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Plastics Business Fall 2016

Strategies for Today’s Plastics Processors

Processors Reach Out to Youth in Plastics Preventing Workplace Violence Maximizing Mold Change Efficiency Tax Implications of the Election

Official Publication of Manufacturers Association for Plastics Processors


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director’s letter

I Wish I Would Have... Winter 1993: It was around 3:30 in the morning. I had just grabbed lunch in the plant cafeteria and consumed a large pork tenderloin sandwich, fries and a Coke – a normal lunch for those working third-shift production. I was in the shift supervisor’s office filling out the usual paperwork of time cards, scrap and quality tracking reports when the screams of one of my employees pierced through the noise of the extruders and other manufacturing equipment found in typical blown film bag-making operations. Without thinking, I ran toward the shouts for help and saw Janet, my line #311 machine operator, being slowly pulled into a bag converting machine. By the time I reached her, the emergency stop button had been used to deactivate the machine, but Janet’s hand and fingers were literally jammed between steel guarding, heavy drive chains and other machine components. Because I was a new and inexperienced shift supervisor, I was helpless in trying to free her as my brute force efforts to reverse the machine equated to moving a 1,000-pound boulder with a plastic fork. Within seconds of my feeble attempts to fix the situation, a 25-year production veteran arrived on scene, ripped off a mechanical panel and manually reversed the machine to free Janet. Nearly 24 years later, I can still hear the screams for help, feel the panic and vividly see Janet’s black-framed safety glasses ajar on her face. Worst of all, I can’t help but think that I could have done more as a leader to prevent such an accident: I feel that I was the one who put Janet in harm’s way. At the beginning of November, I relayed this experience to a room full of manufacturing professionals during MAPP’s annual Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Summit. I shared two “I wish I would have” thoughts with the attendees, hoping my story could inspire leaders to act differently and take steps that have the potential to save someone else from living through such a horrific experience.

Manufacturers Association for Plastics Processors, Inc. (MAPP) 7321 Shadeland Station Way, Suite 285 Indianapolis, IN 46256 phone 317.913.2440 • fax 317.913.2445 www.mappinc.com MAPP Board of Directors President Ben Harp, Polymer Conversions, Inc. Vice President Norm Forest, Dymotek Molding Technologies Secretary Ryan Richey, Precision Plastics, Inc. Bill Bartlett, First American Plastics/Quad, Inc. Craig Carrel, Team 1 Plastics, Inc. Michael Devereux II, Mueller Prost PC John Hoskins, Octex Holdings LLC James Krause, Microplastics, Inc. Bob MacIntosh, Nicolet Plastics, Inc. Terry Minnick, Molding Business Services Tom Nagler, Natech Plastics, Inc. Brian Oleson, Centro, Inc. Eric Paules, Crescent Industries Missy Rogers, Noble Plastics, Inc. Alan Rothenbuecher, Benesch Law Teresa Schell, Vive LLC Tom Tredway, Erie Molded Plastics, Inc. Mike Walter, MET Plastics, Inc.

I wish I would have… n  done a better job of keeping Janet’s attention during our first-day-back safety meeting. Because safety was the number one priority of our company, we always met as a shift for fifteen minutes before returning to work after a weekend. However, I allowed these meetings to become too routine and too boring. Instead of introducing new ideas and messages to capture the attention of my people, I simply went through the motions. Safety awareness suffered as a result. For those reading this message, I feel there is no excuse, given the resources and information available at our fingertips, not to make things more interesting, impactful and exciting. Don’t fall into the trap that I fell into – it’s not worth the price you may eventually pay! n  focused more on group behavior rather than individual behavior for the purpose of improving workplace safety. Since I was new to manufacturing in 1993, I did not understand the concept of behavior-based safety. However, today, I feel all plastics manufacturing companies should strive to create peer-driven or Behavior-Based Safety (BBS) cultures. A BBS culture creates a safety partnership between management and employees that continually focuses people's attentions and actions on the daily safety behavior of everyone in the facility. In this environment, people are expected to point out unsafe acts. For those on the receiving end of such critiques, it is expected that they understand, appreciate and graciously accept the efforts of their peers and co-workers to keep them safe. Safety is everyone’s business. For those who feel safety awareness and practice may have dropped in priority, I would strongly encourage a tactic to reinvigorate safety mindfulness. It’s better to do it now than to live the rest of your life agonizing over the “I wish I would have done more” thoughts that you will experience if the unthinkable should happen.

Executive Director, MAPP

4 | plastics business • fall 2016

Plastics Business

Strategies for Today’s Plastics Processors

Published by:

Peterson Publications, Inc. 2150 SW Westport Dr., Suite 101 Topeka, KS 66614 phone 785.271.5801 www.plasticsbusinessmag.com Editor in Chief Jeff Peterson

Advertising/Sales Janet Dunnichay

Managing Editor Dianna Brodine

Contributing Editors Nancy Cates Brittany Willes Lara Copeland

Art Director Becky Arensdorf Graphic Designer Kelly Adams

Circulation Manager Brenda Schell


Plastics Business

Strategies for Today’s Plastics Processors

Contents Fall 2016

profile

8

view from 30

solutions

20

36

features profile Consistent Processes Lead to Consistent Results at Revere Plastics.......8 operations Unexpected Confusion: OSHA’s Proposed Lockout/Tagout Standard Changes............................................................................. 12 strategies Take Steps to Prevent Workplace Violence........................................... 14 view from 30 Maximizing Mold Changeover Efficiency at Dorel Juvenile Products... 20 industry Election Results Create Path for Tax Changes...................................... 26

departments director’s letter................... 4 association.........................18 product..............................30 advertisers.........................54

review MAPP’s Annual Benchmarking & Best Practices Conference................ 32 solutions Bemis Wins Inaugural Educational Outreach Contest........................... 36 management Using a B.O.L.D. Approach to Succeed in an Unpredictable Business World.................................................. 42 training room Advanced Injection Molding Simulation of Fiber-Filled Materials........ 46 booklist Event Speakers Make Recommendations............................................. 52

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profile

Consistent Processes Lead to Consistent Results at Revere Plastics by Dianna Brodine, managing editor, Plastics Business

With four facilities, nearly 1,000 employees and highly recognizable brand names on its customer list, Revere Plastics Systems isn’t the typical small- to mid-sized processor featured in this magazine. A larger corporate structure, however, doesn’t keep the Clyde, Ohio-based manufacturer from experiencing the same challenges as others in the industry. In the last two decades, Revere Plastics has undergone ownership changes, diversified its customer base and realigned its production structures through training and interfacility communication. A focus on consistent processes has pointed the company in a new direction, to the benefit of employees and customers alike. Committing to an identity Revere Plastics has a complex history that began with the merging of two respected firms. Wollin Products and Plastics Engineered Components (PEC) merged to become Titan Plastics in 2001, with a private equity firm at the head. Through the next four years, quality concerns troubled the newly joined injection molding facilities, and growth was slower than expected. Steps were taken to effect a turnaround, including new management team members and facility restructuring to reduce costs, but the economic recession curtailed those efforts. In the mid-2000s, the company was renamed and became Revere Plastics Systems. Company ownership changed again in the latter part of the decade, and another management team was tasked with leadership. Still, the slowly recovering economy – particularly as housing lagged in its rebound – kept a hold on Revere Plastics. It was time to try a new approach. Glen Fish, current president of Revere Plastics Industries, is a mechanical engineer by degree and a problem-solver by trade. With a background in automotive, aerospace and defense, Fish had experience in revitalizing manufacturing facilities, and he believed the structure of automotive manufacturing could be applied in the consumer goods market with great success. A focus on consistent processes led to higher quality metrics and better communication on the production floor. Photos courtesy of Revere Plastics.

8 | plastics business • fall 2016


Building a turnaround Phase 1: Aggressive focus on quality In many ways, when looking to implement a new set of standards and procedures – especially with a new management team and employees who are potentially nervous about change – a focus on quality is the best place to begin. Production employees take pride in the work they produce, so creating structure that emphasizes improvements in product quality is a good way to get everyone on board. Metrics are easy to see and understand. Processes can be laid out in simple if/then steps. Results, once tallied, can be used to motivate employees and management alike to implement improvement standards and procedures in other areas. So, as a first step to building a better Revere Plastics, Fish asked his team to make an aggressive six-month push toward improved quality. “At the Clyde facility, there had been so much change,” Fish explained. “The employees hadn’t had consistent structure or direction, and a focus on quality was going to give us both things.” One part, in particular, was a quality concern, and it became the ‘‘low-hanging fruit’’ that would provide a quick victory. Fish began holding daily meetings with the Clyde facility employees. A storyboard was wheeled onto the production floor to provide a visual reminder of the issue and the goals. Operators were pulled in to problem-solve, which had never happened before. Within a month, the quality issue had been solved. “We celebrated,” said Fish. “I bought pizza for everyone, and we celebrated. They never had that before, and it made the team eager for more wins.” Elevating the quality standards required both a change of culture and a form of training. “Engaging the hourly work force in finding the solution was key,” Fish explained. “We also were teaching the supervisors to be more data-driven and empowering them to make some decisions. The Clyde facility used to have staff meetings where supervisors went into a room and tried to figure out problems. I eliminated that meeting; instead, the general manager created a daily gemba walk so those working on the production floor can hear and participate in the problem solving. We ask the hourly employees to speak up and tell us what they want.” Now in place for two years, the daily walk is an important part of the company culture, and quality standards are a matter of employee pride. Phase 2: Diversification of customer base and product portfolio The second step in Fish’s leadership of Revere Plastics Systems was a hard look at the company’s book of business.

Revere Plastics has four facilities in the US and Canada serving the appliance, automotive, outdoor power equipment and medical markets.

Focused primarily on the appliance market, Revere Plastics had a long-standing and successful relationship with Whirlpool, but diversification – smart diversification – needed to become a priority. A new facility had recently been built in Jeffersonville, Indiana, to accommodate incoming business in the appliance market, but a series of miscommunications left 30 presses and a new workforce underutilized. Although a small amount of lawn and power tool work remained from the days of PEC, no efforts had been made to expand the market, and one facility – possibly the facility with the most potential of the four Revere Plastics locations – was sitting in the middle of a major automotive market, but not developing any automotive customers. “We created a business development position at the end of 2014,” said Fish. “By the end of the first quarter of 2015, we shipped some of the underutilized presses in Jeffersonville to other facilities to avoid buying new equipment. Labor and overhead resources were scaled back, and we’d returned some business to our customer that didn’t fit our core competencies.”

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profile t page 9 Fish then added five salespeople who focused initially on filling the open capacity in the Jeffersonville plant. In addition to appliance molding, the facility also has added automotive and outdoor power equipment production to its rotation. “There’s a shortage of capacity in that area on the automotive side, so we’ve struck a nerve that is creating opportunity for us,” he explained. “Once we felt the Jeffersonville facility was in a good place, we looked at opportunities in our other three facilities. We had infused the quality mantra and added more structure, such as daily key performance indicators. It was time to look at ways to expand.” The Clyde facility remains predominantly filled with appliance work, although some automotive applications are rolling off the company’s 132 presses. With 600 employees at that facility alone, it is the largest in the Revere Plastics Group. The Revere Plastics facility in Canada is located in a region known for automotive production, but the organization has traditionally provided overflow work in small assemblies, along with home security and medical work. It’s small and profitable, but with open capacity that Fish soon hopes to fill as a supplier in the automotive market. The Poplar Bluff, Missouri, plant focuses

A focus on the

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The majority of the work done for the appliance industry includes a secondary assembly or decorating process.

on outdoor power equipment but also has some small appliance, automotive and medical work on its 47 presses. “In all of these spaces where we have existing work, we’re asking where we can provide value and where our next frontier could be,” Fish explained. Revere Plastics purchased a 3D printer to assist its engineers with prototyping, and the company is focusing its efforts on bringing its own brand of value to new projects. “We created a product engineering group in the last 12 months that is leading the way in cost reduction engineering. It’s gaining us some traction in the outdoor power equipment market and with other appliance manufacturers. We want to gain a reputation for bringing value well beyond injection molding, and that includes both the engineering knowledge we can offer and the secondary services we provide on almost 90 percent of our projects.” Phase Three: One RPS Chaos can come with capacity maximization and new project onboarding, but Fish has a plan to address that, too. “One of the major things we’ve done is called One RPS,” he said. “Revere Plastics was a merger of two companies with different processes and systems, so we continue to commonize across all of our facilities.” At the Clyde facility, a quarterly lean review is conducted with a lean sensei. Consultants come in one or two days each month to conduct additional lean reviews and training, and efforts have begun to increase communications across all four plants by making time for those of similar job titles at each facility to meet and share. “Leadership wasn’t a strong point for us,” said Fish, “because it hadn’t been a focus. We put great people in place, but it was up to us to give them the resources they need. We hired a trainer to go to each facility every other month to teach time management, accountability and other leadership qualities to the management teams. Then, we asked him to include our team leaders and quality auditors. As we’re taking the next step in


our lean journey, we’re rolling that leadership training out to the operators next year.” One RPS aims to make it simpler for four separate facilities to operate as one company. “We’ve stabilized the operations, added structured processes and put the right products to fit our identity into each plant,” said Fish. “We developed a mission, a vision and a five-year plan – all things that give us goals when we come to work.” More movement on the horizon Fish admits he sets high standards, and more changes are coming to Revere Plastics, both operationally and commercially. “There is no area where I think we’ve reached a peak yet,” he said. “For instance, our engineering talent is far above average, but we’re just tapping into that now, both from a product and a process standpoint.” Currently, the product engineering group is a support function for potential and existing customers, but it may eventually reach a point where its services are offered as a separate cost center.

I think the processes are starting to speak for themselves, but getting material to and from the machines can look somewhat chaotic,” he said. Beginning this year in both the Clyde and Poplar Bluff facilities, Revere Plastics is converting from forklifts to tuggers for material handling. Small totes will be utilized to move product instead of large bins, and the tuggers will travel the facility in a circular pattern on a more frequent basis, rather than having forklifts moving up and down aisles every few hours. “At the Clyde facility, we are molding, welding and leak testing 20,000 parts for front and top load washers every day,” said Fish. “When we make this shift in material flow, it will improve our labor efficiency, improve our facility safety and clean up our plant. It’s a major culture change.” These days, that’s par for the course at Revere Plastics. n

Material flow is another area where Fish sees opportunity. “When you look at what we’re accomplishing in our facilities,

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operations

Unexpected Confusion: OSHA’s Proposed Lockout/Tagout Standard Changes by Phil N. Molé, MPH, VelocityEHS In an attempt to modernize certain standards that may be, according to the agency, “confusing, outdated or unnecessary,” OSHA recently proposed 18 changes to its recordkeeping, general industry, maritime and construction regulations through its Standards Improvement Project. One proposed change involves removing the word “unexpected” from the term “unexpected energization” in the Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Standard for the stated reason of eliminating confusion surrounding the standard’s applicability. Inadvertently, OSHA has raised concerns about whether the proposed change actually represents more than just a clarification, but a broadening of the standard’s applicability. Below, we look at the LOTO Standard, along with OSHA’s reasoning for the change and steps employers can take to maintain LOTO compliance. About the Lockout/Tagout Standard OSHA first issued the LOTO Standard in 1989 to protect workers from injury in the event of “unexpected energization” of equipment they are servicing, which can release hazardous energy, including electricity from energization or mechanical energy from movement. The standard requires that machines or equipment be de-energized and locked or tagged-out by the worker performing the maintenance before the work is performed to prevent unplanned energization. OSHA currently maintains that the standard’s original intent was to protect workers from the release of hazardous energy from any startup during servicing, unexpected or not, and that employers would be liable for injuries under the standard in either case. In the proposed rule, OSHA presents legal case decisions to support the current interpretation, but the precedent isn’t clear because the decisions didn’t hinge upon how the word “unexpected” affects applicability. But, some decisions have clearly rejected the argument that the standard applies in cases where alternatives to LOTO, such as automated machine controls, were used to eliminate potential for unexpected energization. In one case (Reich v. General Motors Corp., Delco Chassis), both OSHRC and the US Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit rejected OSHA's broader interpretation of the LOTO Standard, saying it did not apply where startup procedures such as time-delays, audible/visual warnings or multi-step activation

12 | plastics business • fall 2016

The agency has proposed removing the term “unexpected,” amending the standard to what it claims to be the original and intended interpretation, making it applicable to all equipment servicing activities where there are energization, startup or stored energy hazards. processes alerted workers servicing equipment to energization because startup was not “unexpected.” OSHA’s proposed change In its proposed revision of the LOTO Standard, OSHA states its belief that the GMC Delco decision misconstrued the term “unexpected” by allowing employers to use warning and delay systems as alternatives to LOTO procedures. OSHA also maintains these alternatives place a burden on exposed employees to recognize the warning and escape injury instead of removing the risk altogether by isolating machines from their energy sources during servicing. As a result, the agency has proposed removing the term “unexpected,” amending the standard to what it claims to be the original and intended interpretation, making it applicable to all equipment servicing activities where there are energization, startup or stored energy hazards. According to OSHA, this change will improve protection of workers by taking the burden off of employees to avoid hazards by identifying alarms or stages in a multistep startup process. Furthermore, the agency states that the GMC Delco decision necessitates case-by-case assessments of various warning schemes to determine the applicability of the LOTO Standard. While it has provided its compliance officers with 11 different factors to evaluate and determine whether particular warning devices are adequate and reliable enough to allow employees to escape all


types of hazardous energy in any circumstance, the situation still creates a degree of uncertainty about the standard’s applicability. It is currently unclear when or even if the proposed rule will be finalized, as it has been criticized for extending beyond the reach of a typical standards improvement measure. Critics argue that the proposed change constitutes a significant new rulemaking since it expands the interpretation of the LOTO standard, is contrary to relevant legal precedent and would greatly increase the cost to industry. They also argue that this expansion overlooks the reasoning and effort behind implementation of alarm systems and other mechanisms to prevent employee exposure to hazards during startup. OSHA is allowed to broaden the scope of its LOTO standard, they conclude, but only by following proper notice and comment requirements under rulemaking procedures within the Administrative Procedures Act, thus recognizing the significant change in applicability this interpretation represents. What employers can do Even if the future of the proposed rule is uncertain, it does show that OSHA is placing increased emphasis on the importance of LOTO procedures. Now would be a good time to review

current written LOTO procedures and make sure they outline critical safety steps to identify and isolate all forms of hazardous energy an employee may be exposed to during startup, including electrical, mechanical, thermal, hydraulic and pneumatic. It’s also a good time to confirm LOTO procedures are in place for any and all servicing and repair activities. Keep in mind that LOTO procedures must be specific to the job, rather than to the machine itself, and must address all hazards, even those that might occur if the worker only locks out part of the equipment. Perhaps most importantly, employees must be trained on these procedures, and training must be documented. While the fate of the proposed rule remains to be seen, a focus on better LOTO procedures will greatly enhance employee safety and help reinforce a proactive EHS culture rooted in injury prevention. n Phil N. Molé, MPH, is an EHS and sustainability expert at VelocityEHS, an award-winning cloud software company that delivers a comprehensive suite of EHS products that help companies better manage SDS/Chemical inventories, audits, inspections, incidents, corrective actions, compliance issues and reporting, and safety meetings management. To learn more, visit www.EHS.com or call 888.362.2007.

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strategies

Take Steps to Prevent Workplace Violence by Van Harp, partner, Harp & Associates, LLC

Violent acts in the workplace are a reality of today. An active, a culture of fear or rules without allowing employees to engaged management team with a plan can reduce the threat provide feedback, the seeds can be sewn for violent behavior. of an incident. When taking steps to keep your business free Understanding of the code of conduct in a facility makes it from violence, remember: easier to know when employees are acting in ways outside of those guardrails. That can be an early warning sign of a Planning, Preparation and Practice = Prevention situation that could be dangerous. The management team should concentrate on four areas to reduce the threat of violent conduct in the workplace and Relevant Policy and Procedures Each business should outline policies and procedures prepare for action should an event occur. designed to enhance safety and draw further attention to 1. Code of conduct the guardrails of the code of conduct. These can include the 2. Relevant policies and procedures following: 3. Training • No weapons 4. Assessments • No drugs • No violent personal contact Code of Conduct • No belittling or threatening behaviors, including verbal Basically, a code of conduct creates the guardrails that illustrate assault the acceptable and unacceptable behaviors and attitudes in the workplace. These guardrails are the essentials of good human behavior: all people should be treated with respect; disrespectful, For these to be relevant and made important to the organization, insubordinate conduct is not tolerated; people should be treated there must be an owner who is responsible for the original in a way that allows them to maintain their dignity and respect; iteration of the policies. The owner then takes responsibility and an opportunity should be provided to vocalize disagreements for updating the policies when necessary and reviewing current laws for compliance. The policies should be current and dated, and hammer them out. with updates provided annually. The goal is to create a successful, thriving and productive workplace environment. In many cases, that begins with the In my personal opinion, the employees should be given ownership culture, and culture often begins with the unspoken code of of the policies and procedures at performance appraisal time when conduct that governs behavior. Every company is in business being evaluated for salary increases or bonuses. Define each of to make money. That can’t be done in a facility where the expectations and, at appraisal time, note these as objectives in employees constantly are fighting or working separately. the performance plan. Not only does this limit company liability Instead, the leaders in each facility must build a culture by clearly setting guidelines, but it also refreshes and emphasizes that sets the tone. If leadership belittles employees, creates the importance of the policy to each employee. Compliance with

14 | plastics business • fall 2016


the policies and procedures should be addressed and annotated in an actual review document during the performance appraisal. Positive reinforcement of the policies and procedures can serve as motivation to continue following those guidelines. By tying successful rules compliance with positive performance reviews, the desired behavior is encouraged and the facility is a little safer. Training While it may seem that no one can adequately prepare for workplace violence, there are steps that can be taken to reduce the possibility of a dangerous event and save lives in the event the unthinkable happens. In-house speakers. Ask an employee who has the ability and willingness to lead a discussion about workplace violence. This is not a public speaking event – instead, it’s done during the team meetings that are already happening during the daily work routines. Ask employees to talk about workplace violence, misconduct, knowing employees and creating a safe environment. To teach is to learn.

Event preparation. The 24/7 news cycle can be a significant stressor, but it also provides an opportunity to learn. When there is an incident in the US or even globally, do a brief analysis. Ask employees what lessons can be learned – and importantly, was there a kernel of validity to the grievance? What could they look for to prevent an incident like the one that occurred? What would they do in that situation? The mental “what if’s” are valuable. As a team, talk about how to change behaviors to improve response or prevent the incident completely. Role playing/simulations. This one can be more difficult. Role playing is uncomfortable, and it might feel silly, but it’s important to start the conversations about preventing and reacting to workplace violence. During team meetings, offer a situation for discussion. These situations can be on the continuum from “the employee’s behavior doesn’t seem right” to “a dangerous situation is happening on the floor.” What do you say? How do you react? page 16 u

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strategies t page 15 It’s awkward and uncomfortable when these simulations first begin. The team will be embarrassed, unsure of the “right” answers and worried about being offensive. It’s important to put aside all personal worries to acknowledge that these training exercises could be an actual life-threatening or lifeending event. There is no stupid answer during the discussions, because the point is to find the better answers. Once the conversations start, everyone begins to feel better because, while no one wants to think a violent event will happen, it’s better to have a plan. Addressing the possibility is a step toward being prepared. Assessments Two steps can be taken when assessing a workplace – inside and out – and its employees for potential weak points. Facility assessment. An assessment of the environment inside and outside a facility should be done. I recommend a 360-degree MBW – management by walking around. Walk the entire facility while employees are there and doing their jobs. This shows concern for their safety and elevates awareness, but also provides information about the facility during the work day. What windows are unlocked? What doors are unlocked? Are there areas of concealment in the outer perimeter? Are there locks that don’t work? Are the fences safe? Are entrances, exits and specialty areas/rooms clearly marked and labeled? Then, perform another assessment before everyone arrives for the day or after they leave at night. Are things left undone from the day before? Who is around the neighborhood? Who is the first to work? Where do they park? Is there adequate lighting in all areas inside and outside? Is there order and symmetry at shift change? Is that an opportunity for someone to walk in without being noticed? Look at the security technology – is it in proper working order and tested regularly? Finally, do a review of the written policies and procedures. Now that assessments have been done in the heart of the business day and when the facility is empty, how does that align with the policy and procedure document? Where are the gaps? Employee interviews. Once the physical facility assessment is complete, perform structured employee interviews. Ask each employee to answer a series of 10 questions, most of which have “yes or no” answers (see sidebar). Once these questions have been answered, data-driven information will be available to identify gaps between the policy and what actually is done. This will allow leadership and employee teams to develop gap closure plans and increase the safety of the employees.

16 | plastics business • fall 2016

10 Questions to Ask Employees When Conducting an Internal Assessment 1. Have you been trained to respond to a violent incident? 2. Do you have the authority to respond to a threat of violence? 3. Do you think your company’s current safety policies/procedures are sufficient? 4. Do you think the policies/procedures are being implemented and followed? 5. Do you feel your colleagues and coworkers are “on board”? 6. Do you feel the business is moving in the right direction for providing a safe and secure workplace environment? 7. What changes or suggestions do you have to improve safety/security? 8. Do you know how to get support/help in case of a violent incident? 9. Is there a current situation that causes you concern at this time? 10. Has there been a situation in the past that caused you concern? © Harp & Associates

And, when those interviews take place, very honest conversations will happen about concerns within the workplace that are not just related to safety. When coupled with the survey answers, some real substance and recommendations can be considered for the benefit of not only the facility, but the larger organization. Workplace violence is no longer an isolated incident that only happens to other companies. It could happen anywhere, but steps can be taken to reduce the likelihood of an incident and increase the safety of employees if the worst should happen. n Van Harp is a partner in Harp & Associates, LLC, a workplace violence prevention consultancy. The company’s focus is awareness, recognition, prevention and response to violent workplace incidents in both public and private settings. The approach is from a 360-degree perspective to prevent concerning incidents from escalating along the continuum of violence up to and including extreme violence/active shooter. For more information, email HarpAssociates@hotmail.com.


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association

HR On-Boarding and Training Checklists Available MAPP conducted a benchmarking activity to collect on-boarding and training checklists from MAPP member companies. Member companies submitted their on-boarding and training checklists to the MAPP staff. These checklists were then scrubbed of identifying company information, reviewed, organized and compiled into one concise document. This 56-page handbook includes 28 different checklists from plastics processing companies. The handbook is broken down into categories, including generic on-boarding checklists, training checklists and job-specific checklists. Some job-specific training checklists include new operator training, set-up tech training and mold technician training checklists. Members can access this handbook through the Benchmarking Reports section of the MAPP website at no cost. Manufacturing Day: Educational Outreach Award Winners Named MAPP is pleased to announce its first Educational Outreach Award winners. This award was created in an effort to celebrate manufacturers who work to engage young people and their communities in the manufacturing industry. The winners were voted on by nearly 500 MAPP members, peers and colleagues on the following aspects of their initiatives: Creativity/ Resourcefulness, Sustainability, Ability to Replicate in Other Companies/Areas and Overall Impact. The winners are: • 1st place: Bemis Manufacturing • 2nd place: TASUS • 3rd place: Plastikos To learn more about the award and to view all of the top submissions, see page 36 and visit www.mappinc.com. Membership Satisfaction Survey Now Open Each year, MAPP conducts its Membership Satisfaction Survey. The results of this survey allow MAPP’s staff and Board of Directors to understand the needs of its membership and areas of opportunity. The survey, open to members through

18 | plastics business • fall 2016

Dec. 1, looks at the various aspects of MAPP membership, including cost-reduction programs, events, benchmarking opportunities, networking opportunities and overall satisfaction with membership. MAPP members interested in participating in this survey can access the link by visiting www.mappinc. com/event-calendar. Thank you in advance for participating – your feedback helps MAPP improve! MAPP Welcomes New Members MAPP is pleased to welcome the following members to the MAPP organization: • CH3 Solutions LLC, Dalton, Georgia • Ferriot Inc., Akron, Ohio • GTM Plastics, Garland, Texas • InterTrade Industries, Westminster, California • KregTool, Huxley, Iowa • LMR Plastics, Greeneville, Tennessee • Mahle Filter Systems, Murfreesboro, Tennessee • Moldamatic LLC, Penndel, Pennsylvania • Poly-Ject Inc., Amherst, New Hampshire • Primera Plastics, Zeeland, Michigan • Royal Technologies Corp., Hudsonville, Michigan Cellphone Policies Benchmarking Handbook Available Due to high interest from members on how companies are handling cellphone usage in their facilities, MAPP has released its latest human resources benchmarking handbook on cellphone policies. This handbook includes 32 cellphone policies from various MAPP members. All policies have been scrubbed of companyidentifying information and compiled into one document. The document also includes a foreword highlighting important features of the policies, including the use of phones for recording video, cellphone usage while driving, cellphone damage, emergency calls, code of conduct and possible disciplinary actions for employees who ignore the policy. This handbook is free for members and can be found under the Benchmarking Reports section at www.mappinc.com. Benchmarking and Best Practices Conference Session Videos Available for Purchase If you were unable to attend the 2016 Benchmarking and


Best Practices Conference, all programming in the main ballroom (more than 90 percent of the conference) was recorded. Was there a session that you would like to re-watch or share with your team? We are extending a special purchase price to attendees. To purchase your video copy of the 2016 Benchmarking Conference, visit www.mappinc.com to find order information. 2016 Wage and Salary Report Now Available MAPP’s Wage and Salary Report, now in its fourteenth year, has evolved each year to encompass new job titles as well as important industry and business trends within the plastics sector. This report remains one of the very few compensation reports dedicated exclusively to the plastics manufacturing industry. The 2016 report contains comprehensive analyses on nearly 60 different job classifications from plastics processing facilities across the United

States. The data in this report represent nearly 26,000 fulltime and part-time employees across 27 states. This year’s report includes eight additional job titles based on feedback from previous years, as well as a breakdown by US region. Slightly more than half (56 percent) of the job descriptions analyzed in this year’s report show wage changes above the current US inflation rate of 0.82 percent, when compared to the 2015 Wage and Salary Report. Overall, plastics manufacturing positions experienced an average of a two percent increase in wage/salary. Exactly 75 percent of plastics job titles experienced either stagnant salaries or some amount of growth in compensation. Roughly 13 percent of positions analyzed in this year’s report revealed a greater than five percent growth in wage/salary. More information can be found in this year’s report, available for purchase under the Publications tab on www.mappinc.com. n

You Can’t Argue with Results Stop Walking the Plant Floor: RJG Reveals Remote Machine Monitoring System RJG recently revealed The HubTM, a complete web application solution for managing injection molding plant floors. The Hub provides a simple interface that allows users to access, support and view all of the eDARTs on their network from a web browser. The Hub displays the number of machines that are running, how many are down, how much scrap is being produced, what changes have been made and more. It also automatically stores data from every shot, allowing users to view exactly how each job performed at any given time. With detailed job summary reports, managers can quickly deploy resources to fix issues the moment they occur and resolve ongoing problem areas. Job audit reports verify that each machine is running at the proper alarm and control settings and notify users of changes made during the job run. For more information, visit www.rjginc.com.

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www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 19


view from 30

The View from 30 Feet Business gurus often talk about the view from 30,000 feet – the big picture that provides a look at overall operations. Perhaps, however, the focus should be on the view from 30 feet – a close-up of specific processes and procedures that make an impact now.

Maximizing Mold Changeover Efficiency at Dorel Juvenile Products Dorel Juvenile Group in Columbus, Indiana, is the largest child car seat manufacturer in the world. The company’s 700 employees manufacture products sold under the Safety First, Costco and Eddie Bauer brands, and all molding is performed in the Columbus assembly plant on 68 injection molding machines. “Three years ago, we had 89 injection molding machines,” said Gabe Revell, operations manager and continuous improvement manager. “A few years before that, we had 100 molding machines. Capacity wasn’t an issue and our utilization numbers were less than 50 percent on every press category, so we didn't worry about changeover.”

by Dianna Brodine, managing editor, Plastics Business

Photo courtesy of Dorel Juvenile Group

Over time, however, older equipment was phased out and the facility began operating with fewer machines. Utilization climbed into the 80s and, rather than letting a mold sit in a press until it was needed again, changeovers happened with greater frequency – but, not much efficiency. “Changeovers were taking us four to six hours,” explained Revell. “To do that changeover, we would schedule a machine for a full eight-hour shift. We realized we were doing about 130 mold changes a month, and that was leading to a lot of lost time. We set a goal to accomplish mold changeovers in one hour, part to part. QMC Consortium shares information, processes At that same time, Troy Nix, executive director of Manufacturers Association of Plastics page 22 u

20 | plastics business • fall 2016


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view from 30 t page 20 Processors (MAPP), called to see if Dorel Juvenile Group would be interested in taking part in a mold change consortium. “We said not only would we be interested in participating in it, we'd like to host it,” Revell explained. The QMC Consortium consisted of 18 Indiana companies that were performing anywhere from five to 150 mold changes per week. The consortium defined a complete mold change as the amount of time consumed from the last good part of the old job to the first good part of the new job. The consortium members’ mold change times ranged from 30 minutes to six hours or longer, although the most common responses were in the range of 60 to 90 minutes. The majority of companies participating in the consortium had manually timed the mold change process, half had value streammapped their processes to make improvements and nearly a third had videotaped their processes to identify opportunities for change. That’s where Dorel Juvenile Group decided to start. Dorel digs deep to find bottlenecks “Once we agreed to host the consortium, we had a deadline to meet,” said Revell. “We felt one-hour mold changes were achievable without major investment, so the first thing we did was film a mold change.” “It was terrible,” he admitted. “Watching a six-hour mold change is rough. We had to plug the camera in because a camera battery won't last six hours, and at one point, the technician doing the change went to break. For 30 minutes, the press just sat there. It was excruciating.” However, the exercise provided a place to start. A team from Dorel watched the film and listed the steps involved in the mold change. At the time, Dorel was using one technician per mold change, so as each step was done on one side of the injection molding machine, the technician then had to walk around to the other side of the press to perform the same operation. “It was grueling to watch,” Revell said, “but it was necessary for us to understand where the waste was happening.” Uncovering the opportunities for improvement During the QMC Consortium event, Dorel staff presented all the activities that happened during mold changes – the order of the steps, the time each step took, the personnel involved – and the consortium attendees critiqued the process. “We took that input,” said Revell, “and looked at how we could

22 | plastics business • fall 2016

Additional Improvement Ideas Offered by QMC Consortium Participants • Use two cameras to film a mold change, with one mounted above the press for additional visibility into the process. • Dedicate tool carts specifically for mold changes. • Bring mold and tools to the press prior to machine stoppage. • Pre-dry material prior to changeover. • Plumb all water-to-water manifolds on mold with only one direct water line to each manifold. • Standardize clamps for all molds. • Invest in technology such as magnetic platens, shuttles, hydraulic clamping systems and master unit die bases. implement those ideas, but we also wanted to involve our mold change technicians in making changes to the process.” Staff from Purdue University's Manufacturing Extension Program (MEP) were present at the QMC Consortium and, after talking with them, Dorel Juvenile Group contracted with the MEP to assist with training. “We went through an initial session that was a lean overview as it relates to changeover,” he said. “It was very focused on what has value and what’s non-value-added. Value is only found when the machine is running and making parts, so we made a list of changeover steps that could done outside of the machine stopping.” The Purdue MEP consultants worked with the Dorel team to find solutions to objections and initial resistance. With input from those in the tool shop and maintenance shop, the changeover process was dissected step by step. Each time objections or concerns were raised by Dorel team members, those concerns were challenged until a resolution was achieved, and each person had direct input in finding ways to reduce mold changeover time. “The improvement team then trained their peers on the shift,” Revell explained. “Bringing someone in from the outside to work with our team added credibility to what we were trying to achieve,” he said. “And, it was critical that this wasn’t an order that came down from the management staff. Our team came up with the solutions – the


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guys who were doing the work needed to understand where the problems were and then come up with the best ways to fix them. We wanted them to believe in what they were doing and understand how it adds value to them and their jobs. Not doing that is probably why we’ve had less success with similar efforts in the past.” 60-minute changeovers are in reach The solutions were simple, but the impact has been immense. The mold changeover process at Dorel Juvenile Products was recently filmed again – in one hour and 20 minutes. “First, we made some process improvements,” said Revell. “There were issues with scheduling, planning and sequencing, so we spent time really thinking about how we were doing things.” Solutions included taking the mold to the press and having the crane ready before stopping the machine and having the tools press-side before beginning work. “These were simple things that the technicians didn't really think about until they watched themselves do the changeover,” he added. Another simple solution was implementing a two-person change. “We started understanding that two technicians are more than twice as fast as one technician once you remove the travel time around a machine,” he said.

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From the mold improvement standpoint, Dorel Juvenile Group standardized the hookups for water and hydraulics. “We also bought eyebolts for every mold,” Revell explained. “It seems silly, but the amount of time people spent looking for an eyebolt for a mold was ridiculous. That was an idea that came out of the consortium, so we spent a few hundred dollars to make sure one was located with each mold.” Revell acknowledged the company is still working on its onehour goal, but he’s proud that Dorel Juvenile Group has made no major investments or equipment purchases to accomplish the improvements. “Focusing on the process owners and engaging them in the solutions were the keys,” he said. “We could’ve gone out and bought tons of equipment and made huge investments, but if we didn't change the technicians’ approach to the problem, it wouldn't have changed anything.” n

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 23


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Election Results Create Path for Tax Changes by Michael J. Devereux II, CPA, CMP, partner, Mueller Prost

With Donald Trump winning the White House and Republicans maintaining majorities in both the US House of Representatives and US Senate, the prospect for tax reform and forthcoming business-friendly Department of the Treasury regulations is significant. While both parties agree on the need for tax reform, their visions for our future tax code are significantly different. The Republicans’ sweep in November 2016 creates a unique environment that has enhanced the likelihood of major changes to come. Likewise, a Trump administration is poised to roll back numerous Treasury regulations promulgated by President Obama to create a more business-friendly environment to allow US manufacturers to compete on the world stage. Much has changed since the last time the United States had a major overhaul of the tax code. When Ronald Reagan signed the Tax Reform Act of 1986 on Oct. 22, 1986, the world economy and US manufacturing were entirely different. Going into 2017, tax provisions in three competing plans will vie for a spot in a potential tax reform bill. President-elect Trump’s tax plan In the last months of Donald Trump’s campaign, he modified his tax plan to align his proposed tax rates/brackets to that of the US House of Representatives’ plan, condensing the seven existing tax brackets to three, with tax rates ranging from 12 percent to 33 percent. Trump’s plan will retain the existing capital gains rate, capped at 20 percent, while repealing the 3.8 percent Obamacare tax on investment and passive income. He proposed repealing the individual Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), too. For C Corporations, Trump’s tax plan lowers the top business tax rate from 35 percent to 15 percent and eliminates the corporate AMT. In addition, he proposes a one-time repatriation of corporate profits held offshore at a rate of 10 percent. Most credits and incentives would be eliminated, except for the Research & Development (R&D) tax credit, a provision of the code that most plastics processors use to reduce their overall federal and state tax liabilities. Under Trump’s tax plan, US plastics processors would be allowed to elect to expense capital expenditures for equipment and machinery. US House of Representatives: the Blueprint Throughout 2016, the US House of Representatives released six different plans to tackle various issues within our country, including poverty, national security, the economy, the Constitution, health care and tax reform. The Tax Reform “Blueprint,” as it’s identified

26 | plastics business • fall 2016

US House of Representatives Blueprint for Tax Reform and President-elect Trump’s Proposed Tax Rates Current Law

Blueprint

10% 15%

0% / 12%

25% 28% 33%

25% 33%

35% 39.6%

in the document released by Speaker Paul Ryan’s office, aims at simplifying the code, while increasing jobs and fueling growth. Here is a look at select provisions of the House Republicans tax plans that will affect plastics processors and their ownership groups: The Blueprint flattens and reduces the individual income tax brackets, condensing seven tax brackets to three. It proposes a maximum tax rate of 25 percent on small business income from sole proprietorships or pass-through entities (S Corporations, Partnerships and LLCs). The Blueprint repeals the individual AMT. Families and individuals would be able to deduct 50 percent of their net capital gains, dividends and interest income, leading to basic rates of 6 percent, 12.5 percent and 16.5 percent. Under this new approach for taxing small businesses, sole proprietorships and pass-through businesses will pay or be treated as having paid reasonable compensation to their owner-operators. Such compensation will be deductible by the business and will be subject to tax at the graduated rates for families and individuals. The compensation that is taxed at the lowest individual tax bracket rate of 12 percent effectively will further reduce the total income tax burden on these small businesses and pass-through entities. Moreover, the Blueprint lowers the corporate tax rate to a flat rate of 20 percent and repeals the corporate AMT. In addition, the Blueprint allows for the full and immediate expensing of the cost of investments, including tangible property (such as equipment and buildings) and intangible assets (such as intellectual property). The Blueprint allows corporations to deduct interest expense against interest income, with no current deduction for net interest


expense. Excess interest expense would be carried forward indefinitely and allowed against interest income in future tax years. The House Ways and Means Committee would develop special rules for financial services companies, such as banks, insurance companies and leasing companies. Finally, the plan allows net operating losses to be carried forward indefinitely, allows taxpayers to continue to use the last-in-first-out (LIFO) method of accounting and keeps the R&D tax credit. Senate Finance Committee: Corporate integration The US Senate has taken a completely different approach to tax reform. The Senate Finance Committee (SFC) believes the first step to tax reform is to level the playing field between C Corporations and pass-through entities (S Corporations, Partnerships and LLCs). In doing so, the SFC proposes the following: • allow C Corporations to deduct dividends paid; • impose withholding (35 percent) on dividends and interest; and • eliminate the preferential dividend rate. The SFC believes that by enacting these provisions, more companies will be organized as C Corporations, thus allowing Congress to enact tax reform for business and individuals as separate endeavors. Conclusion In addition to tax implications of the election, numerous Treasury regulations that affect plastics processors and their ownership groups have been issued in recent years. Some that have and could have a significant impact on the plastics industry include the tangible property regulations, research expenditure regulations, research credit regulations, domestic production activities deduction regulations, corporate inversions and limitations on discounts when transferring ownership to future generations. We expect the new administration to take a fresh look at these regulations and assess how they impact jobs and growth for our economy.

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While many believe the election results did not purport to provide a mandate to Congress and the future administration, one thing is for sure – changes are coming. Hopefully, these changes will help plastics processors as they compete in the world market. n Michael J. Devereux II, CPA, CMP, is a partner and director of Manufacturing, Distribution & Plastics Industry Services for Mueller Prost. Devereux’s primary focus is on tax incentives for the manufacturing sector. He serves on MAPP’s Board of Directors and has been a MAPP sponsor since 2006. Mueller Prost’s Tax Incentives Group is nationally recognized and has assisted numerous companies in the plastics industry capture these benefits. For more information, email mdevereux@ muellerprost.com or call 314.862.2070.

General Industrials Michael D. Benson mbenson@srr.com +1.248.432.1229

Plastics & Packaging David M. Evatz devatz@srr.com +1.312.752.3328

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Comau Introduces New Robots Comau, Turin, Italy, introduced the extension of its small robot family for quick applications in restricted spaces, including handling, assembly and pick and place, by introducing two new robots – Racer5-0.63 and Racer5-0.80. Both are controlled by the R1C 19" rack-mounted controller, which can be integrated into a single cabinet to control an entire line. The robots also are available in the openROBOTICS version where the robot is directly integrated into the existing machine/line automation controlled by B&R technologies. Both robots are built on the Racer3 technological platform, offering solutions that share the same components and parts, in a strategy aimed at expanding the integrated range of robots. Racer5-0.63 features a reach of 630mm and payload of 5kg. Racer5-0.80 is also rated for a payload of 5kg, but has an extended reach of 809mm. For more information, visit www.comau.com/EN.

ASACLEAN™ Introduces Next-Generation Purging Compound ASACLEAN™, Parsippany, New Jersey, introduced a new UF2 grade purging compound for blown and cast film extrusion applications, as well as injection molding. The UF2 grade purging compound enables faster changeovers for reduced equipment downtime, resulting in increased productivity and greater cost savings for plastics manufacturers. UF2 grade purging compound is recommended for color changes, material changes, hot runner cleaning and shutdown/sealing. Use of UF2 grade compound requires less product than competing products and results in quicker cleanup. With a processing temperature range of 170-320°C (340-610°F), ASACLEAN’s UF2 Grade requires 0.0004 (0.01mm) clearance for hot runner gates and extrusion dies. For more information, visit www.asaclean.com.

WITTMANN BATTENFELD Announces Smart Multi-Component Technology WITTMANN BATTENFELD, Kottingbrunn, Austria, announced the MicroPower 15/10H/10H. It is the first two-component machine of the all-electric MicroPower series designed for injection molding of small and micro parts. This 15-ton machine, equipped with two horizontal injection units and a rotary disk, can be used for either singlecomponent or two-component injection molding. This makes it possible to mold parts in different colors and/or made of different materials and/or produce two different parts simultaneously in one cycle, with two ejectors handling parallel ejection of the parts in the latter case. When using the machine for multi-component injection molding, the integrated rotary disk takes care of transporting the part to the second injection unit and back. The MicroPower multi-component machine also lends itself to liquid silicone injection molding or metal/ceramic powder injection molding. For more information, visit www.wittmann-group.com/en_us.html.

30 | plastics business • fall 2016


Toshiba Unveils All-Electric Injection Molding Machine Toshiba Machine, Elk Grove Village, Illinois, unveiled the ECSXII all-electric injection molding machine. The machine is capable of outputting extremely small shot sizes with precision and ease. Featuring a streamlined frame design, a re-engineered clamping unit and bushing-free, grease-free tie bars, this machine has greater performance and faster injection speeds. Enhancing the ECSXII is Toshiba’s V50, a built-in controller using realtime input to report molding conditions and automatically adjust mold settings for greater part repeatability and fewer rejects. The V50’s touchscreen interface and up to 40 optional userprogrammable outputs enable molders to customize machine cells without investing in additional OEM programming. For more information, visit www.toshiba-machine.com.

Frigel Extends Advanced Control Technology to Cooling Product Lines Frigel, Scandicci, Italy, extended its 3PR technology platform to its Microgel and Heavygel product lines, making it the only company that offers common control capabilities on three types of cooling systems, as well auxiliary components. The 3PR technology delivers the first availability of Wi-Fi and Ethernet connectivity in portable chillers so users can access crucial operating data, including temperatures, pressures, flow rates and energy use. Among the key features of the control technology is a 7-inch, full-color touchscreen. Users can easily view, control and optimize all aspects of their equipment based on real-time data across their network infrastructure, including building management systems. Unique to the Frigel control technology are on-board maintenance recommendations, as well as troubleshooting guides and event/ processing data history logs to ensure maximum equipment uptime. For more information, visit www.frigel.com.

iD Additives Announces New Division and Foaming Agent iD Additives, Inc., LaGrange, Illinois, announced it has opened a new division, iD LiquiD Systems™, devoted to the production of liquid colorants and additives in Flint, Texas. Caps and closures, toys, cutlery, bottles, packaging, housewares and other products are all good candidates for this technology. iD LiquiD Systems will distribute to the North American market from the Texas facility. Additionally, iD Additives has announced a new addition to its line of foaming agents, the iD High Temperature Foam, designed specifically for use with high-temperature resins. It features a low (less than two percent) LDR and is non-hydroscopic, so no material drying is required. It improves material flow and dimensional stability for both cosmetic and non-cosmetic applications. For more information, visit www.idadditives.com.

Chem-Trend Acquires Ultra Purge™ Chem-Trend, Howell, Michigan, announced it has acquired the business from Moulds Plus International to widen its product portfolio for thermoplastics processing operations. The purchase includes the brand Ultra Purge™ along with product and processing technologies and other business assets. Ultra Purge™ is a high-performance line of purging compound technologies sold throughout North America, Europe and parts of Asia and South America. The Ultra Purge™ line of purging compounds covers a broad range of thermoplastics applications, including injection molding, hot runners, caps and closures, PET preforms, blow molding extrusion, film extrusion, automotive and more. For more information, visit www.chemtrend.com. n

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 31


review

MAPP’s Annual Benchmarking & Best Practices Conference: Perseverance, The Secret of All Success When more than 500 plastics processors and industry partners gather in one place, the opportunities for sharing, learning and making valuable connections are immense. The JW Marriott in Indianapolis, Indiana, was once again the location of the 2016 MAPP Benchmarking & Best Practices Conference. The value in the annual event goes beyond inspiring keynote speakers, although attendees were on their feet in applause for Titan Gilroy, a former inmate who has become a media personality dedicated to the advancement of manufacturing, and Lt. Col. (retired) Rob “Waldo” Waldman, a fighter pilot who shared stories of his time in military combat and the wingmen who had his back, while encouraging the audience to identify the wingmen in their own organizations. Intense peer-to-peer discussions on issues common to every molding facility were found in formal roundtable sessions and during session breaks. Exchanges with industry experts on facility safety, competitive business models and best-in-class sales practices contributed to 36 intensely focused hours. Processors became professional speakers while sharing knowledge earned through struggles in their own organizations to overcome significant issues. Following the Perseverance theme, leaders from processing companies across the US spoke to fellow attendees about • Recovering from natural disasters that included Hurricane Katrina and a massive facility fire; •  Enduring an unexpected OSHA inspection and the lessons learned from the experience; • Slowing an employee exodus by focusing on morale to retain employees already committed to a company and attract new prospects.

Nix All photos courtesy of Corie Farnsley, CorComm Creative

32 | plastics business • fall 2016

On the second morning of the conference, operational and processing personnel gathered around tables to solve problems related to shift changes, cellphone use on the shop floor and procedure documentation; senior company leaders discussed challenges in finding qualified employees and reviewing new technologies; and human resources professionals queried others on training resources, employee retention plans and incentive programs. Other peer learning experiences at the 2016 event included sessions on 4DX, the internet of things, implementing a Zero Net Waste program and cooperative health care programs to reduce and control costs. The MAPP Benchmarking & Best Practices Conference will return to Indianapolis on Oct. 12-13, 2017.


Attending the MAPP conference bolstered our confidence in our current strategies of developing our people, developing our culture and working each day to eliminate waste at Viking. Networking with conference attendees provided meaningful opportunities to reflect on what we’re doing and how common our struggles are in the industry. Our team came away energized! – Shawn Gross, engineering manager, Viking Plastics

Bailey

Shift Your Brilliance – Harness the Power of You

Simon T. Bailey, Simon T. Bailey International Speaker and author Simon T. Bailey is the leader of the “brilliance” movement – helping more than one million people find their brilliance, shift their thinking and produce sustainable results. Bailey’s previous work experience includes serving as sales director at the world-renowned Disney Institute based at Walt Disney World Resort. In 2003, he founded Brilliance Institute, Inc., to teach companies how to grow their most important asset – people. Bailey spoke about the emotional equity that exists in “the way we’ve always done it,” which is a powerful force working against change. He said employees come to work and want to leave an impact, but often get caught up in a fast environment that has multiple priorities, but no clear vision. The resistance to new ideas leaves employees and management worn down and suffocates the brilliance that lies in individual thinking and enthusiasm, he said.

He challenged audience members to act as leaders within their organizations by doing the following: See Differently. Give your business a fresh start by looking at it and understanding it in a new way. Step outside of “the way it’s always been done” to see what possibilities exist. Build Rapport. Working with millennials requires a mindset shift to tap the energy, knowledge and potential of the younger generations. Make the effort to understand what they need from your organization. Learn to Listen. How do you listen authentically instead of having selective hearing? Do you truly understand what the people speaking to you are trying to convey? Create a Moment. For your customers and for your employees, how are you creating moments that will be remembered and have an impact? Those moments solidify the desire to work together, to succeed together and to build a deeper relationship.

Never Fly Solo!

Lt. Col. (retired) Rob “Waldo” Waldman Lt. Col. (retired) Rob “Waldo” Waldman is a professional leadership speaker and author of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller “Never Fly Solo.” He teaches organizations how to build trusting, revenue-producing relationships with their employees, partners and customers while sharing his experiences as a combat-decorated F-16 fighter pilot and businessman. He believes the key to building a culture of page 34 u

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 33


review t page 33 Every year, the MAPP Benchmarking Conference inspires me to be a better leader, a better follower and a more dynamic person in general. This year I was reminded that success doesn’t always come easily. The battles I am most proud of winning are the ones which took blood, sweat and tears to fight; the ones which shaped me as much as I shaped them; the ones that refined who I am and crystallized my resolve. – Carl “Tiger” Bartle, operations superintendent, Deluxe Plastics trust lies with a person’s wingmen – those people who help to overcome obstacles, adapt to change and achieve success. Waldo encouraged audience members to train their teams thoroughly for each mission, to build a company culture that promotes integrity and support and to lead their teams in a way that enables each member to become a wingman. To do so, Waldo – who was terrified of heights – told of the time he had to jump off a 33-foot diving board as part of his fighter pilot training. Thirty-three feet (which might as well have been a 500foot cliff) stood between Waldo and his dream career, so he took a deep breath and made the leap. He asked audience members, “What is your 33 feet? What is standing between you and your own success?” Successful wingmen are dedicated to the following principle commitments: Commitment to yourself. Complacency kills, and a commitment to yourself means never settling into a habit of complacency. “Your comfort zone is your danger zone,” and a wingman has to be ready to get out of that comfort zone. A wingman is always willing to stretch himself, even in the face of difficult changes and adversity. Commitment to the mission. Waldo recounted stories of his days as a fighter pilot in which he committed to

34 | plastics business • fall 2016

learning and practicing for missions because a wingman is always mission ready. This commitment to mission encouraged audience members to always be prepared and be ready with a contingency plan, which builds trust in their teammates. Commitment to the team. When you know who your wingmen are and who you’re a wingman for, you ensure that you never fly solo. Leaders build trust with their teammates by supporting, collaborating and watching for potential threats. True wingmen do not focus on ranks or titles, but on building up everyone in their team. Commitment to courage. “Lose sight, lose fight,” is the motto for this commitment. Leaders are ready to take action despite fear, apprehension or ego. Audience members were encouraged to reflect on their own purpose and to be ready to take risks to fulfill that purpose. A wingman’s courage allows him to help, ask for help and let teammates know he will not let them fail.

Everyday Leadership

Bill Clement, Two-Time Stanley Cup Champion Two-time Stanley Cup champion Bill Clement is a speaker, broadcaster, actor, entrepreneur and author. His new book, “EveryDay


Leadership – Crossing Gorges on Tightropes to Success,” introduces valuable life lessons linked to leadership and success, all born from the devastation of personal and financial defeat. Clement was a championship hockey player with the Philadelphia Flyers. An AllStar center, he fought Clement through injury to help the Flyers win two Stanley Cups, but when his career ended, he suffered through depression and bankruptcy before finding new career opportunities in the broadcasting booth and acting. With touching stories and laugh-out-loud humor, Clement reflected on his time in the National Hockey League and the lessons he learned from those he skated with, those he worked for and those he led as a captain of his team. First and foremost, leaders – whether on the hockey ice or in the business world – need to earn trust and respect. That comes from day-to-day behavior in the workplace witnessed by those you are trying to lead. Everyday leaders do the following: Embrace challenges. From competition from rivals to economic downturns and the struggle to recruit youth

During the break/networking sessions, the contacts we made were invaluable. We connected with a marketing company, an additives supplier and a consulting group. They were all amazingly aligned with our needs, and we are moving forward with making business improvements with their assistance. – Shelley Fasano, vice president operations, Dymotek Molding Technologies

to the industry, Clement explained that leaders embrace and attack those challenges, rather than ignoring them or waiting for others to provide solutions. Leave yesterday behind. Whether wins or losses, leaders leave the events of the previous day or year in the past and look ahead with vision, strategy and enthusiasm. Be an energy source. Every organization has those who suck the energy from the room and those who light others up. Be someone others can plug into for encouragement. Give more to their cultures than they take. Those who lead put more into their organizations – more energy, more knowledge, more resources – than they remove. Pull people, as opposed to pushing people. A leader who forces employees or coworkers to perform tasks, rather than encouraging them to follow, is never effective – or at least, not for long. n

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 35


solutions

Bemis Manufacturing Wins Inaugural Educational Outreach Contest TASUS and Plastikos also honored Filling the human resources pipeline with qualified candidates is one of the greatest challenges in manufacturing. Many plastics processors have established outreach efforts to assist in educating their local communities about the opportunities available for careers in manufacturing, but communication silos exist that keep other manufacturing companies across the US from recreating successful peer efforts. To share knowledge and celebrate success, the Manufacturers Association for Plastics Processors (MAPP) held the first Educational Outreach Contest in recognition of manufacturers who work to engage young people in the manufacturing industry. Member companies were asked to provide a description of how their organizations are working with local schools, programs or students to raise awareness and build interest in the plastics industry. The association membership voted online after reviewing the entries, and winners were announced in coordination with Manufacturing Day on Oct. 7. The contest is set to become an annual event. The winner of the first place award is Bemis Manufacturing, Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin. TASUS Corporation, Bloomington, Indiana, received second place, and Plastikos of Erie, Pennsylvania, was third. Selections from each company’s submission information follow, providing an insight into outreach efforts by fellow plastics manufacturing companies. First Place: Bemis Manufacturing Company, Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin Bemis Manufacturing Company has not only been engaged in working with local middle and high schools in providing students with skill sets needed to succeed in the new economy, but also is providing the leadership to promote the plastics industry. • Scott Kuehn is the new chairperson for Project GRILL. Project G.R.I.L.L. stands for Growing Readiness in Learning & Leading

36 | plastics business • fall 2016

and showcases manufacturing career opportunities to high school students through real world design, production and distribution. Its unique blend of cooperation among manufacturers (sponsors), high schools, teachers, students and parents creates a learning environment where students truly experience the manufacturing process. The journey begins with students creating a “mini” organizational chart, determining who will lead the team and who will take care of the finances, inventory of materials, etc. It continues through design, purchase and fabrication. This effort concludes 10 months later with a fully functional barbecue grill. Learn more at www.projectgrill.com. • Bemis has provided opportunities for high school students to participate in youth apprenticeships through Lakeshore Technical College. Students go through an interview process for the specific area of interest, (i.e., finance, engineering, manufacturing, etc.). Once the students are selected, they are assigned to a Bemis mentor, and for the next 10 months they will spend in excess of 200 hours during the summer and an additional 250 hours during the school year learning and page 38 u


Life & Times

of RJG’s Detect Process Inconsistencies

Packing & Filling Variation

Industries Served

Cooling Variation

Mold Deflection

Where have eDARTs been purchased?

31 different countries

eDART introduced

2002

 Auto

Valve Gate Software introduced

2006

 Electronics

flx - Abnormal Part Containment system released

 Packaging

 Aerospace

2008 7 Ways the eDART Can Help Molders Abnormal Part Containment Produce Repeatable Parts Run Processes Based on Templates Detect Process Inconsistencies

RJG, INC. www.rjginc.com

eDART Milestones

2000

 Medical

 White Goods

Back Pressure Variation

Networking introduced with the eDART Data Manager (EDM)

2009

conx - process stabilization system released & original system renamed apex

2012

v10 touch screen software released

2014

Determine Causes of Processing Problems

2-Shot software released

Adjust Process Conditions in Real Time

2016

Eliminate Manual Sorting

The Hub™ networking will be released


solutions t page 36 applying lessons learned through the mentor and associates in the given field of interest. • Bemis has concluded its third year of Teacher Externships with Sheboygan Falls High School. For one week, nine teachers participated in a Monday through Friday immersion. The week involves 25 Bemis associates who participate by presenting and discussing their specific responsibilities. The importance of quality tool design, engineering, customer relationships, supplier importance, quality, processing and other topics are covered in detail. On Wednesday, a day coined as “Supplier Day,” local suppliers to Bemis are visited. The teachers get an inside view of other manufacturers in the area, demonstrating the importance of the supply chain. The week ends with a “graduation” of sorts, thanking the teachers for their time and efforts. These externships have changed how teachers are approaching their lesson preparations. Example: A math teacher has developed story problems simulating actual challenges that engineers and quality employees face each day. Cost of plastic, size of part, cycle times and screw geometry are just a few of the criteria now being factored into lessons to produce a quality injection molded part.

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• Bemis works with and has invested in Red Raider Manufacturing (RRM), which will support all students attending either Sheboygan North or South high schools with the technical curriculum necessary to succeed in this new economy. Welding, engineering, design and robot programming are some of the skill sets students will learn. The credits they earn can be applied to a post-high school technical college. • Working with a machine partner from Cincinnati, Bemis secured a 33-ton Roboshot injection molding machine from Milacron for Sheboygan Falls High School. This may be the first injection molding machine consigned to a high school in the country. Working with SFHS technical education instructor Ed Hughes, who has developed curriculum around the machine cell, students have the ability to learn about mold building, machine operation, chemistry, engineering, processing and related skills. Second Place: TASUS, Bloomington, Indiana TASUS continually strengthens and grows its relationship with the surrounding community by being involved in education in a variety of ways. Through the company’s involvement in various programs, TASUS hopes to build interest in plastics manufacturing while helping to change the negative perceptions associated with the industry. The challenge is not only changing perceptions of the students, but also of their parents, teachers and counselors. According to a 2014 study by the Manufacturing Institute and Deloitte, only 37 percent of respondents would encourage their children to pursue a career in manufacturing. However, those with high industry familiarity supported manufacturing apprenticeship and degree programs more than 70 percent of the time. Through these programs, TASUS hopes to reach students, parents, teachers and counselors to spread awareness of the great career opportunities in manufacturing, changing the perceptions moving forward. • For the past decade, TASUS has had an ongoing relationship with Hoosier Hills Career Center because of its focus on students entering STEM-related career fields. TASUS has continually taken internships from the Hoosier Hills Career Center. In 2016, Brandon, one of those interns, became a part of the R&D team. The company worked with his schedule, and he balanced finishing his senior year and interning at TASUS in the afternoon. During his time there, Brandon traveled to the TASUS plant in Alabama and helped on several automation projects. He will go to Vincennes University in the spring to pursue his engineering degree. TASUS will continue taking interns from Hoosier Hills and plans to look for more this spring. • Every year, TASUS attends the CTE (Career Technical Education) Summit. The summit connects local businesses and


colleges with high school students to prepare them for possible career paths. TASUS participated in rap sessions, where students interacted with TASUS employees through games that educated them on the manufacturing industry. TASUS also participated in a career booth, networking with students. The event was successful, and TASUS will continue participating each year. • TASUS has also partnered with the Hoosier Hills Career Center for the Youth Employability Skills (Y.E.S!) Comprehensive Curriculum and Virtual Tours. The company became involved with Y.E.S! because it starts as early as the 8th grade preparing students to enter careers in the manufacturing industry after graduation. The current collaboration between TASUS and Hoosier Hills Career Center is a video tour of the plant that can be shared with students for years to come. The video will showcase what goes on in the day-to-day operations, employees’ insight on a variety of positions, as well as the great benefits of working at TASUS. Additionally, through this program the company will be involved in mock interviews and industry discussion panels at regional high schools. Third Place: Plastikos, Inc., Erie, Pennsylvania Over the last three years, sister companies Plastikos, Inc. and Micro Mold Co., Inc., have hosted more than 18 plant tours focused around continued education and career development for local students. During these tours, more than 100 students ranging from grade school to high school have been exposed to manufacturing operation and industry. • Plastikos and Micro Mold host facility tours for students ranging from middle school to college level. Through a partnership with CareerStreet – a career exploration and planning nonprofit program that helps bridge the gap between educators and companies within the Erie region – Plastikos provides students and teachers with touring experiences. The Minority College Experience/Women

in Science and Engineering (MCE/WISE) Program at Penn State Behrend also has visited Plastikos’ facility to show up-and-coming engineers what it is like to work in a manufacturing environment. Machine and/or equipment demonstrations are performed, and physical part samples are placed on display for the students so they understand the connection between the parts Plastikos manufactures and the products they eventually will become. • Plastikos and Micro Mold offer seasonal, part-time and fulltime paid internship opportunities to students ranging from high school to college level. School comes first, so Plastikos customizes each student’s internship schedule around his or her classes. Internships for high school students are less job-specific than those at the collegiate level, with a rotation program whereby a student is exposed to each department (e.g. product inspection, mold setup or production). On average, Plastikos and Micro Mold employ three to four interns each year and have created seven new full-time positions over the years for those students who excelled during the internship process. • At Micro Mold, a custom four-year apprenticeship program is available to individuals who would like to become toolmakers. The program requires 8,000 hours of on-the-job training as well as 576 hours of structured classes. At Plastikos and Micro Mold, apprentices are considered full-time employees; therefore, apprentices are fully compensated for their work during this training period and afforded the wide range of benefits that all members of the team enjoy. Additionally, the company also pays for tuition and other expenses for classes that are required outside the workplace to complete the apprenticeship program. n

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management

Using a B.O.L.D. Approach to Succeed in an Unpredictable Business World by Jill Johnson, president, Johnson Consulting Services

Our economic, political and social environment is exceptionally volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. It has become increasingly difficult to develop strategies for success when every time you turn around there is another challenge that threatens your enterprise survival. One of the most effective methods you can employ to navigate in this unstable business climate is to take a B.O.L.D. Approach. This four-point framework will focus your strategic mindset on gaining the insight and critical skills you need to thrive.

B

Business Strategy. Grow your organization with purpose and prosperity. Rethink your approach to planning. Stop engaging in strategic planning focused on fun, bonding events where you vision-quest about idealistic wishes for your future, resulting in ineffective plans and written reports that collect dust. Focus instead on grounding your planning efforts by gaining the information and insight you need to develop effective business strategies. Leverage the emerging opportunities available to you, and minimize the risks that an uncertain business landscape creates for your enterprise. Those who thrive in an unstable environment focus on understanding the potential future of evolving trends. So, what do you do now? Let go of old ideas. Coalesce your business strategies around innovation and adaption. Build your sustainable success on a viable future that is grounded in a full understanding of your situation, not on wishful thinking. Manage your transitions effectively by hiring more sophisticated talent to match your evolving needs. Consider how you can leverage new opportunities to enhance your operation and profitability.

O

Opportunities. Uncover the potential in your market to achieve sales results. Effective strategic planning in turbulent times requires a deep assessment of your market opportunities. This environment is driven by significant market forces influencing your enterprise success and long-term potential. These market forces impact your business lifecycle and the ongoing value of your product or service

42 | plastics business • fall 2016

offerings to your consumers. You must fully understand the impact of the market forces determining your ability to survive and thrive. Staying close to your target market is crucial to your long-term success. But market needs, wants and desires change over time. You must understand how your market is changing and why. To remain relevant, you need to determine what you need to change to meet those evolving market needs. Key market forces impact most businesses today. These include shifting demographics, competitive actions, fluid economic conditions, unstable capital markets, governmental interference impacting regulations and reimbursement, technology evolution, and workforce skills and capabilities. Industry changes as organizations adapt to these forces and generational shifts. You have no control over these market forces. Yet, you continually have to adapt and adjust your strategies to respond to them.

L

Leadership. Lead with confidence and effectiveness. It takes many, many hours to master a skill or hone your expertise. Don’t expect to be an effective leader in the beginning. It takes time. Building your insight to effectively navigate stormy strategic waters will take time, too. Asking the right questions is the foundation of an effective strategic mindset. Yet, learning to ask the right questions is extremely difficult because most people only ask superficial questions that have easy answers. Asking challenging questions allows you to deepen your understanding of the impact of each market force and its influence on your long-term potential for success. Effective leaders in turbulent times are not afraid to listen to divergent perspectives. They understand that their ability to take corrective action before things go completely haywire requires candor from their teams and a full understanding of the market forces. Confident leaders use objective advisers to get to the truth and to push their teams. Look for real expertise that has proven results. Stay away from advisers offering strong sales hype and marketing sizzle. They can do lasting damage to your enterprise. page 44 u


Indianapolis, IN, October 14th, 2016 – Eighteen plastics executives met by exclusive invitation to identify critical people issues and share best practices. Request your free copy of this industry report “People are not Plastic!” Report reveals: • Tools to address widening skills gap. • How to address “brain drain” caused by retiring boomers. • Effective millennial management strategies. • Engagement practices to get employees “back in the game.”

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management t page 42

D

Decision-Making. Gain the clarity you need to thrive. Effective decision-making in an uncertain and unstable world begins with a desire for clarity. Gaining clarity requires a complete and candid understanding of your situation. Truth gives you information. Well-researched information gives you insight. Insight gives you the clarity you need to set the right priorities and focus your team on the most critical activities impacting your success. Make sure you are not operating under a false set of assumptions that were correct at one time but have not been updated to reflect your current situation. If your assumptions are wrong, your ability to make good decisions will be severely limited by your skewed viewpoint. It is critical that you reassess your assumptions about the future. Getting the right information for effective decision-making is essential. Look for more than superficial answers to the critical issues you face. Be willing to invest the time and money to bring in a fresh and different point of view to discover the truth. The value of taking a B.O.L.D. approach? By taking a B.O.L.D. approach, you will integrate an action plan for uncertainty into every facet of your strategic mindset.

By asking challenging questions to understand your current and evolving situation, you will build confidence that you are developing the business strategies to enhance your success. You will uncover the potential in your markets. You will be a more confident and effective leader. You will make better decisions. As a result, others will be more confident in following your lead. If you demand more of yourself and your team, they will think more strategically, become more effective leaders, make better decisions and achieve results designed to create lasting success for your enterprise. So, take action now. What is the first B.O.L.D. step you will make to address the impact of uncertainty and volatility in your enterprise? n Jill Johnson is the president and founder of Johnson Consulting Services, a highly accomplished speaker and an award-winning management consultant. Johnson helps her clients make critical business decisions and develop market-based strategic plans for turnarounds or growth. Her consulting work has impacted nearly $4 billion worth of decisions. She has a proven track record of dealing with complex business issues and getting results. For more information, visit www.jcs-usa.com.

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Advanced Injection Molding Simulation of Fiber-Filled Materials Improving mechanical properties and/or weight reduction requires finding ways to improve stiffness while reducing weight. Fiber-filled polymer materials have been the number one choice to accomplish these goals, but the transition has not been easy or straightforward. The primary challenge has been that increasing fiber content in polymers makes their shrinkage more difficult to predict and control. Adding the fiber content into polymers to enhance their mechanical properties further increases the complexity of understanding how the final part will perform. Aspects such as rotation of fibers during filling, final fiber orientation, fiber degradation, higher fiber fill content, anisotropic shrinkage and long glass fibers are just a variety of examples of the daily challenges plastic manufacturers encounter. The replacement of metal parts with fiber-filled polymers has been a significant uphill battle for the injection molding industry.

by Matt Proske, vice president, SIGMA Plastic Services, Inc. Matt Proske holds a degree in manufacturing engineering from Kent State University and has 20 years of experience in aluminum casting, highpressure die casting and injectionmolded polymers. SIGMASOFT® Virtual Molding is a comprehensive process model used to allow polymer processors significant insight into the production system in advance of building. Virtual Molding’s broad suite of software modules allow companies to optimize their molding systems on every project, whether simple or complex. For more information, visit www.virtualmolding.us.

Understanding the behavior of thermoplastics in the injection molding process Each polymer has individual material properties and, as such, behaves differently under the same conditions, resulting in the need for processing changes when different polymer grades are used. Thermoplastics behave differently according to their polymer structure, which can be subdivided as semi-crystalline and amorphous material types. One fundamental characteristic common among all thermoplastic materials is their nonNewtonian flow behavior: Viscosity decreases with increasing shear rates. The change in viscosity as a function of shear rate creates the commonly known fountain flow, which exists when the melt front at the center of the wall thickness flows ahead of the melt at the walls (Figure 1). The polymer viscosity also is affected by the addition of fillers into the material, where – depending on the type of filler and filler content – it can increase/ decrease the viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, shrinkage and crystallinity. A second characteristic also common among thermoplastics is their tendency to shrink volumetrically during the cooling process. However, the shrinkage is often nonuniform.

Note: All figures provided by SIGMA Plastic Services, Inc. Figure 1. Fountain flow sketch compared to wall thickness cross section using SIGMASOFT® Virtual Molding

46 | plastics business • fall 2016


The time- and temperature-dependent nature of the polymer during the injection molding process can and will affect the stress field in the part. This is related to their polymer structure and fillers, but also dependent on processing choices and local mold temperatures, resulting in differential cooling. During the injection molding process, a hot melt is introduced into a cold mold over multiple consecutive cycles. The reproduction of the same process over these multiple cycles creates a quasi-steady state during which the mold will maintain the same temperature changes throughout each cycle and produce very similar part quality during a production run. Another characteristic is the viscoelastic nature and behavior of polymers, which can directly influence the final mechanical properties. The time- and temperature-dependent nature of the

polymer during the injection molding process can and will affect the stress field in the part. The Young’s modulus of the material increases in the areas where the melt solidifies and remains low at the molten areas. The differential cooling of the part will affect how the local stresses are created, while the part is constrained by the mold during the cooling time. The constraint of the mold disappears when the product is removed from the mold. Stresses in the article relax, and the article continues to cool and shrink outside of the mold – all in a nonuniform way. Similarly, a fiber-reinforced material will still show the viscoelastic behavior, but also will have an anisotropic shrinkage (orientation affects local shrinkage rates). The use of fibers in polymer materials helps in transferring some of the stresses to the fibers, increasing the mechanical properties. The type of fiber, aspect ratio, fiber content and fiber length will affect the injection molding process. Fibers oriented in the flow direction vs. cross-flow will produce this differential shrinkage, as well as the final anisotropic strength and stiffness (Figure 2). Final fiber page 48 u

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training room t page 47

Figure 2. Fiber orientation with respect to inlet location and wall thickness location

orientation between the surface and middle regions of the wall thickness throughout the entire part will not be the same and will introduce a multiaxial stress in the interior. Molten material entering into the cavity during packing also will affect the fiber orientation. Reproducing the behavior of thermoplastics in computational simulations The proper reproduction of the thermoplastic behavior using computational simulations not only relies on the quality of the material data, but also on the meshing technology and the models used by the solvers to calculate physical behavior.

four categories: thermophysical, rheological, mechanical and morphology. Similarly, mold and insert materials also must be described with thermophysical and mechanical properties. Once the material properties are measured, the information is imported into the material database calculator and fitted using models that will be used by the solver. The solver requires a mesh, which is a system composed of finite volumes and points of calculation. In order to easily mesh the complete complex molding

The polymer properties are measured using a series of tests that capture the essence of their physical nature. The properties needed to simulate the molding process can be divided into

Figure 3. 3D CAD and FVM mesh in SIGMASOFTÂŽ Virtual Molding

48 | plastics business • fall 2016

Figure 4. SIGMASOFTÂŽ Virtual Molding injection molding process setup


Figure 5. Temperature change during injection molding cycle

The Material Advantage

Figure 6. Mold temperature change over multiple consecutive cycles

system composed of multiple different materials and individual geometries, a finite volume method mesh (FVM) is used. Simulating the injection molding process of a fiber-filled material The FVM mesh always represents a three-dimensional calculation using the Fourier and Navier-Stokes equations of heat transfer, and mass, energy and momentum considering gravity and inertia. The heat and fluid flow of the injection molding process are calculated simultaneously using parallelized computing power limited only to the hardware capabilities. This coupled simulation removes the necessity of boundary conditions and ideal temperatures by simulating the exact injection molding process. page 50 u

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 49


training room t page 49 A thorough and extensive introduction of the challenges to reproduce the injection molding process was necessary to define the differences between part design analysis and comprehensive process simulation. Comprehensive process simulation includes the injection molding process utilizing all the mold components, heating/ cooling system, inserts, part and polymer delivery system (gate, runner, hot runner) with independent thermodynamic, rheological, mechanical and morphology properties. This is possible due to the ability to generate a mesh of the entire tool using the FVM (Figure 3).

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Ice on Fire

Such a comprehensive model computes the molding process over multiple consecutive production cycles using a predefined process (Figure 4). The mold loses heat to the environment at the surface when in the open position and transfers heat across the parting line when closed. The cold and hot areas are easily identified and based on the temperature history, as well as cooling layout. The temperature change in the mold is based on the local shear rates and melt temperatures entering the cavity over multiple cycles. The ability and effectivity of the properties of the mold materials and cooling lines to dissipate the heat, maintaining a uniform surface temperature (Figures 5 and 6), also is factored. When simulating fiber-filled materials, the orientation can be tracked down at any time during the process and at the surface or subsurface regions. It is crucial to understand the effect of the gate locations in the final fiber orientation. The fibers will have a flow-induced fiber orientation during filling. As the part cools down and the material shrinks, externally applied pressure (called packing pressure) forces melt into the cavity to compensate for the contracting material. Thus, the fiber orientation changes continuously during the filling and packing process. Figures 7 and 8 show some examples of fiber orientation changes due to number of gates, gate locations and changes to the molding process for filling and packing definitions. The ability to force more melt into the mold cavity during packing changes based on the gate locations, packing pressure and packing time. During the packing phase the material begins to solidify at different rates, depending on the local temperatures and part design (wall thickness). There are areas where the material will become isolated and will not be compensated for the liquid shrinkage. Isolated areas increase the possibility for higher sink marks and voids. Figure 9 shows the areas that remain connected to packing (red), isolated (blue) and solidified (transparent) at different times during packing and cooling.


Figure 7. Fiber orientation differences; flow vs. cross flow on surface

Figure 8. Flow-induced fiber orientation at three injection molding stages

Figure 9. Part Solidifications during packing and cooling

Local stresses will differ within the part as a result of differential cooling and when the shrinking occurs. Areas that remain molten for a longer period of time will have a lower modulus in contrast with the solidifying areas with higher modulus. In addition, the part will be constrained by the mold as it solidifies. There is a possibility of the part sticking into the mold as a result of extended cycle times. The force required to eject the part may exceed its modulus and puncture it or leave a mark behind. Furthermore, the applied forces to certain areas will increase the local stresses (Figures 10 and 11). This often is the result of improper cooling within the mold. Isolated hotspots can drive extended cycle times.

Figure 10. Part displacement during ejection

Figure 11. Local stresses after ejection

Figure 12. Effect on fiber orientation and part distortion using two different gating configurations

differential cooling, fiber orientation (in this example), packing time, cooling time and part ejection. The complex nature of manufacturing processes essentially requires specifically developed software programs to capture enough detail of the real process that the root cause of realworld problems can be understood and resolved. n

The final distortion of the part (Figure 12) is a combination of all the above described calculations: independent properties of each material, full process information, multiple cycles,

www.plasticsbusinessmag.com | 51


booklist

Event Speakers Make Recommendations Selections Suggested by Speakers at the 2016 MAPP Benchmarking & Best Practices Conference

Whether a keynote presenter or a member of the MAPP association sharing personal experiences, event speakers referenced books that have influenced them. From leading through daily actions to achieving strategic priorities, these five books were recommended or written by those who presented. Shift Your Brilliance

Author: Simon T. Bailey Released: April 21, 2014 This book is your roadmap, your call to action, your opportunity to create accelerated results professionally, personally and financially. It is time for you to turn every day into a brilliant breakthrough. Shift Your Brilliance will teach strategies for sharpening your focus, steps to clear your vision, actions to harness individual and organizational potential, tools to unearth what really sets you on fire and tips on how to become a Chief Breakthrough Officer.

The Gift of Fear and Other Survival Instincts That Protect Us from Violence Author: Gavin De Becker Release Date: May 11, 1999

Gavin de Becker, the man Oprah Winfrey calls the nation’s leading expert on violent behavior, shows you how to spot even subtle signs of danger – before it’s too late. Shattering the myth that most violent acts are unpredictable, de Becker offers specific ways to protect yourself and those you love, including ... how to act when approached by a stranger ... when you should fear someone close to you ... what to do if you are being stalked ... how to uncover the source of anonymous threats or phone calls ... the biggest mistake you can make with a threatening person ... and more.

The 4 Disciplines of Execution: Achieving Your Wildly Important Goals

Author: Chris McChesney, Sean Covey, Jim Huling Released: April 24, 2012 The 4 Disciplines of Execution (4DX) is a simple, repeatable, and proven formula for executing on your most important strategic priorities in the midst of the

52 | plastics business • fall 2016

whirlwind. By following The 4 Disciplines, leaders can produce breakthrough results, even when executing the strategy requires a significant change in behavior from their teams. 1. Focusing on the Wildly Important 2. Acting on Lead Measures 3. Keeping a Compelling Scoreboard 4. Creating a Cadence of Accountability 4DX is not theory. It is a proven set of practices that have been tested and refined by hundreds of organizations and thousands of teams over many years.

Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead Author: Sheryl Sandberg Release Date: March 12, 2013

Thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. This means that women’s voices are still not heard equally in the decisions that most affect our lives. In Lean In, Sheryl Sandberg examines why women’s progress in achieving leadership roles has stalled, explains the root causes and offers compelling, commonsense solutions that can empower women to achieve their full potential.

Everyday Leadership: Crossing Gorges on Tightropes to Success Author: Bill Clement Released: 2011

As a speaker, few can match the impact Bill Clement has on his audiences around the world. Drawing from his experience as a business owner, entrepreneur, actor, broadcaster and two-time Stanley Cup Champion, this inspirational autobiography recounts many of Clement’s successes but is also brutally honest about his failures and having to rebuild success after complete financial and emotional defeat. n Book summaries provided by the publishing entity.


We’re everywhere. Since 1958, the pharmaceutical and medical industry has come to rely on the technology and expertise INCOE extends. From pill bottles and medical disposables, to highly engineered components vital to advanced diagnostic technology, INCOE has provided customers innovative hot runner systems and creative solutions which have ensured they remain productive and competitive. After all, when you compete in an uncompromising and demanding marketplace, you can’t afford to leave your molding solutions to just anyone. Look to INCOE... we’re tried, tested and true.

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advertisers A-1 Tool Corporation...............................................................................................a1toolcorp.com................................................................................................................ 25 Amco Polymers.........................................................................................................amcopolymers.com......................................................................................................... 13 ASACLEAN/Sun Plastech Inc.................................................................................asaclean.com.........................................................................................Inside Front Cover B A Die Mold...........................................................................................................badiemold.com................................................................................................................ 24 Carson Tool & Mold.................................................................................................carsonmold.com.............................................................................................................. 25 Chase Plastics............................................................................................................chaseplastics.com............................................................................................................ 38 ChemTrend...............................................................................................................chemtrend.com.............................................................................................................. 6, 7 Conair........................................................................................................................conairgroup.com/promise................................................................................ Back Cover Concept Molds, Inc...................................................................................................conceptmolds.com.......................................................................................................... 25 Crestcom...................................................................................................................crestcomleadership.com.................................................................................................. 43 Extreme Tool & Engineering....................................................................................extremetool.com.............................................................................................................. 24 Federated Insurance..................................................................................................federatedinsurance.com.................................................................................................. 47 Frigel.........................................................................................................................frigel.com........................................................................................................................ 27 Grainger....................................................................................................................grainger.com......................................................................................... Inside Back Cover Harbour Results, Inc.................................................................................................harbourresults.com.......................................................................................................... 15 Ice Miller LLP...........................................................................................................icemiller.com.................................................................................................................. 50 INCOE Corporation..................................................................................................incoe.com........................................................................................................................ 53 IQMS........................................................................................................................iqms.com........................................................................................................................... 3 Ivanhoe Tool & Die Company, Inc...........................................................................ivanhoetool.com.............................................................................................................. 25 Jade Group International...........................................................................................jademolds.com................................................................................................................ 23 M. Holland................................................................................................................mholland.com.................................................................................................................. 43 MAPP (Manufacturers Association for Plastics Processors)........................................mappinc.com................................................................................................................... 54 MBS (Molding Business Services)...........................................................................moldingbusiness.com...................................................................................................... 19 Mold Craft.................................................................................................................mold-craft.com................................................................................................................ 24 Mueller Prost.............................................................................................................muellerprost.com............................................................................................................ 23 Novatec.....................................................................................................................novatec.com.............................................................................................................. 28, 29 OCTEX.....................................................................................................................octexlabs.com.................................................................................................................. 49 Paulson Training Programs, Inc................................................................................paulsontraining.com/MAPP............................................................................................ 11 Polymer Technology & Services .............................................................................ptsllc.com........................................................................................................................ 49 RJG, Inc....................................................................................................................rjginc.com....................................................................................................................... 37 SIGMA Plastic Services, Inc....................................................................................3dsigma.com................................................................................................................... 45 SRR (Stout Risius Ross)...........................................................................................srr.com............................................................................................................................ 27 South Bend Lathe Co. ..............................................................................................southbendlathe.com.................................................................................................. 40, 41 Superior Tooling.......................................................................................................sti-nc.com........................................................................................................................ 25 Synventive Molding Solutions..................................................................................synventive.com............................................................................................................... 50 Tooling Docs ............................................................................................................toolingdocs.com/tour...................................................................................................... 21 Ultra Purge/ChemTrend............................................................................................chemtrend.com................................................................................................................ 17 VIVE – Marketing for Manufacturers......................................................................vive4mfg.com................................................................................................................. 10 Wittmann Battenfeld.................................................................................................wittmann-group.com....................................................................................................... 39 Yushin America, Inc.................................................................................................yushinamerica.com......................................................................................................... 44

54 | plastics business • fall 2016


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Plastics Business - Fall 2016  

Plastics Business - Fall 2016