Issuu on Google+

Perth Writers Festival Fri 4–Mon 7 March 2011

Beautiful writing, lively debate and big ideas on the beautiful grounds of The University of Western Australia. The Perth Writers Festival long weekend has something for everyone, including a fabulous opening party, readings, talks, workshops and our always popular Family Day.

BOOK 6488 5555 perthfestival.com.au


2

Welcome Shelagh Magadza, Artistic Director Our thoughts are what define us as human beings, and the ability to share them forms the heart of every good society. We extend a warm invitation to hear some of the world’s great thinkers and to share your own ideas at the Perth Writers Festival. It is with great pride that I look back over the four years since we established the Perth Writers Festival on The University of Western Australia campus. Our aim was to grow a Festival that welcomed book lovers from all walks of life in our community. We also aimed for recognition internationally, for Perth to become a distinctive and welcoming place for writers and thinkers from across the world.

Year on year the Perth Writers Festival has grown, with audiences young and old making the weekend a buzzing hub. This year’s program has many great offerings, from fact to fiction, crime to history and fantastic children’s writing. It is well worth taking the time to explore this program. Thank you to the growing number of audiences, writers, sponsors, donors and volunteers who have helped make this such a successful event. Now an important part of our City’s calendar, Perth Writers Festival will continue to be a source of inspiration.

From the Program Managers Katherine Dorrington and Danielle Benda, Perth Writers Festival It is our great pleasure to invite you to explore the 2011 Perth Writers Festival program, which offers an abundance of ideas, debate and conversation about the issues which most deeply touch our lives and a chance to meet the most lauded and loved authors writing today. This year we are proud to present a wide range of discussions on topics which drive the world – from Barack Obama’s first two years in power to the meaning of democracy and its place in the new world order, from the nexus between politics and fossil fuels to the moral and ethical issues surrounding Gaza. There is sure to be something to stimulate all minds. Literary lovers will relish our special Book Club events, focusing on the classics and the masterful Henry James, and revel in the robust conversation about issues being addressed in contemporary literature.

Our outstanding poetry line-up will thrill all lovers of the poetic voice; and this year we pay special tribute to one of Western Australia’s greatest literary sons, Randolph Stow. The real joy in putting this program together is the time spent pairing speakers and crafting session topics to encourage different perspectives to be brought into focus. The final ingredients needed to complete this mix are the ideas and views you bring to the discussion. This is your Festival and we encourage you to share your opinions, join the debate and seize the once-a-year chance to meet your favourite authors. Danielle Benda takes over as Program Manager while Katherine Dorrington is on maternity leave.

SEE THREE & WIN!

Perth Writers Festival

One great experience deserves another when you ‘See Three’ or more events at the Perth Festival

Purchase tickets to three separate Festival events and you automatically go into the draw to WIN one of three fabulous prizes: a spectacular overseas arts experience at the 2011 Singapore Arts Festival; exclusive accommodation at the award-winning Cable Beach Club Resort & Spa in Broome; or accommodation and dinner for two at the multi-award winning Must Margaret River. For full terms and conditions visit perthfestival.com.au or call Festival Info on (08) 6488 5555.

Ticket Information Events

Much of the program is FREE and marked in the brochure. Bookings for free events are not required. Please arrive early to ensure entry.

Ticketed Events

Some Festival Highlights, workshops and sessions require tickets and can be booked in advance. Family Day illustration and writing workshops are $10 and include all materials. Spaces are limited and these workshops sell out quickly. Bookings through perthfestival.com.au or Festival Info 6488 5555. Door sales subject to availability.

Perth Writers Festival Box Offices Octagon Theatre Fri 4 March, 9am–4.15pm Sat 5 & Sun 6 March, 9am–8pm Mon 7 March, 9am–6.30pm

University Club Theatre

Sat 5 & Sun 6 March, 9am–5.30pm Mon 7 March, 9am–5.30pm All programs and artists are subject to change and alteration without notice.

Parking and Free Shuttle – Mon 7 March

Mon 7 March is a Public Holiday, however University classes still operate. Parking will be limited on these days to paid parking areas only along Hackett Drive and in car parks 1, 3, 23 & 25. Space is limited and we recommend arriving early for parking along Hackett Drive. Please do not park in red or yellow bays on this day or you will attract an infringement notice. The Festival has organised for additional FREE parking at Sir Charles Court Reserve near Broadway and The Avenue. A free shuttle bus will operate between this car park and the Festival hub from 8.30am–7.30pm.


3

Festival Highlights Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment We’ve hand-picked a selection of must-see events for you at this year’s Festival. Many are FREE, with ticketed events starting at only $12.50. We’ve also included a student price throughout the program.

These are just a selection of the many riches to be found in the following pages – and don’t forget to check out our FREE Family Day program on pages 12 and 13.

Each session is numbered 1 . Use these numbers with biographies on pages 14 and 15 to find sessions with your favourite authors.

Professor Tim Flannery is a writer, scientist and explorer and just happened to be the 2007 Australian of the Year. His new book is a biography of our planet and our species. Here on Earth traces our shared histories and asks us to think about how we have survived together so far and what it will take for us to continue living together. In his renowned style, he offers provocative and visionary solutions. Introduced by Josh Byrne.

An Evening with Annie Proulx

2

Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Annie Proulx’s work tackles bleak themes with a sharp sense of humour and masterful use of language. In acclaimed novels such as The Shipping News, she has explored the relationships of her offbeat characters with a wide and often wild landscape. Bird Cloud is her first work of nonfiction in 20 years and documents her own relationship with the land and its inhabitants as she buys a farm in Wyoming and sets about building a home. Join her in conversation with Ramona Koval of ABC Radio National’s The Book Show.

This is a very good book. It should be required reading for politicians and corporate leaders. READINGS

Ms Proulx writes with all the brutal beauty of one of her Wyoming

WHEN Thur 3 March, 7pm WHERE Winthrop Hall PRICE $21.50/Friends $19/Students $15.55

WHEN Sun 6 March, 6.30pm WHERE Winthrop Hall PRICE $21.50/Friends $19/Students $15.55

An Evening with Armistead Maupin

snowstorms. WALL STREET JOURNAL

3

Get set for a fascinating interview with one of America’s most beloved and charismatic authors as he reflects on society, life and his work, including the latest addition to his Tales of the City series, Mary Ann in Autumn. Now in its third decade, the Tales of the City series remains sassy, sweet and surprising as cherished characters explore life and love in San Francisco. As always, Maupin writes with the insight, compassion and mordant wit that have captivated readers for years and continue to bring new fans to the fold. Chair: Geoff Hutchison.

Perhaps the most sublime piece of popular literature America has ever produced … As with the Beatles, everyone seems to like Maupin’s Tales – and, really, why would you want to find someone who didn’t? SALON WHEN Sun 6 March, 8pm WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $21.50/Friends $19/Students $15.55

Truth and Fiction

4

McCusker Charitable Foundation Opening Event Celebrate the opening of the Perth Writers Festival as acclaimed writers respond to the theme of ‘Truth and Fiction’. Featuring: novelist Anjali Joseph (Saraswati Park); philosopher Raimond Gaita (Romulus, My Father and Gaza); biographer Lyndall Gordon (Lives Like Loaded Guns: Emily Dickinson and her Family’s Feuds); twice Man Booker nominated Damon Galgut (In a Strange Room); Man Asian Literary Prize winner Miguel Syjuco (Ilustrado); and 2007 Australian of the Year and scientist Tim Flannery (Here on Earth). Book for the Opening Party that follows to meet writers from the entire program over drinks and canapés.

WHEN Fri 4 March, 7pm WHERE Winthrop Hall PRICE $35/Friends $33 OPENING ADDRESS AND PARTY $85/Friends $73

Perth Writers Festival

Tim Flannery: Here on Earth

1


4

Festival Highlights Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment

Science is the New Art

Backstage Politics

6

Dexter is Delicious

7

Annie Proulx has long been influenced by the natural world, making her home on 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie purchased from the Nature Conservancy. Tim Flannery is a writer, scientist and explorer who delves into our relationship with the planet. Join them for a conversation on the connection between art and science. Chair: Stephen Romei.

It’s been nearly 60 years since Phillip Adams’ by-line first appeared in a newspaper. Since then, as a broadcaster, filmmaker, columnist and writer, he has made an enormous contribution to social and political debate in Australia, rubbing up against pollies of all persuasions. His new book, Backstage Politics: Fifty Years of Political Memories, takes us behind the scenes of many encounters. Chair: Geoff Hutchison.

After selling more than one million copies and inspiring a wildly popular TV show, Jeff Lindsay returns with his most hilarious, macabre, and purely entertaining novel yet, Dexter is Delicious. Everyone’s favourite serial killer is now a proud father, but has marriage and family life tamed his bloodlust? Join Jeff as he discusses Dexter and the dark side with James Lush.

WHEN Sat 5 March, 9.30am WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $12.50/Friends $11.30/Students $9.55

WHEN Sat 5 March, 5pm WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $12.50/Friends $11.30/Students $9.55

WHEN Sat 5 March, 6.30pm WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $21.50/Friends $19/Students $15.55

Feast of Words

Perth Writers Festival

5

8

The Democracy Debate

9

Talking Couches

10

Join us for a Bacchanalian feast for body and mind as international and national storytellers infuse gourmet food and wine with flavourful readings. Authors Joanne Harris, Armistead Maupin, Simon Armitage and Adam Ross delight and transfix while you feast on an indulgent three-course banquet and reds and whites from the award-winning Watershed Premium Wines.

With the growing global influence of the Asia and Pacific region, the resurgence of religious fundamentalism, bigotry, widening inequality and Facebook, Google and Wikileaks, do we have to rethink how democracy will work in the coming century? How do the 19th and 20th century ideals of democracy hold up? Tariq Ali, Ken Crispin, John Keane and Antony Loewenstein share their thoughts on the future of democracy. Chair: Dr Carmen Lawrence.

Sit back and chill out this summer on one of our comfy Festival Talking Couches, located at key locations around the City and at Perth Writers Festival Family Day. These eclectic lounges have been radically redesigned by young people and will amuse, inspire and beguile with a prerecorded selection of their stories, thoughts and hopes for the future.

WHEN Sat 5 March, 6.30–10.30pm WHERE The Great Court PRICE $122.50/Friends $112.50

WHEN Sat 5 March, 8pm WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $21.50/Friends $19/Students $15.55

WHEN All weekend WHERE Perth Writers Festival Precinct

Thrilling New Tastes

11

The Obama Syndrome

12

Andrew O’Hagan: The West

13

Closing Address

Joanne Harris, the bestselling author of Chocolat, has crafted a dark and intricately plotted new thriller in Blueeyedboy. Told through posts on an internet site, this is the tale of a poisonously dysfunctional family, a blind child prodigy and a serial killer who is not who he seems. Join Joanne with Geraldine Mellet for a conversation about her new novel.

Tariq Ali argues that very little has changed since George W Bush left the White House – especially when it comes to foreign affairs. But while the ‘war on terror’ continues abroad, at home the honeymoon is definitely over with a Republican surge in the recent mid-term elections. Join writer and filmmaker Tariq Ali for this thoughtprovoking lecture.

Twice Man Bookernominated novelist Andrew O’Hagan grew up on the west coast of Scotland. His people looked west to the Ireland they came from, and further west to the America that was coming to dominate their lives. For O’Hagan, the concept of The West – literature’s dream territory, cinema’s golden land – is at the centre of some of the greatest debates in modern life.

WHEN Sun 6 March, 6.30pm WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $21.50/Friends $19/Students $15.55

WHEN Mon 7 March, 3.30pm WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $12.50/Friends $11.30/Students $9.55

WHEN Mon 7 March, 6.30pm WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $35/Friends $33


5

Workshops Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment

14

The A–Z of Getting Published Dive into a day-long seminar designed to teach you all that’s involved in getting published, from landing an agent, working with editors, finding a publisher, preparing a book for publication and hitting the publicity trail.

Contributors include Random House Publisher Meredith Curnow, Senior Editor at Text publishing Mandy Brett, Director of UWA Publishing Terri-ann White and agent Lyn Tranter. For details and full line-up, go to perthfestival.com.au

WHEN Fri 4 March, 10am–4pm WHERE Festival Tent PRICE $72.50/Friends $64/Students $55

Fiona McGregor

17

Ron Elliott

18

Screenwriting

Through the Discomfort Zone

Melina Marchetta

15

Writing Fiction

Anthony Eaton

16

Fantastic Ideas

‘Show not tell’ is the mantra of all good writers, but it can be hard to do. Melina shows you her method, giving examples and asking participants to write short pieces. Select the right words and discover dialogue with more than one purpose.

Look at theory and the practical problems of building a fantastic world, with an emphasis on character, avoiding cliché and narrative structure. Anthony brings his own experience and you have the chance to unpack your own ideas.

WHEN Sat 5 March, 10am–1pm WHERE Fox Theatre PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sat 5 March, 2–5pm WHERE Fox Theatre PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

David Whish-Wilson

19

Crime Writing

Jon Bauer

# 20

Getting Out of Your Own Way

Why do we get stuck? What are we afraid of? How can we overcome obstacles presented by difficult subject matter? This workshop helps you tackle things that make you frightened, uneasy, ashamed or just plain embarrassed.

Stories for page and screen share certain elements, namely character and conflict. Consider how stories can be told using visual means, dialogue, acting and subtext and learn about structuring your writing and using the script format creatively.

Learn from a master about crime story structure and using multiple points of view. David references everything from TV series such as The Wire and Oz to Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent and the novels of George Pelecanos.

Sometimes, the problem with writing is the writer. This workshop helps dispense with all the things holding you back – with discussion and writing exercises to help develop selfcriticism and a writing process that works for you.

WHEN Sat 5 March, 10am–1pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 4 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sat 5 March, 2–5pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 4 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sat 5 March, 10am–1pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 5 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sat 5 March, 2–5pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 5 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

Ursula Dubosarsky

21

Melanie Ostell

22

Fiction Workshop

Writing for Children

Melanie Ostell

23

Selling the Story (non-fiction)

Maria Tumarkin

24

Writing Memoir

It seems so simple, but writing good quality stories for children is a fine art. After all, those very few words need to be chosen carefully! Let one of Australia’s most successful children’s authors show you how it’s done.

You have a great manuscript, but how do you interest a publisher or agent? Melanie Ostell from UWA Publishing provides comments on your work and marketplace insight. Sign up, then get your synopsis and first chapter to us (by Feb 25) for detailed feedback.

It’s a great story, but how do you sell the idea to a publisher? Melanie Ostell from UWA Publishing shows how to make an impact with your submission. Sign up and send your proposal and ten pages of writing to us (by Feb 25) for detailed feedback.

Good memoir writing does more than retell your story; it gives new voice to all our stories. Learn how your experiences can mean something to other people and the human condition.

WHEN Sat 5 March, 10am–1pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 6 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sat 5 March, 2–5pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 6 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sun 6 March, 2–5pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 4 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sun 6 March, 10am–1pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 5 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

Sophie Gee

25

How does Jane Austen do it?

Leah Giarratano

26

Writing Nasty Villains

Carmel Bird

27

Writing the Story of your Life

Seeds for Stories

28

State Library of Western Australia

Her books are as fresh and relevant as when first written 200 years ago, but have you thought about what techniques Jane Austen employed to entice and enchant us? Sophie Gee guides us through the layers of her writing.

Get your dark side onto the page. Clinical psychologist and bestselling crime writer Dr Leah Giarratano takes you inside the mind of a psychopath, exploring the motives, thoughts and desires of the worst predators amongst us.

Find the best way to put your own life into your own words. Identify your voice, explore your past, sharpen your thoughts and develop your memories in this interactive workshop with writer Carmel Bird.

Find out how to use the rich resources of the State Library to take your story from an idea to publication. Authors Amanda Curtin and Mark Greenwood share how they have used the library to inspire their published work.

WHEN Sun 6 March, 2–5pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 5 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sun 6 March, 10am–1pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 6 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sun 6 March, 2–5pm WHERE Arts Lecture Room 6 PRICE $62.50/Friends $55/ Students $51

WHEN Sun 13 March, 2–4pm WHERE State Library of WA PRICE $22 bookings essential BOOKINGS 9427 3211

Perth Writers Festival

Publishing Seminar:


6

Saturday Sessions – 5 March 2011 Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment

Time 9.30– 10.30am

Octagon Theatre

The University Club Theatre

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

CRIMINALLY MINDED

INSPIRED BY NATURE

Annie Proulx has long been influenced by the natural world, making her home on 640 acres of Wyoming wetlands and prairie purchased from the Nature Conservancy. Tim Flannery is a writer, scientist and explorer who delves into our relationship with the planet. They discuss the connection between art and science. Chair: Stephen Romei.

Jeff Lindsay and Leah Giarratano get deep inside the minds of psychopaths in their latest novels. Is writing about society’s nasty side therapeutic or distressing? Join them for a conversation on the ups and downs of crime writing. Chair: Ben Martin.

The natural world is often a starting point for creativity. Gregory Day, Suzanne Falkiner, Adrian Hyland and James Bradley consider the role landscape plays in firing up a writer’s imagination. Chair: Mark Tredinnick.

What is it about fantasy and science fiction that is so attractive for teens and adults alike? Three outstanding writers working within the genre, Bernard Beckett, Lev Grossman and Will Elliott, share their thoughts. Chair: Ara Jansen.

30

31

LIVES LIKE LOADED GUNS

IN A STRANGE ROOM

Acclaimed biographer Lyndall Gordon explores the life and work of poet Emily Dickinson. The author of almost 1800 poems, but with only ten published in her lifetime, Dickinson has become a mythic character. In her original and page-turning biography, Gordon offers a fascinating new interpretation 33 of the poet’s life.

In a Strange Room by novelist Damon Galgut was shortlisted for the 2010 Man Booker Prize and is a beautiful evocation of place and human connection. He talks to Ramona Koval of ABC Radio National’s The Book Show about the nature of memory, the compulsion to travel and relationships between 34 wanderers.

Perth Writers Festival

12.30–1.30pm IT’S A DOG’S LIFE Andrew O’Hagan’s unique new novel is a fascinating insight into the life of Marilyn Monroe, provided by her canine companion Maf in the last few years of her life. A shrewd observer of the modern age, Maf is a great vehicle to explore the nature of celebrity and the height of 1960s political, cultural and literary life in America. Chair: Stephen Romei. 38

2–3pm

The University Club Banquet Hall

Festival Tent

SCIENCE IS THE NEW ART

5

11am–12pm

Dolphin Theatre

TRIAL BY MEDIA The relationship between the media and judicial system can be fraught; the media is often accused of scaremongering, and yet there are times when the courts get it wrong. Journalists Colleen Egan, Richard Lloyd Parry and former Supreme Court Judge Ken Crispin consider the role of the fourth estate within the justice system. Chair: 43 Lawrence Apps.

29

FANTASY AFFAIRS

HOME COMFORTS

MINDING THE PLANET We all agree the planet is in danger and yet we seem unable to work together to agree on a solution. Psychologist Dorothy Rowe and scientist Ian Lowe consider what it will take to persuade us this issue is serious enough to act.

The idea of home can have many different meanings, from physical and geographical spaces to the comfort and familiarity to be found in a home library or captured in a piece of art. Carmel Bird, Hetti Perkins and Brenda Walker contemplate what home means to them. Chair: Donna Ward.

Richard Lloyd Parry’s gripping book follows the story of young British woman Lucie Blackman, who fell prey to unspeakable evil while working as a hostess in Japan. Eight years earlier, Perth woman Carita Ridgeway was a victim of Joji Obara. Richard’s examination of the crimes offers insight into the societies in which they occurred. Chair: 32 Geraldine Mellet.

FROM THE BOOK TO THE EASEL

BREAKING THE MOULD

Wayne Ashton and Ron Brooks work between two very different mediums: literature and art. They talk about the creative challenges each brings.

The latest books by Adam Ross, Miguel Syjuco and Rodney Hall are playful disruptions of traditional literary forms. From interrupted narratives to unique perspectives to blending truth and fiction, they discuss why they moved away from formal narrative structures to tell their stories.

35

36

37

SAND

MASTERCLASS

THE MAGIC OF OZ

What is the importance of sand to the Western Australian psyche? Two of WA’s favourite sons discuss how this most basic of elements has come to exemplify something essential about being West Australian. John Kinsella and Robert Drewe sit down with Chair Stephen Bevis.

Debut novelists Kirsten Tranter and Sophie Gee have spent years studying the classics, from English Renaissance literature to 18th-century satire. They discuss what the masters can teach us when it comes to writing fiction. Chair: Angela Meyer.

Is there a uniquely Australian fantasy voice? Do the Australian character and landscape influence the nature of our fantasies? Margo Lanagan, Anthony Eaton and Will Elliott consider how living in Australia influences their writing. Chair: Helen Merrick.

40

41

39

GAZA: ZIONISM AND ANTI-ZIONISM

GETTING INSIDE THEIR HEADS

The invasion of Gaza in 2008 provoked worldwide condemnation and questions about Israel’s right to exist. Some asked why other nations acting unjustly don’t face debate about the validity of their sovereignty. Raimond Gaita and Antony Loewenstein discuss the issue.

Lyndall Gordon and Hazel Rowley have written ground-breaking new biographies of Emily Dickinson and Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. They consider the difficulties of writing about well-known subjects and the need to put aside traditional theories to discover new interpretations. Chair: Rosemary Sayer.

44

PEOPLE WHO EAT DARKNESS

PEOPLE LIKE US?

45

From pregnancies and new motherhood to failed marriages and empty nests, the new fiction of Carmel Bird, Natasha Lester and Fiona McGregor explores the joys, challenges and messiness of the lives of apparently ordinary people. Chair: Terri-ann White.

46

42

GIVING VOICE TO MEMORIES Rodney Hall, Kate Holden and Ron Brooks have written three very different memoirs, utilising three very different styles. They talk to Rachel Robertson about finding the right voice to tell their story.

47


7

Saturday Sessions – 5 March 2011 Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment

3.30–4.30pm

The University Club Theatre

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

LETTERS FROM CHINA

THE FINGER

Yan Lianke is one of China’s greatest living authors. Currently under heavy scrutiny from authorities, he battles to maintain creative integrity. His latest novel, Dream of Ding Village, was inspired by the AIDS epidemic in Henan, where thousands were infected through criminally negligent blood-selling practices. Chair: Rosemary Sayer 48

5–6pm

BACKSTAGE POLITICS

In a collision between art and science, history and pop culture, acclaimed art historian Angus Trumble examines the finger from every possible angle. He talks with Alan Dodge about different representations of the finger in art from Buddhist statues in Kyoto to Rubens’ fondness for gloves.

6

Octagon Theatre

So much has been written about icons Marilyn Monroe and the Roosevelts that finding a new angle can be difficult. Andrew O’Hagan and Hazel Rowley explore these mythic individuals on a more personal level in their new books, one fiction and one biography. Chair: Angela Meyer.

DEXTER IS DELICIOUS

8–9pm

THE DEMOCRACY DEBATE With the growing influence of the Asia and Pacific region, the resurgence of religious fundamentalism, widening inequality and Wikileaks, do we have to rethink how democracy works? Tariq Ali, Ken Crispin, John Keane and Antony Loewenstein share their thoughts. Chair: Dr Carmen Lawrence. PRICE $21.50/Friends $19/Students $15.55

9

Stephen Daisley and Chris Womersley’s atmospheric new novels are stories of war and transformation. They explore the devastating effects of war and its legacy on returning soldiers. Chair Stephen Romei.

51

ECCENTRIC CHARACTERS

NEW VOICES, OLD LANDS

Gregory Day and Toni Jordan’s witty new novels are populated with casts of idiosyncratic characters. They talk to Ben Martin about writing with a comedic touch.

Miguel Syjuco was awarded the Man Asia Literary Award for his unpublished novel Illustrado while Anjali Joseph was included in The Daily Telegraph’s top 20 authors under 40. Their exciting novels are fresh visions of two old countries, the Philippines and India. 55

54

Acclaimed Australian poets Kate Lilley, John Tranter and John Kinsella share exhilarating readings of their new poetry. Chair: Peter Rose.

52

WESTERLY RANDOLPH STOW TRIBUTE West Australian writer Randolph Stow showed us a way to write about ourselves. Gail Jones, Gabrielle Carey, Richard Rossiter and Dickon Oxenburgh discuss his writing and its ongoing influence. Chair: Delys Bird

56

THE MASTER: HENRY JAMES

BOOK CLUB EVENT

Everyone’s favourite serial killer, Dexter, is now a proud family man, but has marriage and family life tamed his bloodlust? Join Jeff Lindsay as he discusses his new Dexter novel with James Lush.

7

From researching Durban slums to trawling Perth’s seedy underworld to delving into the psyches of Australia’s most fearsome criminals, writing crime fiction is never dull. Malla Nunn, David Whish-Wilson and Leah Giarratano discuss the stories behind their new novels. Chair: Ara Jansen. 50

FREE VERSE

Sunken Garden

FEAST OF WORDS

PRICE $21.50/Friends $19/Students $15.55

NIGHTMARES OF WAR

53

The Great Court

Arts Courtyard Stage

Festival Tent

ALL IN A DAY’S WORK

49

AMERICAN ICONS

After over 50 years in politics, arts and the media, broadcaster and columnist Phillip Adams has plenty of stories to tell about his time rubbing up against pollies. He talks about his new book Backstage Politics.

6.30–7.30pm

Dolphin Theatre

Kirsten Tranter and Peter Rose’s new novels reference Henry James’ writing, particularly The Portrait of a Lady and The Aspern Papers. They consider the influence of Henry James on contemporary writing and their work.

Join us for a PRICE $21.50/Friends Bacchanalian feast $19/Students $15.55 for body and mind as 57 international and national INDIGO LAUNCH storytellers infuse gourmet food and wine with flavourful readings. Join us as Robert Drewe and John Kinsella launch Authors Joanne Harris, Armistead Maupin, Simon the final volume of Armitage and Adam Ross literary journal indigo. delight and transfix while The event features you feast on an indulgent readings, music and a special appearance by three-course banquet award-winning author and reds and whites Mark Tredinnick and from the award-winning the inaugural winner Watershed Premium of the $5,000 Nature Wines. Conservancy Prize for Nature Writing. Chair: WHEN 6.30–10.30pm Donna Ward. PRICE $122.50/Friends $112.50 8

58

Perth Writers Festival

Time

Octagon Theatre


8

Sunday Sessions – 6 March 2011 Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment

Time

The University Club Theatre

Octagon Theatre

The University Club Banquet Hall

Dolphin Theatre

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

9.30– 10.30am

ANIMAGICA

By Amiina with the films of Lotte Reiniger

11am–12pm

TILL DEATH DO US PART

POPULAR OR LITERARY

The whole literary landscape has been altered by the internet and the death of the book is constantly being proclaimed. What is the future of books and reading? Will e-books change the way the publishing industry works? Lev Grossman, Geordie Williamson, Angela Meyer and James Bradley weigh into the debate.

Adam Ross and Anjali Joseph are debut novelists generating a huge amount of buzz. Their novels explore, in very different ways, the institution of marriage and the idea of selfhood. They talk to Sarah Schadlow about their writing.

People have very strong opinions on their differences, but what exactly is the distinction between popular and literary fiction? Toni Jordan, Sophie Gee and Melina Marchetta consider where the line can be drawn. Chair: Rachel Robertson.

60

61

62

THE ART OF THE INTERVIEW Lotte Reiniger is one of the greatest creators in animation history. Inspired by Chinese silhouette puppetry, she made 60 beautiful and mesmerising films, 40 of which still survive today. These delicately wrought black and white marvels revolutionised the film industry in the 1920s–1940s and brought timeless fairy tales to life for children and adults to enjoy like never before.

Perth Writers Festival

THE DEATH OF PRINT

As a special treat for the Perth Festival, three members 12.30–1.30pm Writers of Icelandic group Amiina create a delicate and ethereal score for Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty and Aladdin and the Magic Lamp. Well known for their work with Sigur Rós, Amiina utilise an assortment of instruments – including violin, glassophone, musical saw and water-filled glasses – to evoke magical soundscapes of wonder and possibility.

Ramona Koval is host of ABC Radio National’s The Book Show. Her new book revisits scores of interviews she has done with some of the greatest writers of our time. One-time interviewee Andrew O’Hagan sees if she can give as good as she gets.

VISUAL NARRATIVES

READER RAPPORT

Curators Angus Trumble and Hetti Perkins are drawn to the visual. From paintings inspired by remote landscapes of Arnhem Land to the lush palazzos of the Renaissance, they talk about the works they love and the impact art has had on their lives. Chair: William Yeoman.

How a reader is either distanced from or identifies with certain characters is central to how they engage with a book. Jon Bauer, Richard Lloyd Parry and Chris Womersley consider whether creating empathy is essential to keeping readers interested. Chair: Stephen Romei.

63

SEEING STARS British poet and novelist Simon Armitage is one of the most popular and widely known poets of his generation. Seeing Stars, his latest collection, is a wildly inventive and hyper-vivid array of dramatic monologues, allegories, parables and tall tales. Chair: Geordie Williamson.

64

THE THRILL OF TRANSGRESSIONS

65

SOPHISTICATED FARE

Fiona McGregor’s Indelible Ink and Kate Holden’s The Romantic are stories of change and discovery. Their female protagonists skirt conventional boundaries in their exploration of self. They talk to Donna Ward about pushing the limits.

Writing for young adults has never been so good, with sophisticated concepts and multi-dimensional characters. The novels of Bernard Beckett and Melina Marchetta appeal to both teens and adults. They discuss writing for a transitional age.

67

68

ORIGINALLY COMMISSIONED BY JERSEY BRANCHAGE FILM FESTIVAL

WHEN 9.30–10.30am & 11.30am–12.30pm PRICE $24.50

2–3pm

59

GILLO’S BOOKSHELF: WALKING THE LINE 720 ABC PERTH BOOK CLUB EVENT

Jeff Lindsay (Dexter series) and Joanne Harris (Chocolat, Blueeyedboy) explore our attraction to the dark side. Is writing about bad guys more fun than writing about good guys? Hosted by 720 ABC Perth’s Gillian O’Shaughnessy. PRICE $12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

80

66

WHY WE LIE

THIS IS AUSTRALIA

PUBLIC VS PRIVATE

From everyday fibs to grandscale public deception, renowned psychologist Dorothy Rowe explores the reasons we lie and constructions of truth in her new book. She speaks to crime writer and psychologist Leah Giarratano.

The new novels of Kim Scott, Ron Elliott and Roger McDonald all feature very different Australian stories, using the distinctive landscapes and characters of the nation to explore a variety of themes. They talk to Rosemary Sayer about their writing.

With any biography, memoir or fictional story borrowing from truth there comes a point at which the author faces a question of ethics – what to tell and what to leave out. Rodney Hall, Peter Rose and Hazel Rowley consider the decisions they’ve made in writing their books.

69

70

71


9

Sunday Sessions – 6 March 2011 Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment

Octagon Theatre

The University Club Theatre

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

3.30–4.30pm MEETING OF MINDS Ramona Koval and Phillip Adams have met and talked with some of literature’s most fascinating minds. They consider why we want to hear from the writers we love and what it is that compels us to find out more about their lives and ideas. Chair: Mark Naglazas.

72

5–6pm

VOTE 1 FOR THE BIOSPHERE How can we make the changes necessary to tackle climate change in a democracy? What about the planet’s other creatures and plants? Can we give them a voice and, if so, how? Or is democracy inadequate for dealing with environmental catastrophe? Ian Lowe and John Keane tackle the issue with Senator Scott Ludlam. 73

NIGHT OF THE GOLDEN BUTTERFLY

FACT OR FABLE

Working across poetry, fiction and children’s books, Les Murray, Mark Tredinnick and Ursula Dubosarsky are wordsmiths fascinated by language. They discuss their curiosity about words with Donna Ward.

Sometimes the only way to tell a true story is by fictionalising it. Yan Lianke and Caroline Overington are two authors finding freedom in fiction to explore issues that would otherwise be off limits. They talk about the benefits and limitations of fiction as a vehicle for truth. Chair: Stephen Scourfield. 74

Winthrop Hall

$21.50/Friends $19/ Students $15.55

$21.50/Friends $19/ Students $15.55

$21.50/Friends $19/ Students $15.55

AN EVENING WITH ARMISTEAD MAUPIN Get set for a fascinating interview with one of America’s most beloved and charismatic authors as he reflects on society, life and his work, including the latest addition to his Tales of the City series, Mary Ann in Autumn. Chair: Geoff Hutchison.

Dorothy Hewett is one of Australia’s best known poets. In the first retrospective volume of her work since her death in 2002, her daughter Kate Lilley presents a selection of Hewett’s poetry written over a period of 60 years, finding surprising new angles and resonances. Chair: Terri-ann White. 78

DESERT ISLAND DESIRES

AN EVENING WITH ANNIE PROULX

Do you have a favourite book that has stood the test of time? We’ve asked three of our Festival guests – Toni Jordan, Sophie Gee and Brenda Walker – to share their dogeared favourites and what makes them so special. Bring your book club and join the discussion. Chair: Angela Meyer.

In novels such as The Shipping News, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annie Proulx has explored the relationships of offbeat characters with a wide and often wild landscape.

BOOK CLUB EVENT

Bird Cloud, her first non-fiction work in 20 years, documents her relationship with the land and its inhabitants as she buys a farm in Wyoming and sets about building a home. Join her in conversation with ABC Radio National’s Ramona Koval. 2

79

BE PART OF GILLIAN O’SHAUGHNESSY’S NEW CLUB FOR BOOK ENTHUSIASTS – GILLO’S BOOKSHELF! Curl up with 720 ABC Perth’s new book club, Gillo’s Bookshelf, for your go-to-guide to top authors, great reads, peer reviews and the season’s exclusive literary events with Afternoons host Gillian O’Shaughnessy. As a member, you receive up-to-date reading lists, invites to exclusive events and the chance to participate in activities and discussions on air and off. The perfect complement to your 2011 Perth Writers Festival experience! Join now at abc.net.au/perth

3

BOOK LAUNCH

77

Sunken Garden

11

75

SELECTED POEMS OF DOROTHY HEWETT

Simone Lazaroo, Ian Reid, Rodney Hall and Roger McDonald give voice to their beautiful new books. Chair: Dennis Haskell.

Octagon Theatre

Joanne Harris, the bestselling author of Chocolat, has crafted a dark and intricately plotted new thriller in Blueeyedboy. Told through posts on an internet site, this is the tale of a poisonously dysfunctional family, a blind child prodigy and a serial killer who is not who he seems. Chair: Geraldine Mellet.

8–9pm

WORD PLAY

SHARED READINGS

Tariq Ali’s final novel in the Islam Quintet completes an epic panorama that began in 15th-century Moorish Spain. Moving between the cities of the 21st century, from Lahore to London, from Paris to Beijing, this novel reveals Ali in full flight, at once imaginative and intelligent, satirical and stimulating. Chair: Geordie Williamson. 76

6.30–7.30pm THRILLING NEW TASTES

The University Club Banquet Hall

Dolphin Theatre

Perth Writers Festival

Time


10

Monday Sessions – 7 March 2011 Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment

Time 9.30– 10.30am

The University Club Theatre LITERARY POSTCARDS

TRUTH TELLING

From fiction to memoir, the new books of Damon Galgut, Kate Holden and Maria Tumarkin explore the idea of travelling to find oneself. They talk to Geordie Williamson about their writing.

What capacity is there for information exchange in repressive regimes? Chinese author Yan Lianke has had his novels banned in his home country while freelance journalist and author Antony Loewenstein has looked at these questions in the Middle East. They discuss freedom of expression and the ways restrictive controls can be overcome.

81

82

Lev Grossman’s new novel is both a critique and homage to some of the fantasy genre’s greatest writers, including CS Lewis and JK Rowling. Margo Lanagan subverts traditional fairy tale forms to produce wildly original and dark short stories. They discuss their unique take on fantasy writing. Chair: Sarah Schadlow.

CONFOUNDING EXPECTATIONS

Perth Writers Festival

SETTING IT UP

One of Australia’s best-loved poets, Les Murray, takes us through his new volume of poems, Taller When Prone. Combining a mastery of form with a matchless ear for Australian vernacular, these poems evoke rural life here and abroad. Chair: Dennis Haskell.

Place is integral to the new novels of Stephen Daisley, Kirsten Tranter and Gregory Day. They talk to Ara Jansen about creating vibrant and well realised locations in their writing.

MEN’S BUSINESS Roger McDonald’s When Colts Ran is an epic portrayal of Australian manhood, while Chris Womersley’s Bereft is an exploration of one man’s life and grief. They consider writing about masculinity.

93

STARTING EARLY

What happens when the past won’t leave you alone? The new novels of Gail Jones, Jon Bauer and Natasha Lester explore the impact of childhood and complicated histories. Chair Donna Ward.

Novelist Malla Nunn and Ron Elliott have backgrounds in screenwriting and film, while Robert Drewe has been intimately involved in the film adaptations of his books. They talk about the transition between fiction and film. Chair: Mark Naglazas.

HEARTS ON THEIR SLEEVES

CULTURAL CONVERSATIONS Kim Scott and Simone Lazaroo are writers interested in the interface between different cultures. They talk about the ways they explore cultural exchange within their fiction.

88

PROTECTED PLACES

Brenda Walker, Maria Tumarkin, Fiona McGregor and Raimond Gaita discuss how the very personal act of writing about their lives and experiences in memoir affected those lives. Chair: Rosemary Sayer.

Victoria Laurie’s new book is an exploration of one of Western Australia’s most beautiful areas, the Kimberley. President of the Australian Conservation Foundation Ian Lowe has worked on preserving some of Australia’s most unique environments. They discuss the survival of these majestic sites.

91

BEHIND THE POLICE TAPE CAPTURING THE WORLD IN WORDS

94

84

87

90

Journalist Colleen Egan and novelist David Whish-Wilson have spent years researching, investigating and writing about two of Perth’s most high-profile crimes. They talk with Terri-ann White about the stories behind their books and the different ways they have told them, from truth to fiction.

Being stung by the reading bug as a child opens up a whole new world of excitement and possibilities. We’ve asked some of our favourite children’s writers to share the books that started their reading journeys. Join Wendy Orr, Brian Falkner, Andrew Joyner and Sandy Fussell on this trip down memory lane.

83

86

TALLER WHEN PRONE

89

REVERBERATIONS FROM THE PAST

REEL TIME

John Tranter’s new collection includes radical revisions, mistranslations and multilingual dealings, while Simon Armitage writes with an air of playful misrule. Join these two internationally renowned poets for a wide-ranging conversation about their writing. Chair: William Yeoman.

85

2–3pm

Festival Tent

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

11am–12pm TWISTED TALES

12.30– 1.30pm

The University Club Banquet Hall

Dolphin Theatre

92

THE HARD YARDS

James Bradley and Stephen Scourfield have spent many hours considering how a wellplaced word can capture the essence of a place, both in their own writing and in the writing of others. They talk to Chair Geordie Williamson.

95

Many long hard days spent in musty libraries and microfiche files are part of a writer’s daily life. Biographer Suzanne Falkiner and novelist Amanda Curtin discuss their approaches to research and the wonderful journeys that they have embarked on.

96


11

Monday Sessions – 7 March 2011 Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment The University Club Theatre

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

$12.50/Friends $11.30/ Students $9.55

3.30–4.30pm THE OBAMA SYNDROME Tariq Ali argues that very little has changed since George W Bush left the White House – especially when it comes to foreign affairs. But while the ‘war on terror’ continues abroad, at home the honeymoon is definitely over with a Republican surge in the recent mid-term elections. Join writer and filmmaker Tariq Ali for this thought12 provoking lecture.

5–6pm

HOOKED Journalists Richard Lloyd Parry and Caroline Overington discuss the real life stories that get under your skin as a journalist, from domestic crime to international intrigues. What happens when you can’t let them go? Chair: Lawrence Apps.

Former Supreme Court Judge Ken Crispin has spent most of his career determining truth and justice, while psychologist Dorothy Rowe is renowned for her work on how we communicate, and most recently, the reasons we avoid truth. Join them for a conversation about truth and lies. 

101

6.30–7.30pm

THE GRIFFITH REVIEW: WAYS OF SEEING

ON GRIEF

98

SELECTED POEMS OF FRANCIS WEBB

Festival Tent

MORE THAN CRIME

How do you write about grief without sounding Ian Lowe and Julienne mawkish and resorting van Loon discuss the role to clichés? Stephen of ‘certainty’ and ‘play’ Daisley, Natasha Lester in stalling or advancing and Carmel Bird consider human knowledge and the ways they explore development. Chair: the effects of loss within Carmen Lawrence. their writing. Chair: Dennis Haskell.

97

TRUTH AND LIES

The University Club Banquet Hall

Dolphin Theatre

Malla Nunn and Adrian Hyland are authors using the crime genre as an opportunity to explore political issues in their writing. They talk about the potential for weaving complex issues into a thrilling story.

99

ELSEWHERE

FIVE BELLS

Wayne Ashton’s magical BOOK LAUNCH new novel shifts Editor Toby Davidson between hemispheres and Publisher Terriand generations, while ann White are joined Ian Reid explores the by poets Lucy Dougan, changes international Mal McKimmie, Marcella travel has brought to Polain, Andrew Taylor, people’s lives in the Morgan Yasbincek and 19th century. They talk Simon Armitage, who talk about their works, set a about their impressions long way from home – of Francis Webb and read whatever ‘home’ might his poems. mean. 102

100

Gail Jones is one of the shining stars in Australia’s contemporary literary scene. The intelligence and intensity of her language is a hallmark of her novels. In conversation with Rosemary Sayer, she discusses her new novel, Five Bells.

103

104

ANDREW O’HAGAN: THE WEST CLOSING ADDRESS

Twice Man Booker-nominated novelist Andrew O’Hagan grew up on the west coast of Scotland. His people looked west to the Ireland they came from, and further west to the America that was coming to dominate their lives. For O’Hagan, the concept of The West – literature’s dream territory, cinema’s golden land – is at the centre of some of the greatest debates in modern life. In this illuminating and entertaining talk, the novelist takes Perth as his starting point to argue how notions of Westerness surround us. What is geography to the imagination now? Did The West give the west a bad name? And is Perth the point where west and east finally dissolve? WHEN 6.30–7.30pm WHERE Octagon Theatre PRICE $12.50/Friends $11.30/Students $9.55

Lotterywest Festival Films Screening now until 17 April 2011

Enjoy balmy summer nights under the stars as award-winning dramas, love stories, comedies and thrillers light up the giant outdoor screens of Somerville (UWA) and Joondalup Pines (ECU). Picnic with friends, then sit back and enjoy the best films from around the world, including Best Picture winners from Spain (Cell 211), Israel (The Human Resources Manager) and Venice Film Festival (The Double Hour). View the program and film trailers at perthfestival.com.au/lotterywest-festival-films Supported by Lotterywest, The University of Western Australia, The West Australian, ANZ, 720 ABC Perth, Edith Cowan University, Watershed Premium Wines

13

Perth Writers Festival

Time

Octagon Theatre


Family Day Sessions – Sunday 6 March 2011 Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment

Kids’ Tent

Time

Kids’ Courtyard Stage

9.30–10.15am

Join in the wonderful Word Spy Quiz! Learn strange and fascinating things about the amazing world of words. Win prizes! Get your buzzers ready! Ages 9–12

The author of Raven’s Mountain talks about how a story changes as it grows from the inspiration stage and about facing fear in children’s literature. Ages 8–12

107

10.30–11.15am

9.30–10.30am & 11.30am–12.30pm

59

ANIMAGICA By Amiina with the films of Lotte Reiniger

108

TALKING FAMILIES WITH ANTHONY EATON

Meet Boris. He lives with his Mum and Dad in a converted bus in Hogg Bay and likes pets and exciting adventures. With his super-sized imagination, you’ll never be bored. Ages 4–10

Anthony Eaton discusses how he’s used ‘family’ experiences in his books. Get ready to laugh at things Anthony and his brother did to one another as kids! Ages 10–13

11.30am–12.15pm

11.30am–12.15pm

109

110

THE ART OF ILLUSTRATION WITH RON BROOKS

TIME TRAVELLING WITH SANDY FUSSELL

Where do ideas for pictures in children’s books come from? Find out from Ron Brooks, who has worked on Australia’s best-loved picture books, including Fox, Old Pig and The Bunyip of Berkeley’s Creek. Ages 10–13

Join the author of the Samurai Kids series as she shares time-travel secrets – journeying to Aztec times, swinging a samurai sword and racing across the Arctic 800 years ago. Ages 8–12

12.30–1.15pm

12.30–1.15pm

111

ZOMBIES VS UNICORNS WITH MARGO LANAGAN AND STEPHEN DEDMAN

1.30–3pm

Perth Writers Festival

106

RAVEN’S MOUNTAIN WITH WENDY ORR

112

KUMIKO AND THE DRAGON’S SECRET WITH BRIONY STEWART

Which is better, zombies or unicorns? And what side are you on? Join Margo from Team Unicorn and zombie advocate Stephen as they discuss the good and evil sides of fantasy writing. Ages 14+

Afternoon 1.30–3.15pm

9.30–10.15am

THE RETURN OF THE WORD SPY WITH URSULA DUBOSARSKY

Morning 9.30–11.15am 10.30–11.15am MEET BORIS WITH ANDREW JOYNER

Midday 11.30am– 1.15pm

105

Octagon Theatre

113

Briony shares top tips for creating fantasy stories and performs magic acts of live illustration based on her Kumiko and the Dragon books. Draw your own dragon and take a dragon drawing kit home! Ages 7–12 1.30–2.15pm

114

BRIAN FALKNER ON ADVENTURE WRITING

SECRETS OF SURVIVAL WITH CRISTY BURNE

Many of Brian Falkner’s real adventures have found their way into his books – from skimming the ocean in a sea-plane to being attacked by wasps. Learn the stories behind the stories. Ages 7–11

Werewolves? Easy. Vampires? Check. Japanese demons, shape-shifting tanuki or the Filth Licker in your bathroom? Help! Chisty Burne shares secrets you need to survive. Ages 8–12 2.30–3.15pm

115

TELLING OUR OWN STORIES WITH CHERYL KICKETT-TUCKER AND LAURA DUDGEON Waarda means ‘talking and sharing stories and information’ in Noongar. Join Cheryl and Laura as they explain where their stories have come from. Ages 6–12

Lotte Reiniger is one of the greatest creators in animation history. Inspired by Chinese silhouette puppetry, she made 60 beautiful and mesmerising films, 40 of which still survive today. These delicately wrought black and white marvels revolutionised the film industry in the 1920s–1940s and brought timeless fairy tales to life for children and adults to enjoy like never before. As a special treat for the Perth Writers Festival, three members of Icelandic group Amiina create a delicate and ethereal score for Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty and Aladdin and the Magic Lamp. Well known for their work with Sigur Rós, Amiina utilise an assortment of instruments – including violin, glassophone, musical saw and water-filled glasses – to evoke magical soundscapes of wonder and possibility. All ages ORIGINALLY COMMISSIONED BY JERSEY BRANCHAGE FILM FESTIVAL

PRICE $24.50


13

Family Day Sessions – Sunday 6 March 2011 Bookings and Festival Info: 6488 5555 • perthfestival.com.au • Places are limited – book early to avoid disappointment Kids’ Courtyard ALL DAY

BETTER BEGINNINGS: STATE LIBRARY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Kids Workshops 116

People around you, the tales they tell and every day events offer perfect inspiration for great stories. Find out how people in WA make for some great reads. Ages 8–12

ALL DAY

117

The Book Cubby is a special place for families to make books together. Bring your ideas, get inspired by the work of others and put it all together in a book to take home. Ages 0–5 9.30–9.50am, 10.30–10.50am, 11.30–11.50am, 1.30–1.50pm

BETTER BEGINNINGS: STORY AND RHYME TIME

118

WHERE Arts Lecture Room 4 PRICE $10 10–11am

Brian Falkner’s adventures have readers on the edge of their seats. From computer hackers to teenage pranksters, his characters are not your typical action heroes. Where does he get his ideas? Brian reveals his secrets. Ages 7–11 WHERE Fox Theatre PRICE $10

ALL DAY

WORKSHOP WITH WENDY ORR

119

INTERACTIVE MURAL WITH PAULA HART Perth artist Paula Hart starts us off by drawing her unique characters – then you colour them in. Watch as the mural transforms throughout the day. 120

REMIDA PRESENTS SOUNDS OF LANGUAGE Remida reveals the valuable things to be found in rubbish and industrial waste. Explore ways we communicate through sound by making fantastic instruments from plastics, bristles, laminate and other materials. Then take them home! All ages ALL DAY

TALKING COUCHES

10

Keep your eyes peeled for our Talking Couches. These eclectic lounges have been radically redesigned by young people and will amuse, inspire and beguile with their prerecorded stories, thoughts and hopes for the future.

122

WORKSHOP WITH BRIAN FALKNER

Enjoy stories and rhymes with your babies and toddlers with staff from the State Library of Western Australia. Ages 0–5

ALL DAY

121

WORKSHOP WITH CHERYL KICKETT-TUCKER AND LAURA DUDGEON

Find favourite stories and the latest children’s books for under fives; discover free e-books and more online. Ages 0–5

BETTER BEGINNINGS: BOOK CUBBY

10–11am

11.30am–12.30pm

123

Write a story framework, get suggestions on finding ideas and building interest and find out why editing is important. See draft pages from Wendy’s manuscripts to discover the stages of a book’s development. Ages 8–13 WHERE Fox Theatre PRICE $10 1–2pm

124

WORKSHOP WITH ANDREW JOYNER You don’t have to be class comedian to tell a funny story. Andrew Joyner shows how to make a picture hilarious and reveals how funny drawings lead to great stories. Ages 7–10 WHERE Fox Theatre PRICE $10 2.30–3.30pm

125

WORKSHOP WITH SANDY FUSSELL

Family Day supported by

Learn how to make a samurai kabuto hat, sumo wrestlers, cherry blossoms and more from paper. Did samurai kids do origami? How do historical fiction writers handle gaps in history? Ages 8–12

Children and Young People’s Program Partner

WHERE Fox Theatre PRICE $10 9.30–11.30am & 12.30–3.30pm

126

City of Subiaco Commissioner for Children and Young People WA

Ever wanted to learn how to juggle, master a diablo, spin a plate on a stick or walk on stilts? Here’s your chance to learn with our fantastic circus skills workshop! All ages WHERE Perth Writers Festival Precinct

Seven artists create immersive real and virtual environments across the UWA campus. Perth Festival’s Dialogues with Landscape public program features several family friendly events over the weekend. Check them out at perthfestival.com.au

Perth Writers Festival

CIRCUS SKILLS WORKSHOP


14

Biographies

Perth Writers Festival

Each session is numbered Phillip Adams (NSW) had his first by-line in an Australian newspaper nearly 60 years ago. The atheist and contrarian was described by Gough Whitlam as ‘Australia’s most perceptive social critic’ and by Robert Manne as ‘perhaps the most remarkable broadcaster in the history of this country’. His credits include books, TV and a dozen feature films including Barry McKenzie and Don’s Party. He has won lots of honours and attracts many enemies. [6, 72] Tariq Ali (UK) is a writer and filmmaker who has written seven novels, over 20 books on world history and politics and a number of plays for stage and screen. His latest books are Night of the Golden Butterfly and The Obama Syndrome. [9, 12, 76] Wayne Ashton’s (WA) work spans painting, ink drawings and fiction. As well as writing the highly acclaimed novel Under a Tin-Grey Sari, he has produced 12 solo exhibitions and three radio dramas. His latest book is Equator. [36, 103] Simon Armitage (UK) works as a freelance writer, broadcaster and playwright and has written extensively for radio and television. His previous titles include Kid, The Dead Sea Poems and CloudCuckooLand. His latest is Seeing Stars. [8, 66, 86, 102] Lawrence App (WA) is a journalist and communications consultant, and a former Associate Professor at the University of Queensland and Curtin University. [43, 97] Jon Bauer (VIC) is the author of short stories, and plays for stage and radio. His work has been published in The Daily Telegraph, The Sleepers Almanac and The Bridport Prize, as well as broadcast on national radio. Rocks in the Belly is his first novel. [20, 65, 83] Bernard Beckett (NZ) is a secondary school teacher and writer of young adult fiction, whose knowledge of teenage culture is reflected in his true-to-life adolescent characters. He has published more than ten novels and won two NZ Post Book Awards and two LIANZA Children’s Book Awards for Malcolm and Juliet and Genesis. His current book is August. [31, 68] Stephen Bevis (WA) is Arts Editor of The West Australian. [40] Carmel Bird (VIC) is one of Australia’s most dazzling and imaginative short story writers and has published a number of novels, including the Miles Franklin-shortlisted Red Shoes and Child of the Twilight. Carmel has edited many journals and anthologies, including the recent Home Truth. [27, 35, 46, 99] Delys Bird (WA) is Editor of Westerly and a Senior Honorary Research Fellow at The University of Western Australia. [56] James Bradley (NSW) is the author of novels Wrack, The Deep Field and The Resurrectionist and a book of poetry, Paper Nautilus. His books have won or been shortlisted for a number of major Australian and international literary awards and have been widely translated. The Penguin Book of the Ocean is his most recent. [30, 60, 95] Mandy Brett (VIC) is a Senior Editor with Text Publishing. [14] Ron Brooks (TAS) has illustrated numerous children’s books, many of which have become classics in Australian publishing, including Fox, The Bunyip of Berkeley’s Creek and Old Pig (named Best Book of the Year in 1997 by The New Yorker). Drawn from the Heart is his memoir. [36, 47, 109] Cristy Burne (WA) lived for seven years in Japan as a teacher and editor, where she became fascinated with Japanese folklore. She won the Voices on the Coast Youth Literature Award for emerging writers in Queensland. Takeshita Demons is her first published book. [114] Josh Byrne (WA) is an environmental scientist and presenter for ABC’s Gardening Australia. [1] Gabrielle Carey (NSW) published Puberty Blues at the age of 20. She is the author of fiction and non-fiction books, including In My

1

– use the numbers to find your favourite authors’ sessions Father’s House, The Borrowed Girl and The Waiting Room. [56] Ken Crispin (ACT) is a former Supreme Court Judge. As a barrister he appeared for a number of high-profile defendants, including Lindy Chamberlain. He has completed a PhD in Ethics and written two books, several articles on law and ethics and the libretto for an opera. His latest is Quest for Justice. [9, 43, 101] Meredith Curnow (NSW) is a Publisher for Random House. [14] Amanda Curtin (WA) has been a professional book editor for more than 20 years. Her first novel is The Sinkings. [14, 28, 96] Stephen Daisley (WA) grew up in the remote parts of the central North Island of New Zealand before joining the army to serve in an infantry battalion for five years. He ventured to Australia to work on an oil rig and eventually settled permanently in Perth. Traitor is his first novel. [51, 90, 99] Toby Davidson (NSW) is a lecturer and Australian poetry researcher at Macquarie University, Sydney. His PhD thesis Born of Fire, Possessed by Darkness: Mysticism and Australian Poetry will be published by Cambria Press (New York) in 2012. He is also an award-winning poet. [102] Gregory Day (VIC) is a writer, poet and musician whose debut novel The Patron Saint of Eels won the Australian Literature Society Gold Medal. His CDs include The Black Tower: Songs from the Poetry of WB Yeats, which was hailed as one of the finest musical interpretations of Yeats ever. His new book is The Grand Hotel. [30, 54, 90] Stephen Dedman (WA) is the author of four novels and more than 120 short stories. He reviews books for The West Australian and teaches Creative Writing at UWA. [111] Alan Dodge (WA) is an art advisor and the former Director of the Art Gallery of Western Australia. [49] Robert Drewe’s (NSW) novels and short stories have been adapted for film, television, radio and theatre and have received many national and international prizes. His memoir The Shark Net was adapted as an ABC and BBC television miniseries, and his 1996 novel, The Drowner, was shortlisted for all five Australian Premier’s Awards. Sand is a collection of short stories and poetry compiled with John Kinsella. [40, 58, 87] Ursula Dubosarsky (NSW) is the author of more than 20 books for children and young adults, many of which have won national literary prizes. She recently completed a PhD in English Literature at Macquarie University. Her most recent book is Return of the Word Spy. [21, 74, 105] Laura Dudgeon (WA) was born in Darwin and is descended from the Beniol Bardi people from north of Broome. Lilli and her Shadow is based on her experience of moving to a new city. [115, 121] Anthony Eaton (ACT) was born in Papua New Guinea in 1972 and moved to the Perth Hills with his family at a young age. His first novel, The Darkness, won the 2001 WA Premier’s Award for Young Adult Literature. Since then, he has released more than ten books for children and young adults. His latest book is Daywards. [16, 42, 108] Colleen Egan (WA) is a Walkley Awardwinning journalist who has worked for The West Australian, The Sunday Times and The Australian. She played a pivotal role in the acquittal of Andrew Mallard, who was falsely imprisoned for the murder of Perth woman Pamela Lawrence. Her book is Murderer No More. [43, 94] Will Elliott’s (QLD) The Pilo Family Circus, won five literary awards, including the Golden Aurealis. He was named one of Sydney Morning Herald’s best young novelists, and his works have been published in the UK, US, Germany, Italy and Sweden. His latest book is Pilgrims. [31, 42] Ron Elliott (WA) is a scriptwriter, director and academic. He has written for Home and

Away, Bush Patrol, Ship to Shore and many more children’s TV series, and his directorial credits include the feature film Justice. Ron is a lecturer in Film and Television at Curtin University. His debut novel is Spinner. [18, 70, 87] Suzanne Falkiner (NSW) is a full-time writer. The Imago: EL Grant Watson and Australia is her fifth biography. [30, 96] Brian Falkner (NZ) is the bestselling author of several novels for children and young adults, including The Real Thing and The Super Freak, as well as the action-adventure sci-fi novels Brainjack and The Tomorrow Code. Born and raised in Auckland, he worked as a radio journalist, a computer consultant and a graphic designer before realising his dream to be a writer. His most recent book is The Project. [84, 113, 122] Tim Flannery (VIC) is a writer, scientist and explorer who has written many awardwinning books, including The Future Eaters and Country. In 2005 The Weather Makers was published and became an international bestseller, and in January 2007, Tim was named Australian of the Year. His new book is Here on Earth. [1, 4, 5] Sandy Fussell (NSW) studied Mathematics at university, is intensely interested in history and now works in IT. Her Samurai Kids series has been hugely successful, with the third book, Shaolin Tiger, named a ‘Notable Book’ in the 2010 Children’s Book Council of Australia Awards. Her latest work is Jaguar Warrior. [84, 110, 125] Raimond Gaita (VIC) was born in Germany and came to Australia with his parents at age four. He gained a Master of Arts from the University of Melbourne before undertaking a Doctorate of Philosophy at the University of Leeds. He is best known as the author of the prize-winning memoir Romulus, My Father. His most recent is Gaza: Morality, Law and Politics. [4, 44, 91] Damon Galgut (South Africa) wrote his first novel, A Sinless Season, when he was 17. His most famous to date, The Good Doctor, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Dublin/IMPAC Award. He has written a number of plays and taught Drama at the University of Cape Town. His latest book is the Man Booker-shortlisted In a Strange Room. [4, 34, 81] Sophie Gee (Australia/USA) graduated from the University of Sydney and won a scholarship to Harvard to do a PhD in English Literature. She currently lives in Brooklyn (with author-husband Lev Grossman) and teaches 18th-century Literature and the history of satire. Her latest book is The Scandal of the Season. [25, 41, 62, 79] Leah Giarratano (NSW) has had a long career as a clinical psychologist. In 2009, she began her television career presenting Channel 7’s top-rated Beyond the Darklands, in which she was the expert psychologist who delved into the psyche of Australia’s most fearsome criminals. Watch the World Burn is her fourth book. [26, 29, 50, 69] Lyndall Gordon (South Africa/UK) grew up in Cape Town and studied 19th-century American Literature at Columbia University in New York. She is the prize-winning author of several biographies, including works on Charlotte Bronte, Virginia Woolf and Mary Wollstonecraft. Her latest is Lives Like Loaded Guns: Emily Dickinson and her Family’s Feuds. [4, 33, 45] Lev Grossman (USA) studied Literature at Harvard and spent three years doing his PhD at Yale before realising a career in comparative literature was not for him. So, he became a journalist and was made book critic and lead technology writer for Time. His third novel, The Magicians, was named one of The New York Time’s best books of 2009. He is married to author Sophie Gee. [31, 60, 85] Joanne Harris (UK) is the bestselling author of Chocolat (later made into an Academy Award-nominated film starring Johnny Depp), as well as several other novels, a

collection of short stories and cookbooks The French Kitchen and The French Market with food writer Fran Warde. Her latest novel is Blueeyedboy. [8, 11, 80] Rodney Hall (VIC) emigrated from England as a child and, as a result of that six-week voyage by sea, suffers a lifelong addiction to travel. He has won the Miles Franklin Award twice and many of his novels have been published internationally. Popeye Never Told You is his most recent book. [37, 47, 71, 77] Paula Hart (WA) is an independent arts and crafts professional based in Perth. [119] Dennis Haskell (WA) is a poet, professor, editor, critic and Chair of the Literature Board. [77, 89, 99] Kate Holden’s (VIC) first book, In My Skin, is a memoir about her years as a heroin addict and prostitute. It was released to critical acclaim and has been published in nine countries. She is a regular contributor to The Age, The Weekend Australian and Cleo. Her latest book is The Romantic: Italian Nights and Days. [47, 67, 81] Lewis Horne (WA) is a local artist. [10] Geoff Hutchison (WA) is an accomplished Australian journalist and the morning presenter on 720 ABC Perth. [3, 6] Adrian Hyland (VIC) spent many years in the Northern Territory, living and working among Indigenous people. His first book, Diamond Dove, won the 2007 Ned Kelly Award for Best First Fiction and is the first crime novel to feature an Indigenous protagonist since Arthur Upfield’s Boney series. Gunshot Road is the follow-up. [30, 100] Ara Jansen (WA) is a freelance writer, reviewer and public speaker. [31, 50, 90] Gail Jones (NSW) is originally from Harvey, WA. She is the author of two short-story collections, a critical monograph and the novels Black Mirror, Sixty Lights, Dreams of Speaking and Sorry. She has been shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award three times and won the WA Premier’s Award for Fiction. Her latest is Five Bells. [56, 83, 104] Toni Jordan (VIC) was born in Brisbane. Her debut novel, Addition, was published in 2008 to critical acclaim. Toni lives in Melbourne where she works part-time as a freelance copywriter and has a column in The Age. Her new book is called Fall Girl. [54, 62, 79] Anjali Joseph (India) was born in Bombay in 1978. She read English at Trinity College, Cambridge, and has taught English at the Sorbonne. More recently she has written for The Times of India in Bombay and been a commissioning editor for ELLE (India). Saraswati Park is her first novel. [4, 55, 61] Andrew Joyner (SA) is an illustrator and cartoonist published nationally and internationally in newspapers and magazines including The Age, Sydney Morning Herald and Reader’s Digest. He has illustrated books by humourists Ross Campbell and Wendy Harmer. The Terrible Plop is his first picture book. [84, 107, 124] John Keane (SA) is Professor of Politics at the University of Sydney and at Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin (WZB). The Times in England has ranked him as one of the country’s leading political thinkers and writers whose work has ‘world-wide importance’. His most recent is The Life and Death of Democracy. [9, 73] Cheryl Kickett-Tucker (WA) belongs to three areas of the Noongar people. Her children’s book Barlay! was inspired by tales she tells her children and legends passed on to her by her mother. [115, 121] John Kinsella (WA) has written many volumes of poetry, including the prizewinning collections Peripheral Light: New and Selected Poems and Contrary Rhetoric. He is an Extraordinary Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge University, and a Research Fellow at the University of Western Australia. His latest book, Sand, is a collaboration with Robert Drewe. [40, 52, 58]


15

Biographies Ramona Koval (VIC) presents The Book Show, broadcast on ABC Radio National and podcast to the world. She is invited to interview writers at literary festivals internationally and all over Australia. She is the author of several books. Her latest is Speaking Volumes: Conversations with Remarkable Writers. [2, 34, 63, 72] Margo Lanagan (NSW) is a highly acclaimed writer of novels, short stories and poetry, an editor and a mother of two boys. She lives in Sydney. Her short story collection Black Juice won two World Fantasy Awards and a 2006 Printz Honor Award. Her current books are Yellowcake and Zombies vs Unicorns. [42, 85, 111] Victoria Laurie (WA) is an award-winning journalist. Her latest book is Kimberley, Australia’s Last Great Wilderness. [92] Carmen Lawrence (WA) is a Professorial Fellow at UWA. She has served in State and Federal politics for 21 years. [9, 98] Simone Lazaroo (WA) was born in Singapore and at the age of two migrated with her family to WA. All three of her published novels have won the WA Premier’s Award for Fiction. Simone has a PhD in Writing and is currently a senior lecturer in Creative Writing at Murdoch University. Sustenance is her latest work. [77, 88] Natasha Lester (WA) gave up her job as a marketing executive for Maybelline cosmetics to return to university and study Creative Writing. She completed a Master of Creative Arts along with her first novel, What is Left Over, After, which won the 2008 TAG Hungerford Award for Fiction. [46, 83, 99] Yan Lianke (China) is one of China’s greatest living writers. He is currently under heavy scrutiny from authorities, exemplifying the battle to maintain creative integrity in China. Dream of Ding Village is his third book to be banned in his homeland and second to be published in Australia, following Serve the People! [48, 75, 82] Kate Lilley (NSW) has taught Feminist Literary History and Theory at the University of Sydney since 1990 and has published widely on early modern women’s writing and contemporary poetry. [52, 78] Jeff Lindsay (USA) is the author of the acclaimed Dexter novels, now adapted into an award-winning TV series. Jeff has penned a number of plays and performed on the stage in New York and London. He lives in South Florida with his family. His latest is Dexter is Delicious. [7, 29, 80] Richard Lloyd Parry (UK/Japan) is the Asia Editor of The Times. He was educated at Oxford and has lived in Tokyo as a foreign correspondent since 1995. In 2005, he wrote his first novel, In the Time of Madness, about his experiences as a young reporter in Indonesia and East Timor. People who Eat Darkness is about the disappearance of Lucie Blackman in Tokyo. [32, 43, 65, 97] Antony Loewenstein (NSW) is a Sydneybased journalist, author and blogger. His bestseller My Israel Question was shortlisted for the 2007 NSW Premier’s Literary Award. He has written for The Australian, Sydney Morning Herald, The Guardian and Washington Post. The Blogging Revolution is his latest book. [9, 44, 82] Ian Lowe (NSW) is President of the Australian Conservation Foundation and Emeritus Professor of Science, Technology and Society at Griffith University in Brisbane. His previous books include A Big Fix and Living in the Hothouse. His latest is A Voice of Reason: Reflections on Australia. [39, 73, 92, 98] Scott Ludlam (WA) is an Australian Greens Senator for Western Australia. [73] James Lush (WA) is a media consultant, master of ceremonies and broadcaster for 720 ABC Perth. [7] Roger McDonald (NSW) began his working life as a teacher, ABC producer and book editor before writing poetry for several years and turning to fiction in his 30s. His first

novel, 1915, won the Age Book of the Year Award and he won the Miles Franklin Award for The Ballad of Desmond Kale. His most recent work is When Colts Ran. [70, 77, 93] Fiona McGregor (NSW) is the author of four works of fiction: Au Pair, shortlisted for the Australian/Vogel Award; Suck My Toes, winner of the Steele Rudd Award; Chemical Palace, shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Award; and most recently, Indelible Ink. Fiona has also written a travel memoir, Strange Museums. [17, 46, 67, 91] Melina Marchetta (NSW) swept the pool of literary awards for young adult fiction with her first novel, Looking for Alibrandi, which was released as a major AFI-winning film. Melina taught secondary school English and History for ten years, during which time she released three more novels. Her latest is The Piper’s Son. [15, 62, 68] Ben Martin (WA) is Assistant Editor of The West Australian. He has worked at The Daily Telegraph in London and is a former crime reporter and magazine columnist. [29, 54] Armistead Maupin (USA) served as a naval officer in Vietnam before moving to California to work as a reporter. In 1976 he launched his daily serial Tales of the City in the San Francisco Chronicle, which grew into an international sensation when rewritten as novels. Maupin’s eight-volume Tales of the City sequence is now a multimillion bestseller, published in 11 languages. The latest is Mary Ann In Autumn. [3, 8] Geraldine Mellet (WA) has worked as a radio and television broadcaster and scriptwriter. [11, 32] Helen Merrick (WA) is a lecturer in Curtin University’s Department of Film and Television. [42, 84] Angela Meyer (VIC) has had stories, reviews and articles published widely. She runs the popular Crikey blog LiteraryMinded, and is working on a novel as part of her doctoral project through UWS. [41, 53, 60, 79] Les Murray’s (NSW) work is studied around Australia and has been translated into several languages. He has been awarded the TS Eliot Prize, the Queen’s Gold Medal and the Mondello Prize. He has published more than 30 books. His most recent collection is Taller When Prone. [74, 89] Mark Naglazas (WA) is Movie Editor for The West Australian. [12, 72, 87] Malla Nunn (NSW) grew up in Swaziland before moving with her parents to Perth in the 1970s. She attended university in WA and then in the USA. Her debut novel, A Beautiful Place to Die, was published to international acclaim. Her latest release is Let the Dead Lie. [50, 87, 100] Andrew O’Hagan (Scotland) was born in Glasgow in 1968. His debut novel, Our Fathers, was shortlisted for the 1999 Man Booker Prize, and his second, Personality, won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction. In 2003 Granta named him as one of the Best Young British Novelists. His latest work is The Life and Opinions of Maf the Dog, and of his friend Marilyn Monroe. [13, 38, 53, 63] Wendy Orr (VIC) resigned from her position as an occupational therapist to become a full-time writer and an hour later heard that her novel Leaving It To You had been shortlisted in the Children’s Book Council Book of the Year Awards. Ark in the Park won the award two years later, and her most successful work, Nim’s Island, was made into a Hollywood blockbuster. Her new book is Raven’s Mountain. [84, 106, 123] Gillian O’Shaughnessy (WA) is the Afternoons presenter on 720 ABC Perth. [80] Melanie Ostell (WA) is Publisher at UWA Publishing with more than 20 years of experience in the industry. [22, 23] Caroline Overington (NSW) is a two-time Walkley Award-winning journalist who is currently a senior writer and columnist with The Australian. She is the author of two non-fiction books, Only in New York and Kickback, which is about the UN oil-for-food

scandal in Iraq. I Came to Say Goodbye is her second work of fiction. [75, 97] Dickon Oxenburgh (WA) is a local playwright and actor. [56] Hetti Perkins (NSW) is a member of the Eastern Arrernte and Kalkadoon Aboriginal communities. She is the Senior Curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art at the Art Gallery of NSW and has curated major survey exhibitions, including the Australian Indigenous Art Commission at the Musée du Quai Branly in Paris. Art+soul was released late last year. [35, 64] Annie Proulx (USA) wrote her first novel, Postcards, in her 50s and followed it with The Shipping News, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Her short story ‘Brokeback Mountain’ was published in 1997 and was later adapted into an Academy Awardwinning movie. Her new book is Bird Cloud. [2, 5] Ian Reid (WA) has written seven fulllength non-fiction works in his career as an academic, mainly on literary and historical topics. The End of Longing is his first novel. [77, 103] Rachel Robertson (WA) lectures at Curtin University. Her work has been published in Westerly, Island, Griffith Review and Best Australian Essays. [47, 62] Stephen Romei (NSW) is The Australian’s Literary Editor. [5, 38, 51, 65] Peter Rose (VIC) is a poet, memoirist and novelist and is Editor of Australian Book Review and former Publisher at Oxford University Press. His memoir, Rose Boys, won the National Biography Award in 2002. Roddy Parr is his second novel. [52, 57, 71] Adam Ross (USA) was born and raised in New York. He was a child actor and state champion wrestler before he went on to study writing at Washington University. He worked as a teacher and journalist for more than ten years and now writes full-time. He lives with his wife and two daughters in Nashville. Mr Peanut is his debut novel. [8, 37, 61] Richard Rossiter (WA) is a local book reviewer, editor and author. His latest book is Arrhythmia. [56] Dorothy Rowe (Australia/UK) worked as a teacher and child psychologist before taking her PhD at Sheffield University. From 1972 until 1986 she was head of the North Lincolnshire Department of Clinical Psychology. She is now engaged in writing, lecturing and research and is renowned for her work on how we communicate and why we suffer. Why We Lie is her latest book. [39, 69, 101] Hazel Rowley (Australia/USA) is the author of three biographies: Christina Stead: A Biography, a New York Times Best Book; Richard Wright: The Life and Times; and Tête-à-Tête: Simone de Beauvoir and JeanPaul Sartre. Recently she has turned her attention to the Roosevelts with Franklin and Eleanor: An Extraordinary Marriage. [45, 53, 71] Rosemary Sayer (WA) is a popular speaker, lecturer and moderator. She is the author of The CEO, the Chairman and the Board. [45, 48, 70, 91, 104] Sarah Schadlow (WA) is an academic with a broad range of work interests – including cultural studies and business. [61, 85] Kim Scott (WA) grew up on the south coast of WA. His second novel, Benang: From the Heart, won the 2000 Miles Franklin Award and he has had poetry and short stories published in a number of anthologies. His latest work is That Deadman Dance. [70, 88] Stephen Scourfield (WA) is Travel Editor of The West Australian and author of several fiction and non-fiction books, including Connected and WA Premier’s Book Award winner Other Country. [75, 95] Briony Stewart (WA) is a writer and visual artist from Perth. Her first children’s book, Kumiko and the Dragon, won an Aurealis Award and was a CBCA notable book. [112]

Miguel Syjuco (Philippines/Canada) was born in Manila, lived for a decade in Canada, spent three years in Adelaide completing his PhD in Creative Writing and now works as an editor at The Gazette in Montreal. His debut, Ilustrado, was awarded the Man Asia Literary Award for best unpublished novel written in English by an Asian writer. [4, 37, 55] Lyn Tranter (NSW) is a leading literary agent and the proprietor of Australian Literary Management. [14] John Tranter (NSW) is an internationally renowned poet. His many volumes of poetry include Under Berlin, which won the Grace Leven Prize, and At the Florida. He is the author of 20 books and Editor of the free internet magazine Jacket. His most recent collection is Starlight: 150 poems. [52, 86] Kirsten Tranter (NSW) grew up in Sydney and lived in New York from 1998 to 2006, where she completed a PhD on English Renaissance Literature at Rutgers. She has published fiction, poetry and literary criticism. The Legacy is her first novel. [41, 57, 90] Mark Tredinnick’s (NSW) awards include the Newcastle Poetry Prize, Blake Poetry Prize and Calibre Essay Prize. His work has appeared in publications worldwide. [30, 58, 74] Angus Trumble (VIC) is Senior Curator of Paintings and Sculpture at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, Connecticut, and the author of many articles and seven books on art history. He has followed his book A Brief History of the Smile with The Finger: A Handbook. [49, 64] Maria Tumarkin (VIC) was born in the former Soviet Union and immigrated to Australia in 1989. She has published three books and is currently working as a Research Fellow at the Institute for Social Research, Swinburne, on the international ‘Social Memory and Historical Justice’ project. Otherland is her account of a trip with her daughter back to Russia. [24, 81, 91] Julienne van Loon (WA) is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at Curtin University and author of several fiction and non-fiction works. [98] Brenda Walker (WA) is the author of several novels. Reading by Moonlight: How Books Saved a Life, her memoir of reading and healing, won the 2010 Victorian Premier’s Award for Non-Fiction. Brenda teaches Writing at UWA. [35, 79, 91] Donna Ward (WA) is Managing Editor of indigo, a journal of WA creative writing. [35, 58, 67, 74, 83] David Whish-Wilson (WA) left Australia in 1984 to live in Europe, Africa and Asia. During this time he began to publish short stories and had a longer piece shortlisted for the Australian/Vogel Literary Award. He currently teaches Creative Writing at Curtin University. His new book is Line of Sight. [19, 50, 94] Terri-ann White (WA) is Director of UWA Publishing, a writer, former bookseller and general enthusiast about books and ideas. [14, 46, 78, 94, 102] Geordie Williamson (NSW) is Chief Literary Critic of The Australian and a regular contributor to ABC Radio National’s The Book Show. [60, 66, 76, 81, 95] Chris Womersley’s (VIC) debut novel, The Low Road, won the Ned Kelly Award for Best First Book in 2008. His fiction and reviews have appeared in Granta New Writing 14, Best Australian Stories 2006, The Monthly and The Age. In 2007 one of his short stories won the Josephine Ulrick Literature Prize. Bereft is his second novel. [51, 65, 93] William Yeoman (WA) is The West Australian’s Books Editor. [64, 86]

Perth Writers Festival

Visit perthfestival.com.au for full biographies and more information


16

How to Book Festival Info 6488 5555 (Mon–Fri 9am–8pm, Sat–Sun 9am–5pm) • perthfestival.com.au

PERTH WRITERS FESTIVAL PRECINCT MAP

GENERAL INFORMATION Further Information Online

ay R

nts B

Mou

Main Entrance

oad

To Perth City

Festival Bookshop Tennis Courts

Y

HW rling

Sti

Music

Winthrop Hall & Undercroft

Octagon Theatre Green Room

Festival Tent & Kids Tent

ett D rive

Geography - Geology

Tropical Grove

Riley Oval Arts

The Great Court

Physics

For public transportation timetables and information visit www.transperth.wa.gov.au or call 13 62 13.

Somerville

Earth Science Museum

Kids Courtyard

Info Booth Bookshop Café

Fox Theatre Arts Courtyard Stage

Shuttle Reid Library

Arts Lecture Uni Club Rooms Theatre Banquet Hall 4, 5, 6 Car Park 3

Matilda Bay

Venue Information

Parking For detailed parking maps please visit our website perthfestival.com.au/pwf or contact Festival Info on 6488 5555. Parking restrictions apply and illegal parking will attract an infringement notice.

Parking and Free Shuttle: Mon 7 March Mon 7 March is a Public Holiday, however University classes still operate. Parking will be limited on this day to pay parking areas only along Hackett Drive and in car parks 1, 3, 23 & 25. Space is limited and we recommend arriving early for parking along Hackett Drive.

All Perth Writers Festival events are at The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley. An information booth is located on Riley Oval to assist you with any queries during the Festival. If you need assistance at any time, please ask one of our many friendly volunteers wearing Festival t-shirts.

Please do not park in red or yellow bays on this day or you will attract an infringement notice.

Wheelchair Access and Captioned Performances

A free shuttle bus will operate between this car park and the Festival hub from 8.30am–7.30pm.

All Perth Writers Festival venues are wheelchair accessible. Captioned performances for the hearing impaired:

Perth Writers Festival

Dymocks Booksellers are the official bookseller for the Festival. Titles by all participating authors are available for purchase at the Festival Bookshop located on Riley Oval. All authors will sign books at the bookshop immediately after events.

Getting to The University of Western Australia

Dolphin Theatre

Hack

Sunken Garden

Hackett Hall

Administration

Car Park Whitfield Court

Visit perthfestival.com.au/pwf for event information, biographies of writers, web links and reviews. Remember to sign-up to our eNews for regular updates and special offers.

Thrilling New Tastes with Joanne Harris, Sun 6 March, 6.30pm Andrew O’Hagan: The West, Closing Address, Mon 7 March, 6.30pm Please advise if captioned seats are required when booking.

Special Thanks Special thanks to all our volunteers and staff helping in the production of the 2011 Perth Writers Festival.

Perth Writers Festival Presenting Partner

Supported by

The Festival has organised for additional FREE parking at Sir Charles Court Reserve near Broadway and The Avenue.

Café Facilities The University Club Café is open for a range of drinks and hot food, takeaway sandwiches, salads and light snacks. Fri 4 March, 7.30am–9pm Sat 5 March, 7.30am–8pm Sun 6 March, 9am–8pm Mon 7 March, 7.30am–5pm

Indigenous Program Partner

Supporting Sponsors Brett and Annie Fogarty Fremantle Press HarperCollins Australia State Library of WA

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.


2011 Perth Writers Festival Guide