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would only be a need for three computers – in total. To say nothing of a forecast 30 years ago that stated categorically that there would be a maximum of 100,000 mobile phones in the UK - ever. Now everyone has one, and some have two! The point here is that forecasting anything in the future is fraught with unknowns, such as a total change in technology creating a sea change in fundamental information. The cost of a mobile phone 30 years ago was around $1,800 in 1985 costs, now they are effectively free with a monthly contract, or pay-to-use top up systems. However, I am personally not forecasting as such, I am looking forward and imagining what could well happen if the technological progress continues at an ever increasing rate. In doing so I take into consideration technology, the economic impact on the volume of production and the capital investment necessary. I also look laterally at everything going on in the world of technology and seek alternate ways of creating solutions. Are there companies or organisations able (financially) to work on the basis of a ten to twenty year strategy, and also able to change course almost instantly when the technological environment changes without losing the long term strategic goal? Why not have a direct link through DNA/and using stem cells to electronics? And the reverse with signals into the body – such as an artificial eye.

The only boundaries that science has to observe are those of ethics: that is the greatest challenge of all At great risk of leaving out names of people who worked in the field and published papers and documents, I would like to acknowledge the following – and in not in any particular order: Gene Weckler, Paul Weimer, R Dyck, M.A. Schuster, M.M. (John) Attalla, J. Brugler, J.W Horton, F.L.J. Sangster, M. F. (Mike) Thomsett, Ed Snow and John Rado. If I have left anyone out, then it is certainly not deliberate, just a failing memory and missing documents, for which I can only apologise. And to complete the picture by acknowledging my teams included the following: Peter Fry, Peter Hughes, Savvas Chamberlain, Eddie Tranter, Brian Crowle, and more engineers, scientists, technicians and operatives. And I should add Eric Fossum who found me over two years ago, Mike Thomsett who came over to the UK and we met up and talked a bit about old times in 2014, and Johannes Solhusvik who has been my main point of contact.

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The creation of mos detector arrays keynote paper june 2015  

The creation of the Active Pixel - the system used in almost every digital camera system

The creation of mos detector arrays keynote paper june 2015  

The creation of the Active Pixel - the system used in almost every digital camera system

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