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Perth Courier

March 24, 2011 • Edition 40

www.yourottawaregion.com

Th e

The Perth and District Community Newspaper since 1834

Town needs plan to deal with clogged courts

IN BRIEF

BY GEOFF DAVIES

Ottawa man charged after police chase through Perth

the county, the report said. This year saw a significant increase geoff.davies@perthcourier.com in OPP activity, the county’s largest policing body, resulting in the Perth must develop a plan to jump in charges. deal with its overloaded courtThe report said the town is takhouse after the number of charging several steps to deal with the es filed jumped more than 20 per backlog of fines. cent in 2010, says Jim Connell, The town has contracted a colthe town’s director of protective lections agency, RecoverCorp Inc. services. Connell said the company is conIn a report presented to town tracted to collect, on the town’s behalf, fines that have not yet been paid. RecoverCorp then earns a commission on the fines recovered, worth about 15 per cent of the fine’s value. “Working through the process we’ve come to the understanding that outside help is appropriate because of the volume of fines that are outstanding,� said Connell. “We’re hoping it will increase the rate of recovery,� he said, adding the company should have better resources to find those owing the sometimes hefty fines – people who, presumably, don’t want to be found. “A lot of the fines have been outstanding for longer than 10 years.� The value of fines which became overdue in 2010 was almost $640,000, according to numbers provided in the report. The value of fines worth more than $5,000 Chance, a five-year-old golden retriever from the True Companion Dog Obedience School, sits with trainer made up about a quarter of this total, and those worth up to $500 Judy Stewart at the Perth and District Union Public Library. Chance is part of the library’s Paws for a made up about 44 per cent. Story program, which will take place every Saturday. Kids will choose a book then read to Chance for 15 minutes, as sisters Karissa (left) and Kyrsten Payne did on March 17. Kassina Ryder photo See ‘Town needs to plan’, Pg. 3

A 34-year-old Ottawa man was charged with dangerous driving after leading police on a chase through Perth on March 12. OPP officers noticed a white sport utility vehicle travelling westbound on Highway 7 at a “high rate of speed,� a press release from the OPP stated. After police tur ned on their emergency lights, the vehicle failed to stop and instead turned down Wilson Street then headed down Mather Street before stopping in an apartment parking lot. The man was charged with impaired driving, dangerous operation of a motor vehicle and fleeing from police. He has been released and is scheduled to appear in court in Perth on May 9.

Perth man charged with car theft A Perth man has been charged with theft of a motor vehicle on after investigating a care theft that occurred on March 12. T h e 2 0 - ye a r- o l d w a s a l s o charged with mischief, possession of property obtained through crime, breaching probation and failure to comply with conditions of an undertaking. He is scheduled to appear in court in Perth on April 11.

end, these totalled almost $1.4million, marking an increase of roughly 38 per cent. “The increase in revenue was significant,� said Connell. Roadside tickets were a big contributor to the ticket surge, making up 82 per cent of the charges filed in 2010. The packed cour thouse is directly related to policing in

councillors on March 8, Connell said a new plan is of the “utmost importance,� after 646 charges still pending at the end of the 2010 – about two-thirds more than the year before. Not only was it was a record year for the number of charges filed, disposed of, and still pending, but the value of fines paid was also unprecedented. At year

EVERY DOG HAS ITS READ

Local doctor honoured

INSIDE

Humble healer: ‘I’m just one of the guys’ BY GEOFF DAVIES geoff.davies@perthcourier.com It was Dr. Ross McLean’s first week practising in Perth, and the community was getting a feel for the new guy. He was just getting settled into his new digs at 22 Foster St., working alongside doctors Aubrey Kidd Local teacher travels the globe. and Jim Tweedie. But with Kidd 4 away on holidays, McLean was borrowing his office while his own was getting set up. That must have been where the mix-up began. After his first week on the job, the recent graduate of the Queen’s School of Medicine was at the local Canadian Tire. “So what do you think of the

A learning journey

Fire leaves Perth residents homeless

BY KASSINA RYDER kassina.ryder@perthcourier.com

Perth’s new reading series is attracting some of Canada’s best authors, including a Scotiabank Giller Prize winner. The First Edition Reading Series (originally named the Perth Reading Series) began on Jan. 14 at the Factory Grind and was organized by newspaper writer John Pigeau and Michael Glover. Pigeau said the series is now so popular, he has authors booked from now until December. He has also started work on a list for 2012. “Most of the authors who are coming I simply emailed on Mike McNamee makes CCHL Facebook and said, ‘would you Tier 1 all-star team. 19 be interested in coming to this

Perth’s McNamee gains all-star status

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76



RELA X!

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said. The series is also going to include two special events, called Reading on the Tay, at the Ecotay Education Centre, this summer. The events are scheduled to take place on July 17 and July 24. Pigeau said he hopes a literary festival could be born from the seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; success. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that in the future, if those outdoor events work really well, that could lend itself to a literary festival, I would think,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It seems like the perfect kind of town for it.â&#x20AC;? Pigeau has applied for a grant through the Canada Council for the Arts to help fund the series, but wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if it has been approved until July. He said the grant money would be used to See â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;New reading seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, Pg. 3

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our mandate is weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to bring in some of the most talented writers in Canada to Perth, and I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on our way to doing that,â&#x20AC;? he said. The list also includes authors who are releasing new books. Pigeau said some of the writers he contacted suggested others, and the roster of amazing authors just keeps growing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some of them turned out to be award-winning writers and people just launching new books,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re) just friends of those writers, but it turns out theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all quite good and most of them well-known in Canada.â&#x20AC;? What originally began as a monthly event has had to expand to accommodate two authors during certain months, Pigeau

new reading series in Perth?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? said Pigeau. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most said yes.â&#x20AC;? Pigeau said he believes one of the reasons authors are willing to travel to Perth is just to get a chance to see the town. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m still scratching my head as to why, but I think it has a lot to do with Perth,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think a lot of people have heard of it as one of the prettiest towns in Ontario.â&#x20AC;? The long list of authors includes Kathleen Winter, whose book Annabel was shortlisted for the 2010 Scotiabank Giller Prize and Johanna Skibsrud, winner of the 2010 Scotiabank Giller Prize for her book, The Sentimentalists. Pigeau said the series is definitely meeting its goal.

Made in USA

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A kilt-clad Dr. Ross McLean receives the Glenn Sawyer Award, honouring a career of service in medicine, from Dr. Alan Drummond (left) and Dr. Mark MacLeod, president of the Ontario Medical Association. Geoff Davies photo

New reading series attracting Giller Prize winner

Apartment complex destroyed by early morning fire last month. 5

t's e! a h d

new guy, doc?â&#x20AC;? said a fellow who approached him in the aisle. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mistaken me for Dr. Kidd, thought McLean. But I might as well have some fun with this. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very good,â&#x20AC;? McLean told the man. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d best listen to everything he says.â&#x20AC;? That was 1971, and McLean has been in the community ever since. Days, nights, or weekends, his work in Perth has him bouncing between the hospital, the clinic and the homes of his patients, some of whom heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s known for 40 years. For some families, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s even delivered three generations of babies. Rewarding as it is being so See â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Local doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, Pg. 3


Page 2 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

COMMUNITY NEWS

A celebration of syrup in Lanark

The Village of Lanark celebrated its annual tapping-out party on Saturday, March 19, at Providence Point. Dorothy Paul performed the ceremonial tree-tapping, with help from Providence Point owner Rene Bosman. (Left) Michaelia Majore, 7, enjoys a piece of freshly-made taffy. (Above) Rena Schyff and Jade Schyff enjoy the scenery on a wagon ride. (Right) Ray Thompson shows off the finished product at the taffy stand. (Bottom left) Alanna Riff feeds the alpacas. (Bottom right) Julia Thompson shows her son, Ezra Jacobs, part of the syrup-making process inside the sugar shack. Andrew Snook photos

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Perth Courier

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Ontario’s Highlands Tourism Organization (OHTO) is a new regional tourism initiative designed to drive economic growth through tourism in the areas of Renfrew County, Lanark County, Haliburton County, as well as parts of Hastings County, County of Lennox & Addington, and Frontenac County.

456075

Rafting the Ottawa River, Upper Ottawa Valley Submitted by Ethan McDonald


March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 3

COMMUNITY NEWS

FROM THE FRONT Stories continued from Page 1

Town needs plan to deal The report said the town recovered about a third of the value of last year’s delinquent fines. Wage garnishment is another new enforcement initiative the city undertook in 2010. In this process, the court can order a person’s employer to give the town a portion of their paycheque until their fine is fully paid. The report said several fines

have been collected this way. A new online initiative has also helped the town collect fines quickly. Payfines.ca allows people to pay up online, and the money collected this way makes up 12.5 per cent of the annual total, the report said. The majority of these payments came within 30 days of the charge being laid. The Town of Perth took over administration of the Provincial

Offences Court a few years ago, and it currently gets about half-aday each week to deal with these charges, which can range from driving and uninsured vehicle to liquor law violations, Connell said. Any plan to deal with the backlog of charges will basically boil down to scheduling more time at the courthouse to deal with them, he said.

Local doctor honoured Kayla Fournier, 10, left, and Victoria Bali, 12, of Kids for Critters in Carleton Place, which raises money for animal welfare groups like LAWS, dressed up as their favourite animals on March 14 to promote the March 27 fundraiser at the Carleton Place arena. Photo by Desmond Devoy

Get ready to stomp your paws for LAWS BY DESMOND DEVOY desmond.devoy@metroland.com Want to direct some applause at LAWS? Then shake a leg – or a paw, for that matter – at the Stomp Your Paws for LAWS country concert and live auction fundraiser event for the Lanark Animal Welfare Society on Sunday, March 27, at the Carleton Place arena, upper hall, 75 Neelin St., from 2 to 4 p.m. Lynn Plexman, who has been organizing the event since before Christmas, said she hopes the event will become an annual fundraiser for the non-profit organization. Plexman got the idea for the fundraiser because the Town of Carleton Place, along with neighbouring municipalities like Beckwith Township and Mississippi Mills, have signed a contract making LAWS their designated animal pound for the next three years. “There will be many more animals that will need veterinary care and spaying and neutering,” said Plexman. “They’re going to need more money.” The entertainment list is a veritable who’s-who of Ottawa Valley country and western talent. The entertainment line-up includes Arlene Quinn, Johnny Spinks, Lex Donaldson, Sara Mithcell, Andy Bowes, Brad Scott Band. The MC for the event will be Charlie Kitts. In fact, one of the evening’s headliners – all of whom are volunteering their time – was instrumental in getting all of the talent onto the stage. “Arlene Quinn…organized all of the performers, and she is an animal lover and a LAWS supporter,” said Plexman. The entire LAWS board will also be in attendance for the afternoon of music. “We need the community to get behind LAWS and support them,” said Plexman. Plexman herself has been an animal supporter for more than

25 years. “It’s something you learn from your parents, to be compassionate to animals,” said Plexman, who is also involved with the Cat Rescue Network in Ottawa. “Parents have to show their children that it is important to help animals.” While there will be volunteers dressed up as dogs, and animals will be on hand for the afternoon performances, no real animals awaiting adoption will be at the concert. “It would be too scary for animals to go,” said Plexman. Instead, people can browse the LAWS website at the concert to see which animals are available for adoption. There will also be door prizes and a live auction, as well as free refreshments like water and pop provided by Steve’s Independent supermarket. The live auction will be held in between acts and the number of items is still growing. “We’ve got a lot of items donated and we are still approaching businesses for more,” said Plexman. “The Carleton Place community has been very generous with their donations.” Tickets are available at the following locations: Pakenham General Store; Almonte Natural Foods; Ballygiblins restaurant, Carleton Place; SRC Music, Carleton Place; Balderson Fine Foods; Jo’s Clothes, Perth; Vickie’s Specialty Shop, Smiths Falls; Lanark Animal Welfare Society office, Drummond/North Elmsley. Tickets will also be sold by LAWS at the Carleton Place WalMart on Saturday, March 19, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, seniors over 65, $10, children 13 and under free. Tickets at door, add $5. For more information, visit www.lanarkanimals.ca The fundraising drive is desperately looking for volunteers in Carleton Place, Mississippi Mills and Beckwith. Those wishing to volunteer can contact Plexman at 613-253-3035.

456626

THE TOWNSHIP OF LANARK HIGHLANDS

embraced by a community, McLean says it’s all the more so because they didn’t just take his word – or credentials – at face value. Not even the Canadian Tire guy. “They tested you out, tested your knowledge, got to know you, got to trust you,” he said, recalling how families sometimes sent a child for a checkup, then another member for something minor, before fully opening up. Four decades later, McLean has built up an impressive résumé. He was chief of staff of the Great War Memorial Hospital for six years, overseeing the merger of the Perth and Smiths Falls hospitals. He remains medical director of the Lanark Lodge seniors’ home, and has been for 15 years. He’s held various positions with the Ontario Medical Association, and also organizes a program that places medical students in rural communities throughout eastern Ontario. And he just added another accolade to the list. McLean was presented with the Glenn Sawyer Award on March 17, honouring a distinguished career of service. The award is given by the OMA to recognize a doctor’s outstanding contributions to the association, the medical profession or their community. Nominees are put

A number of staff members, by virtue of their office, are “Commissioners of Oaths”. If you require the service of a Commissioner of Oaths, you must make an appointment. Once an appointment is made you must come to the Municipal Office in person and provide personal identification that includes your photo and signature. There is a fee of $5.00 for this service. Please note that a “Commissioners of Oaths” is not the same as a “Notary Public”. If you require a notarized signature, please contact your legal counsel.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Application forms are available from the Clerk’s Department or by visiting www.serviceontario.ca. A marriage license is valid for a period of three (3) months from the date of issue. The license fee is $100.00 payable in cash, cheque, money order or debit. Once you have filled out the application, you must call the Municipal Office to make an appointment. When you come, make sure you and your partner bring identification, such as a birth certificate (along with any change of name certificates), current passport, Record of Immigrant Landing or Canadian citizenship card, along with photo identification to prove your current legal name and age.

BIRTH, MARRIAGE AND DEATH CERTIFICATES Applications may be obtained from the Clerk’s Department or by visiting www.serviceontario.ca.

More than a job Being a physician is a profession, not a job, he said. Especially in a rural community, it comes with its own responsibilities and sacrifices, but the rewards come along just as often. “A physician who comes to rural community is a full-service physician, they’re not going to be able to practice designer medicine,” said Drummond. “You’re going to have to be involved with house-calls, with hospital-based work, with assisting in the operating room or delivering babies or working in the emergency department.” McLean – through his leadership in the medical community, his dedication to the community at large, and his work introducing young doctors to the joys of rural practice – epitomizes what a community doctor should be, said Drummond. Another colleague of McLean’s, Dr. Richard Moxon, echoed the sentiment. “He is our spiritual leader, he’s our mentor, he is the guy we go to

when we need help,” said Moxon. Always ready to lend a hand, he said McLean would come in to help him with difficult deliveries in “the old days.” Even today, he said it’s not uncommon to see McLean helping out in the ER, even when he’s not on call. “He certainly deserves this award,” said Moxon. The only person who might disagree with him, though, would be McLean himself. In an interview before the award ceremony, McLean said the real credit is due to the doctors, nurses and other workers who make up the area’s exceptionally-supportive medical community. “That’s why I feel uncomfortable for any special recognition,” he said. “I’m just a family doc doing my job as part of a team. We do it well, but I would tell you there are at least seven doctors in this community who do everything that I do and are every bit as deserving of any recognition.” He said if he can take special pride in anything, it would be his part in helping to bring some of his medical colleagues to the community. “This is really a community recognition and not specifically to Ross McLean,” McLean said. “I’m just one of the guys.”

Perth’s new reading series

Author Paul Seesequasis reads from his book Tobacco Wars at the First Edition Reading Series at the Factory Grind on Jan. 14. The series boasts a list of award-winning Canadian authors that will visit Kassina Ryder photo Perth each month.

help pay for the authors’ fees and transportation costs. The proceeds after costs from the series will still be given to a local charity, Pigeau added. The Perth and District Food Bank received the proceeds from January’s event and is also scheduled to receive the proceeds from April’s event. Pigeau said he is grateful to the individuals and businesses helping to give the series its start. The Factory Grind provides the venue for free and the Perth and District Union Library and The Book Nook have agreed to showcase books written by the authors who will read that month. “As it’s growing it’s kind of overwhelming, so I’m really thankful we have a few sponsors,” Pigeau said. The next step is to try to secure a place for the authors to stay while they’re in town. Pigeau said he plans to approach local bed and breakfasts and hotels to see if they might be interested in providing accommodations to authors participating in the series. Local authors are also encouraged to participate. So far, local authors Phil Hall and David Mulholland are both scheduled. For more information about the series and to see the schedule of authors, visit www.firsteditionreadingseries.blogspot.com or visit the First Edition Reading Series Facebook page.

MUNICIPAL MATTERS

613-259-2398 or 1-800-239-4695

COMMISSIONER OF OATHS

forward by their peers. In the eyes of colleague Dr. Alan Drummond, McLean has achieved all three. “When we think of what a professional colleague should be, we think of Ross McLean,” said Drummond.

www.lanarkhighlands.ca

NOTICE OF FIRE BAN EFFECTIVE APRIL 1ST - MAY 15TH

For all up to date fire ban information in the Township of Lanark Highlands, please call the Township office at 613.259.2398 ext. 500. Or visit our website at www.lanarkhighlands.ca

COUNCIL MINUTES, AGENDAS, REPORTS The agendas, minutes and reports for all meetings of Council and Committee of the Whole are posted on the Township’s website in advance of the meeting. Please visit our website at www.lanarkhighlands.ca and look under Committee Meetings.

THINKING OF BUILDING? If you are planning a building or renovation project, please contact the Building Department at the Township Office prior to doing any work. Calling ahead can save you money and a great deal of aggravation later! If you build without a permit a $500 charge will apply.

DID YOU KNOW? Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) collected through Lanark Highlands waste sites is sorted and processed at approved facilities in Ontario and Quebec – it does not get shipped overseas for processing! When you recycle WEEE you support the development of green industry in Canada while reclaiming valuable resources and preserving local landfill space. KEEP IT GREEN – RECYCLING WORKS!

Council Meeting Schedule:

Tuesday, March 29 at 6:00 p.m. – Special Committee of the Whole Tuesday, April 5 at 2:30 p.m. – Committee of the Whole Tuesday April 19th at 2:30 p.m. – Committee of the Whole Thursday, April 21 at 7:00 p.m. – Council

NOTICE

ACTIVATION OF REDUCED LOAD PERIOD ON ALL TOWNSHIP ROADS Take notice that reduced load restrictions (five (5) tonnes per axle) will be in force on all Township Roads effective Monday, March 7th, 2011. The reduced load period is necessary for the protection of all Township Roads which are susceptible to damage during the spring thaw. The restriction will be removed when the likelihood of road damage has diminished. For enquiries about reduced loads please contact: The Township of Lanark Highlands Public Works Department at 613-259-2398


Page 4 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

COMMUNITY NEWS

Local teacher takes lessons overseas

BY GEOFF DAVIES

geoff.davies@perthcourier.com After 25 years teaching in Perth and Smiths Falls, Wynne White still had a few lessons up her sleeve. Recently retired and restless, she decided to take her trade overseas, first teaching English to tourism workers in Nepal. Now, 10 years and four countries later, Wynne knows that, in the global classroom, it’s not the lessons you give, so much as the lessons you learn, that count. Be flexible, be patient, and cherish the relationships you make along the way. But one thing remains just as important as those wise tips, says White: “if you’re not having fun, get another job.” White began volunteering with CUSO-VSO in 2001, using her many years in Lanark County classrooms to train teachers in Nepal, Laos, Cambodia and – most recently – Ethiopia. Along the way, she’s had her fair share of fun. Often, it involved her motorbike. With White’s work usually taking her between towns scattered across a rural countryside, motorbiking was the only way to travel in countries like Laos and Cambodia. Literally. “Oh, it was great fun,” she said with a laugh. “I only fell off a few times. I hit a cow once.” Her cattle encounter took place one day on a dirt road in rural Cambodia, as she was passing a cow being led along by a young girl. “The cow must’ve got frightened hearing the motor and suddenly jumped in front, and I ran into it,” White recalled. “I fell down and the cow fell down and then we both got up and everything was fine.” Having become pretty proficient on her Honda step-through motorbike, White said she was looking forward to riding her hog once again in Ethiopia. But she would soon find out things there run at a different pace. White went to Ethiopia in September 2008. She settled in at Haramaya University, one of the country’s oldest universities, located outside the ancient walled-city of Harar, in the eastern part of the province.

said. “Everybody recognized it as a problem.” One of the things she did to fight this was to launch a poster campaign, plastering the school with 400 sheets asking everyone to “please be on time.” Except, though Haramaya University holds lessons in English, not everyone there has the same language abilities. So the posters had to present their point through pictures: please “bee” on time, illustrated with a clock. But seeing the impact her work has on the places she visits is only half the reward. The rest is simply being there. “I just love it,” White said. “Life’s a lot simpler in some of these places. You don’t have a lot of stuff, like a phone, mail or bills.” Though she’s looking forward to spending the summer with friends and family in her home near Murphys Point Provincial Park, White said she’s already plotting her next adventure. Next on her hit list: South America. “As long as I’m healthy I can’t Though she’s glad to be back home in Lanark County, Wynne White says she’s anxious to keep exploring the world. As a volunteer with CUSO-VSO, she’s been to Nepal, Laos, Cambodia and Ethiopia. She says she picture just hanging out at hopes to make South America her next destination. Kassina Ryder photo home.” There, she worked with a small team of university staff to develop a training program for professors, who generally go straight to the classroom after earning their degrees. “They’ve got Masters, they’ve got PhDs, but they’ve never learned how to teach,” she said. White helped develop a oneyear teacher training program, a pilot project at Haramaya which is currently being considered by Ethiopia’s ministry of education to be adopted nationwide. Surprisingly, one of the big lessons she brought to the university’s staff may seem a bit elementary. “These are people who are very experienced in their field, but they couldn’t manage to be punctual,” said White. White said everyone – students and staff alike – weren’t very watchful of when they dribbled into the classroom, and lessons were frequently delayed as a A young woman walks by donkeys loaded with firewood in Harar, a traditionally Muslim city in eastern result. “They were always running Ethiopia. Haramaya University, where Wynne White worked, is a short distance outside the city’s ancient Photo courtesy of Wynne White behind in their curriculum,” she walls.

Group aims at first homeless shelter for Perth kassina.ryder@perthcourier.com At least once a month, a Perth and District Collegiate Institute student walks into Christine Campbell’s office and tells her they need a place to stay for the night. “Sometimes I’ll have student who will say, ‘I can’t go home tonight,’” said Campbell. “As somebody who works in a school, it would be nice to be able to say, ‘OK, I’ve got a place for you tonight.’” Campbell is a child and youth worker at PDCI and is also chair of the board for the Cornerstone Landing Emergency Shelter. The group, along with Terrilee

Kelford of the Transitions Action Coalition, is aiming to purchase and run Perth’s first homeless shelter. The ideal shelter would be a four or five bedroom house close to schools and grocery stores, Campbell said. Ideally, the house would operate 24 hours a day and have both paid staff and volunteers, all of whom would participate in training courses prior to working. Staff would be able to provide counselling, connect clients with local agencies such as Open Doors for Lanark Children and Youth, help them to possibly reconnect with their families, or help them to get their Social Insurance Number or other paperwork in order to become

employable Campbell said. The most important goal will be to provide those in immediate need with a place to stay, along with helping them determine their next steps, Campbell said. “When times are a bit tough for somebody, it gives them that respite,” she said. “The time to emotionally stabilize so they can make some good choices about their future.” Kelford agreed. “It has to be designed in a manner that moves the kids on,” she said. “It’s short-term emergency housing.” Kelford said while the shelter might start off only being available to youth and might only have overnight hours in the

beginning, adults and families require services as well. Kelford said if the group can secure a duplex, then one side of the house could serve adults and families while the other served youth. But it’s too early to set the logistics of the project in stone, she added. For now, the group aims to put together a formal fundraising plan that will be presented to various organizations in the area, Kelford said. The plan will include statistics about homelessness in Lanark County, along with highlighting the project’s goals. The women said approximately $200,000 is needed to purchase a house to serve as the shelter and to start operations. The group aims to begin oper-

ating by next fall, Kelford said. Meanwhile, the group will focus on raising awareness about rural homelessness in Lanark County. “We know there are some great people in this county who care about their local communities and it’s a question of getting this information to them, to make them aware there is a problem,” she said. Campbell said Perth’s Dignity House Hospice and other organizations have met needs in the county, and a homeless shelter is just another step in that direction. “Perth is a great community, but there is a little hole here,” she said. “This would be the last little hole that I see that needs to be patched.”

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BY KASSINA RYDER


March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 5

COMMUNITY NEWS

Lanark Grannies fight on for drug bill after initial victory BY GEOFF DAVIES geoff.davies@perthcourier.com

Arson destroys housing complex, leaves residents homeless BY KASSINA RYDER kassina.ryder@perthcourier.com Former residents of a housing unit on the Upper Scotch Line say the fire that took place last month destroyed more than just their homes, it destroyed their community. Jennifer Larocque and her neighbour Janey Nagle have both lived in apartments in the housing unit for nearly a decade. Their daughters, both students at Glen Tay Public School, took the bus to and from school each and every day. The girls grew up together. “They had each other at the end of the day,” Nagle said. That all changed in the early morning hours of Feb. 18, when someone set their house on fire. A neighbour began banging on Larocque’s door around 2:30 a.m. and told her to call 911. When she opened the door, she could immediately tell there was a fire. “All you could smell was this smoky smell,” Larocque said. Firefighters could tell right away that the fire had been set on purpose, according to a press release from the Lanark County detachment of the OPP. “It was immediately apparent that the fire had been deliberately started and the investigation commenced at that time and is active and ongoing,” stated the release. The release also said that after the fires were extinguished, the building was still considered safe enough for residents to go home. “No one was injured and although the structure received some damage, it has been deemed safe for people to return to their homes,” the release stated. Though everyone was able to return home immediately after the fire, subsequent inspections revealed a plethora of problems with the building. Faulty wiring, insufficient smoke detectors and a lack of emergency exits were all listed on an inspection report signed by the Drummond/North Elmsley Tay Valley Fire Department’s assistant fire marshal Greg Saunders on Feb. 24. They were then told they could not return to their homes. The next day, Tay Valley Township’s chief building official, Edward Freeborn, issued an Order Prohibiting Use or Occupancy of Unsafe Building, and residents were given three days to empty

their apartments. Since Feb. 24, both Larocque and Nagle’s families, along with the other former residents, have been homeless. “When you are homeless and you have a family, it really doesn’t make you feel very good as a person,” Nagle said. “I’ve always had a roof over my kids’ heads and paid my bills. “It’s a shock.” Former residents have been staying at the Colonial House Motor Inn on Highway 7 thanks to the support of local community groups and the hotel’s owner. The Red Cross funded the hotel stays from Feb. 24 to Feb. 27 and donations from the PerthUpon Tay branch of the Royal Canadian Legion and other community members have helped pay for the remainder of the time. Nagle and Larocque said the community has been wonderful throughout their ordeal. Freda Fournier with the Civitan Club has been bringing them hot meals each day, and Glen Tay Public School and Stock Transportation have arranged for the kids to be picked up for school at the hotel. But as the days go by, the women are increasingly worried about where they will go next. Nagle has three children and said four-bedroom apartments in Perth are few and far between. The ones that are available cost at least $1,000 per month. “That’s not realistic for me,” Nagle said. Larocque has a daughter who lives with her and step-children who often spend the night. She said she was fortunate enough to have insurance, which has covered some of her costs, but she said she doesn’t know how she will afford first and last month’s rent in a new apartment. The women are now looking to hold a fundraiser to help raise money toward getting new housing. A fundraising dance called the Homeless Mothers and Children Benefit Dance is scheduled to be held at the Perth-UponTay branch of the Royal Canadian Legion on April 2 from 8 p.m. until 1 a.m. Tickets will be $10 and will be available at the door, or by calling The Colonial House Motor Inn room 112 (Larocque) or room 126 (Nagle). In the meantime, the women are taking life one step at a time. “I keep living day by day,” Nagle said.

Stop in the name of food Perth and District Food Bank chosen as home for pilot project BY KASSINA RYDER kassina.ryder@perthcourier.com The Perth and District Food Bank is getting a facelift, complete with a new location and new programs. Nancy Wildgoose is the community food centre co-ordinator for the PDFB. She said the new program is part of a partnership between the food bank and the Stop Community Food Program. The Stop, which began in Toronto in the 1970s, was looking to expand their community food centre model to other communities as part of a pilot project. Perth and Stratford, Ont. were chosen as homes for the pilot community food centres. The PDFB will move into a new building at 190 Gore St. (formerly the home of the Rideau Christian Fellowship Church) and will base its operations on the Stop food centre model, Wildgoose said. “We’ve created a formal partnership with them and when we move into our new building, we are going to be working on developing a whole new set of programs,” she said.

New programs will include a community kitchen that will offer cooking classes, community meals and a community garden. The emergency food services that currently exist will continue, Wildgoose added. The Stop model aims to support local food banks while supporting local agriculture, according to its website. By growing its own food, the food bank will have a steady supply of healthy, locally grown produce while building community spirit, Wildgoose said. “We want to make it a go-to place,” Wildgoose said. “We want to offer people a dignified place to come and learn and live.” Anyone wanting to learn more about the new partnership is invited to the annual general meeting of the PDFB at its new location at 190 Gore St. on March 24 at 7 p.m., Wildgoose said. Katherine Scharf, the director of the Stop Community Food Program in Toronto, will be giving a presentation about the program and the new partnership with Perth.

We invite you to attend the presentation of the UPPER CANADA DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD 2010 DIRECTOR’S ANNUAL REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY Tuesday, March 29, 2011 Perth and District Collegiate Institute 13 Victoria Street, Perth, ON 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. In this exciting video presentation you will discover: The value of Full-Time Learning in Kindergarten How we support the success of all learners through Trailblazers and other Pathways, Mentoring Programs, and Credit Recovery Our High Performance Schools How Strategic Planning improves student achievement How our staff members go the extra mile to care for our students How our Principals and Teachers are guiding student learning to improve results

Come Meet Your Trustee and Help Us Celebrate the Quality of Public Education! For more information, call 1-800-267-7131 or visit www.ucdsb.on.ca

Greg Pietersma Chair

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Janey Nagle (left) sits in a room in Perth’s Colonial House Motor Inn with her daughter Allysha and former neighbour, Jennifer Larocque. They have been living at the inn since a fire destroyed their home last month. Kassina Ryder photo

Sharon Swanson’s fingers must be exhausted. As a member of the Lanark County Grannies, she has been furiously at work writing letters to federal politicians in support of Bill C-393, which, if passed, would make it easier for Canadian companies to sell generic drugs overseas. With 308 members sitting in the House of Commons and 105 senators, those letters have been keeping her and the Grannies busy. Not that Swanson minds. “You can stay and do it all day long,” she said. “It’s seductive because we’re so close, we’re so close after all these years.” The House of Commons passed the bill to amend Canada’s Access to Medicines Regime on March 9, which humanitarians say could have a dramatic impact on the struggle against HIV/AIDS. The next step is for a second reading in the Senate, which could happen as early as March 21. If approved there, it would be a major step towards cutting red-tape on a bill that, despite being on the books since 2004, has been used by only one company to send one shipment of HIV/AIDS drugs to another country. The Lanark County Grannies is one of 240 groups who have been fighting for this bill for more than two years as part of the Stephen Lewis Foundation’s Grandmothers to Grandmothers Campaign. Aside from countless phone calls, letters, emails, and many visits to MPs, the campaign has also involved a trip to Ottawa for Swanson and her colleagues. She was part of a group of 10 local Grannies who went to Parliament Hill to watch the vote on March 9. “There were over 85 grandmothers in the gallery, it was packed on both sides,” said Swanson. “And we had the most Grannies out

there of all, which is kind of nice, not that it makes any difference.” That day the bill passed by a vote of 172-111. A private member’s bill originally sponsored by the NDP, it got a unanimous vote in favour from that party, as well as votes from a majority of Bloc MPs and some Conservatives. It received the support of most Liberals, except for two MPs who voted against the bill and several who abstained. “It was great to see 26 Conservatives vote in favour of the bill,” said Swanson. “Brave souls.” Local MP Scott Reid did not support the bill, Swanson noted, saying she found it disappointing, especially after the Grannies’ previous attempts to lobby him. As part of this effort, on the morning of March 7, Swanson and five other Lanark Grannies held a brief vigil outside of Reid’s office to deliver a letter urging him to support the bill. Their message: “Few people in life get the opportunity to vote for something that can save the lives of thousands.” Both Conservative and Liberal members have panned the bill on the grounds that it may infringe upon intellectual property rights, and that it would not be as effective as it’s made out to be. As for the senators, Swanson said the Grannies’ hope to appeal to them as fellow grandparents. “We’re hoping that the senators will have compassion for the grandmothers who are raising these sick children,” she said. “Can you imagine lying in bed at night and hearing them cry from pain when you know that the pill exists somewhere else, but it’s too expensive for you? I can’t.” She said there is concern a delay in the Senate could kill the bill if an election is called, but even if that happened it wouldn’t be the end of the road for its supporters. “The Grannies aren’t giving up and were not going away yet.”

David K. Thomas Director


Page 6 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

EDITORIAL OUR OPINION

In praise of action S

trength is best used when it protects the weak. That is why our planes have taken to the skies over Libya. If ever there was a just war, this is it. The irony of western powers launching firepower on a Middle Eastern country the eighth anniversary of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq was probably not lost on many people. But the differences between the two conflicts are like night and day. This time, the Arab League “respects” the United Nations mandate. Not only are they on side, but nations like Qatar and the United Arab Emirates are also in support. Countries that took the U.S. and its allies to task for their Iraqi adventure – like France, Germany and Canada – are now not only on board, but leading the charge. It is not lost on us that part of the reason why we are taking action in Libya is because of that country’s oil wealth – with gas prices shooting up, with no signs of the rise abating, we almost have to. Yes, the reasons why our six fighter jets and the HMCS Charlottetown are in the area are not entirely altruistic, and may even be partially selfish. But we can be certain that the rebels of Benghazi, facing certain annihilation just a week ago, or torture or exile if they survived, are just glad that we have arrived at the party – a little late and out of breath, but we’re there, making it an even fight. We support our men and women in the air, on the seas in the support base in Italy. These actions are part of a coming day of reckoning for Col. Gaddafi, the alleged mastermind behind the Lockerbie bombing in 1988, attacks on his own people, and spreading countless degrees of misery around the world. Your oil money, Swiss bank accounts and henchmen won’t save you now. We do agree with the New Democratic Party that this should not be an open-ended mission. Even though time was of the essence with last week’s decision, if it is not over within three months, it does need to come back to the House of Commons for a proper debate. The Libyans know best how to decide the future of their country, one without Col. Gaddafi and his family. Hopefully, the action taken by Canada and her allies this week will hasten an end to this bloody civil war. And once the dust settles, and a new democratic government is set up, Canada will be there, as we always have been, ready to help with tools, sweat and advice on rebuilding.

Local Landmark

A trip to the emergency department

U

sually I can sit down at the computer with an idea for this column and away I go. Today, however, In this space each week, we will feature a photo of local interest. you must excuse me while I unBe the first to correctly identify the location or item in the picture scramble my brains which have by emailing editor@perthcourier.com with the subject line, “Local been in a bit of a whirl this past Landmark,” and your name will be printed in next week’s paper! Unfortunately, there was no winner for last week’s landmark, which week or two. It all started well. We were was the mural on the back wall of The Perth Courier office. planning a birthday treat for our This week’s local landmark leads to the deed. now 15-year-old grandson, but, like most teenagers, he wasn’t readily available, so our get-together was delayed. However, we finally roped him in, and booked a Chinese dinner at his favourite place, our local Sky Dragon. Towards the end of the meal, one of our party of nine dropped a fork and dear husb reached down for it. Whereupon he says his mind went blank and, since we were heading out to pay the bill, we didn’t notice that he was having difficulty getting to his feet. When I turned back, he was at the desk behaving strangely. Other folk were waiting and the waitress was patiently explaining to him that he’d already paid the bill. But he was fumbling in his pockets and piling money on the counter. I assumed he was counting out a tip, so I sorted that out, and away we went for tea and birthday cake at a friend’s house. Just a senior moment, we all assumed. But then, during the evening I looked across the table and noticed that his eyes had gone blank, so I suggested we head home early. Again, he couldn’t rise from his seat and seemed to

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I

Betty

BENDELL Settled In have lost the power of speech. “We’d better get him to emergency,” said our host, who recognized possible signs of a stroke. From then on it’s been a whirl of tests and phrases like ministrokes, with long waits while he had CT scans and other tests, both at Perth and at the new wing of the Smiths Falls hospital. I overheard the receptionist asking someone making an appointment not to wear any jewellery. They’d already asked me before our appointment if dear husb wore earrings, which made me smile. At 80, this seemed a bit unlikely, but these days, who knows? She was now saying to someone planning to have their abdomen scanned the same question. Ah well, “Live and let live” has always been my man-

tra, and if you really feel better with a ring through your navel, good luck to you. I assumed that all the information these various departments were collecting would be emailed to our doctor, so I rang his office for an appointment, only to learn that he was away on a course. A visit to another doctor would make everything clear. After a three-hour wait, as he’d been called away to an emergency, he confirmed that poor old nearest and dearest had suffered two strokes to the left side of his brain, checked the pile of medication I’d been carrying around in the roomiest handbag I could find and told us “no aspirin,” because the hospital had prescribed another blood thinner. Then our doctor returned from his course and rang to say not to forget to take aspirin. Now you will begin to see why my brain is in a bit of a whirl. I rang his office back for an appointment as there were all sorts of questions I needed answered: Should he exercise or rest? When would he be able to drive? But the earliest appointment available is weeks away, so I shall have to ask someone at the hospital tomorrow when we go to have a 48-hour monitoring device fitted. And on it goes. Ah well, he’s almost his old self again, although his speech is still a bit slow. And he’s started to complain about my cooking, so things seem to be getting back to normal.

Current Events 101

t’s tough being a so-called humour columnist these days. You may have noticed that in the grand scheme of things there isn’t a lot of funny stuff going on. Oh, sure, I could tell you about March Break and how, for a change, the kids were healthy but I lost the battle against a yucky slobbery cold. I could wax woeful about listening to all sorts of people jetting off to warmer climes. I could probably come up with an entire column about the misery of looking out my window and seeing everywhere in the backyard melting except my ice-encased patio, where I would love to be sitting right about now. But now, given current global events, doesn’t seem to be the right time for minor complaints. Groom-boy and I are news junkies, which goes with the journalism training, I suppose. So we often watch the news in the evening, and it is usually on in the background during supper, too. I realize the news and family dinners do not always make good companions. Fortunately it is mostly background noise – we can’t all see the television while we’re eating. That’s a good thing, too, because I honestly can’t think of a time in the last few years when there has been so much really bad news in one newscast night after night after night. It’s safe to say recent current events have raised a lot of questions in our household, and it all started with Egypt. Boychild is beginning to get a handle on his place in the world, but sometimes that link is a bit tenuous. Since he is showing an interest in current events I’m not about to discourage it, even if it could, conceivably, cause night-

Stephanie

GRAY Past Deadline mares. That’s why I’m around to help explain it and put it into some sort of context. This isn’t always easy, though. When he asks why people are rioting and protesting and fighting in Egypt and Libya, I have a tough time coming up with suitable answers about north African politics (and please don’t ask me about the Middle East). “Well, the people don’t like their government, and in those countries that is the only way they can express that.” “But why?” So there are watered down explanations about government oppression and democracies versus dictatorships and how dictatorships aren’t considered to be a good thing and how some leaders are a bit too crazy to be running a country. (I left out the part about Gadhafi’s weird costumes.) “But Stephen Harper is a good prime minister, right?” Ahem. “That depends on who you ask,” I said, biting back some beautiful opportunities to be

sarcastic about dictatorships in Canada. Now we are bombing Libya, but as of this writing that development has not registered with any of the shorter residents of the house. That one might be trickier to explain. And then there is Japan and the “would that ever happen here” questions. At first it was easy to answer “no” to the tsunami and earthquake questions. First of all, we’re too far inland to ever be affected by a tsunami. But then eastern Ontario gets rattled by a tiny earthquake (which I thought was someone slamming a car door really really hard). So then we have another discussion about plate tectonics and how even though there is a fault line near here, it’s not the same as what exists in “the ring of fire.” So far there haven’t been many questions about the nuclear catastrophe. I’m still thinking about responses to that one because even though we have been assured our plants are “safe,” it’s nuclear power, for crying out loud. Never say never. If it’s not an earthquake, it could be something else. “What kind of disasters could happen here, Mom?” I think about the ice storm and climate change and how we might see more severe storms roaring through here. I think about terrorism and its “randomness” that isn’t necessarily random. Flooding, fires, train derailments, chemical spills – lots of things could happen. Thinking about these things is just one more reason why being a grown-up can be stinky. “I think we’re really lucky to live where we do, Boychild. We live in a good place.”


March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 7

COMMUNITY

Trap and transfer can cause major problems the harvesting of this renewable resource, the last thing we need in outdoor Ontario is the addition of more beavers. Granted, it’s a lot easier for us rural people to make observations like this than it is for urban residents. Unless involved one-on-one with this, our largest rodent, at their summer cottage, most urban folk get only a passing glance at the impact beavers have on the outdoor world. And lest one gets the impression that the actions of these dam builders are all bad, nothing could be further from the truth. But beavers, like deer and other forms of wildlife that increase beyond the carrying capacity of their habitat, must be limited in numbers for their own good. When they flood cattle pastures, hay fields, wood lots (including sugar maple bushes), and cause road and rail washouts, these up-to-50-pound fur bearers must be controlled for the good of the people too. How, for instance, can you justify an overabundance of beavers that, when short of

BRIGGS-JUDE Outdoors their necessity food of aspen, poplar, and birch, begin dropping century-old oak, pine, and maple. Most people don’t know or realize that each beaver has a cutting quota that works out to about 150 trees a year. The unfortunate part of this stumping harvest is that about half of these chewed off trees get hung up and can’t be utilized by the animals for either food or dam

And what do many people do when they have a beaver or a raccoon or any other animal problem on their property? They control them by live trapping the culprits and releasing them on someone else’s land. What an idiotic practice based on the socalled humane concept. Certainly dropping the critter in someone else’s lap alleviates your own problem. But it’s cruel to release a beaver or any other creature into a habitat that has a resident population of its own. Scarred pelts and dead carcasses often show that there was no welcome mat out and that the newcomer met only resistance in a defence of territory. May we suggest that whatever you do in regard to controlling nuisance or problem animals, you do it on your own property. For our wildlife community has no room for another problem thrust suddenly in its midst, and judging from what I see and hear, neither does any other rural landscape in Ontario, which by the way includes Crown land, parks, and conservation areas.

Climbing gas prices: Get more bang for your buck

LETTERS

Readers blasts ‘blatant bias’ of editorial cartoons Dear Editor, Let me register my annoyance at the blatant bias being consistently shown in your selection of your editorial cartoons. Relevance, even truth, is never a consideration; all that is required is a drawing that shows the Leader of the Opposition in a bad light. In most cases, these cartoons have no basis in fact; they are simply designed to put Mr Ignatieff down. I should perhaps state, here, that I am not, nor have I ever, been a Liberal or even voted for that party. In fact, for a number of years I was a card-carrying Progressive Conservative, holding a number of offices at the local level including that of constituency president. I am somewhat embarrassed to admit that these days, because the “Conservatism” practised by Mr. Harper and his gang have no roots whatsoever in Canadian Conservative tradition. It would seem to be drawn directly from radical right-wing Republicanism in the United States; the “Con-

Art

building. Another good example of some necessary control is when we see the township road superintendent and his crew come down twice a week to clear the seven-foot culvert under County Road 36. In the past, beavers have plugged this huge water passage so thoroughly that dynamite has had to be used to release the backup of water. Another example is raccoons whose numbers have increased dramatically in the last several years. Apart from their raids on corn fields and domestic poultry, these light-fingered bandits are bad medicine for ground-nesting birds. Studies conducted in New York State with radio-collared raccoons revealed they were systematically working the hay fields and hedgerows for duck, pheasant, meadowlark, bobolink, and other such bird nests. Our own observations reveal cavity-nesting bluebirds and wood ducks, along with bankburrowing kingfishers and swallows, also suffer heavy losses to these masked predators.

BY COURTNEY SYMONS

servative” Party seem s to have morphed into a kind of “Tea Party North” – with the same contempt for law, justice, fairness or anything else that stands in their way. Way back when every city and many towns had two newspapers, political bias was acceptable. Competition between papers was expected, and that extended to include political promotion. Nowadays, we have come to expect our papers to be objective, reasoned and fair – none of which your choice of cartoons suggests you favour or practice. Can we rely on your fairness and objectivity in your reporting when your prejudices are so openly and tastelessly displayed on your editorial pages? I have been a fan of The Courier ever since I came to Perth. The paper has a long and proud history, and I suggest that it deserves better than what we have been seeing in the upper corner of recent editorial pages. Ian Doig

Correction

On March 8, the Town of Perth’s committee-ofthe-whole passed a recommendation to propose amalgamation talks to the townships of Tay Valley and Drummond/North Elmsley. The townships will only receive an official communication on this matter if the recommendation was approved by Perth Council on March 22. Incorrect information appeared in our March 17 issue. We apologize for the inconvenience.

If you have an opinion about something you read on the pages of The Courier, or about something going on in your neighbourhood, why not write a letter to the editor? It’s as easy as emailing editor@perthcourier.com

Trips to the pump are really packing a punch these days, as gas prices continue to rise across Canada, and around the world. Although filling the tank is hard to avoid, there are ways to save money and maximize fuel efficiency. GasBuddy, a website based out of Regina, offers a list of the cheapest gas prices in the area. “Most of the time, you won’t even have to go that far out of your way,” said Jason Toews, co-founder of the GasBuddy website. “You can save money just by knowing where to go.” Prices are constantly updated, allowing users to compare gas stations in their vicinity and choose accordingly. GasBuddy even has a downloadable application for the iPhone. In addition to gas prices, GasBuddy offers tips for drivers to maximize their mileage. With spring around the corner and the days getting warmer, Toews said that drivers should limit their use of air conditioning to save on gas. Opening the windows instead, however, isn’t always best. “It’s actually better to use the AC on the highway than it is to open the windows,” Toews said. The air flowing through the vehicle increases aerodynamic drag, causing the engine to burn up to 10 per cent more fuel with the effort. With snow still on the ground, however, air conditioning isn’t yet a concern. Many Canadians begin their days by warming up the engine as they slough off snow and ice from their vehicle. “There is a misconception about how long is needed to warm up your

car before driving,” said Korey Kennedy, manager of public and government affairs for the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) of North & East Ontario. “Many people think that five minutes are needed to fully warm

up the engine, but 30 to 45 seconds will do the trick,” he said. Idling a vehicle for more than a minute is a waste of fuel, he added. Turning off the car and restarting it requires less gas than to keep it running.

Kennedy also suggested taking anything unnecessary out of the trunk or back seat. More weight within the vehicle requires more fuel to move it. The “jack rabbit start,” as Kennedy called it, should be avoided at all costs. That means taking your time to stop or start, and attempting to maintain a constant speed. A good way to maximize your fuel efficiency is to use cruise control whenever possible. Additionally, the faster a vehicle goes, the more the drag increases. Driving 100 kilometres per hour, instead of 120, reduces fuel consumption by about 15 per cent, said Toews. Most cars achieve optimal fuel efficiency at about 90 kilometres per hour. Checking your tire pressure regularly is another way to get the most out of your gas. One tire that is under-inflated by two pounds of air per square inch (PSI) increases fuel consumption by one per cent. Kennedy suggested checking the tires once a month to ensure proper inflation. Gas prices will continue to fluctuate and potentially keep increasing. This variance happens for a number of reasons, Toews said. Recent revolts in Libya, the supplier of two per cent of the world’s crude oil, have certainly contributed to the rising costs, but are not the only reason for increased prices. “We’ve been cooped up inside all winter long,” Toews said. “We’re tired of it. We want to get outside and go places.” As the weather gets nicer, people drive more, and with this increased demand comes increased domestic gas prices. To check out things locally, visit GasBuddy’s website at www.ontariogasprices.com and enter the name of the town or area you want to see.

Spring Fling gets royal treatment The Perth Lioness Club is hosting its annual Spring Fling on April 28, at 6 p.m., in the Lions Hall at the Perth Fairgrounds. Since this event precedes the Royal Wedding by two days, a wedding rehearsal party theme is being planned. Guests are encouraged to come dressed in casual chic or wedding attire, complete with hats, gloves, tiaras and fine jewels. A prize will be awarded to the best “Wedding Spirited” table. Mary Cook, a local historian and author, will be our guest speaker. Darlene Rupert, owner of Elysium Lingerie and Bridal Boutique, will host a fashion show of casual attire, mother-of-the-bride fashions and accessories. Guests will be served royal desserts, fruit selections and Queen’s tea.

A silent auction will feature a variety of gifts generously donated by local merchants and businesses. Throughout the evening many door prizes will be awarded. This annual event has raised more than $20,000 for the Great War Memorial Hospital Foundation in the past four years. Tickets have already been sold out for this year, and the Lioness Club plans to donate all proceeds to the foundation. Success depends on community support, and the Perth Lioness Club thanks all those that bought tickets or donated prizes for this event. This active club always welcomes new members. For more information, please, call Josie Roberts at 613267-3769. Submitted by the Perth Lioness Club.

Municipal Connection Environmental Services at 613-267-3311, Ext 2233.

www.perth.ca Municipal Water Testing The Town of Perth will be conducting a door-todoor campaign to obtain water samples throughout the municipality for lead testing in the drinking water system. The lead sampling program is mandated to all water systems in Ontario under Ontario Regulation 170/03. This program is in its third consecutive year of the program with results well below the provincial guidelines for lead in drinking water. Staff will canvass various neighbourhoods to obtain 20 random drinking water samples between March 21 and April 1, 2011. This program is free to all who participate and sample results will be shared with participants. Municipal staff will be clearly identified with photo identification. If you have questions about the program or require assistance, call Grant Machan, Director of

Council Agendas, Minutes, Reports The agendas, minutes and reports associated with all meetings of Council and Committees/ Advisory Panels of Council are posted to the Town’s website in advance of the meeting. Please visit our website at www.perth.ca and look under “Council/ Administrative Services.”

NOTICE OF INTENT 2011 Budget Estimates Please be advised that pursuant to the Municipal Act – R.S.O. 2001, S. 291(1) the Corporation of the Town of Perth will be considering a By-law for the purpose of approving the 2011 budget estimates, at a Special Meeting of Council to be held on March 29th, 2011, 5:15 p.m., Perth Town Hall, 2nd Floor, Council Chambers.

For specific details, please contact Lang Britchford, Treasurer, at 613-267-3311, ext. 2223. Guidelines regarding delegations to address Council, can be found on the Perth website at www.perth. ca, or by contacting Lauren Walton, Town Clerk, at 613-267-3311, ext. 2239, prior to noon on Thursday, March 24th, 2011.

Getting to Know your Municipal Staff Over the next several months, the Town of Perth will use this space to profile its full-time staff members, as well as volunteers of the Perth Firefighters’ Association, giving readers a glimpse of who provides your municipal services and how. We hope you find it informative and enjoyable. Name: Grant Machan Department: Environmental Services Title: Director Years Worked for the Town: 16

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here was a time in our recent memory when the live trapping and transfer of certain species of animals in this province was a valuable aid in wildlife management. I’m not talking here about the international exchange of Ontario moose, marten, and Hungarian partridge for United States; wild turkeys, or some of the other reintroduction programs involving outgoing fisher or incoming elk. What I am trying to point out was the movement within the province of specific kinds of native wildlife, which were low in population or had become non-existent in many areas of their former range. The most noticeable recipient of this live trap and transfer was our national emblem, the beaver. Ensured of a future by employing quotas placed on individual trap lines, the then Department of Lands & Forests actually flew live beavers into remote northern lakes to aid the income of the native people. Today, with a substantial loss in the fur market and the resultant decline in

Hometown: Perth Job Description: Overseeing the roads, water, sewer and solid waste systems for the municipality, and giving departmental support for the municipality’s fleet operations. Personal Information: Grant’s interests include volunteering in the community, Masters Swimming Program, Perth & District Agricultural Society and he enjoys camping with his family. On Working for the Town of Perth: Grant feels that working in a community that is your hometown is very rewarding.


Page 8 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

ENTERTAINMENT

Souls touched

TENNANT Musical Musings As evidenced last night in our home, any song they touched brought out all they had in interpreting their shared vision and enhancing the other’s offering. They shared their souls with us. We were blessed. I hope you jump next time they’re playing near and catch the fire this complementing duo delivers. The magic of live music continues. From adulation to disappointment. Back in 2009 (originally recorded in 2008) I was watching Spectacle – a TV show hosted by Elvis Costello where he interviews and plays with various musical celebrities. He was speaking with Elton John and I was shocked to hear John state one of his early heroes, and a later mentor, was Leon Russell. Way back when, approximately 1969, my brother turned me onto

Films for the heart and soul BY JIM DEACOVE On Sunday, March 27, at 2 p.m., we return to the short films format, with four films scheduled. You will notice each film is not overly long. This is in response to the many requests for discussion time after each viewing. So bring your opinions, your pens and pencils, your friends and your own refreshments, for an enjoyable afternoon of some of the best independent films in the world. Diplomacy: Nine minutes, English and Persian with English subtitles; written and directed by Jon Goldman. Two interpreters face the high-stakes task of translating between a Middle Eastern foreign minister and an American head of state, during the first high-level diplomatic meeting in 30 years. As tensions rise, the interpreters attempt to keep negotiations on track. Will their unorthodox approach bring about mutual understanding or further the divide? Dutch Bird: 20 minutes, English; written and directed by Kirk Weddell. Concerned friends rope an Irish villager into competing in a carrier pigeon race, to distract him from grieving the loss of his wife; however, the race may have gotten him into more trouble than any of them were counting on. This comedic short is about the lengths to which people will go for their friends. Clutch: eight minutes, English; written by Greg Waters and directed by Jackie Schulz. Brian’s hangover gets even worse when his ex-girlfriend drops off her car to his repair shop. She also hands over their five-year-old daughter, Rosie, to stay with Daddy until the clutch is fixed. He’s behind in his work, he can’t find the part, and a mechanic’s workshop is no place for a fairy princess. The Runaway: 23 minutes, German with English subtitles; written by Linus Foerster and directed by Ulrike Grote. A struggling architect heads out the door, late for a job interview, only to be confronted by a mysterious young boy outside his apartment. As their day together unfolds, their true connection reveals a much larger story. This short film was nominated for an Academy Award and you will see why. The films are shown at the Myriad Theatre. There is a $2 donation that goes towards theatre rental. Different films shown the last

Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Don’t miss them. Bring your friends. Bring your opinions. Bring your own refreshments. Joel continues to supply popcorn with real butter. The coffee shop remains closed on Sundays. For more information, contact Jim Deacove at 613 267-4819, or fp@superaje.com. See you at the movies.

The proceeds of the Black Tie Bingo will be directed towards the purchase of nine computers-on-wheels to benefit patient care at the GWM site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Contributions such as Mike Fair’s will help us realize this goal. Thank you very much Kristine! Shown above are, from left: Kristine Fair-Clemmens of Mike Fair Chevrolet Buick GMC Cadillac with Gord Cowie, GWM Hospital Foundation board member and Black Tie Bingo co-chair. This message is generously underwritten by

Perth Courier

Th e

Proud print sponsor of the GWM Hospital Foundation Black Tie Bingo.

Thank You, Wib & Christopher!

The GWM Hospital Foundation takes pleasure in acknowledging the generous contribution from Crains’ Construction towards the Foundation’s fundraising event - Black Tie Bingo to be held Saturday, April 9 at Code’s Mill on the Park. The proceeds of the Black Tie Bingo will be directed towards the purchase of nine computers-on-wheels to benefit patient care at the GWM site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Contributions such as Crains’ will help us realize this goal. Thank you very Wib and Christopher! Shown above are, from left: Wib Crain and Christopher Crain flanking Margot Hallam, GWM Foundation Executive Director and Black Tie Bingo co-chair.

Tickets are selling quickly!

This message is generously underwritten by

Perth Courier

Th e

Proud print sponsor of the GWM Hospital Foundation Black Tie Bingo.

Thank You, Lisa!

For a complete list of Bingo prizes to be won, visit our website – www.gwmfoundation.com Proudly presented by

Diamond Partner: Emerald Partners: Civitan Perth Courier Club of Perth Canada Inc. Th e

Platinum Partners:

A&B FORD

Perth & Smiths Falls

Moe Johnson

Sales Ltd

CHEVROLET BUICK GMC CADILLAC

Lynda & Tony Hendriks

Recent local draw winners

Local Waves • Soft Hits

CONSTRUCTION LIMITED

Gold Partners: 456389

Todd & Shelley Stepanuik

The GWM Hospital Foundation takes pleasure in acknowledging the generous contribution from A&B Ford Sales Ltd. towards the Foundation’s fundraising event - Black Tie Bingo to be held Saturday, April 9 at Code’s Mill on the Park. The proceeds of the Black Tie Bingo will be directed towards the purchase of nine computers-on-wheels to benefit patient care at the GWM site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Contributions such as A&B Ford Sales will help us realize this goal. Thank you very Lisa! Shown above are, from left: Margot Hallam, GWM Foundation Executive Director and Black Tie Bingo co-chair with Lisa Hasler of A&B Ford Sales Ltd. This message is generously underwritten by

Debbie & Larry Sparks

Perth Lions Club “300 Club” draw Winners in the final Perth Lions Club “300 Club” draw on March 12, 2011, were: Julie Ottman, $1,500; Ernie Coutts, $1,000.

The GWM Hospital Foundation takes pleasure in acknowledging the generous contribution from Kristine Fair-Clemmens of Mike Fair Chevrolet Buick GMC Cadillac towards the Foundation’s fundraising event - Black Tie Bingo - to be held Saturday, April 9 at Code’s Mill on the Park.

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Steve

Russell when Russell co-ordinated and was the musical director for Joe Cocker’s Mad Dogs and Englishmen tour, subsequent film and album. Remember Russell’s song Delta Lady or the tune Superstar made famous by Rita Coolidge; cowritten by Russell and Bonnie Bramlett? I’d admired his work over the years and have seen him play live a couple of times. Besides his solo material, he’s been an a stable sideman, having recorded with a diverse list including Jerry Lee Lewis, George Harrison, Delaney Bramlett, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton, The Byrds, The Beach Boys, Willie Nelson, Tijuana Brass, Frank Sinatra, The Band, BB King, Bob Dylan, Glen Campbell and the Rolling Stones. So when I later heard John and Russell were recording an album together, I couldn’t wait to get hold of one. I actually had it (called The Union) well before you may have noticed it being advertised repeatedly on television. It has a who’s who of supporting players like Jim Keltner, Booker T. Jones to name a few. So much hype, so much of a letdown for me. Now, I believe John means well in his attempts to regenerate Russell’s career, but it sounds like too many of John’s albums and lacks the Russell sound on most of the cuts. Though Russell wrote a couple and has writing credits on four others, the production is far too Elton-esque. Russell’s sound tends toward backing female choirs, sometimes edging towards gospel. They’re evident on a couple, but it still didn’t cut it for me. Hearts Have Turned To Stone, a Russell-written piece, most reflects his usual sound. On March 14, 2011 Russell was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In his acceptance speech, Russell said, “A year ago, Elton found me in a ditch on the side of the highway of life and took me in…treated me like a king. I’d just like to say thank you very much. I appreciate it, and hallelujah.” I’m glad he’s receiving muchdeserved accolades, but I hope to hear more on his own terms of this illustrious entertainer. Maybe next time. Support live music everywhere.

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usic is a very personal thing. While listening to a live performance, one person sitting beside you may be laughing, while those on the other side are wiping their eyes for entirely different reasons. It’s where the music takes you; where a skilled musician whisks us away, transporting each and every one of us to somewhere within our own soul. When you think of soul, we’re trained to think of the incomparable Aretha Franklin. But, in fact, it can be anything that touches us deep inside in a place that seems to have a mainline to our hearts and emotions, be it a physical art piece or a piece of music. On Saturday night, Nonie and Eugene shared their soul and brought their eclectic styles to Music On McLean House Concerts in good ol’ Perth. Their infecting blend of Celtic, blues and folk, interspersed with whimsy and glimpses of self-penned song origins, touched the appreciative crowd, swaying them from tears of laughter, to tears of unreleased emotion. I first heard Nonie years ago in one of Ontario Council of Folk Festival Conference’s many late-night song circles where she embedded in my mind her stellar blues style on guitar and harmonica. A couple of years later, I caught her and Eugene together at the Barrie Folk Festival where, again, via a song circle stage, I was impressed with the dynamic and musical genuineness the two produced together.

Perth Courier

Th e

Proud print sponsor of the GWM Hospital Foundation Black Tie Bingo.

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M

Thank You, Kristine!


Page 8 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

ENTERTAINMENT

Souls touched

TENNANT Musical Musings As evidenced last night in our home, any song they touched brought out all they had in interpreting their shared vision and enhancing the other’s offering. They shared their souls with us. We were blessed. I hope you jump next time they’re playing near and catch the fire this complementing duo delivers. The magic of live music continues. From adulation to disappointment. Back in 2009 (originally recorded in 2008) I was watching Spectacle – a TV show hosted by Elvis Costello where he interviews and plays with various musical celebrities. He was speaking with Elton John and I was shocked to hear John state one of his early heroes, and a later mentor, was Leon Russell. Way back when, approximately 1969, my brother turned me onto

Films for the heart and soul BY JIM DEACOVE On Sunday, March 27, at 2 p.m., we return to the short films format, with four films scheduled. You will notice each film is not overly long. This is in response to the many requests for discussion time after each viewing. So bring your opinions, your pens and pencils, your friends and your own refreshments, for an enjoyable afternoon of some of the best independent films in the world. Diplomacy: Nine minutes, English and Persian with English subtitles; written and directed by Jon Goldman. Two interpreters face the high-stakes task of translating between a Middle Eastern foreign minister and an American head of state, during the first high-level diplomatic meeting in 30 years. As tensions rise, the interpreters attempt to keep negotiations on track. Will their unorthodox approach bring about mutual understanding or further the divide? Dutch Bird: 20 minutes, English; written and directed by Kirk Weddell. Concerned friends rope an Irish villager into competing in a carrier pigeon race, to distract him from grieving the loss of his wife; however, the race may have gotten him into more trouble than any of them were counting on. This comedic short is about the lengths to which people will go for their friends. Clutch: eight minutes, English; written by Greg Waters and directed by Jackie Schulz. Brian’s hangover gets even worse when his ex-girlfriend drops off her car to his repair shop. She also hands over their five-year-old daughter, Rosie, to stay with Daddy until the clutch is fixed. He’s behind in his work, he can’t find the part, and a mechanic’s workshop is no place for a fairy princess. The Runaway: 23 minutes, German with English subtitles; written by Linus Foerster and directed by Ulrike Grote. A struggling architect heads out the door, late for a job interview, only to be confronted by a mysterious young boy outside his apartment. As their day together unfolds, their true connection reveals a much larger story. This short film was nominated for an Academy Award and you will see why. The films are shown at the Myriad Theatre. There is a $2 donation that goes towards theatre rental. Different films shown the last

Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. Don’t miss them. Bring your friends. Bring your opinions. Bring your own refreshments. Joel continues to supply popcorn with real butter. The coffee shop remains closed on Sundays. For more information, contact Jim Deacove at 613 267-4819, or fp@superaje.com. See you at the movies.

The proceeds of the Black Tie Bingo will be directed towards the purchase of nine computers-on-wheels to benefit patient care at the GWM site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Contributions such as Mike Fair’s will help us realize this goal. Thank you very much Kristine! Shown above are, from left: Kristine Fair-Clemmens of Mike Fair Chevrolet Buick GMC Cadillac with Gord Cowie, GWM Hospital Foundation board member and Black Tie Bingo co-chair. This message is generously underwritten by

Perth Courier

Th e

Proud print sponsor of the GWM Hospital Foundation Black Tie Bingo.

Thank You, Wib & Christopher!

The GWM Hospital Foundation takes pleasure in acknowledging the generous contribution from Crains’ Construction towards the Foundation’s fundraising event - Black Tie Bingo to be held Saturday, April 9 at Code’s Mill on the Park. The proceeds of the Black Tie Bingo will be directed towards the purchase of nine computers-on-wheels to benefit patient care at the GWM site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Contributions such as Crains’ will help us realize this goal. Thank you very Wib and Christopher! Shown above are, from left: Wib Crain and Christopher Crain flanking Margot Hallam, GWM Foundation Executive Director and Black Tie Bingo co-chair.

Tickets are selling quickly!

This message is generously underwritten by

Perth Courier

Th e

Proud print sponsor of the GWM Hospital Foundation Black Tie Bingo.

Thank You, Lisa!

For a complete list of Bingo prizes to be won, visit our website – www.gwmfoundation.com Proudly presented by

Diamond Partner: Emerald Partners: Civitan Perth Courier Club of Perth Canada Inc. Th e

Platinum Partners:

A&B FORD

Perth & Smiths Falls

Moe Johnson

Sales Ltd

CHEVROLET BUICK GMC CADILLAC

Lynda & Tony Hendriks

Recent local draw winners

Local Waves • Soft Hits

CONSTRUCTION LIMITED

Gold Partners: 456389

Todd & Shelley Stepanuik

The GWM Hospital Foundation takes pleasure in acknowledging the generous contribution from A&B Ford Sales Ltd. towards the Foundation’s fundraising event - Black Tie Bingo to be held Saturday, April 9 at Code’s Mill on the Park. The proceeds of the Black Tie Bingo will be directed towards the purchase of nine computers-on-wheels to benefit patient care at the GWM site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Contributions such as A&B Ford Sales will help us realize this goal. Thank you very Lisa! Shown above are, from left: Margot Hallam, GWM Foundation Executive Director and Black Tie Bingo co-chair with Lisa Hasler of A&B Ford Sales Ltd. This message is generously underwritten by

Debbie & Larry Sparks

Perth Lions Club “300 Club” draw Winners in the final Perth Lions Club “300 Club” draw on March 12, 2011, were: Julie Ottman, $1,500; Ernie Coutts, $1,000.

The GWM Hospital Foundation takes pleasure in acknowledging the generous contribution from Kristine Fair-Clemmens of Mike Fair Chevrolet Buick GMC Cadillac towards the Foundation’s fundraising event - Black Tie Bingo - to be held Saturday, April 9 at Code’s Mill on the Park.

456254

Steve

Russell when Russell co-ordinated and was the musical director for Joe Cocker’s Mad Dogs and Englishmen tour, subsequent film and album. Remember Russell’s song Delta Lady or the tune Superstar made famous by Rita Coolidge; cowritten by Russell and Bonnie Bramlett? I’d admired his work over the years and have seen him play live a couple of times. Besides his solo material, he’s been an a stable sideman, having recorded with a diverse list including Jerry Lee Lewis, George Harrison, Delaney Bramlett, Ringo Starr, Eric Clapton, The Byrds, The Beach Boys, Willie Nelson, Tijuana Brass, Frank Sinatra, The Band, BB King, Bob Dylan, Glen Campbell and the Rolling Stones. So when I later heard John and Russell were recording an album together, I couldn’t wait to get hold of one. I actually had it (called The Union) well before you may have noticed it being advertised repeatedly on television. It has a who’s who of supporting players like Jim Keltner, Booker T. Jones to name a few. So much hype, so much of a letdown for me. Now, I believe John means well in his attempts to regenerate Russell’s career, but it sounds like too many of John’s albums and lacks the Russell sound on most of the cuts. Though Russell wrote a couple and has writing credits on four others, the production is far too Elton-esque. Russell’s sound tends toward backing female choirs, sometimes edging towards gospel. They’re evident on a couple, but it still didn’t cut it for me. Hearts Have Turned To Stone, a Russell-written piece, most reflects his usual sound. On March 14, 2011 Russell was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In his acceptance speech, Russell said, “A year ago, Elton found me in a ditch on the side of the highway of life and took me in…treated me like a king. I’d just like to say thank you very much. I appreciate it, and hallelujah.” I’m glad he’s receiving muchdeserved accolades, but I hope to hear more on his own terms of this illustrious entertainer. Maybe next time. Support live music everywhere.

456664

usic is a very personal thing. While listening to a live performance, one person sitting beside you may be laughing, while those on the other side are wiping their eyes for entirely different reasons. It’s where the music takes you; where a skilled musician whisks us away, transporting each and every one of us to somewhere within our own soul. When you think of soul, we’re trained to think of the incomparable Aretha Franklin. But, in fact, it can be anything that touches us deep inside in a place that seems to have a mainline to our hearts and emotions, be it a physical art piece or a piece of music. On Saturday night, Nonie and Eugene shared their soul and brought their eclectic styles to Music On McLean House Concerts in good ol’ Perth. Their infecting blend of Celtic, blues and folk, interspersed with whimsy and glimpses of self-penned song origins, touched the appreciative crowd, swaying them from tears of laughter, to tears of unreleased emotion. I first heard Nonie years ago in one of Ontario Council of Folk Festival Conference’s many late-night song circles where she embedded in my mind her stellar blues style on guitar and harmonica. A couple of years later, I caught her and Eugene together at the Barrie Folk Festival where, again, via a song circle stage, I was impressed with the dynamic and musical genuineness the two produced together.

Perth Courier

Th e

Proud print sponsor of the GWM Hospital Foundation Black Tie Bingo.

456346

M

Thank You, Kristine!


March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 9

You Say Tomatoes, we say don’t miss the show! BY IAN DOIG This month, Perth’s Studio Theatre production jumps the gun with the funny, but poignant, comedy, You Say Tomatoes, which takes a humorous look at the differences between American and British attitudes. Sounds like sure-fire fun! Performances will be held at the Studio Theatre at 8 p.m. on March 31 and April 2, 8 and 9 and at 2 p.m. on April 3 and 10. Tickets are $18 from “Tickets Please”

(a small convenience fee applies) or directly from the theatre. Visit www. studiotheatreperth.com for details. The Kemptville Players Inc. proudly presents Jenny’s House of Joy, by Norm Foster – a two-act comedy that is every bit as risqué as the name promises. It’s set in a house of ill-repute in Baxter Springs, Kansas, circa 1870, a frontier town where vigilante justice is the norm. Five women with five different personalities – a very funny play, but with a serious undertone.

“The audience can expect to laugh,” says director George Anderson. “They might even get teary-eyed, too.” Leslie Hall is the venue, and show dates are April 7 to 11. Sounds like real fun! 2Women Productions begins bringing the storyteller’s art to our area with Landscapes of Silence; A Daughter’s Story, a recounting of family secrets that cannot be spoken. Marta Singh grew up in Argentina when atrocities were occurring. But her family were “good people.” Her family could not “know.” Then at 16 she became pregnant. That could not be spoken of, either. Presentations will be on April 16 at Smiths Falls Station Theatre, April 23 in the Carleton Place Cinema and in Perth’s Studio Theatre on April 29. Tickets can be ordered from Tickets Please, 613485-6434.

Halfway to Heaven is the title of a new musical, written and directed for the Mississippi Mudds by Mark Piper. Edward wakes up in heaven without his memory. His guardian angel, Sabio, makes him an apprentice angel, and brings him to help with one of his charges, Doris. With Sabio’s help, Edward becomes human again for a short time, learns something about his past, and rediscovers lost love. Look for old standards like All You Need is Love, and challenging pieces including Stairway to Heaven, I’ll Be There, and Bohemian Rhapsody. Tickets are $20 from Arts Carleton Place, 132 Coleman St., or by calling 613-2572031. Show times are April 29 and 30 and May 6 and 7 at 8 p.m. There will be a matinee on Sunday, May 1 at 2 p.m. See you at the show!

We Are Moving! Effective April 4th 2011 130 Sproule Rd, Perth North on 511, just past Glen Tay Transportation

Las Vegas performer Houston MacPherson does his Jack Nicholson impersonation during his Legends of Las Vegas in Concert show, in front of a full house at Perth’s Studio Theatre on Friday, March 18. MacPherson can imitate more than 100 celebrities. Andrew Snook photo

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HERE’S HOUSTON!

JOHNSON CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC 613-264-2402

456416

Ennis Carpentry Building • Plenty of free Parking • Wheelchair accessible • Massage Therapy


REGIONAL CONTACT Ludwig Ratzinger, a chocolatier in Crow Lake, tells Derek Holbeche about the art of making chocolate at Foodsmiths on March 4. Ratzinger’s business, Fine Chocolate by Ludwig, is being featured on an episode of CTV’s Regional Contact. It is scheduled to be aired at 6:30 p.m. on March 26. Kassina Ryder photo

Far Visions gallery

SPRING SWEEP SALE

We are making way for new inventory and are selling artisans’ selected

• Jewellery • Pottery • Silk • Metal Work

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2011 Kia Soul 2U AT

2010 Nissan Cube 1.8SL CVT

2011 Toyota Matrix Base w/Conv pack AT

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2 2 2

Comprehensive 5-year Warranty AM/FM/CD/MP3 Stereo with USB & AUX inputs

PLUS

CASH & PAY SAVINGS

9 9

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2 2

2011 Kia Rondo EX

2012 Mazda Mazda5 GS + AT

2011 Toyota Matrix w/Conv pack AT

2

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175 hp @ 6,000 rpm

157 hp @ 6,000 rpm

132 hp @ 6,000 rpm

2 2 2 2

2 2 2 9

2011 Kia Sorento LX-V6 AWD

2011 Honda CR-V 4x4 EX

2011 Ford Escape 4x4 XLT 3.0L

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Horsepower

276 hp @ 6,300 rpm

180 hp @ 6,800 rpm

240 hp @ 6,550 rpm

Torque

248 lb.ft. @ 5,000 rpm

161 lb.ft. @ 4,400 rpm

223 lb.ft. @ 4,300 rpm

2 2 2

2 2 2

Voice Activated Bluetooth® Steering Wheel Mounted Audio Controls

\

FOR 90 DAYS

‹

HWY: 6.3L/100KM (45 MPG) CITY: 7.7L/100KM (37 MPG)

Heated Front Seats Roof Rails

Soul 4u shown

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2011 KIA RONDO

PASSENGER

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Heated Front Seats

PLUS

CD/MP3 Stereo with USB & AUX

FOR 90 DAYS

PAY

Horsepower

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Bluetooth® Handsfree Connectivity Steering Wheel Mounted Audio and Cruise Controls

HWY: 7.5L/100KM (38 MPG) CITY: 10.6L/100KM (27 MPG)

Rondo EX shown

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2011 KIA SORENTO CASH PURCHASE PRICE FROM

$

19,895 ALL-IN PRICE

NOW GET UP TO

4,100

$

Comprehensive 5-year Warranty

IN CASH SAVINGS

21,679

$

Includes delivery, destination and fees of $1,784.

HWY: 7.4L/100KM (38 MPG) CITY: 10.6L/100KM (27 MPG)

Smart Key with Push Button Start Voice Activated Bluetooth® Rear Parking Sonar

Sorento EX-V6 Luxury shown

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED *5-year/100,000 km worry-free comprehensive warranty *5-year/100,000 km powertrain warranty *5-year/100,000 km extra care roadside assistance *no deductible charge

Visit kia.ca/daretocompare to learn more. Making informed decisions – that’s how we can all drive change.

KIA MEMBER REWARDS Earn points towards future discounts. It’s FREE and it’s incredibly rewarding.

Follow us on

Kia’s new Customer Friendly Pricing includes delivery and destination fees and all mandatory government levies. Prices do not include dealer administration fees ($399 to $699), licensing, PPSA or applicable taxes.

** 0% purchase financing available on all 2011 models on approved credit (OAC). Term varies by model and trim. Financing example based on 2011 Forte Sedan (FO54OB) with a total price of $17,465. 0% financing for 60 months. Cost of borrowing is $0. Delivery and destination fee ($1,455) and other fees ($15) included. License, insurance, applicable taxes, PPSA and registration fees are extra. Retailer may sell for less. See dealer for full details. x“Don’t Pay for 90 Days” on select models (90-day payment deferral) applies to purchase financing offers on 2011 Forte, 2011 Forte Koup, 2011 Forte5, 2011 Rio, 2011 Rio5, 2011 Magentis, 2011 Rondo and 2011 Soul models on approved credit (OAC). No interest will accrue during the first 60 days of the finance contract. After this period interest starts to accrue and the purchaser will repay the principal interest monthly over the term of the contract. ‡Cash purchase price for 2011 Sorento (SR540B) is $21,679 and includes a cash credit of $4,100 and delivery and destination fees of $1,650, OMVIC fee, environmental fee and air tax (where applicable), based on the MSRP of $23,995. \Loan credit (cash savings) for 2011 Soul (SO550B)/2011 Rondo (RN751B) is $500/$1,000 and is available on purchase financing only on approved credit (OAC). Loan credit varies by model and trim. All offers exclude licensing, registration, insurance, PPSA, applicable taxes and variable dealer administration fees (up to $699). Vehicles advertised may include optional accessories or after-sale equipment and may not be exactly as shown. ÇHighway/city fuel consumption for 2011 Soul (SO55OB) is 6.3L (45 MPG)/7.7L (37 MPG); 2011 Rondo (RN751B) is 7.5L (38 MPG)/10.6L (27 MPG); 2011 Sorento (SR540B) is 7.4L (38 MPG)/10.6L (27 MPG). The actual fuel consumption of these vehicles may vary. These estimates are based on the Government of Canada’s approved criteria and testing methods. Refer to the Government of Canada publication EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide. ^2011 Kia Soul/2011 Kia Sorento awarded the Top Safety Pick by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The award is applicable to all 2011 Sorento models manufactured after March 2010. Visit www.iihs.org for full details. °The Bluetooth® word mark and logo are registered trademarks and are owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. Some conditions apply to the $500 Grad Rebate Program and $750 Kia Mobility Program. See dealer for details. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of print. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. Offers end March 31, 2011. KIA is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation. § © 2011 Kia Canada Inc. Reproduction of the contents of this material without the expressed written approval of Kia Canada Inc. is prohibited. All information is believed to be accurate, based on information available at the time of printing. Information sourced from independent third-party research.

25 Dufferin St. at Hwy. 7, PERTH

613-326-0023 Sales & Service

SALES HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9-8 • Fri. 9-6; Sat. 9-4

www.perthkia.ca

KIA

Michael Peters Rob Street General Manager Sales & Leasing

Linda Bernicky Sales & Leasing

HWY. #7

Hydro One 453483

Please give.

0%

select models FOR 90 DAYS on

MP3/USB INPUT

2011 KIA SOUL

^

PAY

ALL 2011 MODELS**

DRUMMOND

Jan Hopkins knows that cancer doesn’t discriminate. And that’s why she’s joining the fight by wearing a daffodil pin this April. “Members of my family have lived with cancer. I’m wearing a daffodil pin to show everyone in Perth living with cancer that they are not alone,” says Hopkins. Every April for Daffodil Month, volunteers in Perth and across Ontario work together to raise funds for the Canadian Cancer Society by selling bright, yellow daffodils and by knocking on doors in their community to collect donations. This April, the society has introduced a new daffodil pin as part of its annual campaign. By making a donation and wearing the yellow daffodil pin, you are uniting behind those living with cancer. The money raised during Daffodil Month helps the society fight back against cancer by funding research to outsmart cancer and empowering, informing, supporting and improving the lives of Canadians living with cancer. “To some, the daffodil is just a flower,” says Leanne Waddell, manager of the Lanark, Leeds and Grenville Canadian Cancer Society. “To us daffodils fight cancer by funding research and clinical trials for better treatments and cures and by supporting community services right here in Perth.” In 2010 the Daffodil Month in Lanark, Leeds and Grenville was an outstanding success and for 2011, the society hopes to raise $253,000. For more information about Daffodil Month, where to get a daffodil pin or to volunteer, please visit fightback.ca or call your local Canadian Cancer Society at 613-267-1058 or 1-800-367-2913.

www.yogaconnectionperth.org

FINANCING ON

ALL VEHICLES INCLUDE:

Perth unites behind those with cancer

how the benefits of yoga can impact your life

Got a story idea? E-mail your suggestions to editor@perthcourier.com.

25 Church St., WESTPORT

using proper technique. This year, competitors built dartboard cabinets. Ben Garvock (Grade 11) also competed in Cabinet Making, with a very strong finish.

visit our website to get a fee copy of our special report:

Introduce a friend to The yoga connection and you both receive $10 off the session price. oFFER VALID april 4-18, 2011

Come enjoy our spring savings!!

BRYANT

to reserve a place call 613-267-7148 10 week sessions begin: April 4, 2011

SPRING special!

Starting Sat., March 19 thru to March 31

456758

On Wednesday, March 2, students from Perth and District Collegiate Institute competed in the Eastern Ontario Secondary School Skills Competition at St. Lawrence College in Kingston. School boards from across eastern Ontario registered students to participate in the competition to showcase their talents in the various technical trades. A first-time participant, Grade 12 student Conner Bully, finished second in the Auto Service Technology category. This was a timed contest, in which students troubleshoot, diagnose and repair various vehicle systems. This competition provided an excellent opportunity for students in automotive programs to test their knowledge and skills of the subject area. Kenny Beach, also a Grade 12 student, finished second in Small Powered Equipment. This competition involved dismantling a small engine, measuring all components and reassembling and starting the engine in a timely manner. PDCI first-time participant Kirt Gaylord, a Grade 11 student, competed in the Welding category with a very strong finish. Ryan Harvey (Grade 12) finished third in the Cabinet Making category. This challenge had students build a small cabinet with powered hand tools

Yoga classes in perth brooke valley smiths falls

454604

PDCI showcases its skills

lengthen, strengthen, open your body

452006-12-11

Page 10 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011


March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 11

LOOK ONLINE @ yourottawaregion.com

Call Email

613.267.1100 classifieds@yourottawaregion.com

DEADLINE: MONDAY AT 12 NOON.

COMMERCIAL SPACE

NEED AN OFFICE? $300/month all inclusive. Lots of parking, newly renovated. Call now, 613-264-0302 or 613-341-1934.

AVAILABLE March 1. One bedroom, 2nd floor downtown apartment. Fridge, stove and heat included. $600/ month. No laundry, parking or yard. 613267-6315.

ottawa region

HOUSES FOR SALE

CARSSRIDGE APTS, LARGE 3 bedroom, Ground Floor, $1090/ month available April 1st. In quiet, adult only security building with laundry. Heat, hydro and cable included. 613-283-9650.

Hillside Apartments: Bachelor, 1 and 2 bedrooms. Secure adult only building. Park-like setting. Smoke and pet free. Starting at $700/ month. Call 613-2592076. Large 1 bedroom apartment. Downtown Perth. Newly renovated. Fridge, stove, coin laundry. $625 plus hydro. No pets, non-smoking. Quiet building. Available April 1. References. 613-2640464.

IF YOU WANT TO QUIT drinking and need help, call Alcoholics Anonymous. 613284-2696. IS YOUR OBSESSION with food ruining your life? We can help. Overeaters Anonymous, meetings every Wednesday, 7 p.m. Perth Baptist Church, D’Arcy St., back door. Info Aprile, 613-259-5536. LIVING WITH OR NEAR a drinking problem? Contact Al-Anon or Al-Ateen. 613-2674848 or 613-267-6039.

LOST & FOUND PICTURES, PICTURES, PICTURES! If you have left a photograph with us within the past year and have not yet picked it up, please do so. The Perth Courier, 39 Gore St. E., Perth.

One bedroom coach house apartment. Ground floor, fenced patio, parking, laundry, shed, wood pellet and/or electric heat. High-speed Internet available. Balderson. Suitable for retired. $750 plus utilities. References. H. van Pelt, 613-267-9509.

R E Q U E S T: C e ra m i c floor tiles, any size, colour or quantity. Will pick up. 613-2782868.

PERTH: 2 bedroom apartment in clean, quiet, security building. Fridge, stove, balcony and closet space. Parking and laundry on premise. Available now. $725/month plus hydro. No dogs. 613349-9377.

WORLD CLASS DRUMMER (of Five Man Electrical Band) is now accepting students. Private lessons, limited enrollment, free consultation. Call Steve, 613831-5029.www.stevehollingworth.ca

PERTH: Large two bedroom apartment. Great location. Fridge, stove, heat, hydro, hot water and parking included. $885/month. Available May 1. Please call 613-264-0002. PERTH: One bedroom, second floor walkup apartment. Close to downtown. Fridge, stove, heat, hot water and parking included. $575/month. Available May 1. Please call 613-264-0002. PERTH: 10 Craig St. 2 bedroom apartment in quiet, clean, adult building. Fridge, stove, parking and laundry included. $756/month plus utilities. Available immediately. 613-2835996. PERTH: 2 bedroom apartment $735.00, parking included. Freshly painted. Non-smoking applicant only. No pets. First and last required. Available Immediately. 613267-6980. SHAMROCK APARTMENTS. 1 bedroom apartment. Includes heat. Available now. $610/month. 613-2648380. SMITHS FALLS, Toulon Place, 2 bedroom apartment $820 available April 1st. Heat & hydro included. Attractive clean, quiet, security building by County Fair Mall, laundry facilities, livein superintendent. 613-283-9650. Two large 2 bedroom apartments. Downtown Perth. Fridge, stove, water included. Coin laundry. Non-smoking. No dogs. Quiet building. $650 and $735, April/May. 613-2640464.

REUSE/RECYCLE

MUSIC, DANCE INSTRUCTIONS

CHILD CARE WANTED

BABYSITTER WANTED. Reliable, caring individual required for occasional evening and weekend babysitting of one toddler. Must have experience changing diapers and be task oriented. Playful attitude would be an asset. Please call Stacey or Desmond at 613-2834207.

LEARN TO GROW Star Fleet Trucking YOUR OWN FOOD! HIRING! DRIVERS, Looking for an energet- FARMERS, RANCHERS ic person committed to & RETIREES needed gardening. Full season with 3/4 Ton or 1-ton internship, germination pickup trucks to deliver to harvesting. Share pro- new travel trailers fifth duce and plants. Flex- wheels from US manuible hours. Own trans- facturers to dealers portation (10km from throughout Canada. SEND A LOAD to the Perth). js@ripnet.com Free IRP plate for your dump, cheap. Clean up truck and low insurance clutter, garage sale leftrates! Pref. commercial overs or leaf and yard LOOKING FOR Lic. or 3 yrs towing waste. 613-256-4613. good reliable help exp. Top pay! Call wanted, deck and Craig 1-877-890-4523 WILL PICK UP & RE- fence builders, seriMOVE any unwanted ous inquiries only. www.starfleettruck cars, trucks, boats, Fax resume to ing.com snowmobiles, lawn- 836 3571 or call START Immediately. tractors, snowblowers, 831 5066 Stair Manufacturer reetc. Cash paid for some. quires shop help. PosiPeter, All Purpose Tow& tions available for asing. 613-797-2315, MECHANICS 613-560-9042. www. ELECTRICIANS: Pro- semblers, finishers, and con Equipment is cur- general shop help. allpurpose.4-you.ca rently looking for full Carpentry skill an asset, time permanent Jour- but will train. Must HOME have own transportaIMPROVEMENTS neyman Heavy Duty Mechanics and Jour- tion and be physically neyman Electricians for fit. Fax or email resume SAVE UP TO $800 on our Nisku, Alberta fa- to 613-838-2143 or a new high efficiency cility. Must have certifi- info@stairshop.com furnace and air condi- cation. Preference will tioning bundle from Di- be given to any with unTake the super rect Energy. Call 1-866- derground experience. Highway to 917-8630 before April Excellent work atmosEmployment. 30th. Terms apply. phere and benefits. Trucking, General Work schedule is 4 Labour, Heavy weeks on, 2 weeks off. Equipment HANDYPERSON Will also consider reloOperator jobs. cation or qualified indiGet plugged in. viduals to Edmonton How to register: email: Interior renovations, area from within Cana- n w t t l t d @ p r i m u s . c a drywall, painting, tiling, da. Please fax resume Current listings: greater kitchens, bath, flooring, to 780-955-2411. Ottawa areas - 420 dump runs and small trucking, 152 labour moves. Serving Perth & NEEDED NOW-AZ and heavy equipment area for over 15 years. DRIVERS & OWNER positions. Canada 613-264-8143. OPS - We seek profes- wide, choose presional safety-minded ferred city, province, drivers to join a leading territory, area. PUBLIC NOTICE int’l carrier with finanSponsored by North cial stability; competi- West Transport, Heavy tive pay and benefits; Equipment Training #1 IN PARDONS Re- great lanes; quality Ltd. Visit us at freight; on dry vans onmove Your Criminal Recwww.nwtt.ca -Tel.: ly. Brand new trucks ord! Get started TO613-225-3055 DAY for ONLY $49.95/ available. Lease promo. Limited Time Offer. gram Available. Call CeFASTEST, GUARANTEED ladon Canada, KitchPardon In Canada. ener. 1-800-332-0518 FREE Consultation Toll- www.celadoncanada. free:1-866-416-6772. com www.ExpressPardons.com OTTAWA’S Largest **PLEASE BE AD- Lawn and Property VISED** There are Maintenance Company NO refunds on Classi- pays $120-$360 DAIfor outdoor fied Advertising, how- LY ever we are happy to Spring/Summer work. Hiring honest, competioffer a credit for future Classified Ads, valid for tive, and energetic indi1 year, under certain viduals to fill our various 2011 positions. circumstances. Apply online @ www. PERTH THEATRE PRO- SpringMastersJobs.com JECT (Studio Theatre) Annual General Meet- Woman to look after ing. Meeting to be held elderly lady, Monday, at the Studio Theatre, Tuesday and Wednes63 Gore St. E., 7 day each week. No p.m., Tuesday, April 12. cleaning. Good daily salary. 613-267-5395. WSIB free case assessment. NO UP FRONT FEE for FILE REPRESENCOMING EVENTS TATION. Over $100 Million in settlements. Call toll free 1-888747-6474, Quote # 123

ARE YOU TIRED OF BEING ALONE? Misty River Introductions can find you someone to share your life with. Ontario’s traditional matchmaker. 613257-3531. www.misty riverintros.com (no computer required)

Homestyle Wedding Ceremonies. Choose your location and have a meaningful, relationship-based ceremony designed just for you. Judie Diamond, 613375-6772, judiedia mond@gmail.com, FREE YOURSELF FROM www.judiediamond.ca DEBT, MONEY FOR ANY PURPOSE! DEBT HELP WANTED CONSOLIDATION. 1st, 2nd, and 3rd mortgages, credit lines and loans FULL TIME up to 90% LTV. Self emSEASONAL ployed, mortgage or LANDSCAPE tax arrears. DON’T LABOURERS PAY FOR 1YR PROGRAM! #10171 ON- required for up-coming Must have TARIO-WIDE FINAN- season. CIAL CORP. CALL 1- transportation to Vil888-307-7799. www. lage of Richmond. ontario-widefinancial. Please call 613-838com 4066 or email resume to: harmonygardens@ Mortgage Solutions sympatico.ca Purchases, Consolidations, Construction Lower than bank posted FULL TIME DRIVER and rates (OAC). On site full-time cook wanted. Apprivate funds for credit ply at Lanark Pizzeria issues, discharged bank- or call 613-259-5555. rupts and BFS without PAID IN ADVANCE! proven income. Make $1000 Weekly Chase Financial Mailing Brochures from 613-384-1301 home. 100% Legit! InChase Financial o/b come is guaranteed! 835289 OntarioInc. No experience required. Brokerage Enroll Today! www.na License #10876 tional-work.com $$MONEY$$ Consolidate Debts Mortgages to 95% No income, Bad credit OK! Better Option Mortgage #10969 1-800-2821169 www.mortgageontario.com

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

CL22566

Nothing to do but move in and enjoy the peace and tranquility. Custom (Quality) Built in 2009 with your family in mind. One acre lot for the kids to play in. Dead end road, NO traffic. Minutes from the town of Renfrew and the Ottawa River. 45 Minutes to Kanata. 3+1 Bedroom, 1 ½ Baths. Beautiful custom cabinets, with corion counters. Large back deck looking into a very private Back yard. Established perennial beds, cement walkways at back and interlock walkway at the front with a charming front porch swing. Finished basement with wet bar, rec room, mud room and cold storage. Call 613-432-3714 for more info or visit www.propertysold.ca/6472 and view the other pictures.

FOR RENT

New Rogers Road affordable housing apartment building. 1 bedroom apartments for qualifying household income level. This is a non-smoking building.

Maple Spring Season

• I can read my newspaper while standing, while eating, while riding a bus. • I can give my newspaper to someone else when I am done. • My newspaper’s battery never dies. • I can recycle my newspaper at the curb.

Open Daily: 9am - 4pm Maple Run Studio Tour: Mar 26 & 27 Seniors Music Days: April 5, 13, 20 & 21 (11 am - 1:30 pm) Near Pakenham www.fultons.ca

• If I drop my newspaper, it doesn’t break.

613-256-3867

VACATION PROPERTIES

PLANNING A TRIP TO FLORIDA? Search from 100s of Florida’s top vacation rentals. All Regions of Florida from 2- to 8-bdrm homes. Condos, Villas, Pool Homes - we have them all!

Rates starting as low as $89/night On your next Florida Vacation do not be satisfied with a hotel room when you can rent your own private Vacation home! S US SIIT TU V T VIIS A W T NO OW A N

For more information, please call McLean Associates Property Management at

613-264-0002.

CL23055

Move in to Your Dream Home Before Spring!!

Fulton’s Pancake House

INCOME TAX

MORTGAGES & LOANS

COMING EVENTS

CERTIFIED MASON 10 yrs. exp., Chimney Repair & Restoration, cultured stone, parging, repointing. Brick, block & stone. Small/big job specialist. Free estimates. Work guaranteed. 613-250-0290.

PERSONALS

PERSONAL TAX PREPARATION. $30.00. Over 40 years experience. Valerie Kerr, 613267-6708.

HELP WANTED

CL23693

HEALTH

AVAILABLE MAY 1ST, & HOMECARE 2 bedroom apartment with balcony. Heat, water and parking includ- FATHERS’ SUPPORT ed. Seniors welcome. and information line, F.A.R.E. 613-264-8143 613-267-4189

HELP WANTED

The best place to start planning your Florida Get-Away!

CLASSIFIEDS ... in print & online FOR ONE LOW PRICE! yourclassifieds.ca|PH: 1.877.298.8288|FAX: 613.224.2265 classifieds@yourottawaregion.com

CL13935

2 bedroom apartment. $830/month, includes and hydro. GOLDEN DOODLE & heat Labradoodle pups ready Available April 1. 613to go, Shawville $450, 264-8380. vet checked, first needles and dewormed 2 bedroom apartment. 613-223-5015 Located on Cockburn St., Perth. $750/month. PUREBRED Rottweiller Water, fridge and stove puppies. Parents on- included. Laundry onsite. First shots, tails and site. Call 613-267dew claws done. $600. 6115. Call 613-257-2869. 2 BEDROOM UPSTAIRS apt downtown VEHICLES Arnprior. Washer and dryer in unit, secure building with intercom, parking spot, heat and R. THOMSON hydro extra, $750 Automotive month, first and last Sales & Service 613-302-1669. Toyota’s and Domestic Vehicles 3 bedroom apartment. E-Tested and Downtown. Apply at Certified 613-267-3170, Judy. Financing OAC 613-267-7484 ASHLEY CHASE. 91 Drummond St. Fine adult apartWest ments overlooking Perth, Ontario the Tay River near downtown Perth. One and two bedrooms, HUNTING some with breakfast nook and 2 bathrooms, air conditionHUNTER SAFETY CA- ing, whirlpool, party NADIAN FIREARMS room, library, eleCOURSE at Carp vator. 613-267April 15th, 16th, 17th. 6980. Wenda Cochran 613256-2409 Available March 1. 1 HUNTER SAFETY Cana- bedroom, 2nd floor, dian Firearms Course. downtown apartment. Courses and exams Includes fridge, stove, held throughout the heat and hot water. year. Free course if $600. you organize a group, Available April 1. exams available. Wen- Small 1 bedroom da Cochran, 613-256- apartment. Includes fridge, stove, hot water, 2409. yard and parking. Central location. $400 plus HOUSES heat and hydro. FOR SALE Available April 1: Large 2 bedroom, 2nd floor apartment. InTIMESHARE cludes fridge, stove, hot CANCEL. CANCEL Your Time- water, yard and parkshare Contract NOW!! ing. $600 plus heat 100% Money Back and hydro. Guarantee. STOP Mort- Available April 1: 1 gage & Maintenance bedroom apartment. InPayments Today. 1- cludes fridge, stove, 888-816-7128, X-6868 fireplace, yard and or 702-527-6868. parking. $600 plus heat and hydro. 613267-6315. INDUSTRIAL

“SNOWBIRD SPECIAL” April-August, Room and run of the house. In Perth, close to lakes. Heritage. $400, all facilities, Internet. 613456-6033.

SERVICES

BECAUSE YOUR BUSINESS IS OUR BUSINESS

PETS

Available May 1. 2 bedroom apartment. Clean. Fridge and stove included. $700/month plus utilities. References, first and last required. No smoking. Now showing. 613-283-8278.

ROOM FOR RENT

CL23388

3 bedroom bungalow. $1,110/month, hydro and utilities not included. Washer, dryer, stove and fridge. Available June 1. Close to school and grocery FREE CATALOGUE 1- store. 613-466-0546. 800-353-7864 HALFORD’S-butcher equipAPARTMENTS ment and supplies, FOR RENT leather, beads, craft kits, animal control equipment + trapping 1 bedroom apartment supplies. Order from located downtown Perth. our new web store and $650/month, utilities, get free shipping until fridge and stove inAugust 31, 2011. cluded. Call 613-267www.halfordsmailorder. 6115. com. 1 bedroom apartment, HARMONICAS, NEW: 3rd floor. Quiet seSeydel-Lee Oskar-Blues. cured building, downCoin collection, Cana- town Perth. Heat, wadian type set, Cana- ter, fridge and stove indian pennies. Call 613- cluded. $600/month. 267-1508. References required. 613-267-4844, 10 a.m. HOT TUB (Spa) Cov- - 5 p.m. ers. Best Price, Best Quality. All Shapes & 1 bedroom apt. Newly Colours Available. Call renovated. Centrally lo1 - 8 6 6 - 6 5 2 - 6 8 3 7 cated. Quiet secure www.thecoverguy.ca building. Fridge, stove and water supplied. SCOOTER SPECIAL $600/month. No smok25% Off Select Models ing, no pets. Available Buy/sell Stair lifts, April 1. 613-267-2687. Porch lifts, Scooters, Bath lifts, Hospital beds etc. Call SILVER CROSS 1 bedroom spacious renovated apartment 613-231-3549. overlooking Tay Basin WHITE CEDAR LUM- on Gore Street. $675/ BER, Decking, fencing, month plus hydro. Ron, all dimensions, rough 613-808-5430. or dressed. Timbers and V-joints also avail- 2 bedroom apartment, able. Call Tom at recently renovated. McCann’s Forest Prod- Available immediately. ucts 613-628-6199 or Large yard. $750/ month plus heat 613-633-3911. and hydro. 613-2648143. *HOT TUB (SPA) Covers – Best Price. Best quality. All shapes and colours. Call 1-866585-0056. www.the coverguy.ca

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

HOUSES FOR RENT

ARTICLES 4 SALE


Page 12 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

LOOK ONLINE @ yourottawaregion.com

Call Email

613.267.1100 classifieds@yourottawaregion.com

DEADLINE: MONDAY AT 12 NOON. BIRTHDAYS

BIRTHDAYS

ANNIVERSARIES

CARDS OF THANKS

DEATHS

Collins

CARD OF THANKS The family of the late Doris E. Cameron would like to thank their neighbours, friends and family who dropped off food, called, sent flowers, cards and made donations. Many thanks to the pallbearers and Blair & Son Funeral Home.

Research saves lives.

Happy 4th Birthday

Marjorie Chatterton

CONGRATULATIONS MOM & DAD

Love, All Your Children, Family and Friends

MARCH 30, 2011

Love, Craig & Carol Anne Sandy, Debbie & Mackenzie

CL23920

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MOM!!

Happy Birthday with love, Mommy, Daddy, Abby & Ivey XOXOXOXO

Please give.

Ethelyne & John McInnes on your Golden Wedding Anniversary

90TH BIRTHDAY

CL23914

CL23757

March 27, 2011 It is exciting to see all that you can do, from soccer to t-ball to skating to gymnastics to swimming and yes, even four-wheeling too! You bring us joy and lots of fun. We will always love our birthday boy because you are truly number one.

CL23731

Evan Blackburn

Lucille Collins Peacefully, with her family by her side at Almonte Country Haven on Saturday, March 19, 2011 Lucille Virginia (Verner) Collins (long time staff member, Grace Hospital, Ottawa) at the age of 79 years. Beloved wife of H. Bruce Collins. Loved mother of Virginia (Roger Pinon) Fuller, Don (Karen) Fuller, James (Christine Graham), Tracy (Dan) Nixon, Kelly (Dean) Lanzo, Dave (Joan) Collins, Carol (Dave) McNabb, Jim Collins and Myrna McNabb. She will be sadly missed by numerous grand children and 1 great granddaughter. She was predeceased by her brothers Jim and Jack Verner. Friends may pay their respects at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, 15 Gore St. W. Perth on Wednesday, March 23, from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Funeral service will be held in the Chapel at 10 a.m. followed by a reception in the Blair & Son Family Centre. In remembrance, contributions to the Alzheimer Society of Lanark County. Lucille’s family wish to thank all the staff at Almonte Country Haven for their care and compassion during her stay.

DEATHS IN MEMORIAM

JOB POSTING Job Title:

Freelance reporter/ photographers

Number of Positions: Several Department: Editorial Department Location: Ottawa Do you have a flair for writing? Do you have a passion for news and features and capturing the essence of every story? Are you detail-oriented, with superior written and verbal communication skills? Metroland Media is seeking reporter/photographers for occasional freelance assignments in downtown and South Ottawa, Barrhaven, Nepean, Kanata, Stittsville, Kemptville, Perth, Renfrew, Smiths Falls, Carleton Place, Arnprior, West Carleton and surrounding areas.

Suzanne Landis Managing Editor Email: suzanne.landis@metroland.com

Can We Talk? Are you a self starter who likes to meet people? Do you love everything about living in Smiths Falls? If this sounds like you then we’d like to talk to you. Smiths Falls This Week has an immediate opening for an advertising consultant working out of our Smiths Falls office. This position offers excellent earning potential and the opportunity for advancement with one of the most dynamic media companies in Canada. Interested candidates can email a resume with cover letter by April 1, 2011 to Paul Burton at: paul.burton@metroland.com

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Interested candidates should submit their resume along with writing samples and clippings by April 15, 2011 to:

GREER: In loving memory of our dear son, Howard (Howie), who passed away March 27, 2010. Little did we know that morning God was going to call your name In life we loved you dearly In death we do the same It broke our hearts to lose you But you did not go alone For part of us went with you The day God called you Home You left us peaceful memories Your love is still our guide And though we cannot see you You are always by our side Our family chain is broken And nothing seems the same But as God calls us one by one The chain will link again. Loving you always, Dad, Mom, Jeff & Patti

IN MEMORIAM

IN MEMORIAM

Buchanan

GEMMILL, Laura: In loving memory of Laura Gemmill who passed away March 19, 1976. Mother, It’s been 35 years since you were here, When we think of you we shed a tear, For the good times shared throughout the years, In our hearts we’ll always hold you dear. Remembered always by Theresa, Joe and Families

Jean Isobel Buchanan (nee Armour)

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September 1, 1918 - March 18, 2011 With great sadness we announce the passing of Jean in her 93rd year in hospital, Smiths Falls. Jean was married to the late Clifford Wellington Buchanan and is survived by her children Gerald Wellington (Cecilia Scully) Buchanan of Ottawa, Bette Jean (Brent) Tysick of Ottawa, and Dean Ivan (Patty Bradshaw) Buchanan of Smiths Falls, grandchildren Sean Wellington (Vanessa Jones) Buchanan of Ottawa, Lisa Jean Buchanan of Toronto, Amy Jean (Steven) Blair of Smiths Falls, Ann Marie (Brett) Richardson of South Mountain, Ian Charles (Christie Guenther) Tysick of Freelton, and Breanne Marie Buchanan of Ottawa, and great-grandchildren Brittany, Clarissa, Steffanie and Hilliary Blair, Owen and Frannie Mae Richardson, Sophie and Sydney Tysick, and Fiona Buchanan, as well as many nephews and nieces. Jean was born at Drummond Centre to her late parents Robert Armour and Mary Elizabeth Thompson. Predeceased by her siblings John Samuel, Robert Gordon, Francis McKinley Armour, Muriel Elizabeth (William) Rathwell and Margaret Kathleen Armour. Jean was a resident of Smiths Falls for seventy years, involved with the Presbyterian Church, the Girl Guides and Chimes Rebecca Lodge acting as Grand Nobel, Chaplin and Secretary. Jean was an avid seamstress producing unique and fancy drapes and curtains for many homes and buildings in the region. Friends may pay their respects at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, 112 Beckwith St. N., Smiths Falls, on Thursday, March 24 from 6 to 9 p.m. and again at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, 15 Gore St. W., Perth on Friday, March 25 from 9:30 a.m. until Service in the chapel at 11 a.m. Interment, Elmwood Cemetery, Perth. In remembrance, contributions to the C.N.I.B. or the Smiths Falls Community Hospital would be appreciated.

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Time changes many things but love & memory ever clings.

WHITE, Loretta: In loving memory of a dear wife, mother and grandmother who passed away March 19, 2010. Though her smile is gone forever, And her hand I cannot touch. Still I have so many memories, Of the one I loved so much. Forever loved and sadly missed, Stanley

Many a lonely heartache, Often a silent tear, But always a beautiful memory, Of one whom we loved so dear. Forever in our hearts, Gordon, Debbie HART, GERALD: 15 and Chrissy, years since your pass- Trisha and Steve ing March 21, 1996. Allan and Cory Your presence we miss Your memory we treasure Loving you always Forgetting you never. Forever missed and loved by, Daughter Dale, granddaughters Tanya and Rhonda, great-grandchildren Skyler, Zach and Oliver.

LARMON, EARL WILLIAM (BILL)

WHITE, Loretta: In remembrance of a mother and grandmother who passed away March 19, 2010. Years of striving, little of play, Loving, giving, the whole of the way, A cherished smile, a heart of gold, To the dearest mother a world could hold. Happy memories, fond and true, From us who thought the world of you. Always loved, sadly missed, Rick and Judy Emily and Alexandra

Peacefully, on Friday, March 18, 2011 at the Trenton Hospital with his family by his side in his 73 year. Dear son of the late Russell and Nina (nee Greary) Larmon. Predeceased by his first wife Marie. Left to mourn his loss is his wife and best friend Sue Ballea of Trenton, his sons Ricky and Pat and Mark Larmon and daughter Shannon and the late Bill and Shelley Larmon. Grandfather of Beau, Kurt, Ben, Cameron. There will be a celebration of Bill’s life on March 26, 1-4p.m. at the Royal Canadian Legion, Trenton, across from the City Hall. Everyone is welcome to honour Bill’s life. Refreshments will be served. This was Bill’s wish that everyone would get together with family and friends and friend of Bill Hunter family. He loved to fish and play cards. Hope to see you all there. Sue and all his family. For more info call 613-267-5428.

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March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 13

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DEATHS

DEATHS

Community bulletin board To advertise a non-profit community event, email events@ perthcourier.com and we would be happy to include it in the Community Bulletin Board as space allows.

Friday, March 25

Joan Elizabeth Carter, RN

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In loving memory of Joan Elizabeth (Kennedy) Carter of Perth, Ontario, formerly of Halifax, N.S., who passed away in hospital in Perth on Wednesday, March 16, 2011. Joan was born in Great Village, N.S. on May 7, 1942 and lived there until training as a nurse at the Victoria General Hospital in Halifax, graduating with the class of ‘63A. She worked in Halifax for several years before going to work in London, ON. Joan was diagnosed with MS in the ’70s and moved back to Halifax shortly thereafter. She continued to work as a nurse, mainly on the neo-natal ward at the Izaak Walton Killam Hospital for Children, and later established the Enterostomal Therapy position, which is for the care of open wounds in babies. Joan met her husband, James Melvin Carter, also an MS patient, and they were married on March 5, 2001 in Perth. Jim passed away in August 2010. Joan was a lover of music, and while in Halifax was in the choir of Rockingham United Church. She was an avid reader and was also a writer herself, writing Tears, Trials and Triumphs: A history of the VG School of Nursing, as well as an article for the NS Historical Review entitled Jane Soley Hamilton, Midwife. She was also the editor of the VG Nurses Alumni magazine for many years. Joan was predeceased by her husband Jim, as well as her parents, John Medford Kennedy in 1962 and Bernice (Roop) Kennedy in 2004. She is survived by sisters Ella Kennedy of Toronto, Ont. and Barbara Kennedy of Kentville, N.S. and several cousins. Friends paid their respects at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, Perth where the service was held in the Chapel on Sunday, March 20 at 1:30 p.m. followed by a reception in the Blair & Son Family Centre. In remembrance, contributions to the Multiple Sclerosis Society would be appreciated.

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SMYTH, WILLIAM CHARLES (BILL)

On March 11, 2011 after a courageous battle with cancer, Bill passed away in his 68th year, peacefully at his home in Barrie, surrounded by his loving family. Bill was caring husband to Dianna Rose Smyth (Romanski) for 45 years and the loving father of two sons and their wives; Dr. William-Lee and Gina Smyth of Parry Sound and Steve and Jackie Smyth of Barrie. Bill was affectionately known as “Papa” to five grandsons, Reggie, Raymond, Ryan, Turner and Rudy and one granddaughter Rheannon. Bill was born in Toronto on April 2, 1943 and moved to Barrie in 1975 to raise his family in a smaller community. Ever giving of himself, Bill was actively involved with his family, coaching children’s hockey and served his community for a number of years as director or Telecare Barrie. Bill touched many lives personally and professionally having worked in the industrial lighting industry for 40+ years. He is well revered for his kind and generous heart and for his sense of humour. Bill will be sorely missed by his loved ones, colleagues and customers. Friends were received at the SteckleyGodderham Funeral Home, Barrie and the Inniswood Baptist Church, Barrie where a memorial service was held on March 15, 2011. Donations in memory of Bill can be made to Inniswood Baptist Church, 460 Yonge, St. Barrie, Ontario.

Newton

Lillian May Newton (Hannah) (Herns)

Peacefully at Lanark Lodge, Perth on Friday, March 18, 2011. Predeceased by her first husband Leo Herns and second husband Wilf Newton. Loved mother of Carmen (Diane), Norman (Diane), Richard and Leona Herns and the late Benson (late Carolyn), Harold and Roseanne Herns. Dear sister of Jim (Elenor), Art (Zelda), Cecil (Edith), George (Annette), Alan (Jean), Ken (Alma) and Keith (Mona) Hannah, Florence (Gordon) Clark, Dorothy (Clinton) Kehoe, Carrie (Kenneth) Young and Muriel (Henry) Henwood. Cherished grandmother of Brian Herns, Donna (Herns) Short, Michael Herns, Cindy Herns, Wendy (Herns) Karsay, Steven Herns and Benj Herns and Jamie (Herns) McIvor. She will be remembered by her daughter-in-law Sherry McIver, all her family and friends. Friends may pay their respects at the Blair & Son Funeral Home, 15 Gore St. W. Perth on Sunday, March 27 from 1 to 4 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Monday, March 28 at 10:30 a.m. Interment, Bolingbroke Cemetery. In remembrance, contributions to the Memorial Fund of Lanark Lodge or Alzheimer Society of Lanark County would be appreciated.

blair & son funeral home

Condolences to: www.blairandson.com

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Saturday, March 26 • The Royal Canadian Legion Branch 395 in Lanark is hosting a “Wild Game” dinner at 5 p.m. Enjoy many varieties of wild game prepared in several different recipes. There is something for everyone. • Introductory sessions of Niaa new, dynamic form of fitness and dance, will be held at the ABC Hall in Bolingbroke from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Nia is fun and adaptable to every skill level, age and body type. Although classes are usually taken barefoot, you may wear a non-slip soft shoe or slipper and if you wish, bring along a yoga mat. The introductory special price is $30 (four classes for the price of three), and the drop-in price is $10. Call 613-592-8358 (weekdays), or 613-273-7676 (weekends), or email barb@icoachwellness. com. • The Rideau Trail Association is holding a Winter Weekend End-To-End, departing at 8:30 a.m. Call Bill Murdoch at 613-7674858 for information. • The First Baptist Church on D’Arcy Street will host a community dinner from 4:30 to 6 p.m. • The Snow Road Snowmobile Club is hosting a fundraiser breakfast at 1106 Gemmills Rd. It is also hosting a Bingo fundraiser, with a light supper from 4:30 to 6 p.m. • A pancake breakfast will be held at St. John’s Anglican Church (Hwy. 7, east of Innisville) from 8 to 11 a.m. The cost is $6 per adult and $20 per family. Children under five are free.

Saturday, April 2

• A pancake breakfast will be held at St. John’s Anglican Church (Hwy. 7, east of Innisville) from 8 to 11 a.m. The cost is $6 per adult and $20 per family. Children under five are free. • A Homeless Mothers and Children Benefit Dance will be held at the Perth-Upon-Tay branch of the Royal Canadian Legion from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. Money raised will help some of Sunday, March 27 those left homeless after a fire • The March Jamboree will destroyed a housing complex on

Tuesday, April 12 • John Morrison, the Ontario Command Service Bureau officer, will visit the Perth-Upon-Tay Legion Branch 244. Appointments start at 8 a.m. and are available to all veterans, not just Legion members. For more information about disability pensions, war veterans’ and widows’ pensions and allowances, or to make an appointment, please call Bill McKenzie at 613-267-4448.

1 2 3 4

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Carter

• The Snow Road Snowmobile Club is holding a club meeting at 1106 Gemmills Rd. All are welcome. • The Lanark and District Civitan Club is hosting an Old Tyme Talent Night with dinner beginning at 6 p.m. Dancing will begin at 7 and will end at 11 p.m. The cost is $12 per person and entertainers are free.

the Upper Scotch Line on Feb. 18. Tickets are $10 and are available at the door, or call the Colonial House Motor Inn. • The Perth-Upon-Tay branch of the Royal Canadian Legion is hosting euchre in the legion lounge at 1 p.m. Call Dennis Hoile at 613-264-0944. • The Rideau Trail Association is holding a hike at Wheelers Pancake House and Sugar Shack at 9 a.m. The hike is a level-one five- or 10-kilometre hike and lunch will be held at the pancake house. For more information, call Josie Roberts at 613-267-3769 Wednesday, March 30 • The Rosewood Studio School or Alina MacFarlane at 613-267of Fine Woodworking presents 4713. an evening slide presentation and talk by furniture maker, Sunday, April 3 teacher and author Garrett Hack. • The Westport United Church Hack is a contributing editor at is presenting a Land for Life Fine Woodworking magazine, Concert in aid of the Land For author of The Handplane Book Life house-building project in and Classic Hand Tools, and Tanzania. The concert will feature one of today’s most recognized Freeman and Foster, the Foley woodworking instructors, teach- Mountain Sanctified Singers ing across the United States, and quartets from the Thousand Canada and around the world. Island Chorus. Gidget Kaert will The presentation will start at 7 give a presentation on her recent p.m. at the school, located in the work in Tanzania. The concert Perkins Building at 2 Wilson St. will begin at 7 p.m. and light W. in Perth. Admission is free, refreshments will be served. Freebut your contribution to the Perth will donations are requested. Call and District Food Bank would be Marilyn Moore at 613-273-6785 for greatly appreciated. Call 613-264- more information. 9900 for more information. • The PEP Group monthly lunch Saturday, April 9 will be held at 12:30 p.m. at the • A breakfast to support Relay First Baptist Church at 1 D’Arcy St. Doug Bert and Stephanie for Life will be held at the Snow Smart will give a presentation Road Snowmobile Club. about Dignity House Hospice at Sunday, April 10 1:30 p.m. Please reserve by March 28. Call 613-267-2023. • The Rideau Trail Association is hosting a level-one, fivekilometre family hike at MurThursday, March 31 phys Point Provincial Park. • “The Farm Show” will be Participants are asked to meet presented at the Merrickville at the Lally Homestead at 10 Community Centre on March 31 a.m. Enjoy a walk through and April 1 and 2 at 8 p.m. and the park followed by treats at on April 3 at 2 p.m. For ticket the homestead. Call Margaret information, call Kym at 613-269Lafrance at 613-264-0057 or Pat 3424. Batchelor at 613-264-1559. take place at the Lions Club Hall at the corner of Halton and Arthur streets at 2 p.m. Volunteer musicians will provide an afternoon of music and dancing. The cost is $12 and includes a home-cooked buffet meal. Call Nelda Wark at 613-264-9030. • The Rideau Trail Association is holding a level-one, 14kilometre hike from Glen Tay to Maberly. Participants are asked to meet at 9 a.m. Call Dave or Pat Batchelor at 613-264-1559 for more information.

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Page 14 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

Tickets for Perth’s Black Tie Bingo event nearly sold out care by allowing health-care providers to stay with the patient for longer periods of time, to perform charting normally done at the central desk. The first, of what is expected to be an annual event, kicks off at 5:30 p.m., at Code’s Mill, with a reception, followed by a live auction, a fantastic dinner and six games of bingo. Each game will offer a different themed prize that grows in value as the night goes on. There is a great prize list for the live auction as well. The value of the prizes starts at $400 and increases to several thousand dollars by the end of the evening. “All of the bingo games, except the first, have multiple prizes that are grouped by theme,” said Gord Cowie, foundation director

and event co-chair. A complete list of bingo prizes is on the foundation website at www.gwmfoundation.com. “Those who are attending are in for a great night of entertainment and prizes,” Hallam said. “It’s a chance for people to get dressed up, in formal wear or business attire, and have a fun time.” “A jazz quartet will play during the reception and dinner, and Code’s Mill will be decorated in an elegant yet dramatic fashion. They have also created an excellent dinner menu for the event,” added Cowie. Judy Hands will be the auctioneer for the live auction portion of the evening; and photographer Roger Sands will be on hand to take souvenir portraits, with part of the proceeds from the photographs being donated back

to the foundation. Tickets for the event are almost sold out, so anyone who wants to get in on the action should hurry, before all 200 are sold. Tickets are $100, and include the reception, auction, dinner and bingo games. Extra game cards

can be purchased at the event. Sponsorship packages and tickets for the Black Tie Bingo event are available on the foundation website at www. gwmfoundation.com, by calling the office at 613-264-0638, or by e-mailing mhallam@gwm foundation.com.

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Don’t miss chance to play in area’s first Black Tie Bingo event! Organizers of the fundraising event on April 9 are thrilled with the community response so far. “The support by sponsors has been amazing and very gener-ous,” said Margot Hallam, executive director of the Great War Memorial Hospital Foundation and event co-chair. “Businesses and organizations are really stepping up as sponsors, partners and with prize donations.” The Great War Memorial Hospital Foundation is aiming to raise more than $22,000 to purchase state-of-the-art equipment, Computers on Wheels, for the Great War Memorial (Perth) site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. This equipment can be at the patient’s bedside, and improve

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March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 15

What do Lions do? The Perth Lions Club has given cash donations to the Sight First Program, which provides examinations, treatment and eyeglasses for those in need in Third World countries. Every year, our club collects reading glasses, and cleans and packages them in readiness to be shipped where needed. Every May, you will see Lions out at the Toll Bridges for CNIB. We have also funded the training of Guide Dogs for the Blind and many other functions related to the blind. We also help support BAIT every year. Annually, we support the Heart and Stroke Telethon, participate in the Terry Fox Run, and try to support the GWMH with its wish list. We have also donated a substantial amount in cash to the GWMH. We also support the breakfast program at The Stewart School. Each year, we present bursaries to Perth and District Collegiate Institute and St John Catholic High School, as well as Algonquin College.

Congratulations are in order Our zone convention was held on Sunday, and Branch 244 wishes to extend our congratulations to our new zone commander, Mike Lapensee, and our deputy commander, Dave Cormier. The pancake breakfast on Saturday was well attended, and apparently president John can make pancakes better than his stew. Thank you to all the volunteers and people who donated items for this fundraiser. This Saturday is another meat draw with your chance to get an Easter ham. All musicians are welcome to join in on our “sit around” kitchen music party. Our general meeting is on Monday, March 28. Nominations will be open for our elections in May for our new executive. Please attend this very important

Wayne

STEELE meeting. If you are interested in taking a position, or helping on a committee, contact Bill McKenzie. We need new members to get involved in the operation of our Legion, if we wish to continue our tradition of support for our veterans, their families, our youth and our community. If anyone is planning a family party, anniversary, wedding reception, etc., contact Susan at 613267-4400 for a personal tour of our facilities. Remember our oath, “Service, not for self, but for others.”

There are many more programs and organizations that we help, but unfortunately it would take up too much time and space to mention them all. By now, you are probably wondering how we raise funds. In August, we hold the Perth Garlic Festival. At the festival, we also have a “Bacon on a Bun” booth. During the Perth Fair, we have a “Bacon on a Bun” booth and the “Muffin Tin” game. Twice a year we have the “300 Club” draws, and recently, we have obtained a “Yellow Car” we use to raise more funds. All of the proceeds from these activities go back to the community and help us to donate to all of our causes. The Yellow Car has been designated to help raise funds for Dignity House. As for our operating expenses, these are raised through hall rentals and bar services. We are self-supporting in regards to most of the maintenance and operations of facilities. All of our members volunteer many hours, both for the fundraising events and maintenance of the hall, and labour that needs to be done. In other words, we try to be as self- sufficient as possible. There is another bonus in being a member of the Perth Lions Club. It is the camaraderie and friendships that are developed amongst all members. This includes all gatherings with other Lions clubs and conventions. Every member of the Perth Lions Club is proud to wear our colours of yellow and purple and be a Knight for the Blind. We are all more than happy to tell you about ourselves and the things that we do as Lions. Hopefully, we can start to share more of our selves with you as time goes by. Be on the watch for more news in regard to what the Perth Lions Club is doing, who the members are, and what their accomplishments are. Remember, “We Serve.” Submitted by the Lions Club of Perth.

 If someone is hurt and needs help  If someone is Taking or Damaging Someone else’s Property  If you see someone hurting someone else (an Act of Violence)  If you see a Fire Out of Control Important: 4- Party Telephone Lines do not display information in 9-1-1 system. The EMERGENCY SERVICES will ask for: Address: Municipality, Street or Road Name, Property Identification Number (PIN) Description of the problem: Fire, Violent Act, Injuries to People. Telephone you are calling from. Your name. 390218

PROPOSED ROAD CLOSINGS TAKE NOTICE that the Council of Tay Valley Township proposes the passage of a by-law to stop up, close and sell unassumed road allowances in a subdivision that was never constructed and which are no longer required for municipal purposes. Any person who believes they may be adversely affected by the closure of such unassumed road allowances has an opportunity to express their concerns at an open meeting to be held: Tuesday, April 19, 2011 - 7:00 pm Tay Valley Township Office 217 Harper Road

DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED CLOSINGS In Sherbrooke Ward – The unassumed roads in Concession 7, Part Lot 20 and 21, identified as Manor Drive, Cedar Grove Lane, Maple Hill Drive and Silver Birch Court as shown on P119 (commonly known as the Brule Subdivision), located east of McGowan Lake and north of Highway 7. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION relating to the proposed by-law is available at the Municipal Office during regular business hours. (1.800.810.0161 or 1.613.267.5353) 456257

“I have heard of the Lions, but just what is it that they do?” Time and time again, as a Lions member, I have heard this question. Then, at our last meeting, our guest speaker, Gina Rushmore, advertising consultant for The Perth Courier, told us how she asked people she knew the same question. To our surprise, most people had no idea what the Lions do. So hopefully I can help answer this question for everyone. Lions Club International’s motto, “We Serve,” says it all. But the key is just how and where we serve. By the name, it is obvious that we are international, which also means we serve nationally and in our communities. The Lions Club of Perth mainly concentrates on serving Perth and the surrounding area. How do we serve? In 1929, when Helen Keller was made the first Lion woman, she asked if the Lions would consider being Knights for the Blind. Since that time, every Lion is honoured to take on this role. Just how do we do this?

The Municipalities of Beckwith, Carleton Place, Drummond/North Elmsley, Lanark Highlands, Mississippi Mills, Montague, Perth, Smiths Falls, Tay Valley ask you to CALL 9-1-1.

Dated this 17th day of March, 2011 Robert Tremblay, Clerk


Page 16 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

Awesome auction to Build a Bridge interesting variety of items being donated for the silent auction and anticipate over 100 items will be available.” In addition to the silent auction, guests will enjoy a home-cooked turkey dinner with all the trimmings prepared by the members of the Civitan club, including their fabulous desserts. Live music will be provided by Tell Mama, and the Perth Town Crier will carry out the emcee duties. Tickets are $30 per person and can be ordered by e-mailing bethp@ripnet.com, by calling Beth at 613-267-5340, purchased at Shadowfax in Perth or through local club members. Information is also posted on the Friends website at www. friendsofmurphyspoint.ca. Doors open at 6 p.m. on April 15, with dinner served at 7 p.m. Come and join the hikers, skiers and outdoor enthusiasts of these three clubs and help to build a bridge. The assistance of Ontario Parks and the Perth Civitan Club in this worthwhile project is gratefully acknowledged. Submitted by the Friends of Murphys Point Park.

Farmers’ market seeks new vendors for this season The McDonalds Corners Farmers’ Market is seeking more vendors for its coming season. With the surge of interest and demand for locally-produced food, the market is expanding to meet that demand. There are openings for fruit and vegetable growers using traditional chemical-free methods (organic certification is not necessary), bakers, locally produced foods and juried art and crafts. Members must be local and live within an 80kilometre radius of McDonalds Corners. The unique market is located at the MERA Schoolhouse in McDonalds Corners in a friendly, relaxed, beautiful setting under the trees. Visitors are greeted by the sounds of local musicians and the smells of freshly baked breads

and cut flowers. Friends meet at the market cafe for fair trade coffee and to sample tasty treats from vendors. Pizza is served from the outdoor wood-fired oven. Local co-operatives between friends and neighbours are encouraged. Many growers who don’t have large amounts to sell can get together with others, perhaps taking turns to staff a booth. The market is open on Saturday mornings from 9 a.m. until noon from May 21 to Oct 8. A meeting for new and returning vendors will be held on Saturday, March 26 at 2 p.m. at the MERA Schoolhouse in McDonalds Corners, Hwy. 12 at Con. 9A. For information, call 613-278-2739 or email mcdonaldscornersfarmersmarket @hotmail.com.

Lanark Leeds & Grenville has been working very hard! We have engaged partners to develop a vision for a Healthy Lanark Leeds and Grenville, assessed our local needs and assets, and identified recommended actions to address the six priority areas as established by the Ministry of Health Promotion and Sport. Local agencies and individuals are welcome to join this Partnership to collaborate and work together so that we can all lead healthy and active lives. For more information about the Partnership, call Lois Dewey, 613-283-2740 or email Lois.Dewey@healthunit.org.

Recommended Actions from Community Consultation Healthy Eating

Mental Health Promotion

Physical Activity, Sport & Recreation Provide a variety of opportunities for accessible and inclusive physical activity. Promote physical activity as do-able for all.

Substance & Alcohol Misuse Enhance & facilitate adaptive qualities in youth that promote protective factors that buffer risky environments and lead to resilience (e.g. Developmental Assets). Implement health promotion programs in schools, workplaces, communities & with families that encourage appropriate use of alcohol and avoid problematic substance use for all ages.

Provide individuals/ families/ communities with information and resources to help them maintain good mental health, recognize mental health challenges and get support Foster environments that enhance community connectedness for children, teens, adults and seniors

Injury Prevention Create & implement policies and programs that support safe environments. Promote safe environments and healthy lifestyles to prevent injuries in all ages, especially falls among seniors and children.

Provide opportunities for individuals to develop food selection, food preparation, and food safety skills. Provide supportive environments for healthy food choices.

Tobacco Use/ Exposure Support tobacco-free lifestyles by increasing the availability of comprehensive tobacco awareness, prevention, cessation services for youth and adults. Implement health promotion programs that encourage a smoke free lifestyle for all ages.

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Excitement is building over the “Help us Build a Bridge Bash” fundraiser coming up on Friday, April 15. This event is a joint initiative of the Friends of Murphys Point, Tay Valley Ski Club and Rideau Trail Association Central Club, and will raise funds to help replace the bridge over Black Creek on the McParlan House Trail at Murphys Point Provincial Park. A significant part of the fundraiser, which will be held at the Perth Civitan Hall, is an awesome silent auction. Some of the intriguing items for auction include a half-hour sightseeing flight, manure for your spring garden, firewood, a Via Rail ticket package valued at over $1,000, a bottle of Lanark County maple syrup that won the John David Eaton World Champion Cup at the Royal Winter Fair (some of this batch was presented to Prince Charles), a CD package from Chris McKhool and the Sultans of String, and a ladies’ bicycle. “Community support for this event has been tremendous,” said event co-ordinator Beth Peterkin. “We are thrilled with the

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March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 17

Help available for those who are grieving met any of these people, I felt we understood one another immediately.” “Speaking openly and honestly helped me to see more clearly what was happening for me.” Community Home Support Lanark County offers grief and bereavement support groups regularly during the year at its Perth office (40 Sunset Blvd.). Each group meets eight times over a four-month period. Currently, groups are facilitated by Susan Samila and Jean Whieldon, both trained and experienced hospice volunteers. Samila comes to this volunteer work with over 30 years’ experience in counselling and group work, and Whieldon also has extensive experience in facilitating groups.

can share their stories and their pain and be supported by others who have also experienced deep loss. It is surprising to many that this simple way of being together is generally not experienced as more depressing, but as a lightening of personal pain. Group members are helped by others listening deeply to their stories, their grief; and in turn they are able to help other group members in the same way. Even if a person’s loved one died, for example, two years previously, he or she can generally benefit from a support group. Some comments from previous group members are: “I realized I was not alone – we were all in the same boat.” “Even though I had never

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The current group began meeting on March 15. To obtain more information, please contact Rebecca Bowie at 613-267-6400 or rebeccab@chslc.ca. The above article was submitted by Community Home Support Lanark County.

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“PLEASE TAKE A MESSAGE”

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CELEBRATE OUR ACHIEVEMENTS at St. James’ Anglican Church - Parish Hall Corner of Harvey and Drummond streets

WEDNESDAY, March 30, 2011 AT 7 P.M.

The GWM Hospital Foundation takes pleasure in acknowledging the generous contribution from Bill Beacham of The Factory – Leo Adams Investments Inc. towards the Foundation’s fundraising event - Black Tie Bingo to be held Saturday, April 9 at Code’s Mill on the Park.

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ALL WELCOME

The proceeds of the Black Tie Bingo will be directed towards the purchase of nine computers-on-wheels to benefit patient care at the GWM site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Contributions such as Bill’s will help us realize this goal. Thank you very much Bill!

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Page 18 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

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Day, was awarded Album of the Year honours by Penguin Eggs (Canada’s folk and roots music magazine). The Dorner-Sullivan family, hosts of the house concert series, say that Nash is “the ideal artist for a house concert.” A master storyteller, who can play not only folk songs, but also jazz, blues, soul and pop all with only his own voice and an acoustic guitar, Nash tours North America playing concerts and music festivals, charming audiences wherever he goes. “He’s one of those people who’s a real entertainer,” says Margaret Sullivan. “There’s not one moment when he’s onstage that he’s not endearing himself to everyone in the audience through either a story or a song.” Nash is a past winner of the Ontario Council of Folk Festival’s “Songs from the Heart” competition, and has recently taken over the reins as artistic director of the Shelter Valley Folk Festival in Grafton. Nash’s performance at Shakey Acres, in Bennett Lake Estates, between Fallbrook and Maberly, will begin at 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 9. Tickets are $20 and are available at Shadowfax in Perth, the Nature Lover’s Bookstore in Lanark, Fall River Espresso in Maberly and at the Sharbot Lake Pharmacy. For more information, or to reserve tickets, phone 613-268-2376 or email shakeyacres@hotmail. com.

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The long-awaited house concert by Jory Nash at Shakey Acres is set for Saturday, April 9. The Toronto singer-songwriter was originally scheduled to perform in the Incident At Shakey Acres house concert series last November, but the concert had to be rescheduled at the last minute. Many music lovers in the area will remember Nash for his soul workshop at last summer’s Blue Skies festival, where he wowed audiences with his renditions of well-loved hits by Smokey Robinson, Sam Cooke and Marvin Gaye. CBC radio’s Stewart McLean named Nash’s recording of “Tracks of My Tears” as, “one of the best cover songs ever.” Nash’s influences aren’t limited to Motown and soul, though. His 2007 album, “Folk, Jazz, Blues and Soul,” contains recordings of “Fly Me To The Moon” and Woody Guthrie’s “So Long It’s Been Good to Know You,” along with Smokey Robinson’s classic. Cover songs are only a small portion of Nash’s extensive repertoire, which is chiefly made up of his own outstanding compositions, that blend elements of his widely varied influences into an original stew of sound. His six critically acclaimed CDs each have a distinct personality and a high standard of quality, but all of them reflect Nash’s recognizable trademark. His 2009 album, New Blue

Construction

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March 24, 2011 • The Perth Courier • Page 19

Goat Run to aid Japan BY GEOFF DAVIES geoff.davies@perthcourier.com

Attention runners! Here’s your chance to test your mettle before the Kilt Run. The Running Goats Club is organizing a fundraiser run in support of the Japan relief effort. The Spring Goat Run is now scheduled for 9 a.m. on April 2. Those interested can sign up at the Running Goat store up until April 1. But this race has a catch. Dubbed a “prediction run,” runners must estimate their own finishing time beforehand. The runner whose finishing is closest to their guess gets a free pair of running shoes, supplied by Mizuno, a Japanese company. “So, in other words, you could be last and still win,” says Mary Stewart, one of the event’s organizers. Stewart said the race will be held on a “goat-worthy” – though currently undisclosed – course, so be prepared for some bumpy terrain. Registration costs $10 per person, with all proceeds going to support the relief effort in Japan, which was hit by an earthquake and tsunami on March 11. After the race, Japanese tea will be served and special prizes and awards will be given out. Due to the nature of the prediction run, no watches will be allowed on the course, she said.

Perth native eyes bright future — no butts McNamee hopes to best 40 goal season that won him All Star spot and a special bet

selected to the CCHL Tier 1 AllStar teams:

BY ANDREW SNOOK andrew.snook@perthcourier.com

The Smiths Falls Jr. A Bears season may have ended in the opening round of the playoffs, but forward Mike McNamee can’t be too upset when he looks back at his 2010-11 season. McNamee had a big breakout campaign, scoring 40 goals and 41 assists, finishing third in goals and seventh in the league scoring race. A big jump in production from 2009-10 season, when McNamee finished with 25 goals and 13 assists. For his efforts he was voted on to the CCHL Tier 1 2nd All-Star Team. All-star voting and award selections are all made by the CCHL Tier 1 general managers. The 18-year-old Perth native said several factors contributed to his improvement on the ice. “Obviously being a third year player and having an ‘A’ on your jersey gives you a little more confidence,” he said. “I can thank my linemates. Me and Matt Robertson were together from the start of training camp. Matty was definitely a help to my success, and

Perth native Mike McNamee dives for a puck against the Ottawa Jr. Senators earlier in the season. McNamee was recently named to the CCHL Tier 1 2nd All-Star Team. McNamee finsihed the season with 40 goals, good for third overall in the league. File photo

I thank everyone who played with us.” McNamee admitted he had an extra incentive to score 40 goals this season. “I was playing in the floor hockey in the old rink and my uncle walked in and yelled to me, ‘How many goals am I going to score this year?’ I said 40. He started giggling and said, ‘If you score 40 goals I’ll quit smoking.’” McNamee said his uncle stayed

true to his word and “butted out” that same night. “As far as I know, I think he’ll stay true,” McNamee said. McNamee said he plans on returning to the Bears in 2011-12, and has his sights set on another big season. “Right now my goal is going to be 50 (goals), but anything over 40 and I’ll be happy,” he said. ALL STARS The following players were

1st Team: Goal - Pete Karvouniaris (Cornwall). Defence - Youssef Kabbaj (Cornwall), Ben Reinhardt (Pembroke). Forwards - Jacob Laliberte (Cornwall), Tyler Tosunian (Pembroke), Andrew Creppin (Gloucester). Coach - Adam Dewan (Kanata). Manager - Sheldon Keefe (Pembroke). 2nd Team: Goal – Scott Shackell (Kanata). Defence – Zachary Carriveau (Nepean), Tyson Wilson (Brockville). Forwards – Mike McNamee (Smiths Falls), Tyson Spink (Cornwall), Matthew Peca (Pembroke). Coach – Todd Gill (Brockville). Manager – Ian MacInnis (Cornwall). 3rd Team: Goal – Justin Gilbert (Brockville). Defence – Nathan Livingstone (Smiths Falls), Ryan Johnston (Nepean). Forwards – Brent Norris (Nepean), Michael Webley (Gloucester), Tylor Spink (Cornwall). Coach – Jason Clarke (Carleton Place). Manager – Jason Clarke (Carleton Place).

County counselled on cycling infrastructure opportunities

BY JANICE LEPAGE The Perth Lanark Minor Midget Rep team played their last three games of the regular season on Jan. 28, 30 and 31. On Jan. 28, the boys hosted the South Grenville Rangers. The squad took on their opponents with relative ease, chalking up eight goals to the Rangers’ one. The two goals in the first period were executed by Brock Liko and Hunter Rombough, assisted by Jacob Lyon, Travis Henderson and Chris Cardinal. The second period was a busy one filled with a few penalties, a lone South Grenville goal and five Perth Lanark goals. Lyon (3), Jakob Erwin and Liko did the honours with aid from Tom Coyne, Liko, Colin Leeflang (2), Aaron Moore (2), Erwin and Lyon. In the third period Coyne scored the team’s eighth goal following a rash of penalties for both teams. Once all calmed down the final score was 8-1 for the Wings. It was a much different scenario in Kemptville on Jan. 30. The Wings never seemed to find their groove at any point in the game. Whether it was the officials’ continual calling of penalties – nine in the first period, a couple in the second and a whopping twelve in the third which cut into the flow of the game or whether the men were just plain tuckered from

a very busy January schedule, they were simply unable to make headway against the Kemptville Panthers’ dominating offence. The Wings were down by three when Lyon, assisted by Henderson and Liko, scored the Wings’ single goal. Kemptville netted two more goals to bring the final score 5-1 for the Panthers. The next night the team bounced back and put the South Grenville Rangers through their paces once again, this time in Prescott. Linemates Liko, Lyon and Moore were in charge of the first period with Moore and Lyon netting two goals assisted by their linemates. The Rangers popped one in this frame as well, keeping the game close. That was to change in the second period. Coyne and Noonan, assisted by Liko and Leeflang, respectively, put a little more distance between the two teams. South Grenville became frustrated and the penalties began to roll out in the third period. The Wings managed to tally two more goals, however, to cap the score at 6-1 for the Wings. Liko and Moore scored with Dakota Henry and Lyon assisting. The boys ended their season at the top with an incredible record of 19-2-3 winning the Upper Canada Minor Hockey League regular season championship. Congratulation Wings!

GUN & HUNTING SHOW Saturday, April 16 and Sunday, April 17

at the Lanark Arena 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. - Saturday 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. - Sunday $6 admission Kids under 16 FREE accompanied by an adult

905-623-1778

TUESDAY, MARCH 29

5:30 - 6:30 p.m. at THE STEWART SCHOOL

To register, visit www.perthtigersbasketball.com or call Kevin at 613-264-8667 or email kjbellamy@sympatico.ca Please send payment (payable to Tigers Basketball) c/o Kevin Bellamy, 8 Inverness Ave., Perth ON K7H 3G6

PAT’S BOOT CAMP

Perth & District Little League

WELCOMES ALL BASEBALL PLAYERS We are looking for baseball players ages 3 and up

Make It Your Life Style

REGISTRATION FEES Blast Ball T-Ball Rookie Minor Major Junior

3-4 years old 5-6 years old 7-8 years old 9-10 years old 11-12 years old 13-14 years old

$30.00 $40.00 $40.00 $80.00 $80.00 $95.00

PLUS

FITNESS, CLEANSE AND WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAM

For registration come to the PERTH ARENA March 26, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. • March 30, 6 - 8 p.m. April 2, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Registration after April 2 will be subject to a $10 fee

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Cost: $75, includes a T-Shirt & Pizza Party

Register now and take advantage of early bird rates Outdoor programs start at $70 www.pusc.ca

For results, try The Perth Courier classifieds.

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SMALL BALL: SR. (2003/2004) JR. (2005/2006) Six Tuesdays: March 29 - May 3 • 5:45 - 6:45 p.m. at PDCI NOVICE: BORN IN (2001/2002) Six Tuesdays: March 29 - May 3 • 5:45 - 6:45 p.m. at Stewart School ATOM: BORN IN (1999/2000) Six Wednesdays: March 30 - May 4 • 5:45 - 6:45 p.m. at PDCI BANTAM: BORN IN (1997/1998) Six Wednesdays: March 30 - May 4 • 6:45 - 7:45 p.m. at PDCI (Those born in 1996 may also join this division)

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IN-PERSON REGISTRATION & PLAYER CARD PHOTOS

Perth Tigers Basketball Spring League 2011

County. Mills told council there is a growing demand for a safe cycling community, adding how research indicates 60 per cent of people surveyed want to ride, but don’t, because the infrastructure isn’t there. He suggested the county get an assessment from the Bicycle Friendly Communities Program. This program tabulates exactly how ‘cycle-friendly’ a region is and the community is the earmarked with a status that can go as high as platinum; a status which notorious cycling city, Portland, Oregon currently holds. Council passed a motion to forward both presentations to the official plan advisory committee as well as the transportation master plan cycling study working group.

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Wings soar to championship

to Lanark County to cycle. “This county is well positioned to benefit economically when it comes to cycling,” Tunnock said to councillors. “The county should acknowledge cycling as a mode of transportation and as an economic generator.” He encouraged council to implement cycling policies into its official plan, handing councillors a list of cycling policies for their consideration. “I believe there is an opportunity in council’s official plan to incorporate your vision for cycling,” he said. “Incorporate these policies into your official plan.” It was then Mills’ turn to step up to the microphone. Mills is part of the Riding in Mississippi Mills group, and asked council to develop a master cycling plan for Lanark

Starts April 3rd

Call 613-267-6826 for info

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A cycle-friendly Lanark County would bring economic, health and environmental benefits to the region, and county council-

its long-term plans. Glen Tunnock and Jeff Mills told councillors that health, economic growth, as well as tourism and environmental opportunities, are reasons to build cycling infrastructure across the county. Tunnock spoke on behalf of the Lanark Cycling Coalition, and was first to present his case to council. He outlined how rural areas have a more active cycling community compared to its urban counterparts, and this growing trend is not limited to road warriors. “Cycling is not just for the spandex crowd,” he said. “It’s for everybody.” An avid cyclist, Tunnock explained he has spoken with cyclists from Ottawa, Kingston and Brockville who often travel

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Perth Courier

lors heard this message twice at its public works committee meeting March 9. Two separate presentations were made to council outlining why the county should implement cycling infrastructure into

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BY CATHY JAMES


Page 20 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

LOOKING BACK 25 years ago

Corporal punishment ban is considered

A

Lanark County Board of Education trustee has put forward a motion recommending corporal punishment be banned in area elementary schools. Dr. Duncan Meikle recommended at a meeting of the education committee last month that the board rescind its policy on corporal punishment. “I brought the matter before the committee because I wanted the policy reviewed,” stated Meikle. “There are a lot of people who feel very strongly about corporal punishment.” Meikle also said he wanted to hear what school principals had to say on the matter because they are the ones who have to deal with on-the-spot discipline. After some deliberation by members of the education committee, a motion was passed tabling Meikle’s recommendation pending a further study by executive council, the results of which will be brought before the board at a later date. Stuart Howard, director of education (who was unavailable for comment), told the members of the committee at the meeting that a survey of elementary administrators and staff revealed that the majority of educators wished to retain corporal punishment despite the fact that it was not used very frequently. According to Glen Blanchard, chairman of the Lanark County Board of Education, policy number 715, which deals with corporal punishment, has been on the books since 1976, but contends the idea may now be outdated. Although corporal punishment is restricted to the use of a strap in Lanark County schools, the procedure surrounding disciplinary action is detailed and regimented. “Corporal punishment can only be administered after all other forms of disciplinary action have failed to attain the desired results,” stated Blanchard. To the best of Meikle’s knowledge, about 18 students in Lanark County elementary schools were the recipients of corporal punishment during the last school year. He also believes that about half of the school principals in the county are in favour of retaining the accepted form of physical discipline. The board policy regarding punishment requires that a school principal or designate administer the strap, but before this

takes place, a mandatory consultation between the parents and school officials is required. Corporal punishment can only take place in the presence of witnesses and, following the act, a detailed report must be submitted to the board detailing the reason, names of witnesses and extent of punishment. “In my point of view, corporal punishment is outdated,” noted Blanchard. “Things have changed a great deal in our society since 1976, and strapping may have had the desired effect in its day.” A major point of opposition regarding corporal punishment, in Blanchard’s view and in the view of other members of the educational fraternity, stems from the fact that children who are designated wards of the crown or who are under the jurisdiction of Family and Children’s Services are exempt from any kind of physical discipline. “If we can’t administer punishment to these children, then why should we show bias towards other students?” said Blanchard. “We have to be very careful in this day and age because childabuse laws are very stringent,” he also stated. “Years ago, parents used to support the idea of corporal punishment, but today this is not often the case.”

press release. The letter from National Grocers goes on to say, “We were very disappointed that the project did not receive full council approval prior to the municipal elections held in late 1985. “It seems that some new members elected at that time were determined to introduce into the negotiations, conditions which we had made very clear at the outset would be unacceptable to us. “For the supermarket to be a competitive vehicle and to anchor the downtown core, the support facilities must be right.” The letter says National Grocers is disappointed the conditions were introduced at such a late hour and “can only hope that those councillors responsible will be able to rationalize their actions to their constituency when the property lies vacant for an extended period of time.” The exit- or entrance-only condition for Drummond Street was introduced late last year and was narrowly passed by a 5-4 vote of council. Meanwhile, the plan proposed by local businessman Joe Perkins is expected to be completed by March 28.

National terminates deal

A rink of four local curlers from the Perth Curling Club has been ranked fourth in Ontario after a four-day provincial intermediate championship held last week in Sarnia. The rink of Harvey Moore, Allan Chaplin, Don Armstrong and Bill McConachie ended its championship bid with a record of three wins and four losses to take the fourth-place position. The team finished its championship climb with an overall record of 13 wins and four losses. “The team feels that what we accomplished to get to the provincials was more important than the actual competition in Sarnia ... it’s not easy to get to the provincials,” said skip Moore. In order to become contenders in the provincial playdowns, the Perth rink had to win two out of three games in Perth, have four straight wins in zone competition and three straight wins in the regional competition. The Perth rink defeated teams from Ottawa as well as teams from throughout Ontario to win a berth in the provincial playdowns. Eight of the top intermediate teams, formed of men over the age of 40, met at the Sarnia Golf

In a letter received by the municipality, National Grocers has abruptly terminated the proposed deal with the town for use of the downtown-core property. Mayor Lowell Yorke said this week that National Grocers is not happy with the last-minute change to the site plan calling for either an entrance or exit only on Drummond Street. In a press release, Yorke says: “National Grocers has reviewed the ingress/egress condition for Drummond Street and has found it unacceptable, hence have removed it from their capital plans.” Yorke said the letter from National Grocers was to the point. Part of the letter says, “Given that agreement on a site plan was a condition of the deal, the agreement between National Grocers Co. Ltd. and the Town of Perth is terminated.” “They feel that the plans submitted to the town almost two years ago always detailed full access to Drummond Street and are disappointed that these new conditions were introduced at such a late hour,” stated Yorke’s

Perth rink places fourth in provincials

and Curling Club for the championship. “This playdown is equal to the Brier, but is for men over 40,” commented Moore. The Perth team began the provincial playdowns on a low note, losing its first two games. On Wednesday evening, the rink was defeated by a team from Barrie 93, and on Thursday morning a rink from the Highland Humber Curling Club in Toronto defeated the local team 8-4. Thursday-afternoon play saw Perth upset a rink from the Chinguacousy Curling Club in Toronto 8-3, and the local team continued its winning streak on Friday when it defeated a Peterborough team 8-7 in an extra end. The locals also defeated another Toronto-based team, the Boulevard Club, on Friday when it trumped the club 7-6 in an extra end. On Saturday, the Perth rink, with a record of three wins and two losses, met two clubs, both with records of four wins and one loss, for its final two matches. The team from the Seaforth Curling Club defeated Perth 10-7 and the Sun Parlour Club from Leamington continued the upset when it defeated Perth 7-5. The final Perth game was one of the most exciting matches, said Moore. “We were down 6-2 during the early part of the game, but we came back and had a 6-5 lead in the final end. The other team had last rock and scored two points,” he explained. Members of the Perth rink felt they had accomplished a lot by winning a berth in the provincials, and Moore said the team felt good about their position and performance during the competition. “We really feel great ... we’re proud of ourselves and of the way we curled. We worked hard to make it to the provincials and we feel we’ve accomplished a lot,” concluded Moore. The Sun Parlour Club from Leamington won the provincial title with a record of six wins and one loss.

ey Raymo, a son, Shawn Ryan. Brady - On Feb. 28, 1986, to John and Donna Brady, a son, Jacob William John. Fraser - At the GWM Hospital, on March 15, 1986, to James and Laurie Fraser of RR 5, Perth, a daughter, Kara Elizabeth. Goodings - At the Almonte General Hospital, on March 11, 1986, to David and Margo Goodings, a son, Erik Davyd. Monnink - On March 7, 1986, to John and Cathy (nee Somerville) Monnink, a son, Tyler Andrew. Nichols - At the GWM Hospital, on March 14, 1986, to Brad Nichols and Janey Nagle of Lanark, a son, Codey George Eric. Potter - At Kingston General Hospital, on March 10, 1986, to Jim and Ginger (Laramee) Potter, a daughter, Bailey Marie. Proulx - At the GWM Hospital, on March 10, 1986, to Dennis and Jocelyn Proulx of RR 1, Balderson, a son, Danen Mitchell. Radford - At the GWM Hospital, on March 11, 1986, to Michael Radford and Carol Ann Oakes of RR 7, Perth, a daughter, Brittany Margaret. Tysick - At the GWM Hospital, on March 11, 1986, to Bryan and Karmel Tysick of RR 7, Perth, a son, Nicholas Craig.

DIED

Callan - In hospital, Kingston, on Monday, March 10, 1986, Harry D. Callan, in his 79th year, beloved husband of Margaret L. Weekes. Cooper - On Wednesday, March 5, 1986, Ruby F. Campbell, wife of the late William F. Cooper. Jamieson - At Lanark Lodge, on Thursday, March 13, 1986, Lavina Jamieson, in her 96th year, wife of the late Robert R. Jamieson. Sharpe - At Toronto, on Wednesday, March 12, 1986, Ethel Mathilda Armstrong, formerly of Toronto, in her 90th year, wife of the late William Clifford Sharpe. Wickware - At the Coleman Health Care Centre, Barrie, Ont., on Tuesday, March 11, 1986, Jessie Westwood, in her 92nd year, wife of the late Walter Halpenny Wickware. BORN The preceding was excerpted Antoine-Raymo - At Kingston from the front page of the March General Hospital, on March 2, 19, 1986 issue of The Perth Couri1986, to Shawn Antoine and Trac- er.

Medical society in favour of water fluoridation The Lanark County Medical Society held its regular meeting at the Memorial Hospital in Carleton Place on Wednesday, March 8. Dr. D.O. Craig of Perth, president, presided. The society unanimously endorsed the Royal Commission’s report on the fluoridation of water supply. The hope was expressed that all local hydro commissions would immediately take advantage of this report and institute suitable measures at an

DIED Cordick - At St. Francis Hospital, Smiths Falls, on Wednesday, March 8, 1961, Samuel J. Cordick, beloved husband of Clara White, in his 81st year. The preceding was originally published in The Perth Courier of March 19, 1986 as the “25 years ago” news.

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Sunday, March 27 9:00 - 9:55 a.m., N.I.N.E Worship (Nursery & Children’s Church available.)

“Dear Child of God, The Three Have Testified” by Pastor Phil Hamilton 10:00 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Traditional Worship “Revelation 14-16” by Rev. Alan Adams

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St. James The Apostle Anglican Church Drummond & Harvey Street 613-267-1163 • www.superaje.com/~stjamesperth

Sunday, March 27 celebrating the 3rd Sunday of Lent: 8 a.m. Said Eucharist: 10 a.m. Choral Eucharist and Sunday School with Sandy, following the SPARK storytelling curriculum Wednesday evenings in Lent: Reflection on the Sunday readings: all welcome in the upper meeting room 1st Tuesday and 3rd Thursday of the Month: Messy Church for all young families, starting with supper at 5:30pm in the lower hall - 2nd Saturday of the month: community dinner: open to all from 4:30 - 6pm, free will offering only Fridays starting 5:30 p.m.: Skater Church: All welcome St. Augustine’s Eucharist: 2nd and 4th Sundays each month: 9:15 a.m. (Corner of Cty. Rd. 10 & Richardson)

St. Paul’s United Church

COME AND JOIN US AT:

Glad Tidings Pentecostal Church

Where we Believe, Belong, Become Rev. Lewis Massarelli 10:00 a.m. Morning worship 160 Wayside Dr., RR 6, Perth, ON Church: 613-267-3295 See Web page for details of programs www.gtpcperth.com

25 Gore Street West Rev. Alan P. Boyd, M.A., Th.M. Director of Music: Brad Mills, B.Mus., A.R.C.C.O

Sunday, March 27 10:00 a.m. “Malice in the Palace,”

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BORN Brady - At Mount Hamilton Hospital, on March 6, 1961, to Jerry and Peg (nee Menzies) Brady of Stony Creek, a son, Thomas Andrew. Brownlee - At the GWM Hospital, on March 7, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. Donald Brownlee of Lanark, a son. Gemmill - At the GWM Hospital, on March 11, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. William Gemmill of RR 4, Christie Lake, a son. Hoch - At St. Mary’s Hospital, St. Louis, Mo., on March 1, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. James B. Hoch (nee Lucille White), a son, Blair Allan. Kellar - At the GWM Hospital, on March 11, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Kellar of RR 3, Arden, a son. Leeflang - At the GWM Hospital, on March 11, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Leeflang of RR 1, Perth, a son. McVeigh - At the GWM Hospital, on March 10, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. Stanley McVeigh of Perth, a daughter. Mitchell - At the GWM Hospital, on March 6, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Mitchell of Lanark, a daughter. Warwick - At the GWM Hospital, on March 10, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Warwick of RR 2, Maberly, a son. Wong - At the GWM Hospital, on March 8, 1961, to Mr. and Mrs. Moon Wong of Perth, a daughter.

144 Gore St. E., Perth www.asburyfmperth.com Everyone is welcome!

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Three good entries were recorded last week, as follows: pickerel, 8 pounds, 2.5 ounces, caught by Arnold Miller of Christie Lake in Christie Lake on March 7; lake trout, the first entry in this class was seven pounds, four ounces, caught by Robert G. Thomas of Perth in Sharbot Lake (off Green Island) on March 9; whitefish, seven pounds, 6.5 ounces, caught by Cyryl Wierzbinski of Smiths Falls in Rideau Lake on March 11 (first in its class).

Busy year for GWM The 38th annual report on the operation of Perth’s Great War Memorial Hospital, released Monday by administrator J.R. Bollons, showed a deficit of $12,980 during 1960. The report has been presented at the 1961 reorganizational meeting of the board by president J.A. Thomas. New officers elected for a threeyear period were: J.J. Finnegan, president; J.H. Moore, vice-president; and board members Allan James, E.M. Sabiston, Leslie Stephenson and J.A. Thomas, retiring president. The year 1960 was a very busy one for this hospital, since construction of the new wing and accompanying changes to the Danner were going on simultaneously. This caused much confusion and crowding of already-overtaxed facilities, and in general, conditions for patients were not good, to say nothing of the inconvenience to the staff who cared for them. Financially, our year-end statement indicates that hospital operation is big business. Total revenue was $346,895.56, but our expenses amounted to $359,875.33. This reveals a 13 per cent increase in costs and a six per cent increase in receipts from patients when compared with similar figures for 1959. The Ontario Hospital Services Commission cut our proposed budget for 1960 by $10,000.00 on expected nurses’ salaries, and asked us to go along with this reduction. It proved to be impractical, for we could not manage with fewer nurses. Much greater use was made of the laboratory this year, and while this is good and indicates that more investigation of patients was carried out, it nevertheless increased our total costs. It is expected that nearly all of

this deficit will be recovered, but will not reflect in our statement for 1960 because of the time lag before the commission makes adjustment.

Sunday, March 27 11:00 a.m. - Worship service and Sunday school multi-age program. Nursery available. Coffee hour Friday mornings 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Please check the website for info on youth group, Bible studies and other ministries, www.standrewsperth.com. Audio loop system • 613-267-2481 A warm welcome to all!

a musical dramatization of the Old Testament story of Queen Esther.

Community Dinner Saturday, April 16, 4:30-6:00 p.m. 613-267-2973 www.stpauls-uc-perth.org

MABERLY GOSPEL HALL

First Baptist Church

“For the LORD is great, and greatly to be praised: he is to be feared above all gods. For all the gods of the nations Psalms 96: 4,5 are idols...” Sunday Meetings 9:30 a.m. Breaking of Bread 11:15 a.m. Sunday School 7:00 p.m. Gospel Meeting Monday - Friday 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. Starting March 14 - Special Gospel Meetings at 105 Dufferin St., Perth, Second Floor Boardroom (Behind Wendy’s). For Information Call 613-268-2616

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Contest reels in more entries

early date in order that the high incidence of dental decay in children in Lanark County might be reduced.

Drummond & North Sts. Minister: Rev. Marilyn Savage; Organist: Ann Savage

17 D’Arcy Street, Perth • 613-267-2023 Seeking, Serving & Sharing Our Saviour Minister: Rev. Frank Morgan, B.A., B.D.

Community Dinner, March 26 4:30 p.m. - 6 p.m. All Welcome Donations accepted.

Sunday, March 27 (Third Sunday of Lent) 9:30 a.m. Adult Bible Class. Nursery provided. All welcome. 10:30 a.m. Morning Worship. Rev. Frank Morgan. Sermon: “Good Questions (iii) ‘Good Questions (iii) ‘Where Can I Go from Your Spirit?’” (Ps. 139:7). Wednesday, March 30 7:00 p.m. Bible Study and Prayer. Following Community Dinner April 30, 4:30 - 6:00 Need a ride? 613-267-2023

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ayor Scott Burchell of Perth told the annual meeting of No. 2 Zone of the Eastern Ontario Development Association on Wednesday that Perth is the fastest-growing town in the Ottawa Valley, with a population of more than 6,000. Perth now has 24 manufacturing industries with annual factory shipments worth $9,000,000. More than 800 employees draw $2,100,000 each year in wages. Mr. Burchell said Perth industries are greatly diversified, ranging from lotions, medicines, textiles, hosiery, blankets, felt and aluminum towers to boots and shoes. J.A. Perkins of Perth said the Ontario Regional Development Council was aiming at decentralization of industry to improve economic conditions and create employment in the smaller communities of the province.

Exciting Asbury Free Methodist Church

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church

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Perth billed as fastest-growing town in the Valley

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50 years ago


March 24, 2011 - THE PERTH COURIER - Page 21

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CORPORATION OF THE COUNTY OF LANARK CLOSING AND SALE OF PART OF COUNTY ROAD 511

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the Corporation of the County of Lanark intends to stop up, close and sell part of County Road 511, more particularly described in Schedule “A” attached hereto. The proposed by-law and plan, describing the parts of County Road 511 to be closed and sold, are available for inspection at the Public Works Department, in the Lanark County Public Works Building, 99 Christie Lake Road, Perth, Ontario, Monday thru Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.. At its Meeting to be held in the Lanark County Municipal Building, 99 Christie Lake Road, Perth, Ontario, on the 6th day of April, 2011, at 6:00 p.m. E.S.T. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, the County Public Works Committee as a Committee of the Council of the County of Lanark will hear, in person, or by his/her counsel, solicitor or agent any person who claims that his/her lands will be prejudicially affected by the by-law and who applies to be heard. Persons who are unable to attend the Meeting may provide a written submission, by Registered Mail or hand delivered, to the undersigned, on or before 4:00 p.m. E.S.T. on April 1st, 2011.

WIN THIS QUILT! Lioness Sandra Bellamy and Joan MacIntosh stand with a quilt to be raffled off during the club’s fall craft sale. Perth Lioness Club members will be selling tickets at various businesses and events in Perth to win the quilt, which was donated to the club by a group of local quilters. The draw will be held on Nov. 6 at 1 p.m. Submitted by Vivian Munroe

We need another Patrick

ADAMS

was preserved in Ireland during the Dark Ages as a result of the solid foundation laid by Patrick. Oh, how we could do with another Patrick ... a true messenger of the holy Gospel for these times and for our land ... whether such an individual were ever canonized or not! We need another Patrick: someone in touch with God, filled with the power of the Holy Spirit, who has personally experienced the transformation produced by Jesus Christ and can pass the faith to others effectively. God grant it, soon!

SCHEDULE “A” Description of the part of County Road 511 to be closed and sold In the Geographic Township of Darling, in the Municipality of the Township of Lanark Highlands, in the County of Lanark and Province of Ontario, and being composed of that portion of County Road No. 511, located in Lots 8 and 9, Concession 3 and Lots 8 and 9, Concession 4, and on Part of the Road Allowance Between Concessions 3 and 4, more particularly described as Parts 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14, Registered Plan 27R8890. Registered Plan 27R8890 is available for viewing at the Public Works Department Office. Da

Asbury Free Methodist Religion Today

Thank You, Carol Ann!

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Township of Darling

Around the globe, Irish folk and the would-be Irish celebrate March 17 as St. Patrick’s Day. Why does this Scot, originally named Patricius, who laboured for a number of years as a slave of a pagan Celtic chieftain, get so much commemoration, even veneration, to this day? As a teenager, Patrick was kidnapped from his homeland of Scotland by Irish raiders and sold to pagan Chieftain Milchu as a slave. But Patrick had been brought up as a Christian, so in the fields of old Ireland, in sunshine, rain or snow, the young slave prayed to his Saviour who graciously revealed Himself to his servant. After a number of years, Patrick had a vision of a ship waiting at Westport to carry him to freedom. He escaped on foot, travelling the many miles mostly at night, until he came upon the very ship he had seen in his vision. At first the skipper did not want him on board, but when the other crew members urged him, he allowed Patrick to join the crew. That voyage, which ended in shipwreck on the coast of France, put him within reach of significant Christian leaders who saw great spiritual potential in Patrick and mentored him for the priesthood. Eventually, Patrick found his way back to Scotland, where he enjoyed the warmth and fellowship of his family and home church. But he experienced some more visions in which he saw Irish people with written messages and heard them

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SUBJECT LANDS

Township of Lanark Highlands

Stewarts Stewarts Lake Lake

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Brasees Brasees Lake Lake

Dated: March 11, 2011 Cathie Ritchie, County Clerk

Community Forests Management Plan 2011 - 2030 Public Review The Corporation of the County of Lanark manages 11,461 acres of Community Forests located in five municipalities: Lanark Highlands Township (9,148 acres), Tay Valley Township (1,025 acres), the Town of Mississippi Mills (1,001 acres), Montague Township (225 acres) and Drummond/North Elmsley Township (62 acres).

The GWM Hospital Foundation takes pleasure in acknowledging the generous contribution from Carol Ann Lehovich of Embers towards the Foundation’s fundraising event - Black Tie Bingo to be held Saturday, April 9 at Code’s Mill on the Park.

The Community Forests Working Group invites you to review the proposed Forest Management Plan and provide comments. The Forest Management Plan is a document which describes the attributes of the Community Forests, the forest types and their management, the natural heritage and cultural heritage values and their conservation.

The proceeds of the Black Tie Bingo will be directed towards the purchase of nine computers-on-wheels to benefit patient care at the GWM site of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital. Contributions such as Embers will help us realize this goal. Thank you very much Carol Ann!

The draft Forest Management Plan is available for your review at http://www.county.lanark.on.ca/PageFactory.aspx?PageID=1684 and comments will be received by letter, e-mail or fax, until May 2nd, 2011.

Shown above are, from left: Margot Hallam, GWM Foundation Executive Director and Black Tie Bingo co-chair and Carol Ann Lehovich of Embers.

The Corporation of the County of Lanark Public Works Building 99 Christie Lake Road P.O. Box 37, Perth, ON, K7H 3E2 Attention: Mr. Jonathan Allen, R.P.A. Facilities and Fleet Manager Telephone: 613-267-1353 x3170 E-Mail: roads@lanarkcounty.ca

This message is generously underwritten by

Perth Courier

Th e

Proud print sponsor of the GWM Hospital Foundation Black Tie Bingo.

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Rev. Alan

begging him to come back to Ireland, “We appeal to you, holy servant boy, to come and walk among us.” So he travelled back to Ireland and the rest is history. Through his efforts, the Christian faith was firmly established in the Irish isle, overcoming all the varieties of pagan worship and superstition which had dominated that land for centuries. It is said that under Patrick approximately 100,000 converts were baptized into the faith, and unnumbered churches were established. His-tory records that the purity of the apostolic faith

Any person desiring to be heard, in opposition to the proposed by-law, or any person requiring further information, is asked to contact the undersigned on or before April 1st, 2011. Janet Tysick, A.M.C.T., Office Coordinator Lanark County Public Works Department P.O. Box 37, 99 Christie Lake Road Perth, Ontario, K7H 3E2 Telephone: 613-267-1353, Ext. 3110 Toll Free: 1-888-9-LANARK Email: jtysick@lanarkcounty.ca

1-888-9-LANARK

HERITAGE WAY REALTY BROKERAGE - Independently owned and operated

www.coldwellbankerhomes.ca W

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Carleton Place 613-253-3175 • Almonte 613-256-5677 7

Recently updated 2 storey home on corner lot. New kitchen, bathroom and much more. $219,900 • mls# 785260

2 Bedrm bungalow on treed, rolling acreage. Large open concept, attached garage. Blue Heron Golf Course is close by. $150,000 • mls# 784723

Waterfront living w great views. Vaulted ceilings, huge master suite & 5pc ens., hardwood floors, gas stove in f. room, full wet bar & much more. $445,000 • mls# 780182

Loads of upgrades, state-of-the-art heating & air purification system. Hardwood & tile. Master bdrm has large ensuite & jet tub. $389,900 • mls# 777739

Residential/commercial 2 bedrm renovated home. Live here – home buisness! $239,900 • mls# 781429

John Coburn

Jason Coleman

Jeff Wilson

Jeff Wilson

Gerry Coleman

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Mississippi River near golf course, 4 bedrm, walk-out to waterfront, hot tub, pool. $474,900 • mls# 785441

88 ft. of shoreline on pristine Palmerston Lake. Year-round 3 bedrm cottage with bunkie. Call now. $239,900 • mls# 745348

Semi-back split with 3 bedrms, 1 bath, hardwood flooring throughout, eat-in kitchen, L.L. family room & laundry. Single carport. Vacant & ready to occupy $192,500

Flooring is hardwood & ceramic, good-size bedrms, master has walk-in closet. Kitchen features large island & open to eating area, full basement. $249,900 • mls# 783599

Spacious “Carlton” model town home features 1644 sq. ft. (from builder’s plans) $234,900 • mls# 783730

Jason Coleman

Rhonda Brunke

Florence Wyman

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John Coburn

Gerry Coleman Broker of Record

John Coburn Broker

Marly Burke Broker

Jeff Wilson Sales Representative

Rhonda Brunke Sales Representative

Jason Coleman Sales Representative

Florence Wyman Sales Representative


Page 22 - THE PERTH COURIER - March 24, 2011

Contact us at: 1702 9th Line Beckwith RR#2, Carleton Place, ON • K7C 3P2 General Inquiries: 613-257-1539 or 1-800-535-4532 (613 area code) Public Works: 613-257-1810 or 1-800-535-4534 (613 area code) cmoyle@twp.beckwith.on.ca

SCHEDULED MEETING DATES 2011 The Meeting Dates are as follows: Monday March 28th Tuesday April 5th

7:00 PM 7:00 PM

Planning Council

Councillor Brian Dowdall Reeve Richard Kidd

Detailed agendas for meetings are available for review on the Township website at www.twp.beckwith.on.ca or at the Township Office 24 hours prior to the meeting

INFORMATION SESSION DRUGS AND ALCOHOL – HOW IT AFFECTS THE FAMILY Thursday March 24th, 2011 @7:00 p.m. Speaker: Erin Lee-Todd, Executive Director of Lanark County Interval House. Sponsored by the Municipal Substance Abuse Committee, Brunton Community Hall, Black’s Corners (Hwy. 15 & 9th Line). Light Refreshments – All are welcome.

FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT Featuring Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2 Friday, March 25th, 2011, Brunton Community Hall – 1702 9th Line at 7:00 p.m. FREE ADMISSION, ALL ARE WELCOME!! Popcorn, Chips, Pop & Water will be available at the canteen!!

THE CANADIAN SAFETY COUNCIL BABYSITTERS COURSE Hosted by the Beckwith Youth Committee. April 15th & 16th, 2011, Friday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. & Saturday 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Brunton Community Hall, 1702 9th Line Beckwith. $40 Registration Fee, taught by Heather Legge. Bring Your Lunch, must be 12 years of age or older. To register or for further information please contact the Beckwith Recreation Department at 613-257-1539. Forms can be found on-line at www. twp.beckwith.on.ca under Recreation ~ Youth Committee

QUILT COMMEMORATES HOME CHILDREN The British Home Child in Canada Memorial Quilt is paying a visit to the Perth Museum this month. The quilt commemorates the more than 100,000 home children who were sent from Britain to Canada between 1869 and 1930. Kassina Ryder photo

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Township of Beckwith invites qualified consultants to respond to the following 2011 request for proposal: 1. Financial Operational Review, AD2011-01.

Lombardy Tri Church Pancake Supper thank you our evening entertainment. It is estimated that 760 people were served from 4 to 7 p.m. We are pleased to announce that the two dental health programs, Dental Issues Group and the Tri County Dental Coalition, will each receive $1,300 because of the generous people in our community. Submitted by the Lombardy Tri Church

The Corporation may award this proposal in part, in whole or not at all.

WWW.TWP.BECKWITH.ON.CA

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The organizing committee of the Tri Church Pancake Supper would like to thank our many volunteers. Without their help, the supper would not be the success that it continues to be. Corporate sponsors and the local media have been very generous in their assistance once again. We would like to express our thanks to the Rideau Mellowdears and Robert Scott for

Award of the contract is subject to the approval of the Council of the Township of Beckwith. A complete package can be obtained by contacting: Cynthia Moyle, CAO/Clerk cmoyle@twp.beckwith.on.ca

For results, try The Perth Courier classifieds.

2 Wilson St. E., Perth

613-264-0123 1-800-552-7242 e-mail: info@ColdwellBankerPerth.com

OPEN HOUSE

OPEN HOUSE

OPEN HOUSE

NEW LISTING

Saturday March 26 • 1-2:30 p.m.

$254,000 - 2 minutes from downtown Perth, this completely renovated side-split offers more than 1600 square feet of quality living space on a mature landscaped & wooded 2.86 acre lot. Prefect for a home business or large family. Open living/dining/kitchen area on main floor with 3 bedrooms & a full bath on the upper level. Family room, 4th bedroom & partial bath on lower level is suitable for a home based business. Basement offers either large finished rec room (or 5th bedroom if required) and laundry/utility room! MLS#782546. Bob Ferguson (c) 613-812-8871 • www.bobsperthhomes.ca

Saturday March 26 • 1-2:30 p.m. 469 Christie Lake Rd. - Wonderful family home fronting on the Tay River only 3 kms from Perth. 3+2 bedrooms, 3 full bathrooms incl. en suite, sun room, finished basement with kitchen, double attached garage with access to main and lower levels, new shingles (2010), new HE propane furnace (2009). $359,000. Christian & Norene Allan, 613-207-0834

613 Townline Rd. Gorgeous, custom built bungalow on ~7.7 acres. 3 bedrooms, master has ensuite and walk-in closet, 3 bathrooms, studio/workshop, wide verandah, lower level with family room, rec room and kitchenette. From Smiths Falls, south on Hwy 29 towards Brockville: turn right onto Townline Rd.; travel 0.5 km to property on left. MLS# 778424. $299,900. Norene Allan 613-812-0407

SUNDAY, MARCH 27 • 1 - 3 P.M. Directions - Hwy. 511 from Perth to Balderson. Left onto Fallbrook Rd. 2.5 km to stop. Turn right and proceed 3 km to property on the right. 1158 Fallbrook Rd. 6 year old chalet style three bedroom, 2 bath home privately set on 30 acres, large wooded areas with trails. Access to Little Mud Lake feeding into the Mississippi River. Custom kitchen, living room with a wall of natural light, dining room with patio door to side deck plus two bedrooms & a bath are on the main level. Master bedroom, ensuite & walk-in closet are on the upper level. Family room, wood burning fireplace, storage, utility, laundry & two other rooms are on the walk-out lower level. $319,000. MLS# 780411. Bob Ferguson (c) 613-812-8871 • www.bobsperthhomes.ca

NEW LISTING

IN TOWN

IN TOWN

IN TOWN

$149,000 - 29 Drummond St. E., Perth. Quick closing possible! Overlooking the Tay Basin and market, walk to all downtown amenities. This two bedroom angelstone & aluminum bungalow with maple floors has good sized living, dining & kitchen area as well as an attached single garage and main level laundry. Forced air gas heat. Metal roof. Nice level, private back yard with built-in brick b.B.Q. Great starter home or for those looking to downsize. Get into town and quit spending your fixed income on increasing gas prices! Bob Ferguson (c) 613-812-8871 • www.bobsperthhomes.ca

$269,000 - Terrific 3 br, brick bungalow on an oversized town lot, large bright living room with hardwood flooring, updated kitchen and bathroom, lower level family room, double garage, central air, natural gas heat, great backyard and a quiet street. MLS #782001. Oral Pretty 613-264-0123

$209,000 - Great 3 br bungalow close to Perth Mews Mall, recent upgrades include Berber carpet in living room, dining room and bedrooms, asphalt shingles, garden shed, large picture windows allow plenty of light to living and dining rooms, paved drive, bigger than it looks. MLS #782017. Oral Pretty 613-264-0123

$179,000 - PARENTS OF ALGONQUIN STUDENTS TAKE NOTE: 5 br, 3 bathroom home plus basement rec room, laundry and second second kitchen area, large living room and dining room with built-in cabinetry, updated kitchen, natural gas furnace plus fireplace, attached garage, house is bigger than it looks but needs some updating, quick closing available. MLS #780346. Oral Pretty 613-264-0123

OUT OF TOWN

OUT OF TOWN

OUT OF TOWN

OUT OF TOWN

$329,900 - Terrific 5-year-old family home shows like new, 3 br, 2 bath, main-floor laundry, hardwood floors throughout, propane fireplace, large master br with ensuite and walk-in closet, double attached garage, central air, high speed, 2 acre lot, move in condition. MLS #778246. Oral Pretty 613-264-0123

$199,000 - Cute 2 storey, 4 br brick home sitting on 5 newly surveyed acres, fieldstone fireplace, HE propane furnace 2009, central air, electrical panel wired for generator (included), two storey barn with 32’x17’ loft, close to schools and downtown Lanark. MLS #772817. Oral Pretty 613-264-0123

$379,000 - Gorgeous year-old custom built, 4 br, 3 bath home in Sheridan Estates, hardwood floors, ceramic tile, vaulted ceiling, master ensuite and walk-in closet, stone fireplace, custom kitchen with island and walk-in pantry, sun room off kitchen, oversized 2 vehicle garage. MLS # 781976. Oral Pretty 613-264-0123

$139,900 - Cute 2 br bungalow on a gorgeous 1.5 acre lot close to Blue Heron Golf Course, recent upgrades include flooring, drywall, roof, Fabritec kitchen, full insulated unfinished basement, year-old propane furnace, 16’x14’ deck overlooking lilac and apple trees, walking distance to golf course and Mississippi River. MLS# 785107. Oral Pretty 613-264-0123

WATERFRONT

ACREAGE

COTTAGE NEAR PERTH AND WESTPORT - CLEAN CROSBY LAKE – Great swimming - sandy wade-in or dive-in at the end of the dock! Charming 2 bedroom cedar cottage plus sleeping cabin. MLS # 769020. $269,000 Call Barbara Shepherd, Cell 613-326-1361

$359,000 - 390 acres of hardwood and softwood bush with over 8,000 ft. frontage on the Bolton Creek, rolling terrain, scenic and private with trails for 4-wheeling, hiking, skiing and hunting, ideal for nature lovers and those wanting to just get away and relax. MLS #785299. Oral Pretty 613-264-0123

OUT OF TOWN

282 McVeety Road – Elmgrove to Hughes to McVeety. Private Nature Retreat – traditional, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, red brick farmhouse built in 1895 – many updates and wonderful convenient extras added. The current owners love the privacy, sights and sounds of nature, ski and walking trails, and the relaxing warmth and character – you will, too! Come see it – 13+ acres, 10 min. to Perth - $354,900. MLS # 777616 Call Joanne Bennell, 613 812-0505 or Barbara Shepherd, 613 326-1361

* Sales Representative

** Broker

*** Broker of Record

451932

www.ColdwellBankerPerth.com

Perth Courier  

March 24, 2011

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