647-932-5193 www.jademolds.com


Profile for petersonpublications

Plastics Business - Summer 2013  

Plastics Business - Summer 2013