Page 1


Peter McEntee ARCH 513.01 Comprehesive Studio Prof. Roberto Viola Ochoa RWU SAAHP I Fall 2012

CONTENTS


1 INTRODUCTION 2 CONTEXT 3 SITE ANALYSIS 4 CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK 5 TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS 6 APPENDIX


INTRODUCTION


Nostalgia is something everyone longs for when times are bad. It is this nostalgic reflection that gives people hope for a better future. War is one of those cases that brought much destruction to Germany, but those nostalgic memories give Germany the strength rebuild itself back to its former glory. As an introduction to a semester long design process with the goal of brining back the life Germany once had. A nostalgic revival. Berlin is one of Germany’s oldest and largest cities to this day. It flourished from its earliest years through the Industrial Revolution, but hit a wall litteraly around the time of the Cold War. Seperated from its people, culture, and art that to this day still is not 100% retrieved from past events. Even one of Germany’s most famous photographer’s was driven out around the time of World War II, Helmut Newton. Kulturforum is Berlin’s central hub for everything to do with its cutural expertise. Film, Museum’s, Galleries, and anything that represents a cultural significance is located in this area. Many distinct architectural landmarks surround the site that will develop into the new Helmut Newton Foundation which is located West of the center of Potsdamer Platz. Mies Van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie and Sharoun’s Philharmonic are just two of the inspirations that make this site of much value and importance to the region of Berlin. Investigating into this area is necessary to update Kulturforum as the cultural headquarter’s and bring new inspiration to an area that is still rebuilding itself from dark times. Nostalgic interjection of a native Berliner into the area is part of the glory Germany once had and will soon have again.


HISTORY I CULTURE I CLIMATE

HISTORY I CULTURE I CLIMATE

CONTEXT


Context I overview COORDINATES: 52.5168° N REGION: Berlin, Germany PROVINCE: Mitte

13.3971° E

Berlin Being Germany’s largest city it is no surprise that it’s cultural range is just as vast and diverse. From the cities many galleries and museums to the youth nightlife, prestigious cuisine and performing arts are just a few of what Berlin has to offer. Located in the Northeastern part of Germany that is mainly marshy woodlands. Berlin’s topography is probably one of the only things about it not as vast being mainly a flat area in general. Its topography has made it part of the Northern European Plain (stretch from northern France to western Russia). Much of this region was formed by the Berlin-Warsaw Urstromtal (glacial valley from the ice age) and now sits between the northern Barnim Plateau and the Teltow Plateau to the south. This created the River Spree that runs along Berlin’s famous master plan, Museum Island. Situated in a woodland based area is not the only part that makes Berlin a very green region. Berlin has a hard focus on sustainability when it comes green spaces throughout the area. Being in a termperate climate the green space/rooftops are not mainly implemented to escape the eat, but to reduce the solar gain on such a highly populated city.

MITTE Residing in most central point of Berlin it is also Berlin’s first borrough that encompases both West and East Berlin districts once seperated by the Wall. wwThis province is the heart of Berlin’s history housing some of its oldest and most precious nostalgic reminders. Museum Island, Brandenburg Gate, Unter den Linden, Potsdamer Platz, and the Reichstag are a few key points throughout the city.


Contex I 11


12 I Context I History The Beginning.... Dating back to 1230 was the beginning of Germany’s largest city and it was a fraction of the size it is today. Located along the River Spree it attracted a greater population and required necessary expansion to accomadate. As the settlement began to spread across the river throughout the decades the River would not be the only thing seperating Berlin. Berlin took off during the 19th century around the time of the Industrial Revolution and completely transformed the city for the better. This sparked a dramatic rise in their economy and population resulting in the identity of being Germany’s central hub. That only increased into the 20th century after the first World War when berlin absorbed a significant number of suburban areas bringing its popluation to about 4 million. During the Weimar Era, Berlin became famous for its cultural transformations, but that would soon be interrupted. As Berlin and Germany itself flourished through the years it hit a major interruption in the 1940’s, World War II. Nazi rule brought much destruction to the Berlin area in 194345 from air raids on the city destorying mostly its buildings and citizens reducing the city to misery. Even after the war in 1945 Berlin was under the command of the powers who were victorious and decided to section the city off it four seperate sectors. Eventually it was taken to the extreme in 1961 around the time of the Cold War, which caused much tension and start the construction of the Berlin wall that would seperate East Berlin and West Berlin. Not only did the wall divide the people, but also its art, culture, and architecture as well. Finally in 1989 the tensions of the Cold War had ended and increased pressure from the citizens of East Germany was just the push needed to bring down the Berlin wall. Reunifying Germany as a whole brought a new hope to the city that would reestablish what it had lost. Nostalgic visions soon would be rebuilt and restored to Berlin. Art, architecture, and many other cultural aspects of the society will eventually bring Berlin to be one of the most worldy cities of the present day.


Context I History I 13

1237

1652

1688

1789

1833

1875

1910

2013


14 I Context I History

Nostalgic Restoration Berlin was a flourishing city before World War II and that is how they wanted to remember it. Rebuilding the times when things were positive would bring the people to forget the ill times and strive to create a new positive history for their Germany.


Context I History I 15


Traditional City block in Schöneberg -Residential area -Densly populated OlderBuildings -Downtown Berlin -5-6 Story Buildings -War related issues fixed in Postwar

New Housing at the Rummelsburg Bay -Some residential area -Developed in the 90’s -Large construction potential -7 Story Buildings -Freely held courtyard system

Row development - the “White City” -Residential area -Developed in the 20’s -Large Housing estates -3-4 Story Buildings -Same structural model used in the 50’s-60’s

Großsiedlung Hellersdorf -Residential area -Developed in the 70’s-80’s -Built mostly in the 80’s -5-6 Story Buildings -Built in large sections

Development with townhouses in Stralau -Residential area -Similar detached predominantly -Condensed forms of housing -2-3 Story Buildings

Mohriner Avenue, Britz -Residential area -Formitive vegitation structure -Limited occupancy index -1-2 Story Buildings -Order to esnsure settlement developement


Residential Neighborhood in Kaulsdorf -Residential area -High proportions of green -Single and Double houses -1-2 Story Buildings

Scenic Imprinting: At the Edge of Lübars -Residential area -Formitive vegitation structure -Limited occupancy index -1-3 Story Buildings -Order to esnsure settlement developement

Downtown district Schützenstraße -Key buisness area -Attractive locations -Districts main center -5-12 Story Buildings -Near the suburband rail and freeways

Kranzler Eck and Ludwig Erhard Zoo Haus -Retail area -Mixes Construction area -Key Public Locations -4+ Story Buildings -Commercial and Industry Chamber

Hackescher Markt in Mitte -Multi functional -City Center -Mix of older and newer buildings -High proportion of residential offices -Retail and cultureal

Village in the Pankow district of Karow -Residential area -Formitive vegitation structure -Older Urban centers -1-2 Story Buildings -Courtyard structures


18 I Context I Climate N

Berlin can be classified as a temperate oceanic climate that averages temperates in the summer to around 23 degrees Celcius (73 degrees Farenheit) with lows around 14 degrees Celcius (57 degrees Farenhiet). Winters are significantly colder with the average temperature to be a high of 2 degrees Celcius (36 degrees Farenheit) and a low of roughly -2 degrees Celcius (28 degrees Farenheit). These temperature ranges make air conditioning in Berlin not as important as in an area like Miami for example, but the heating is where you want to get the most for you dollar.

W

March & September Sunrise (7am)

Noon

S

Sunset (5pm)

N

W

June Sunrise (7am)

Noon

S

Sunset (5pm)

N

W

December Sunrise (7am)

Noon

S

Sunset (5pm)


Context I Climate I 19 Prevailing Winds

Psychrometric Chart Location: BERLIN, DEU

AH

Frequency: 1st January to 31st December Weekday Times: 00:00-24:00 Hrs Weekend Times: 00:00-24:00 Hrs Barometric Pressure: 101.36 kPa

W in d F re q u e n c y (H rs ) L o c a t io n : B E R L I N , D E U ( 5 2 . 5 ° , 1 3 . 4 ° )

D a t e : 1 s t J a n u a ry - 3 1 s t D e c e m b e r T im e : 0 0 : 0 0 - 2 4 : 0 0

© W e a th e r T o o l

50 km/ h

© W e a th e r T o o l

40 km/ h

SELECT ED DESIGN T ECH N IQU ES: 1. passive solar heating 2. thermal mass effects 3. exposed mass + night-purge ventilation 4. natural ventilation 5. direct evaporative cooling 6. indirect evaporative cooling

30 km/ h 20 km/ h

30

h rs 42+ 37 33 29 25 21 16 12 8 <4

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 68+ 61 54 47 40 34 27 20 13 <6

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 34+ 30 27 23 20 17 13 10 6 <3

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

J a n u a ry

F e b ru a ry

M a rc h

A p r il

h rs 38+ 34 30 26 22 19 15 11 7 <3

25

50 km/ h

20

40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 34+ 30 27 23 20 17 13 10 6 <3

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 47+ 42 37 32 28 23 18 14 9 <4

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 53+ 47 42 37 31 26 21 15 10 <5

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

M ay

Ju n e

J u ly

A u g u st

h rs 41+ 36 32 28 24 20 16 12 8 <4

15

10 50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

5

h rs 68+ 61 54 47 40 34 27 20 13 <6

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 62+ 55 49 43 37 31 24 18 12 <6

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 55+ 49 44 38 33 27 22 16 11 <5

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

10 km/ h

S e p te m b e r

O c to b e r

N ovember

D ecember

Comfort

DBT(°C)

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

h rs 40+ 35 32 27 24 20 16 12 8 <4


20 I Context I Vegetation

1970s_

A new housing program was planned for the city in a complex process. There was a system of new required conditions; residential green spaces, open space at day cares, kindergartens and schools. recreational centers, sport facilities etc.

1990-1999_ The city sponsored a program for courtyard, roof and facade greenery to improve the quality of life in apartments.

Following Page Images: 1st Column: WOLFBERRY (GOJI) TANSY (TANACETUM VULGARE) BURDOCK (ARCTIUM) 2nd Column: CHESTNUT (AESCULUS) LINDEN (Tilia) LINDEN (Tilia) 3rd Column: COMMON HAZEL (CORYLUS AVELLANA) CHICORY (CICHORIUM INTYBUS) 4th Column: PLANE (PLATANUS) OAK (QUERCUS) RYE GRASS (LOLIUM)


Context I Vegetation I 21


22 I Site Analysis I History


Site Analysis I History I 23

SITE ANALYSIS


Site Analysis I Introduction 24 I Site Analysis I History

Kulturforum Kulturforum is a culutural hub in the area of West Berlin housing some of today’s innovative architectural designs by Shcharoun and Mies Van Der Rohe. Unfortunately, it was not always like that after World War II where most of the area was not able to escape the effects of war. In the 1950’s and 60’s was when the area began to revitalize itself bringing back a majority of the art collections that were split up after the construction of the Berlin Wall. Today, Kulturforum is part of a new commercial attraction called Potsdamer Platz bringing life back to an area that once and is a cultural significance to us all. Providing an addition to this cultural hub is the development and integration of the Helmut Newton Foundation into the site indicated by the square in the image to the right. The Foundation provides the amenities to display one of Germany’s most famous photographer’s photgraph’s and much more.


Site Analysis I History I 25


26 I Site Analysis I History

Historical Evolution Mitteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transformation through history as depicated in the images below show how long a once densely populated area takes to restore its former glory.

1940

1953

1989

2010


Site Analysis I History I 27

Present Day Mitte This cultural hub is the home of some of Germanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best museums and galleries and also the prestigious world renowed Berlin Film Festfval Many famous institutions like the Berlin Philharmonic by Hans Sharoun sit in this area along with Mies van der Roheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Neue Nationalgalerie. Rebuilding from the destruction has reinvented this area into a world class attraction that brings much pride to the German people.


Diagramatic Analysis

Site Topography

N W

E S

Preserved Trees

Preserved Trees

Building Entrances


Cultural Institutions

Approach (Pedestrian & Vehicular)

Green Space

Street Grid

Views


30 I Site Analysis I Morphology Site Conditions

Wind Charts (Monthly)


Site Analysis I Morphology I 31

CLIMATE SUMMARY

0

D A Y L T

4

LATITUDE: 52.5° LONGITUDE: 13.4° TIMEZONE: +1.0 hrs

NAME: BERLIN LOCATION: DEU DESIGN SKY: Not Av ailable ALTITUDE: 49.0 m © W eather T ool

8

12

10

I R R A D

8

Wind 3pm

6

4

2

0

50

Wind 9am

T E M P

40

30

20

H

10

0

100

500

80

400

60

300

40

200

DEGREE HOURS (Heating, Cooling and Solar)

8k

6k

4k

20

°C

0

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

2k

100

MONTHLY DIURNAL AVERAGES - BERLIN, DEU

A

S

O

N

D

W/ m²

0

0k

S C J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

40

1.0k

30

0.8k

20

0.6k

10

0.4k

0

0.2k

-10

0.0k Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

°C

LEGEND Comfort: Thermal Neutrality Temperature Rel.Humidity Wind Speed

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

DAILY CONDITIONS - 5th June (156)

W/ m²

40

1.0k

30

0.8k

20

0.6k

10

0.4k

0

0.2k

Direct Solar Diffuse Solar Cloud Cover -10

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

0.0k


CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK


Helmut Newton Bringing Voyerism Back to Berlin Helmut Newton, the prolific, widely imitated fashion photographer whose provacative, erotically charged black and white photos were a mainstay of vogue and other publications, died yesterday after a car crash in hollywood. He was 83. The los angeles police told the associated press that mr. Newton lost control of his cadillac after leaving the chateau marmont hotel and crashed into a wall across the street. He died at the cedars-sinai medical center, the agency reported. Guided by a passion for the strength and allure of the female form, mr. Newton reflected the sexual revolution of the 1960’s and 70’s which coincided with his rise to fame. He photographed some of the most beautiful women in the world in poses that emphasized their sexuality and often an accompanying sense of danger and violence.

Helmut Newton Foundation Just a year before his death Helmut established the Helmut Newton Foundation in Berlin, Germany. The wish Newton had for this establishment was that it not be a “dead museum”, but rather a “living institution” that not only brings life to his photography, but also bring people into his life to create a more inspirational understanding of his ways. Newton dedicated part of the institution to a permanent exhibit that display’s many sets, film, newtonmobile, camera’s, and his many publications. Along side Newton’s work is his wife’s June Brunell (a.k.a. Alice Springs) that had a significant involvement in her husbands work. Finally, the accomodation of other artist’s work gives this museum another display of work that Newton may have helped inspire.


Conceptual Framework I Helmut Newton I 35


36 36 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Helmut Helmut Newton Newton

LIfe and Works of Helmut Newton

Life

• Born in 1920 to a wealthy Jewish family in Berlin, he bought his first camera at 12. As a teenager, he was apprenticed to the german theatrical photographer Yva, who was also fond of the naked female form. At 18, however, he was forced to flee the Nazis. Eventually arriving in singapore...Later moved to australia. In 1948, he married June Brown, a photographer who uses the name Alice Springs professionally. He moved to France in the late 50’s. There he began to be noticed for his risque images, eventually earning the nickname “THE KING OF KINK.” • 1947: Meets helmut newton, marries him a year later • 1970: June stands in for Helmut Newton who is incapacitated by illness, for a commerical photo shoot in Paris, thus begins her career as commercial photographer under the pseudonym Alice Springs. • 1998: Swiss production of the volume “us and them” by Helmut and June Newton.

Works

• In Paris 1966 Helmut shot a series of photos for queen where the women gaze out the window as rocket and violence ensues. Here he seems to reference a time where he was in Berlin and watches demostrations from his bedroom window. Much of the work from 1960s is in ways are recreation of events from his childhood. • In Milan 1968 Helmut had to drive from Paris to Milan by car because of a revolution taking place. Not only did the event change the fashion of the time, but because of having to get to Milan by car, Newton was inspired to capturethe energy of the time by shooting in unconventional places like in front of an oil refinery. • The Story of O also became a point of interest during this time along with the photography of Aruthur Schnitzler and Stefan Zweig. • 1980’S “A Reflected Helmut Newton” • Newton produces a series of voyeuristic photos where he is partially or entirely inserted in the picture. These pictures have often been interpreted as an expression of the independence of voyeurism and expressionism. Newtons presence is reminiscent of iconographic tradition which extends from the cave painter’s hand print to Hitchcocks appearance in films. The all make sure to say I am the author of this work. • The theme of voyeurism contains litttle of the seductive force and automatically turns the viewer into a voyeur since the object of desire has already been claimed. • Helmut newton: “many photographers like doing self portraits. I think it’s even more interesting when one is part of a whole mise-en-scene.” Frank horvat: “maybe because it’s so contrary to the nature of photography, which is, after all, an eye directed outwards. Photographic self-portraiture is almost paradoxical. This may be why one is tempted to try it.” Helmut newton: “i don’t know, i didn’t look at it that way. It’s just that if the theme had something to do with my life, past or present, it seems a nice idea to put myself in it.” [Frank horvat with helmut newton: october 1986] • “There has been a series for vogue in ‘79 or ‘80, they asked me to wear fashion, and then i got this idea. I did it in the paris vogue studio, because it was a place i knew well and around which much of my life had evolved. It’s a very personal picture, that’s why it’s one of my favorites. There is first of all me, with my camera, but there is also june, who also got a wonderfully funny expression while she looks at my naked model, there is the vogue studio, with the clothrack, the door to the street is open, you see the cars parked on place du palais bourbon, a place that have known for 22 years, where i had taken thousands of pictures, especially during haute courture collections. The photograph has all the signals of my life: my models, my camera, my wife, the studio, the place du palais bourbon. That ‘s what i call an autobiographical picture.” [Frank horvat with helmut newton: october 1986] • In his photographs, newton often shows his women together with life-like mannequins. At first glance, we can hardly distinguish the two. The plastic bodies resemble real women.Newton ensures that they look real, including pubic and underarm hair. He photographs them embracing the real women, kissing them, reclining on a bed. Here as well, ritual actions are performed in front of the camera. These actions are of unconcealed sexuality, but here too the distancing from the act dispalyed is so great than an emotionally charged tension hardly arises.


Conceptual Framework I Helmut Newton I 37

1960’s

1980’s

1970’s

1990’s

2000’s


38 38 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Helmut Helmut Newton Newton

Helmut Newton’s Influencial Techniques

Perception of Reality

Perfected Movement

Rene Magritte

Hitchcock

Rene Marritte created a very surrealistic style of imagery Alfred Hitchcock’s North by Northwest image above that extends into a new area that beings to play with demonstrates the mastery of how the primary figure perception. Newton picked up on Magritte’s ability to seems to be moving so perfect that nothing is out of challenge oberservers’ perconditioned perceptions of reality. place. Newton remakes a similar movement instead with Newton achieves this in the picture below with the blondea woman demonstrating that not only their form is perfect lady in the room is actually a reflection. but their movement is just as precise.

Woman’s Perfection

Surrealism

Madame Yva

Marcel Duchamp

Surrealism was a major technique in both Marcel As an apprenticeship under Madame Yva it is reflected Duchamp’s and Helmut Newton’s work as in the picture in Newton’s work his love for to female form. Capturing above and below. Newton throws his own twist on the ease of a smile, glow of a cheek, and the beauty of Duchamp’s technique by creating a blurred perspective on how even a woman’s casual movement is intoxicating to the primary focus of the image. Almost as if the primary witness. element is multiple elements in the same scene.


Conceptual Framework I Helmut Newton I 39 Primary

Secondary

Movement

Surrealist

Scale

Composition


Kulturforum

40 40 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Precedents Precedents

Kulturforum is a culutural hub in area of West Berlin housing some of today’s innovative architectur al designs by Shcharoun and Mies V Der Rohe. Unfortunately, it was n always like that after World Wa II where most of the area was not able to escape the effects of w In the 1950’s and 60’s was when th area began to revitalize itself br ing back a majority of the art col lections that were split up after the construction of the Berlin W Today, Kulturforum is part of a n commercial attraction called Po damer Platz bringing life back to area that once and is a cultural s nificance to us all.

1940

Conceptual Approach Integrate Helmut Newton’s photography with the influencial buildings of the site through technique’s used by Helmut Newton in his photo’s

1953

1989

2001

2010


Conceptual Framework I Precedents I 41

Casa de Villamoura Architect: Eduardo Souto de Moura Organization Precedent

Mallorca Houses Architect: Jorn Utzon Views and Organization Precedent

Terracoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s de Braganca Architect: Alvaro Siza

Organization Precedent: Casa en Villamoura Eduardo Souto de Moura

Envelope Precedent: Ceramic Tile

Organization Precedent: Mallorca Houses Jorn Utzon

Envelope Precedent


42 42 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts

Explain relationship of how site was the influence on determing the shape (distortion) to the project


Conceptual Framework I Concepts I 43

Conceptual Process


44 44 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts

  



 





Lobby/Reception/tickets Coat check/Lockers Café GalleryPrivate Property GalleryHelmut Newton GalleryJune Newton GalleryTemporary Projection Room Archive/storage Bookstore Photo Studios Photo Lab Computer Lab Administration

600 500 500 2000 4000 2000 3000 500 500 500 500 500 500 500

Outdoor studio area

1000

 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1

 600 500 500 2000 4000 2000 3000 500 500 500 1000 500 1000 500

   1.4285 

Provide coat area with attendant. Locker boxes separate Exhibition of articles, writtings, props, etc. Exhibits work of other photographers For 40 people For seminars and workshops Includes server room

(100/60) assuming 60% efficiency (Indicative Only) (100/70) assuming 70% efficiency


Conceptual Framework I Concepts I 45


46 46 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts


Conceptual Framework I Precedents I 47


48 48 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts


Conceptual Framework I Concepts I 49

1.

2.

2.

3.

3.

1.

Section Through Outdoor Patioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1. Oudoor Patio 2. Circulation Space 3. Educational Area


50 50 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts


Conceptual Framework I Concepts I 51


52 52 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts


Conceptual Framework I Concepts I 53


54 54 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts

South Elevation

West Elevation


Conceptual Framework I Concepts I 55


56 56 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts

6.

6. 5. 1.

1. 3.

4.

2.

Section Through Gallery Space 1. Gallery 2. Photo Studio 3. Projection Room 4. Mechanical Space 5. Entry 6. Mezzanine Gallery


Conceptual Framework I Concepts I 57

North Elevation

East Elevation


58 58 II Conceptual Conceptual Framework Framework II Concepts Concepts


Conceptual Framework I Concepts I 59


TECHNICALSOLUTIONS


62 62 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Introduciton Introduction


Technical Solutions I Introduction I 63

Explain what I am focusing on? Describe Program/Code, Structure, Sustainability, Mechanical, and Envelope


64 64 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Program Program OMNIPRESENT PAST - INTERVENTIONS IN SAN ESTEBAN - MURCIA, SPAIN Program

Program Department

Program Component

Quantity

Area NSFT

Occupancy Loads

Total net area

Total Gross 60% Efficiency

Total Gross 70% Efficiency

Total Gross 85% Efficiency

Egress Requirements

Floor Area per Occupant (ft!) Remarks

Use Area Type (net OR gross)

Area Ratio (ft!)

Egress System Capacity (inches)

# Means of Egress

# of Occupants

Minimum Door Width (inches)

Minimum Clear Corridor Width (inches)

Bathroom Requirements: Assembly

Maximum Travel Distance

Maximum Common Path of Egress

Un Sprinklered

Un Sprinklered

Sprinklered

Sprinklered

Minimum Length of DE Corridor Un Sprinklered

Sprinklered

Water Closets

Urinals

Male 1/125

2/3 W.C.

Bathroom Requirements: Buisness Drinking Fountains

Lavatories

Female 1/65

Male 1/200

Female 1/200

Urinals

1/500

2/3 W.C.

Water Closets

Male 1/50

Bathroom Requirements: Buisness

Lavatories

Female 1/50

Male 1/40

Female 1/40

Drinking Fountains

Urinals

None

2/3 W.C.

Water Closets

Male 1/50

Drinking Fountains

Lavatories

Female 1/50

Male 1/40

Female 1/40

None

200

Gallery-Private Property

Gallery-Helmut Newton

1

1

2000

4000

2000

4000

3200

5600

Exhibition of articles, 2300 writing, props,ect.

Assembly A-3 occupancy, unconcentrated seating (tables, chairs, stages, platforms)

net

15

133

3

44.44

13.33

8.89 200'

250'

75'

75'

22.22

22.22

0.704

1.067

2.051

0.667

0.667

0.2667

4600

Assembly A-3 occupancy, unconcentrated seating (tables, chairs, stages, platforms)

net

15

267

3

88.89

26.67

17.78 200'

250'

75'

75'

44.44

44.44

1.408

2.133

4.103

1.333

1.333

0.533

Assembly A-3 occupancy, unconcentrated seating (tables, chairs, stages, platforms)

net

15

33

1

33.33

10.00

6.67 200'

250'

75'

75'

16.67

16.67

0.176

0.267

0.513

0.167

0.167

0.533

2600

2300

Assembly A-3 occupancy, unconcentrated seating (tables, chairs, stages, platforms)

net

15

133

3

44.44

13.33

8.89 200'

250'

75'

75'

22.22

22.22

0.704

1.067

2.051

0.667

0.667

0.267

Assembly A-3 occupancy, Exhibits work of other unconcentrated seating (tables, chairs, stages, platforms) 3450 photographers

net

15

200 133

4

50.00

15.00

10.00 200'

250'

75'

100'

25.00

25.00

2600

5200

Museum Projection Room

Gallery-June Newton

Administrative

Educational

1

1

500

2000

500

2000

700

2800

650

575 For 40 People

Gallery-Temporary

1

3000

3000

4200

3900

Coat Check/lockers

1

400

400

560

520

460

Lobby

1

1000

1000

1400

1300

1150

Administration

1

500

500

700

650

Archive/Stroage

1

500

500

700

Bookstore

1

500

500

700

gross

300

2

1

1.87

0.56

0.37 200'

250'

75'

100'

0.93

0.93

Assembly A-3 occupancy, standing space

net

5

200

4

50.00

15.00

10.00 200'

250'

75'

75'

25.00

25.00

1.056

1.600

3.077

1.000

1.000

0.4000

575

Libraries, Reading Rooms

net

50

10

1

10.00

3.00

2.00 200'

250'

75'

75'

5.00

5.00

1.056

0.080

0.154

0.050

0.050

0.0200

650

575

Storage

gross

300

2

1

2.33

0.70

0.47 200'

250'

75'

100'

1.17

1.17

0.01232

0.019

0.036

0.012

0.012

0.0047

650

575

Mercantile Occupancy

gross

60

12

1

11.67

3.50

2.33 200'

250'

75'

75'

5.83

5.83

0.0616

0.093

0.179

0.058

0.058

0.0233

575

Assembly A-3 occupancy, unconcentrated seating (tables, chairs, stages, platforms)

net

15

33 259

1

33.33

10.00

6.67 200'

250'

75'

75'

16.67

16.67

0.440

0.6666667

0.6666667

0.8333333

0.8333333

0

For seminars and 575 workshops

Educational occupancy, vocational areas

net

50

10

1

10.00

3.00

2.00 200'

250'

75'

75'

5.00

5.00

0.132

0.2

0.2

0.25

0.25

0

575

Educational occupancy, vocational areas

net

50

10

1

10.00

3.00

2.00 200'

250'

75'

75'

5.00

5.00

0.132

0.2

0.2

0.25

0.25

0

net

20

25

1

25.00

7.50

5.00 200'

250'

75'

75'

12.50

12.50

0.33

0.5

0.5

0.625

0.625

0

gross

50

28 73

0

0.00

0.00

0.00 0'

0'

75'

75'

0.00

CafĂŠ

1

500

500

700

650

Photo Studios

2

500

1000

0

1300

Photo Lab

1

500

500

700

Provide coat area with attendant. Locker boxes separate

650

Storage

Computer Lab

2

500

1000

1400

1300

Educational occupancy, classroom 1150 Includes server room areas

Outdoor Studios

1

1000

1000

1400

1300

1150

Total Net Total Gross 60% efficiency

17,400

Total Gross 70% efficiency

17,900 25,418 20,943

Recreational Outdoor Area

Total Occupants

23,270

1,359

Total Fixture Count

0.00 Subtotal Rounded Total

*Classfied as Business Occupancy Zone for Plumbing Fixture Calculations *Classfied as Mercantile Occupancy Zone for Plumbing Fixture Calculations *Occupancy Loads determined by gross area type are calculated using 85% efficiency

5.867 3

11.282 6

Water Closets

Urinals

20,585 Building Totals

*Classfied as "A-3: Auditorium without fixed seating, galleries, museums, gymnasiums, etc." cccupancy zone for plumbing fixture calculations *Occupancy Loads determined by gross area type are calculated using 85% efficiency *Classfied as "A-3: Auditorium without fixed seating, galleries, museums, gymnasiums, etc." cccupancy zone for plumbing fixture calculations

3.872 2

4

Male

6

Female

3.667 2

3.667 2

Lavatories 9

Male

5

Female

1.467 1 Drinking Fountains

5

1

0.572 1

0.867 1

0.867 1

1.083 1

1.083 1

0.000 0

0.3696

0.56

0.56

0.7

0.7

0

0.502 1

0.760 2

0.760 2

0.950 2

0.950 2

0.000 0


Technical Solutions I Program I 65

Explain Program purpose of organization. Explain how program and code are achieved in the design


66 66 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Structure Structure Structure Design Conditions Accomplished: Framing views without intrusion of columns Program Considerations Open gallery spaces Sizes

of Structural Elements Columns 8â&#x20AC;? x 8â&#x20AC;? Roof Stucture W36x195 Floor Beams W18x36

Why did I choose steel? To achieve spans needed to keep gallery spaces open and structural columns hidden in the walls Role of the structure to keep gallery spaces open


Technical Solutions I Structure I 67


68 68 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Structure Structure


Technical Solutions I Structure I 69


70 70 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Structure Structure


Technical Solutions I Structure I 71


72 72 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Sustainability Sustainability


Technical Solutions I Sustainability I 73 Design conditions to be accomplished Program Considerations

N Prevailing Winds W in d F re q u e n c y (H rs ) L o c a t io n : B E R L I N , D E U ( 5 2 . 5 ° , 1 3 . 4 ° )

D a t e : 1 s t J a n u a ry - 3 1 s t D e c e m b e r T im e : 0 0 : 0 0 - 2 4 : 0 0

© W e a th e r T o o l

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 42+ 37 33 29 25 21 16 12 8 <4

10 km/ h

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 68+ 61 54 47 40 34 27 20 13 <6

10 km/ h

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 34+ 30 27 23 20 17 13 10 6 <3

10 km/ h

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 38+ 34 30 26 22 19 15 11 7 <3

W

10 km/ h

March & September Sunrise (7am) J a n u a ry

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

F e b ru a ry

h rs 34+ 30 27 23 20 17 13 10 6 <3

10 km/ h

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

M a rc h

h rs 47+ 42 37 32 28 23 18 14 9 <4

10 km/ h

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

Noon

A p r il

h rs 53+ 47 42 37 31 26 21 15 10 <5

10 km/ h

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

h rs 41+ 36 32 28 24 20 16 12 8 <4

W

10 km/ h

Sunrise (7am)

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h 10 km/ h

Ju n e

h rs 68+ 61 54 47 40 34 27 20 13 <6

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h 10 km/ h

J u ly

h rs 62+ 55 49 43 37 31 24 18 12 <6

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h 10 km/ h

O c to b e r

N ovember

Noon

A u g u st

h rs 55+ 49 44 38 33 27 22 16 11 <5

50 km/ h 40 km/ h 30 km/ h 20 km/ h

S

Sunset (5pm)

N

h rs 40+ 35 32 27 24 20 16 12 8 <4

W

10 km/ h

December Sunrise (7am) S e p te m b e r

Sunset (5pm)

N

June M ay

S

D ecember

Noon

S

Sunset (5pm)


11"

11"

-­‐11"

74 74 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Mechanical Mechanical Design Condtions to be accomposhed Program Considerations Design considerations Why did I choose Geothermal

Zone 1 Square  Footage Cooling  Capacity  (tons) Mechanical  Space Cooling  Towers No.  of  Heat  Pumps Cooling  Air  Volume Main  Supply/  Return Branch  Supply/  Return Fan  Room Fresh  Air  Louvers Exhaust  Louvers

14426 sq.  ft. 75  Tons 600  sq.  ft. 75  sq.  ft. 12-­‐6  ton,  1-­‐3  ton 40000  CFM 15  sq.  ft. 35  sq.  ft. 800  sq.  ft. 75  sq.  ft. 65    sq.  ft.

Zone 2 Square  Footage Cooling  Capacity  (tons) Mechanical  Space Cooling  Towers No.  of  Heat  Pumps Cooling  Air  Volume Main  Supply/  Return Branch  Supply/  Return Fan  Room Fresh  Air  Louvers Exhaust  Louvers

9012 sq.  ft. 50  Tons 500  sq.  ft. 50  sq.  ft. 8-­‐6  ton  units,  1-­‐2  ton  unit 20000  CFM 10  sq.  ft. 20  sq.  ft. 600  sq.  ft. 60  sq.  ft. 50  sq.  ft.

Zone 3 Square  Footage Cooling  Capacity  (tons) Mechanical  Space Cooling  Towers No.  of  Heat  Pumps Cooling  Air  Volume Main  Supply/  Return Branch  Supply/  Return Fan  Room Fresh  Air  Louvers Exhaust  Louvers

19106 sq.  ft. 90  Tons 750  sq.  ft. 100  sq.  ft. 15-­‐6  ton  units 50000  CFM 25  sq.  ft. 50  sq.  ft. 900  sq.  ft. 85  sq.  ft.   75  sq.  ft.

11 Holes

78 sq  ft

Psychrometric Chart Location: BERLIN, DEU

AH

Frequency: 1st January to 31st December Weekday Times: 00:00-24:00 Hrs Weekend Times: 00:00-24:00 Hrs Barometric Pressure: 101.36 kPa © W e a th e r T o o l

SELECT ED DESIGN T ECH N IQU ES: 1. passive solar heating 2. thermal mass effects 3. exposed mass + night-purge ventilation 4. natural ventilation 5. direct evaporative cooling 6. indirect evaporative cooling

7 Holes

30

52 sq  ft

25

20

15

13 Holes

2 ton  Unit  Dims 50.25"  H  x  22"  W  x  25.5"  L 4  sq  ft  per  unit

90 sq  ft

3 ton  Unit  Dims 54.25"  H  x  26"  W  x  30.5"  L 5.5  sq  ft  per  unit

10

6 ton  Unit  Dims 60.25"  H  x  28"  W  x  30.5"  L 6  sq  ft  per  unit

5 Comfort

DBT(°C)

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50


Technical Solutions I Mechanical I 75


76 76 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Mechanical Mechanical


Technical Solutions I Mechanical I 77


78 78 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Envelope Envelope

Building envelope Materials Selected: Ceramic Tile Metal Roof

Organization Precedent: Casa en Villamoura Eduardo Souto de Moura

Envelope Precedent: Ceramic Tile Alvaro Size Terracos de Braganca

Organization Precedent: Mallorca Houses Jorn Utzon


Technical Solutions I Envelope I 79


80 80 II Technical Technical Solutions Solutions II Envelope Envelope


Technical Solutions I Envelope I 81


APPENDIX


Roger Williams University School of Architecture Spring Semester 2013 ARCH 513 Comprehensive Studio Syllabus Roberto Viola Ochoa, Adjunct Faculty Working with veiled nostalgia….. Berlin, Germany. Course: ARCH 513 (5 Credits) Schedule: Tuesday/Friday, 1:30-6:00 pm Location: TBD Faculty: Roberto Viola Ochoa, Adjunct Faculty rviola@prodigy.net 857-413 8455 (cell). Before 1:00 am. Via text message is preferable and faster. Office hours: 6:00-7:00 pm Tue. And Fri. or by appointment Course Description: The developments of the twentieth century: WWI, Nazi period, WW2, cold war, building of the wall and its fall decades later, have shaped the city and its people in dramatic and borderline abrupt terms. Berlin is fast trying to re-construct a future by closely looking at the past, which leads to interesting design questions which require at times permanent, at times temporary creative answers. The studio will focus on two hypothetical interventions one temporary, one permanent in the ‘border zone’ between the East and the West. The nature of the projects is also diverse. One will honor and promote the legacy of one of Berlin’s most significant visual artists; the other will be utilitarian to support (and question) the future plans for the Palast der Republik site. Site one: Kulturforum (Cultural Center) The proposed site has gone through tremendous transformations throughout the 20th century. The origin of the area as it exists today dates back to the early 1950’s. At the end of WWII, the public art collection was divided amongst the Bode Museum in the East and a small enclave in Dahlem, a western district of Berlin. The Kulturforum became the cultural center of the West and begun with the construction of the Berliner Philarmonie by Hans Scharoun. Later additions by Scharoun and Mies among others, completed the what we see today.

The proposed project sits on a vacant site in between the two iconic buildings and will house a new Helmut Newton Foundation, currently occupying an old Prussian officer’s casino in the historic center of West Berlin. HNF was established in 2003 and it focuses on promoting and preserving the work of both Helmut Newton and his wife June, an accomplished photographer on her own right. It is understood as a ‘living institution’, in which the work of Helmut Newton can be seen in dialogue with the work of current photographers. Given how the city has evolved, the site represents quite a challenge, in which all sides have virtually equal hierarchical weight and it is part of a green network accessing the Forum. In addition, the program poses several possibilities. Today, the Foundation occupies a building which original purpose was not to exhibit photography, therefore, the program had to adapt to the space. The new building offers the opportunity to pose the question about what the ideal setting to view such work should be. Particularly, work that is so rich, critical and at times quite controversial. Site two: Museuminsel (Museum Island) The Stadtschloss was a Royal Palace on Fisher’s Island, known today as Museum Island. It was a Royal residence for Prussian kings between early 1700’s and 1918 and it became a museum following the fall of the German Empire in 1918. After WWII, the Palace was seriously damaged, and even though rebuilding it would have been possible, the German Democratic Republic authorities decided to demolish it in the 1950’s. In 1973 under king Erich Honecker, the Palast der Republik was built occupying most of the site of the former palace. After reunification, asbestos forced the authorities to close the building, which would be eventually demolished in 2006, process which ended in 2008. After reunification, several interest groups became active in the discussion about what to do with the site. Some advocated for the reconstruction of the former Royal Palace either fully or partially (facades). Others, pushed for preserving the Palast der Republik, recognizing it as part of German History; and a third group advocated for making a park on the site. As of today, not without opposition, the intention is to rebuild three of the four facades of the old Royal Palace, with a contemporary interior. Since the economic and philosophical conditions surrounding this site are still in flux, we are going to be conceptualizing a project that would temporarily occupy the space with


usable program and at the same time, generate revenue for future interventions on the site. The building will support the light commercial activity that currently happens on the edge of the canal.

-Sustainable Design Understanding of the principles of sustainability in making architecture and urban design decisions that conserve natural and built resources, including culturally important buildings and sites, and in the creation of healthful buildings and communities

You are responsible for selecting and concentrating your efforts in the design of one of these two projects. However, there will be a substantial amount of work done in groups. Preliminary programs will be provided, but the hope is that a more specific tailoring of uses will surface as the research on each of the sites develops.

-Building Materials and Assemblies Understanding of the principles, conventions, standards, applications, and restrictions pertaining to the manufacture and use of construction materials, components, and assemblies

Pre-Requisite: ARCH 413 studios, ARCH 331, 333, 424 and 431.

-Building Envelope Systems Understanding of the basic principles and appropriate application and performance of building envelope materials and assemblies

Objectives and Outcomes: The Comprehensive Studio responds primarily (but not exclusively, given the nature of the studio) to the following NAAB Student Performance Criteria: -Comprehensive Design Ability to produce an architecture project informed by a comprehensive program, from schematic design through the detailed development of programmatic spaces, structural and environmental systems, life-safety provisions, wall sections, and building assemblies, as may be appropriate; and to assess the completed project with respect to the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design criteria. -Building Systems Integration Ability to assess, select, and integrate structural systems, environmental systems, lifesafety systems, building envelope systems, and building service systems into building design -Site Conditions. Ability to respond to natural and built site characteristics in the development of a program and the design of a project. -Building Code Compliance Understanding of the codes, regulations, and standards applicable to a given site and building design, including occupancy classifications, allowable building heights and areas, allowable construction types, separation requirements, occupancy requirements, means of egress, fire protection, and structure. -Detailed Design Development Ability to assess, select, configure, and detail as an integral part of the design appropriate combinations of building materials, components, and assemblies to satisfy the requirements of building programs

-Life Safety Understanding of the basic principles of life-safety systems with an emphasis on egress General Requirements -

-

Only legible work will be reviewed at any review (desk crit, pin-up, or jury). There should be a reasonable level of commitment in every drawing/model the student chooses to show. Printed material should be available at every desk crit, pin-up or review. No drawing will be reviewed on a computer screen (unless previously negotiated with the instructor). Work must be printed and ready by 2:00 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock. Research assignments implies a thorough search of information (books, internet, etc) and it also implies for the student to dissect, analyze through drawings and models the information found. Bringing only the printouts does NOT constitute acceptable research. The work this semester will be done both individually and in groups. Given the intensity of the course, daily commitment is expected from the students. Be warned, working only on studio days will not be sufficient. All requirements for each review MUST be completed without exceptions. This is a sort of 'contract' scenario in which you are obliged to comply. Serial iterations are highly encouraged and are necessary as part of the search process. NEVER expect to reach the solution in the first attempt.

. Attendance Design is a process in which feedback and participation is critical; it is consequently imperative that you attend class and bring drawings and/or models to discuss with the instructor. Unexcused absences will constitute grade deduction. More than 3 unexcused absences will constitute an automatic failure. Attendance is mandatory at all reviews (refer to course schedule for dates).


Reviews are a privilege not a right. Every review will be subject to a gate process. Should there be not enough work, you will not be allowed to present. Printed material for the review will be done several days in advance (refer to schedule). Should you be in the situation in which your attendance is compromised, please do not hesitate to let the instructor know ahead of time. Students requiring special accommodations or assistance in the course should schedule and appointment with the instructor as soon as possible. Students are expected to conduct themselves, and complete their work in a manner that reflects the highest standards of the profession Grading Upon completion of each Phase of Term-long Project each student groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work and the contribution of each individual group member will be assessed & evaluated. The following general criteria will be followed for evaluation grading: "A" - is awarded for problem work, which has challenged the student, the student group, the studio & the instructor and usually demanded an extraordinary amount of effort. Issues of the student's own discovery are investigated and presented in an artful manner. "B" - is given when the student's response goes beyond a thorough understanding of the problem's objectives, and has created a design of superior creativity. Presentations are skillfully composed & executed in a clear & competent manner. "C" - is the average grade given when a student demonstrates a thorough understanding of the problem's objectives and presents a complete response to the problem in an appropriate, clear and competent manner. Presentations are complete and meet all the minimum requirements. "D" - reflects an incomplete or incorrect understanding of the objectives and issues the problem demands of a student. Presentations might be incomplete or executed inappropriately. The student is encouraged to meet privately with the instructor for extra help, suggestions, explanations and comments. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fâ&#x20AC;? - is given for unsatisfactory performance & incomplete work. The grades will be announced following the completion of each Phase. Pluses and minuses may be applied to the grades above and help rank work within the studio, or reflect effort and initiative. Any Phase grade below a "B-" represents a condition that requires that the individual student be counseled to raise their level of achievement in the next Phase. Late problem submissions will not be accepted for evaluation & grading.

Note: Graduate Course Grading, GPA and Graduation Requirements: The minimum passing grade in SAAHP graduate level courses is a B-. The minimum GPA for Master of Architecture graduates is 3.0 in 500 & 600 level courses The semester grade is the result of the quality of the work, quantity of work, progress achieved, level of conceptual thinking, execution of the conceptual thinking and technical development, all weighing equally. Talent alone will not guarantee a high grade if it's not accompanied by a serious DAILY commitment. Students will receive written evaluations periodically after every single review. This evaluation will clearly state the deficiencies and the strength of the work, and the improvements that need to be undertaken. Students are always encouraged to have an open discussion about the grade with the instructor. The content of the discussion will be always confidential. Should there be major disagreements, special arrangements will be made following the School of Architecture, Art and Historic Preservation policies.


B.6. Comprehensive Design: Ability to produce a comprehensive architectural project that demonstrate each studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capacity to make design decisions across scales while integrating the following SPC: A.2. Design Thinking Skills A.4. Technical Documentation A.5. Investigative Skills A.8 Ordering Systems A.9. Historical Traditions and Global Culture B.2. Accessibility B.3. Sustainability B.4. Site Design B.5. Life Safety B.8. Environmental Systems B.9. Structural Systems

A.2 Design Thinking Skills: Ability to raise clear and precise questions, use abstract ideas to interpret information, consider diverse points of view, reach well-reasoned conclusions, and test alternative outcomes against criteria and standards. A.4. Technical Documentation: Ability to make technically clear drawings, write outline specifications, and prepare models illustrating and identifying the assembly of materials, systems, and components appropriate for a building design. A.5. Investigative Skills: Ability to gather, asses, record, apply and comparatively evaluate relevant information within architectural coursework and design processes. A.8. Ordering Systems Skills: Understanding of the fundamentals of both natural and formal ordering systems and the capacity of each to inform two and three dimensional design. A.9. Historical Traditions and Global Culture: Understanding of parallel and divergent canons and traditions of architecture, landscape and urban design including examples of indigenous, vernacular, local, regional, national settings from Eastern, Western, Northern and Southern hemispheres in terms of the climatic, ecological, technological, socio economic, public health and cultural factors. B.2 Accessibility: Ability to design sites, facilities, and systems to provide independent and integrated use by individuals with physical (including mobility), sensory, and cognitive disabilities. B.3: Sustainability: Ability to design projects that optimize, conserve, or reuse natural and built resources, provide a healthful environments for occupants and users, and reduce the environmental impacts of building construction and operations on future generations through means such as carbon-neutral design, bioclimatic design, and energy efficiency. B.4. Site Design: Ability to respond to site characteristics suach as soil, topography, vegetation, and watershed in the development of a project design.

B.5. Life Safety: Ability to apply the basic principles of life safety systems with an emphasis on egress. B.8. Environmental Systems: Understanding the principles of environmental systemsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; design such as embodied energy, active and passive heating and cooling, indoor air quality, solar orientation, daylighting and artificial illumination, and acoustics; including the use of appropriate performance assessment tools. B.9. Structural Systems: Understanding of the basic principles of structural behavior in withstanding gravity and lateral forces and the evolution, range, and appropriate application of contemporary structural systems.


106 106 II Appendix Appendix


Appendix I 107 Berlin Philharmonic

Gemaldegalerie

Architect: Hans Scharoun Acoustical consultant – Lothar Cremer with Joachim Nutsch Date: 1956- 1963 Location: Berlin - on the south edge of the city’s Tiergarten and west of the former berlin wall. • Style: vineyard style • Irregular seating - Allows for the best viewing and the best acoustics. • Stage is in the center of the room surrounded by seating • The block seating allows the first row of each block to receive unimpeded direct sound • Seating capacity: 2218 + 120 chorus • Two venue facility with connecting lobby. The smaller venue was constructed in the 1980’s • Built to replace the Philharmonie that was destroyed by British bombers on January 30 1944, the eleventh anniversary of Hilter becoming Chancellor. • 2008 a fire broke out in the hall, large amount of damage to the ceiling. • Maxium sounds reflection happened when the seats are filled.

Architects: Heinz Hilmer & Christoph Sattler Location: sits in the southwest corner of the Kulturforum • Modern-style response to East Berlin’s Museum Island which was inaccessible to the citizens of West Berlin during the seperation of the Berlin Wall. • 72 rooms for a total floor area of 1.25 mi • Upstairs the rooms flow around a center hall the size of a football field

Theater AM Location: West of the Neue Nationalgalerie and Philharmonic Across from the Bibliothek des IberoAmerikanischen Instituts Preußischer Kulturbesitz • Principal venue for the Berlin International Film Festival • 1,800 seat capacity • Sits above a popular night spot, Adagio Nightlife, located underground

Neue Nationalgalerie

St. Matthauskirche

Architect: Mies van der Rohe Location: Kulturforum, Berlin Opening Date: September 15th, 1968 • The gallery is lifted off the ground, representative of classical Greek architecture. The design is raised off the ground like a plinth and becomes a sculptural element. • The basic structure with the heavy roof and symmetrically placed pillars represent a new formal proximity to ancient buildings. • The design incorporates many Miesian details. Including the columnar design and the elegance and detail often associated with his buildings.

Architects: Friedrich August Stuler & Herbert Wentzel Location: Directly North across the street from the Neue Nationalgalerie Date: 1844 and 1846 • Structure inspired by the Italian Romanesque Style • Uses alternating bands of bricks of two colors, yellow and red, which creates a very interesting chromatic effect • St. Matthauskirche used to be surrounded by palaces and stood in the middle of a small square, but now blends in with the new Kulturforum of the present.


108 108 II Appendix Appendix


Appendix I 109


110 110 II Appendix Appendix


Appendix I 111


112 112 II Appendix Appendix


Appendix I 113


114 114 II Appendix Appendix


Appendix I 115


Historical Analysis 116 116 II Appendix Appendix

Berlin 1237

Berlin is one of Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youngest cities, prior to 1237 it was known as Brandenburg. A small community with less then 6,000 inhabitants located in a marsh land on the Spree River. Even though Berlin is young it is packed with history from the first ruler Fredrick I to the reunion of Berlin and Germany after the second World War and the collapse of the Berlin Wall. Berlin is currently the largest city in Germany with a population of over 4 million in the metropolitan area and over 3.5 million in the out lying areas.

Berlin 2013


Appendix I 117

Berlin 1652 over 2013


118 II Appendix Timline: Berlin 118 Appendix

1389_Union of Brandenburg and Berlin 1411_The First Hohenzollerns 1415_Fredrick I becomes Ruler 1440_Fredrick I’s rule ends 1443_First Berliner Stadtschloss was built 8,000 inhabitants (eventually leading to poverty) 1448_”Berlin Indignation” –Citizens rebelled and lost political and economic privileges 1451_Berlin became a royal residence 1510_100 Jews were accused of stealing desecrating hosts, 38 burned the rest were banished 1530_Elector Joachim I donated land from the royal game preserve for the Tiergaten park 1539_Berlin officially became Lutheran 1540_Joachim II introduced the Protestant Reformation 1576_Bubonic plague killed 4,000 inhabitants 1600_Berlin-Colln had 12,000 inhabitants 1618_Thirty Year War Begins 1640_The “Great Elector” Fredrick William was instated 1647_The Boulevard Unter Den Liden 1648_Thirty Year War ends (damages 1/3 of the buildings, eliminates half the population) 1671_Fifty Jewish Families from Austria were given a home in Berlin 1674_The Dorotheenstadt was built 1685_Over 15,000 French Calvinist Huguenots came to Brandenburg and 6,000 settled there 1688_The Friedrichstadt was built 1700_Bohemia, Poland, and Salzburg refugees arrived 1701_Elector Fredrick III crowned himself Fredrick I, King in Prussia 1709_Berlin population 55,000 and the union of Colln and Berlin 1713_Friedrich Wilhelm I ruled military growth was encouraged 1720_First major hospital and Medical school 1740_Friedrich (II) The Great Began his 46 year reign 1755_Poputlation reached 100,000 1786_Fredrick William II developed innovative techniques of censorship and repression of political enemies 1806_Military reform began after French troops marched into Berlin 1809_First elections for the Berlin parliament began 1810_The Berlin University was founded 1812_Jews were allowed to practice all occupations 1814_The French were defeated in the Sixth Coalition 1815_Battle of Waterloo with Prussian troops participating 1827_Berlin is the Capitol of the Province of Brandenburg 1848_Frederick William IV suppressed the revolution in Berlin 1861_Wilhelm I became the new king 1900_84% of the population were Protestants, 10% Roman Catholics, and 5% as Jews 1914_The beginning of World War I 1916_The Hindenburg program called for the mobilization of weapons production, food rations starts 1918_Food supply becomes better due to harvest conditions, Communist party in Germany Forms 1919_Death of Communist leaders Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht 1920_End of World War I, Berlin gains more territories, and population hits 4 million 1922_Foreign minister Walther Rathenau was murdered in Berlin, and railways connects berlin to near cities 1926_ Joseph Goebbels, Nazi Propagandist Chief, became party district leader 1931_The Great Depression damages the city’s economy, Nazi’s fought for control of the streets 1933_President Hindenburg made Hitler Chancellor, Nazi’s moved to take over the nation

1934_160,000 were living in Berlin 1936_Summer Olympics were held in Berlin 1939_Nazi’s destroyed the Jewish community 1940_British air raid on Berlin, Hitler responds with the blitz on London 1943_Nazi’s start shipping Jews to death camps 1944_Berlin is divided into 4 sectors, most of Berlin is destroyed 1945_Berlin becomes the main objective of Allied forces, Hitler commits suicide 1947_Berlin becomes a focal point of the Cold War 1948_Sovients blocked off Western Berlin 1961_Erection of the Berlin Wall 1971_The Four Power Agreement on Berlin was signed 1989_The fall of the Berlin Wall, the end of the Cold War 1990_Germany and Berlin were reunited 1991_German Parliament vote that Berlin become the capital once again 1999_About 20 government authorities moved into Berlin


Appendix I 119

Berlin Chronology

a. 1237 b. 1652 c. 1688 d. 1789 e. 1833 f. 1875 g. 1893 h. 1905 i. 1910 j. 2013


120 II Appendix Districts + Distribution 120 Appendix

of Population Growth

Throughout Berlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history the population has been on the constant rise, but there are always catastrophic events such as the Bubonic Plague in 1576 which decimated almost a third of the population, the Thirty Year War which ended in 1648 killed half the population, and the second World War which ended the steady incline in Berlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population.


Overall Area

Appendix I 121

Key -Desease Control Center -Mixed Use -Local Centers -Government,Educational, Cultural, Health Centers -Trade/ Industry/ assoction disposal sites -Infrastructure and high /medium/low density -Living with Scenic Stamping -Central Locations with a High Share of Green -Forest/Parks -Large Green Networks -Shore Space in the City -Agriculture -Railway, highway, and possible remote stations -Main roads


122 II Appendix General Area 122 Appendix

Key

-Downtown Core and Intergration Areas -District Centers/County Council Houses -Linear Retail Consentration -District Centers -Centers and Large Settlements -New Railroad Stations (East) -Priority Workplaces and Central Facilities -Central Government and Cityhalls -Cultural, Educational and Healthcare Facilities -Sports Centers -Suburban Hold Points


Appendix I 123

Top Left - View of Markisches Museum around 1910 with the Waisenbridge in 1910 and then today.

Top Right - View from Muhlendamm toward the river spree around 1900 and today

Bottom Left - Molkenmarkt with a view to St. Peter in 1785 and today Molkenmarkt and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rotes Rathausâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; around 1900 and today


124 Open+Green 124 II Appendix Appendix Space Over Time

Key Open Space Feilds River Train

1652

1688

1833

1910

2013


Appendix I 125

1652

1688

1833

1910

2013 Rivers from 1652 to 2013

Key River Train

2013


126 126 II Appendix Appendix

The Architektur


Brandenburg Gate - From Left to Right 1930, 1945, and 1967 Belle-alliance-Platz 1750 (left middle) Belle-alliance-Platz after World War II (left bottom)

Avenues from the 1730 Expansion

Appendix I 127


128 128 II Appendix Appendix

Traditional City block in Schöneberg

New Housing at the Rummelsburg Bay

Großsiedlung Hellersdorf

Development with townhouses in Stralau

-Residential area -Densly populated OlderBuildings -Downtown Berlin -5-6 Story Buildings -War related issues fixed in Postwar

-Residential area -Developed in the 70’s-80’s -Built mostly in the 80’s -5-6 Story Buildings -Built in large sections

-Some residential area -Developed in the 90’s -Large construction potential -7 Story Buildings -Freely held courtyard system

-Residential area -Similar detached predominantly -Condensed forms of housing -2-3 Story Buildings

Row development - the “White City”

-Residential area -Developed in the 20’s -Large Housing estates -3-4 Story Buildings -Same structural model used in the 50’s-60’s

Mohriner Avenue, Britz

-Residential area -Formitive vegitation structure -Limited occupancy index -1-2 Story Buildings -Order to esnsure settlement developement


Appendix I 129

Residential Neighborhood in Kaulsdorf

-Residential area -High proportions of green -Single and Double houses -1-2 Story Buildings

Kranzler Eck and Ludwig Erhard Zoo Haus -Retail area -Mixes Construction area -Key Public Locations -4+ Story Buildings -Commercial and Industry Chamber

Scenic Imprinting: At the Edge of Lübars

-Residential area -Formitive vegitation structure -Limited occupancy index -1-3 Story Buildings -Order to esnsure settlement developement

Hackescher Markt in Mitte

-Multi functional -City Center -Mix of older and newer buildings -High proportion of residential offices -Retail and cultureal

Downtown district Schützenstraße

-Key buisness area -Attractive locations -Districts main center -5-12 Story Buildings -Near the suburband rail and freeways

Village in the Pankow district of Karow

-Residential area -Formitive vegitation structure -Older Urban centers -1-2 Story Buildings -Courtyard structures


130 130 II Appendix Appendix

HELMUT NEWTON [1920-2004]


Appendix I 131

HELMUT NEWTON, THE PROLIFIC, WIDELY IMITATED FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER WHOSE PROVACATIVE, EROTICALLY CHARGED BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOS WERE A MAINSTAY OF VOGUE AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS, DIED YESTERDAY AFTER A CAR CRASH IN HOLLYWOOD. HE WAS 83. THE LOS ANGELES POLICE TOLD THE ASSOCIATED PRESS THAT MR. NEWTON LOST CONTROL OF HIS CADILLAC AFTER LEAVING THE CHATEAU MARMONT HOTEL AND CRASHED INTO A WALL ACROSS THE STREET. HE DIED AT THE CEDARS-SINAI MEDICAL CENTER, THE AGENCY REPORTED. GUIDED BY A PASSION FOR THE STRENGTH AND ALLURE OF THE FEMALE FORM, MR. NEWTON REFLECTED THE SEXUAL REVOLUTION OF THE 1960’S AND 70’S WHICH COINCIDED WITH HIS RISE TO FAME. HE PHOTOGRAPHED SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WOMEN IN THE WORLD IN POSES THAT EMPHASIZED THEIR SEXUALITY AND OFTEN AN ACCOMPANYING SENSE OF DANGER AND VIOLENCE.


132 132 II Appendix Appendix

BORN IN 1920 TO A WEALTHY JEWISH FAMILY IN BERLIN, HE BOUGHT HIS FIRST CAMERA AT 12. AS A TEENAGER, HE WAS APPRENTICED TO THE GERMAN THEATRICAL PHOTOGRAPHER YVA, WHO WAS ALSO FOND OF THE NAKED FEMALE FORM. AT 18, HOWEVER, HE WAS FORCED TO FLEE THE NAZIS. EVENTUALLY ARRIVING IN SINGAPORE...LATER MOVED TO AUSTRALIA. IN 1948 HE MARRIED JUNE BROWN, A PHOTOGRAPHER WHO USES THE NAME ALICE SPRINGS PROFESSIONALLY. HE MOVED TO FRANCE IN THE LATE 50’S. THERE HE BEGAN TO BE NOTICED FOR HIS RISQUE IMAGES, EVENTUALLY EARNING THE NICKNAME “THE KING OF KINK.”


Appendix I 133

1947: MEETS HELMUT NEWTON, MARRIES HIM A YEAR LATER 1970: JUNE STANDS IN FOR HELMUT NEWTON WHO IS INCAPACITATED BY ILLNESS, FOR A COMMERICAL PHOTO SHOOT IN PARIS, THUS BEGINS HER CAREER AS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER UNDER THE PSEUDONYM ALICE SPRINGS. 1998: SWISS PRODUCTION OF THE VOLUME “US AND THEM” BY HELMUT AND JUNE NEWTON.


134 134 II Appendix Appendix

W [

1

9

O 6

0

R

-

2

0

K

0

0

S

]


Appendix I 135

1960’S

IN PARIS 1966 HELMUT SHOT A SERIES OF PHOTOS FOR QUEEN WHERE THE WOMEN GAZE OUT THE WINDOW AS ROCKET AND VIOLENCE ENSUES. HERE HE SEEMS TO REFERENCE A TIME WHERE HE WAS IN BERLIN AND WATCH DEMPOSTRATIONS FROM HIS BEDROOM WINDOW. MUCH OF THE WORK FROM 1960S IS IN WAYS RECREATION OF EVENTS FROM CHILDHOOD.


136 136 II Appendix Appendix

IN MILAN 1968 HELMUT HAD TO DRIVE FROM PARIS TO MILAN BY CAR BECAUSE OF A REVOLUTIONTAKING PLACE. NOT ONLY DID THE EVENT CHANGE THE FASHION OF THE TIME BUT BECAUSE OF HAVING TO GET TO MILAN BY CAR , NEWTON WAS INSPIRED TO CAPTURETHE ENERGY OF THE TIME BY SHOOTING IN UNCONVENTIONAL PLACES LIKE IN FRONT OF AN OIL REFINERY. THE STORY OF O ALSO BECAME A POINT OF INTEREST DURING THIS TIME ALONG WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF ARUTHUR SCHNITZLER AND STEFAN ZWEIG.


Appendix I 137

BRITISH VOGUE 1967-MODEL FEMALE VERSION OF CARY GRANT IN HITCHCOCKS NORTH BY NORTHWEST


138 138 II Appendix Appendix

1970’S

SADOMASOCHISM IS THE GIVING AND/OR RECEIVING OF PLEASURE—OFTEN SEXUAL— FROM ACTS INVOLVING THE INFLICTION OR RECEPTION OF PAIN OR HUMILIATION.


Appendix I 139


140 140 II Appendix Appendix

1980â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S


Appendix I 141

“A REFLECTED HELMUT NEWTON” NEWTON PRODUCES A SERIES OF VOYEURISTIC PHOTOS WHERE HE IS PARTIALLY OR ENTIRELY INSERTED IN THE PICTURE. THESE PICTURES HAVE OFTEN BEEN INTERPRETED AS AN EXPRESSION OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF VOYEURISM AND EXPRESSIONISM. NEWTONS PRESENCE IS REMINISCENT OF ICONOGRAPHIC TRADITION WHICH EXTENDS FROM THE CAVE PAINTER’S HAND PRINT TO HITCHCOCKS APPEARANCE IN FILMS. THE ALL MAKE SURE TO SAY I AM THE AUTHOR OF THIS WORK. THE THEME OF VOYEURISM CONTAINS LITTTLE OF THE SEDUCTIVE FORCE AND AUTOMATICALLY TURNS THE VIEWER INTO A VOYEUR SINCE THE OBJECT OF DESIRE HAS ALREADY BEEN CLAIMED.


142 142 II Appendix Appendix


HELMUT NEWTON: “MANY PHOTOGRAPHERS LIKE DOING SELF PORTRAITS. I THINK IT’S EVEN MORE INTERESTING WHEN ONEAppendix IS PARTI 143 OF A WHOLE MISE-EN-SCENE.” FRANK HORVAT: “MAYBE BECAUSE IT’S SO CONTRARY TO THE NATURE OF PHOTOGRAPHY, WHICH IS, AFTER

ALL, AN EYE DIRECTED OUTWARDS. PHOTOGRAPHIC SELF-PORTRAITURE IS ALMOST PARADOXICAL. THIS MAY BE WHY ONE IS TEMPTED TO TRY IT.” HELMUT NEWTON: “I DON’T KNOW, I DIDN’T LOOK AT IT THAT WAY. IT’S JUST THAT IF THE THEME HAD SOMETHING TO

DO WITH MY LIFE, PAST OR PRESENT, IT SEEMS A NICE IDEA TO PUT MYSELF IN IT.” [FRANK HORVAT WITH HELMUT NEWTON: OCTOBER 1986]

MISE-EN-SCENE [TELLING A STORY]


144 144 II Appendix Appendix

“THERE HAS BEEN A SERIES FOR VOGUE IN ‘79 OR ‘80, THEY ASKED ME TO WEAR FASHION, AND THEN I GOT THIS IDEA. I DID IT IN THE PARIS VOGUE STUDIO, BECAUSE IT WAS A PLACE I KNEW WELL AND AROUND WHICH MUCH OF MY LIFE HAD EVOLVED. IT’S A VERY PERSONAL PICTURE, THAT’S WHY IT’S ONE OF MY FAVORITES. THERE IS FIRST OF ALL ME, WITH MY CAMERA, BUT THERE IS ALSO JUNE, WHO ALSO GOT A WONDERFULLY FUNNY EXPRESSION WHILE SHE LOOKS AT MY NAKED MODEL, THERE IS THE VOGUE STUDIO, WITH THE CLOTHRACK, THE DOOR TO THE STREET IS OPEN, YOU SEE THE CARS PARKED ON PLACE DU PALAIS BOURBON, A PLACE THAT HAVE KNOWN FOR 22 YEARS, WHERE I HAD TAKEN THOUSANDS OF PICTURES, ESPECIALLY DURING HAUTE COURTURE COLLECTIONS. THE PHOTOGRAPH HAS ALL THE SIGNALS OF MY LIFE: MY MODELS, MY CAMERA, MY WIFE, THE STUDIO, THE PLACE DU PALAIS BOURBON. THAT ‘S WHAT I CALL AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL PICTURE.” [FRANK HORVAT WITH HELMUT

NEWTON: OCTOBER 1986]


Appendix I 145

1990â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S


146 146 II Appendix Appendix


UNTITLED #261-SHERMAN

ETANT DONNES-DUCHAMP

Appendix I 147

IN HIS PHOTOGRAPHS, NEWTON OFTEN SHOWS HIS WOMEN TOGETHER WITH LIFE-LIKE MANNEQUINS. AT FIRST GLANCE, WE CAN HARDLY DISTINGUISH THE TWO. THE PLASTIC BODIES RESEMBLE REAL WOMEN.NEWTON ENSURES THAT THEY LOOK REAL, INCLUDING PUBIC AND UNDERARM HAIR. HE PHOTOGRAPHS THEM EMBRACING THE REAL WOMEN, KISSING THEM, RECLINING ON A BED. HERE AS WELL, RITUAL ACTIONS ARE PERFORMED IN FRONT OF THE CAMERA. THESE ACTIONS ARE OF UNCONCEALED SEXUALITY, BUT HERE TOO THE DISTANCING FROM THE ACT DISPALYED IS SO GREAT THAN AN EMOTIONALLY CHARGED TENSION HARDLY ARISES. IT IS THUS UNDERSTANDABLE WHY ARTISTS IN OUR CENTURY HAVE ALWAYS BEEN ATTRACTED BY THIS MAGICAL HYBRID BUT SEEMINGLY FREE WORLD.


148 148 II Appendix Appendix

2000â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S


Appendix I 149

THE BIGGEST AND MOST EXPENSIVE BOOK PRODUCTION IN THE 20TH CENTURY


150 150 II Appendix Appendix

REGIONAL VEGETATION COMPREHENSIVE 513_SPRING 2013


Appendix I 151

REGIONAL VEGETATION MITTE_BERLIN_GERMANY

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


152 152 II Appendix Appendix

1800s

1840s_ At this time the only recreational space available to the 322,000 Berliners was the grobe tiergarten that was rebuilt into a landscape park in 1818. 1846-48_ Friedrichshain became the first municipal green space 1864_ Treptower Park was build as an effect of rapid industrialization. The population of Berlin increased to 800,000 by 1870. 1870_ This marked the start of “Park Deputation”. Gustav Meyer became the first public gardener director. This period requires green space to be people’s gardens of exercise, recuperation, socialization and the pure enjoyment of nature. 1888_ Viktoriapark

Forest/Meadows Radial Map

Treptower Park

Viktoriapark

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


1900s

Appendix I 153

1921_ 1,339 ha of parks, green spaces and decorative squares 1920-1923_ Volkspark Jungfernheide _Volkspark Wuhlheide _Volkspark Rehberge 1926_ Erwin Bath planned green spaces on the land filled site of former Luisenstadtischer Kanal in Mitte and Kreuzberg

REGIONAL VEGETATION

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


1900s

154 154 II Appendix Appendix

1950s_ Tierpark Friedrichsfelde (Animal Park)

REGIONAL VEGETATION

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


1900s_EAST BERLIN

Appendix I 155

1970s_

A new housing program was planned for the city in a complex process. There was a system of new required conditions; residential green spaces, open space at day cares, kindergartens and schools. recreational centers, sport facilities etc. URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


156 156 II Appendix Appendix

1900s_WEST BERLIN 1948-1966_ fritz witte created of the main department of green space and horticulture/landscaping gardening. Its focus was on an emergency green program. The first step was the restore the grober tiergarten. The next was to transform the inner city, canals and former loading streets into green space.

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 157

1900s_UNITED BERLIN 1990-1999_ The city sponsored a program for courtyard, roof and facade greenery to improve the quality of life in apartments.

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


158 158 II Appendix Appendix

CURRENT TIERGARTEN

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


CURRENT TIERGARTEN

Appendix I 159

Parliamentary, Governmental and Diplomatic District. The gardens are former hunting grounds and are now home to the Berlin Zoo. Encourages visitors to walk, jog, bike. picnic and engage in recreational activity. 2.5 sq.km., 23 km of walk ways

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


160 160 II Appendix Appendix

ACTUAL USE OF BUILT-UP AREAS FOUNDATION

MARKET

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 161

GREEN SPACE_OPEN SPACE FOUNDATION

MARKET

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


162 162 II Appendix Appendix

INVENTORY OF GREEN SPACES FOUNDATION

MARKET

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 163

BIOTOPE; TYPES AND VALUES FOUNDATION

MARKET

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


164 164 II Appendix Appendix

BIOTOPE; PROTECTION AND HABITAT FOUNDATION

MARKET

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 165

BIOTOPE; DATA_ GROUND WATER FOUNDATION

MARKET

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


166 166 II Appendix Appendix

VEGETATION FOUNDATION

MARKET

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


MOST COMMON PLANTS BURDOCK (ARCTIUM) grows up to 28’’ biennial roots can be harvested

Appendix I 167

COMMON HAZEL (CORYLUS AVELLANA) grows 3-8 m, can reach 15m common to european woodlands cultivated for hazelnuts

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


168 168 II Appendix Appendix

MOST COMMON PLANTS

CHICORY (CICHORIUM INTYBUS) grows between 10-40’’ perennial used for cooking

COUCH GRASS (ELYMUS) grows 40-150 cm tall fast growing

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 169

MOST COMMON PLANTS KNOT GRASS (POLYGONUM) annual_stays under 5cm perennial_3-4 m tall food source

RYE GRASS (LOLIUM) ideal for lawns trimmed short

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


170 170 II Appendix Appendix

MOST COMMON PLANTS

TANSY (TANACETUM VULGARE) grows between 50-150 cm tall perennial flowering

WOLFBERRY (GOJI) grows 5-16’’ tall,must be spaced 24’’ apart perennial no weed control

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 171

MOST COMMON TREES LINDEN (Tilia)

_state tree _1/3 % of tree pop. _little leaf linden on narrow streets _crowned common linden on avenues

50-60’

_flowering _50-60’ tall _40’ spread _med. growth _full sun _various soil _oval shape _wide spreading roots

40’

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


172 172 II Appendix Appendix

MOST COMMON TREES

LINDEN (Tilia)

_norway maple _20 % of pop. _located on streets -blooms early _autumn colors

40-60’ 4-8’’

_shaded _40-60’ tall _40’ spread _med-fast growth _full sun _various soil _oval shape _4-8’’roots

40’

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 173

MOST COMMON TREES OAK (QUERCUS)

_less then 10% of pop. _needs light, not suitable for narrow streets _new gov’t streets have oak _colorful in autumn

40-60’ 4’

_shaded _60-70’ tall _60’-70’ spread _med.growth _full sun _various soil _round shape _4’ deep large roots

60’-

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


174 174 II Appendix Appendix

MOST COMMON TREES

PLANE (PLATANUS)

_6% of pop. _most commonly seen on wide avenues _best known for placement on berlin’s oldest avenue)

75-100’

_shaded _75-100’ tall _80’ spread _med.growth _full sun _various soil _pyramid shape _expansive, destructive roots

80’-

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 175

MOST COMMON TREES CHESTNUT (AESCULUS)

_5% of pop. horse chestnut

40-70’

40-70’

_ornamental _50-75’ tall _40-70’ spread _med.growth _full sun _various soil _oval shape _roots damage foundations

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


176 176 II Appendix Appendix

CURRENT GREEN SPACES

NOMADIC GREEN PARKS

“From the Community.. .. for the Community” PLAYGROUNDS

CITY TREES

ALLOTMENT GARDENS

CEMETERIES

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


Appendix I 177

USES OF VEGETATION

BIOWALLS CIRCULATES AIR OXYGENATING AIR TRAP POLLUTANTS CLIMATE CONTROL

GREEN ROOFS TOLERATES EXTREME CONDITIONS PROVIDES SHADING TO GLASS FACADES URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


178 178 II Appendix Appendix

USES OF VEGETATION EXTERIOR_INTERIOR WALLS SHADING REMOVE POLLUTANTS O2 EMISSIONS

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT_ AESTHETICS ZONING LAND MARKING URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


USES OF VEGETATION

Appendix I 179

FORMALIZING SPACE DIVIDERS CIRCULATION PROGRAM

VIEWS HIGHLIGHTS DIRECTION CIRCULATION

PRIVACY PUBLIC/PRIVATE SPACES ‘TO SEE AND BE SEEN’

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


180 180 II Appendix Appendix

USES OF VEGEATION; GREEN ROOFS

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS


USES OF VEGETATION; GREEN ROOFS

Appendix I 181

URBAN NETWORK OF GREEN SYSTEMS

Veiled Nostalgia Comprehensive Design 2013  

Helmut Newton Foundation

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