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Life ScienceS Invest in Canada

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Canada: A World leading location to Conduct Clinical trials

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Publisher, CeO Steve Montague

anada is a world leading location for pharmaceutical and medical device companies to conduct their clinical trials. Both publicly available information and testimonials from leading global companies doing research in Canada show why many companies choose Canada for their clinical development projects based on its unique combination of quality and efficiency. A clinical trials investment in Canada provides the greatest returns by producing high quality, timely research that generates a robust evidence package in support of new product commercialization. In addition, the prospects of the clinical trials industry in Canada hold the promise of continued growth, as its main players continue to innovate and cooperate in various collective ways and therapeutic areas to maintain this competitive edge. THE FACTS As of October 2014, there were 2,971 active clinical trials in Canada. Canada has the highest number of active clinical trials per capita among G7 nations. Canadian clinicians are conducting clinical trials across all major therapeutic areas. GLOBAL LEADER IN QUALITY The quality of Canadian clinical research is outstanding, thanks to several unique assets stemming from its population demographics, labour force and health care system. These assets include Canada’s ethnically diverse population, universal healthcare coverage, leading universities, and major hospitals and health research centres staffed with highly qualified investigators, as well as national centres

of excellence in specific therapeutic areas for commercialization. DIVERSE POPULATION SUPPORTS BETTER CLINICAL TRIALS Canada, with a population of almost 35 million people, has one of the most ethnically diverse populations, which greatly assist with studies that require large, genetically diverse pools of patients. Having a greater diversity of patients enrolled in clinical trials can lead to enhanced drug development outcomes1 and Canada has the diversity to support enrollment goals. UNIVERSAL HEALTHCARE SYSTEM Canada’s universal healthcare system provides quality and cost advantages for conducting clinical trials. The quality of care received by patients is world class and largely uniform across the country, with a per capita spending of $4,6762. On average, there are 2.1 doctors3 and 7.9 nurses4 per 1,000 people. This high level of spending and universal medical coverage ensures that a common and high standard of care is being delivered to patients before, during and after the clinical trial, resulting in superior data accuracy and quality from all trial sites. Lechleiter J. Closing the Diversity Gap in Clinical Trials. 2 World Health Organization website. http:// www.who.int/countries/can/en/ (accessed 9 October 2014) 3 Globe and Mail article. Canada has more doctors, making more money than ever. Published Sept 26th, 2013 4 Canadian Federation of Nurses unions. https://nursesunions.ca/sites/default/ files/2012.backgrounder.nursing_ workforce.e_0.pdf Report published Feb 2012, accessed 9 October 2014

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ViCe-President Ed Martin MArKetinG COOrdinAtOr Sabrina Woods interns Alisa Torano Brooke Jamieson PerspectiveTM Life Sciences was produced independently of the Government of Canada and Industry Canada. Contents are copyrighted and may not be reproduced without the written consent of Perspective Marketing Inc. The publisher is not liable for any views expressed in the articles and opinions do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher or the Government of Canada and Industry Canada.

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400 Bramptonians keep Medtronic ticking as Medtronic keeps Canadians ticking.

Brampton is about you, about what you can be, about what we can be together. Alive. Energized. Unstoppable. Together, we will make possibilities, ideas, things that keep us moving, things that keep our hearts going. Things like Medtronic makes. Discover what our fast-growing, people-powered Canadian city economy can do for you. Scan the QR code or visit peoplepoweredeconomy.ca


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Canada’s Cost and Tax Advantages Biomedical R & D Canada has a thriving industry in biomedical R & D, with Canadian companies spending close to $900 million in 2012 on R & D activities in the biopharmaceutical sector alone.

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ther Canadian R & D specializations include agricultural biotech, immunology and microbiology. A competitive environment for business costs and business taxes in Canada helps to support this industry. In its 2014 study of global business locations, Competitive Alternatives1, KPMG found that Canada offers the lowest business cost structure and the lowest business tax burden among the G-7 countries for biomedical R & D firms. Details of these findings are presented below, reflecting business costs and taxes for a model biomedical research facility. CANADA’S COST HIGHLIGHTS Biomedical R & D firms based in Canada benefit from total labour costs that are 11.3 percent lower than equivalent costs in the U.S. Competitive salary levels and lower healthcare costs in Canada generate these savings. Leasing costs for suburban office park space in Canada’s major cities are low relative to most other G-7 countries, with savings of 17 percent compared to the G-7 average for this R & D facility. Electricity costs in Canada are 21 percent below the G-7

average for this biomedical research firm – a smaller cost component but still adding to the savings in Canada. Taxes represent the final component of Canada’s cost advantage, as detailed on the next page. Combining all cost factors, Canada has the lowest business cost environment among all G-7 countries, with total business costs 12.3 percent below the U.S. The 2014 edition of Competitive Alternatives was released in March 2014. The results from that study, including the results reported here, reflect exchange rates that were in effect in the fourth quarter of 2013. These results are sensitive to exchange rate changes. During 2014, the U.S. dollar appreciated in value relative to most global currencies, including the Canadian dollar. For the model biotech firm, Canada’s cost advantage relative to the United States increases from 12.3 percent to 21.2 percent at

January 2015 exchange rates. The stronger U.S. dollar significantly increases Canada’s cost advantage for international biotech firms. CANADA’S TAX HIGHLIGHTS Canada’s generous R & D tax credits include the possibility of refundable R & D credits for certain types of firms in some jurisdictions. For this model biomedical R & D firm, eligibility for a refundable R & D tax credit results in a negative effective rate of corporate income tax of -8.2 percent, the second lowest in the G-7. Canada’s statutory labour costs are also the lowest in the G-7 and its costs for other corporate taxes are also low, ranking third among the G-7 countries. Overall, Canada’s total tax index for this biomedical R & D firm is 38.7 – the lowest among the G-7 countries and reflecting total tax costs 61.3 percent lower than in the United States.


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British Columbia’s life science sector thriving in slowed world economy

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ritish Columbia’s life sciences industry is a significant economic contributor enjoying a growth phase. Over 300 companies from biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, medical devices, medical technologies and digital health call British Columbia home. With 177,000 employees and $14.4B in direct GDP contribution, the life sciences industry is embedded in the larger life sciences ecosystem in the province, which brings together academia, health institutions, hospitals, government and industry. Each play a vital role in the commercialisation of innovation. Our industry relies on academia for the discovery and development that our entrepreneurs use to fuel innovation. In turn, the rapid identification of commercial potential leads to an environment in which preclinical and clinical research can be performed within our health institutions and hospitals. Government provides meaningful support for early stage companies as well as the infrastructure relied upon to research and develop innovation. To create a life science company, we need both entrepreneurs and a robust life sciences ecosystem, to help grow and mature commercial innovations. In British Columbia, we have the ingredients to successfully and frequently, commercialise innovation. We are home to one of the most entrepreneurrich regions in North America. Developing companies is one of our strengths, and B.C. has more young companies with

ten or more employees than anywhere else in Canada. We are also supported by one of the most active angel investor communities in Canada, in part due to the thoughtfullyconceived EBC (Eligible Business Corporation) and VCC (Venture Capital Corporation) programmes of our province. Our strategic advisor community has helped craft unique and value-creating deals. We have the experience and success of accessing public markets, with no less than six British Columbian companies having IPOs (Initial Public Offerings) during the past 24 months, with five of the six, now listed on NASDAQ. We have our governments, both provincial and federal, who have renewed their support of this knowledge-based economy, (e.g. BC Tech Fund and the latest 2016 Federal Budget), that will fuel commercial development and advance our innovation to benefit the economy, and most importantly, patients. To continue our success, what is it that we need? 1) We need

synchronisation of our efforts within the province to a greater degree and coalesce collective energies around clear priorities for the life sciences sector; 2) we need to continue to support the best and the brightest research translation to commercialisation; 3) we need to constantly attract capital to fund the development of companies in one of the most capital intensive industries; 4) we need to continually attract global talent to develop our community and grow our company’s knowledge and skill base; and, 5) we need to expedite access to innovation within the healthcare system so that those who need it most, namely British Columbian patients, can benefit first. LifeSciences BC’s commitment is to continue to play a central role in achieving this success. We will continue to catalyse locally, while connecting our community globally. This work is only possible with the support of our Sponsors and Members; for this, we would like to say thank you. Our collective success is, and will continue to be, rooted in our past. When future entrepreneurs of British Columbia’s life sciences companies look back on what we achieve in the next five years, they will hopefully be proud of the care and energy used to prioritise the development of our life science ecosystem. Our ability to work collaboratively will establish the foundation of our future bio-economy, delivering not only economic value for the province, but better health for all British Columbians.


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Providence Health Care Research Institute:

Discovering Real Life Health Solutions

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rovidence Health Care Research Institute (PHCRI) is the research enterprise of Providence Health Care (PHC) and partner to The University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University. PHC’s largest site, St. Paul’s Hospital, is an acute care, teaching and research hospital located in the heart of downtown Vancouver. Our research is directly aligned with priority care programs, with a focus on six main areas: HIV/AIDS, heart and lung health, kidney health, healthy aging, urban health and addiction, and mental health. BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS (BC-CfE) is Canada’s largest HIV/ AIDS research and treatment facility. Pioneered at BC-CfE, the renowned Treatment as Prevention® strategy has been adopted in all parts of the world, and forms the basis of UNAIDS’s 90-90-90 target to end the spread of HIV by 2030. BC-CfE also leads urban health and addiction initiatives, improving knowledge and treatment for health issues in urban populations. Centre for Heart Lung Innovation (HLI) links basic science and clinical innovation to develop innovative approaches preventing and treating heart, lung and critical care disease. Researchers work in a multidisciplinary environment, developing solutions to the biggest health challenges: atherosclerosis and heart failure, emphysema and other chronic pulmonary diseases, severe infections and multiple organ failure.

Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences (CHÉOS) is one of Canada’s foremost health outcomes research organizations. Scientists examine determinants in Vancouver’s most marginalized populations including those with various addictions, aboriginal and women’s health. Canada’s largest study of Aboriginal people with addiction to injection drugs is being conducted from St. Paul’s Hospital. Centre for Heart Valve Innovation is an internationally-recognized pioneer of innovative, minimally invasive heart valve replacement procedures. The first transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedure in North America was performed at St. Paul’s Hospital, with over 1500 procedures performed to date in Vancouver alone. The Centre provides education and training to professionals around the world Through the St. Paul’s Virtual Teaching Laboratory (VTL), education and training is provided to professionals around the world.

Centre of Excellence for Prevention of Organ Failure (PROOF Centre) is a National Centre for the Commercialization of Research, leading the discovery of practical solutions to the expanding burden that vital organ failure imposes on Canadians. The team researches disease risks, develop biomarkers of occurrence, severity and progression to organ failure, and an accelerated, personalized approach by targeting disease mechanisms. British Columbia is a leader in a national patientcentred kidney disease network, a unique and innovative partnership of patients, researchers, health care providers, policy makers, industry and renal agencies to transform care for kidney disease patients. Kidney disease research at PHC has led to an integrated clinical research model that has improved efficiency in the health system for patient and provider. To learn more, visit www.providencehealthcare.org and www.providenceresearch.ca.


genome british columbia • genomics: around the world in every living thing

Genomics: Global Game-Changer Genome British Columbia’s investment into genomics research is generating jobs, creating and advancing new companies and attracting national and international investments to help address challenges facing key economic sectors. Imagine a world where health is a given, not a nice to have. Where forests are numerous, oceans and fields plentiful and energy clean. This world is within reach and that is because genomics, today’s technology, is making life better. The knowledge and innovations emerging from genomics has led to products, processes, and technologies that can address complex biological challenges across a number of sectors.

This is not a dream, we are that close. Some ways that we are putting genomics into action in natural resource sectors:

Agriculture – Pinpointing desirable traits for better wine – Advancing tests for Avian Influenza – Developing vaccines for Johne’s disease in cattle

Fisheries & Aquaculture – Supporting wild fisheries management – Delivering solutions for aquaculture in a changing climate – Problem-solving to mitigate the effects of ocean acidification

Forestry – Selecting the right trees to assuage climate change – Testing for pests prior to entering Canadian ports – Mitigating Mountain Pine Beetle

Environment – Preventing honey bee colony collapse – Identifying sources of watershed contaminants – Sustaining social licenses to operate

Energy – Seeking clean energy solutions – Identifying new reserves – Providing new tools for regulators

Mining – Managing mine waste with improved passive remediation – Providing baseline data for monitoring – Improving methods for less toxic metal leaching


Close to 55% of our current portfolio is invested in health. The potential for genomic knowledge, tools and technologies to deliver benefits to BC is vast, encompassing:

— Improving health outcomes; — Improving healthcare system efficiency; — Stimulating economic growth; and — Fueling scientific discoveries. Health – Diagnosing hereditary cancers quickly – Preventing adverse drug reactions in children – Recognizing rare disease at birth

Open for Business Genome BC also offers commercialization support to companies developing life sciences technologies in BC. The recently launched, Genome BC Industry Innovation Fund (I2) offers repayable growth capital to businesses commercializing innovative life science technology-based products, processes or services. Spanning the spectrum from working with start-up companies spun out of academic institutions or partnering with an existing company that has benefited from new research, Genome BC is open for business.

By the numbers*, Genome BC has:

300+ Fostered 300+ international collaborations

$536m

$200m

Attracted $536 million in coinvestments from international, industry and federal sources

Advanced 33 local companies; these companies have raised private investment of approximately $200 million and secured over $1 billion in co-development deals

21,149

*Economic and Social Impact Analysis MNP LLP.

Created 21,149 jobs

March 2014

Commercializing genomics is good for everyone We will all benefit from the new discoveries, knowledge and products and services geared at keeping us healthier, mitigating against the impact of climate change, developing alternative fuels, improving food quality and making our environment and resource industries more sustainable.

Call us today to learn more about Genome BC’s suite of programs and funding opportunities – driving BC’s bioeconomy and improving the lives of British Columbians. genomebc.ca

+1-604-738-8072


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MSFHR – Supporting health innovation in British Columbia

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ehind every great discovery is a great researcher, and behind every great researcher is a support network that allows creative minds to flourish. In the province of British Columbia, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR) provides this support to the people and projects that help drive BC’s health research innovation. Since its inception in 2001, MSFHR has been nurturing the research careers of BC’s most exceptional trainees and emerging scholars. With a mandate from the provincial government to increase BC’s

capacity for health research, MSFHR has invested more than $330 million in its award programs. MSFHR-funded researchers have been able to leverage that investment, attracting more than $1.1 billion in additional funding from national, international, nonprofit, and private-sector sources. Through its funding activities, the Foundation has played a role in growing BC’s health research sector into a vibrant community that ranks among the world’s leaders in developing new treatments, products and companies and in responding to emerging health threats. Made-in-BC solutions are

transforming the way major health issues are diagnosed and treated – including HIV/AIDS, breast cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. BC-based researchers are also influencing international policy, for example, in the prevention of communicable diseases such as HPV and H1N1. MSFHR is an important component of BC’s thriving life sciences ecosystem. Together with its partners in academia, health care, industry and notfor-profit, the Foundation enables cutting-edge research that influences decision-making, improves health and health care, and contributes to social and economic well-being.

15 YEARS

2001 – 2016

Celebrating 15 years of impact in BC’s life sciences community Over the past 15 years, we have supported nearly 1,600 individual researchers and 80 research teams

MSFHR Trainee Awards prepare the next generation of health researchers for careers in:

Since 2001, the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research has empowered world-class health innovation with global impact.

health authorities

private companies universities

MSFHR Scholars

94%

MSFHR Scholar Awards led to:

remain in BC as health research leaders

$1.1 billion additional funding attracted

$117M

>140 patents filed

investment

By investing in excellence, we support a vibrant health research community in BC that: •

Attracts and retains top international experts.

Leverages funding to develop innovative ideas into new products, new treatments and new companies.

Excels internationally in many areas of research, including cancer, genomics and HIV/AIDS.

4,700

apprentices trained

200 – 1285 West Broadway, Vancouver | 604 730 8322 | info@msfhr.org | www.msfhr.org | Twitter: @msfhr | YouTube: themsfhr


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The region’s culturally diverse With over eight million and climbing, the Toronto region is POOL ACCESS TO A HIGHLY DIVERSE PARTICIPANT ACCESS ACCESS ACCESS ACCESS TO TO A HIGHLY Aglobal TO HIGHLY TO Apeople A HIGHLY DIVERSE HIGHLY DIVERSE DIVERSE DIVERSE PARTICIPANT PARTICIPANT PARTICIPANT PARTICIPANT POOL POOL POOL POOL Montreal Montreal Montreal Montreal Montreal ng YUL YUL YUL GLOBALYYZ CLINICAL TRIALS YYZ YYZ YUL YYZ YYZ connectivity in the workplace. the only growing metropolitan region inPOOL North America, welcoming sgreater than inglobal the United ACCESS ESS ACCESS TO A ACCESS TO HIGHLY A TO HIGHLY A TO HIGHLY DIVERSE A DIVERSE HIGHLY DIVERSE PARTICIPANT DIVERSE PARTICIPANT PARTICIPANT PARTICIPANT POOL POOL POOL The Toronto region Human Health & Sciences (HHS) cluster is Montreal Montreal Montreal Montreal YUL YUL YUL YUL YUL The region is home to a unique pool of potential clinical trial YTZ A SHORT FLIGHT AWAY TheThe region region The The isregion home is region home is tois home atohome unique a unique to to a pool unique a unique pool of potential of pool pool potential of of potential clinical potential clinical trial clinical clinical trial trial trial YTZ YTZ YTZ YYZ YYZYYZ YTZ YYZ ment ACCESS ACCESS ACCESS ACCESS TOTO ACCESS A HIGHLY ATO HIGHLY TO AA HIGHLY TO DIVERSE HIGHLY ADIVERSE HIGHLY DIVERSE DIVERSE PARTICIPANT DIVERSE PARTICIPANT PARTICIPANT PARTICIPANT PARTICIPANT POOL POOL POOL POOL POOL 100,000 new residents each year. processes,about and home to the largest geographic concentration of health sciences Montreal Montreal Montreal Montreal Toronto Montreal participants due to its large, ethnically diverse population. Nearly half ng The egion The region isregion home The isparticipants home region to is home a unique toisdue ahome to unique apool unique to pool of a unique potential pool of potential of pool potential clinical ofethnically clinical potential trial clinical trial clinical trial trial Toronto Toronto Toronto Toronto YTZ YTZYTZ YTZ participants participants participants due to its to due its large, due to large, to its ethnically its large, ethnically large, ethnically diverse diverse population. diverse diverse population. population. population. Nearly Nearly half Nearly half Nearly half half COST ADVANTAGES YYZ YYZ YYZ YYZ YYZ people and climbing, the region ispool make the region ideal assets in The The region region The The is region home The region isToronto home region is tohome is a to home unique is a are unique home to to aCanada. unique adiverse to unique pool a of unique pool potential of pool potential of of potential clinical potential of clinical potential trial clinical clinical trial clinical trial trial trial YTZYTZ YTZ YTZYTZ Toronto Toronto Toronto Toronto of all Torontonians are foreign-born, a much higher percentage cipants participants participants due participants to due its due to large, its to due large, its ethnically large, to ethnically its large, ethnically diverse ethnically diverse population. diverse population. Nearly population. Nearly half Nearly half Nearly half half of all of all Torontonians of Torontonians of all all Torontonians Torontonians are are foreign-born, foreign-born, are foreign-born, foreign-born, apopulation. much a much higher apool much a higher much percentage higher percentage higher percentage percentage than than than thanthan Boston ment Boston Boston Boston Boston Toronto’s lower clinical trial management costs than in the United Chicago politan region in North America, welcoming Chicago ChicagoChicago Chicago Toronto Toronto Toronto Toronto Toronto participants participants participants participants due participants due to its to due large, due its tolarge, due to its ethnically its large, to large, its ethnically large, ethnically diverse diverse ethnically diverse population. diverse population. diverse population. population. Nearly population. Nearly half Nearly Nearly halfNearly half half half that of many major North American cities. of allofTorontonians all Torontonians of all are Torontonians foreign-born, are foreign-born, are foreign-born, are a foreign-born, much aother much higher aethnically much higher apercentage much higher percentage higher percentage than percentage than than than that that of many of that many that of other of many other many major other major other North major North major American North American North American American cities. cities. cities. cities. BOS BOS BOSBOS gTorontonians A SHORT FLIGHT AWAY BostonBoston Boston BostonBOS ORD States, streamlined operations and approvals processes, and Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago ORD ORD ORD ORD dents eachofyear. THE TORONTO REGION HHS CLUSTER IS MADE all of Torontonians allmany ofTorontonians of all all Torontonians ofTorontonians all are Torontonians are foreign-born, foreign-born, are are foreign-born, foreign-born, arecities. aforeign-born, much a much ahigher much ahigher much apercentage higher much higher percentage higher percentage percentage than percentage than than thanUP than of that many that of many of other that many other of major other major North other major North American major North American North American cities. American cities. cities. YUL BOS BOS BOS BOS Boston BostonBoston Boston Boston Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago Chicago recognition of data by U.S and EU authorities, make the region ideal ORD ORD ORD ORD PANT POOL OF A WIDE VARIETY OF ORGANIZATIONS JFK that that of many of that that many of other that of many other many of major other many major other North major other North major American major North American North North American American cities. cities. American cities. cities. cities. Montreal BOS BOS BOS BOSBOS ACCESS LEADING-EDGE INFORMATICS AND DATA JFK JFK JFK JFK New York g ACCESS ACCESS ACCESS ACCESS LEADING-EDGE LEADING-EDGE LEADING-EDGE LEADING-EDGE INFORMATICS INFORMATICS INFORMATICS INFORMATICS AND AND DATA AND DATA AND DATA DATA YorkYork New New York York YYZ ORD ORDORD ORD ORD clinical trials.NewNew for global LGA LGA LGA LGALGA Philadelphia JFK JFK JFK JFK Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia al clinical trialLEADING-EDGE YTZ ACCESS ESS ACCESS LEADING-EDGE ACCESS LEADING-EDGE LEADING-EDGE INFORMATICS INFORMATICS INFORMATICS INFORMATICS AND AND DATA AND DATA AND DATA DATA New York New York NewPhiladelphia York New York WAY The region possesses robust digital infrastructure, as well as TheThe region region The The possesses region possesses region possesses possesses robust robust digital robust digital robust infrastructure, digital infrastructure, digital infrastructure, infrastructure, as as well well as as as well well as as PHL LGA LGA LGA LGA % AND PHL PHL PHL PHL JFK JFK JFK JFK JFK Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia ACCESS ACCESS ACCESS ACCESS LEADING-EDGE LEADING-EDGE ACCESS LEADING-EDGE LEADING-EDGE LEADING-EDGE INFORMATICS INFORMATICS INFORMATICS INFORMATICS INFORMATICS AND DATA AND DATA AND DATA AND DATA DATA & Toronto New New York York New New York York New York 13 Nearly half spopulation. Pharma YUL a universal healthcare system to comprehensive The egion The region possesses region possesses region possesses robust possesses robust digital robust digital infrastructure, robust digital infrastructure, digital infrastructure, infrastructure, as as well as assupport well as as as well asdata data Washington aThe universal a universal a universal a healthcare universal healthcare healthcare healthcare system system to system system support to support towell to support comprehensive support comprehensive comprehensive comprehensive data datadata Washington Washington Washington Washington IAD LGA LGA LGA LGALGA ACCESS PHL TO APHL HIGHLY DIVERSE PARTICIPANT POOL IAD IAD IAD IAD PHL PHL Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia Philadelphia % Medicine 31 gher percentage than Montreal The The region region The The possesses region The region possesses region possesses possesses robust robust possesses digital robust robust digital infrastructure, robust digital digital infrastructure, digital infrastructure, infrastructure, infrastructure, as well as well as as well aswell asas well as asManufacturing Boston collection, analytics and sharing. aversal universal a universal healthcare a healthcare universal healthcare system healthcare system to system support to system support to comprehensive support tocomprehensive support comprehensive comprehensive data data data data Washington Washington Washington Washington collection, collection, collection, collection, analytics analytics analytics and analytics and sharing. sharing. and and sharing. sharing. YYZ Chicago IAD IAD IAD IAD PHL PHL PHL PHL PHL The region is home to a unique pool of potential clinical trial s. BOS s YTZ a universal a universal a universal asharing. healthcare universal aand healthcare universal healthcare healthcare system healthcare system system to system support to support system to to support comprehensive support to comprehensive support comprehensive comprehensive comprehensive data data data data data Washington Washington Washington Washington Washington Electromedical Instrument collection, ction, collection, analytics collection, analytics analytics and and analytics sharing. sharing. and sharing. IAD IAD IAD IAD IAD ORD participants due to its large, ethnically diverse population. Nearly half Manufacturing Toronto collection, collection, collection, collection, analytics analytics collection, analytics and analytics and sharing. analytics sharing. and and sharing. and sharing. sharing. YUL EMPLOYMENT of all Torontonians are foreign-born, a much higher percentage than ABOUT TO Health! AND DATA New York JFK Montreal Medical Equipment &LGA YYZ BostonINSTITUTIONS %INSTITUTIONS WORLD-LEADING ACADEMIC AND HOSPITALS 27 Chicago WORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING ACADEMIC ACADEMIC ACADEMIC ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS AND AND AND HOSPITALS AND HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS Philadelphia that of many other major North American cities. Manufacturing TO Health! an industry-led promotion cooperative focused et-rich for building a diverse YTZ BOS isSupplies ure,WORLD-LEADING asenvironment well as PHL ORD ORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING ACADEMIC ACADEMIC ACADEMIC ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS AND AND HOSPITALS AND HOSPITALS AND HOSPITALS HOSPITALS on raising the profile of the Toronto region’s Human Health & ent portfolio at attractive valuations. Toronto prehensive data Testing Labs Washington IAD&AND WORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING WORLD-LEADING ACADEMIC ACADEMIC ACADEMIC ACADEMIC ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS INSTITUTIONS AND AND HOSPITALS AND HOSPITALS AND HOSPITALS HOSPITALS HOSPITALS ACCESS LEADING-EDGE INFORMATICS AND DATA Sciences (HHS) cluster. R&D JFK New York Boston ng, geographically concentrated ecosystem LGA Philadelphia The region possesses robust digital infrastructure, as well as TO Health! actively promotes and builds profile for the entire Medical & vibrant universities and colleges, world14 % BOS PHL + Diagnostic Laboratories a universal healthcare system to support comprehensive data Toronto region HHS cluster by highlighting its strengths and arch hospitals, established companies and Washington% IAD 15 aceutical, utical, cal, collection, analytics and sharing. New York JFK successes and recognizing industry leaders within the cluster. ps. AND LGAHOSPITALS +INSTITUTIONS Philadelphia TO Health! also assists groups with their own promotional cal, aceutical, tical, PHL outreach through TO Health! brand affiliation and resources, S Washington IAD CLUSTER FACTS which can be used to powerfully present the region as aWORLD-LEADING highly nof an advanced, low-cost businessHHS environment ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS HOSPITALS attractive place to live, work and invest. ups ax incentives and government support. • $1B+ in research funding at n • $840M+ in universities centralized healthcare data and a large, diverse and partner hospitals OUR VISION ups research revenue

The vision of the TO Health! initiative is to make the Toronto • University of Toronto #2 50+ Headquarters offor region •globally renowned its dynamic, innovative human in the WORLD for publications multinational pharmaceutical, health and sciences ecosystem, positioning it among the and citations medical device and nt clinical research networks and a thriving, world’s top five human health and sciences clusters. health companies nical research community with access to over life science graduates • 9,300+ nual research spending, producing global OUR MISSION annually • 800+ home-grown nd translational research. companies start-ups Through realizing ourand vision, we will increase revenue growth • 9,500+ researchers and opportunities for the Toronto region by attracting more risk work in a growing, dynamic and culturally research staff

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he Toronto region is home OF A WIDE VARIETY OF ORGANIZATIO LEADERSHIP to the largest geographic World-leading TO Health! is the outcome of a unique, industry-led initiative to A PERFECT MIX OF strengthen and promote the Toronto region HHS cluster. Started concentration of health academic and 13 % in 2012 by the Toronto Region Board of Trade, this initiative sciences assets in Canada, with attracted top industry leaders to form an HHS Committee. % translational 31 broad consultations across the cluster to identify gaps strong connections to otherThrough and understand needs, the Committee has developed a threeresearch year action plan to unify the narrative for human health and global centres of health science A CONVERGENCE OF KEY ASSETS sciences in the Toronto region under a single, distinctive brand expertise – all of which has and elevate its profile in the international arena. EMPLOYMENT AND created a thriving HHS cluster The core of the HHS cluster The Toronto region Human Health & Sciences (HHS) cluster is 27 % with great potential for growth are world leading universities, home to the largest geographic concentration of health sciences and investment that would place colleges well as research assets inasCanada. it among the world’s leading HHS and community hospitals. IN THE ONLY clusters. The sees over $1.2 HHS CLUSTER 14 % IS MADE THEregion TORONTO REGION UP GROWING Billion dollarsVARIETY in research OF A WIDE OF ORGANIZATIONS 15 % REGION theraPeUtic area eXPertise METRO funding and our research hospitals see over $840 million ChrOniC For more information, visit us at www.TOHealth.ca% CAnCer neurOsCienCe 13University diseAses or follow Pharma & on Twitter @TOHealthToronto DISCOVER THE ACTION! inusresearch revenues. % Manufacturing 31 of Toronto is ranked 2nd in HHS Medicine CLUSTER FACTS Cellular and regenerative Medicine Electromedical Instrument the world for publications Manufacturing • $1B+ in research funding at and citations. The region is • $ EMPLOYMENT universities and partner hospitals Genomics graduating over 9,300 life Medical Equipment & re 27 % Supplies Manufacturing sciences students annually • University of Toronto #2 and has over 9,500 researchers imaging and Medical devices • H Testing Labs & in theR&D WORLD for publications m and research staff leading the and citations m research and developing in % digital and informatics Medical & 14 h our key areas of expertise. Diagnostic Laboratories • 9,300+ life science graduates 15 %

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AcceSS to A HiGHLY diverSe PArtiCiPAnt Pool

A Centre for GlobAl CliniCAl triAls

The region is home to a unique pool of potential clinical trial participants due to its large, ethnically diverse population. Nearly half of all Torontonians are foreign-born, a much higher percentage than that of many other major North American cities.

AcceSS LeAdinG-edGe inFormAticS And dAtA

coSt AdvAntAGeS Toronto’s lower clinical trial management costs less than in the United States. A streamlined operations and approvals processes, and recognition of data by U.S and EU authorities, make the region ideal for global clinical trials.

The region is building a robust digital infrastructure to support comprehensive data collection, analytics and data sharing from our single payer universal healthcare system. YuL Montreal

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connected to tHe WorLd The Toronto region is connected to other major cities around the world by two international airports. The region’s culturally diverse talent pool also enables greater global connectivity in the workplace.

Companies in the Toronto region can access generous provincial and federal programs that leverage their investment dollars. For example, the Scientific Research and Experimental Development Tax Incentive Program (SR&ED) provides investment tax credits for those conducting research and development.

Home to An eStABLiSHed And connected indUStrY ecoSYStem The Toronto region offers a convergence of leading medical research with international business expertise and advanced manufacturing capabilities. It is home to an established industry ecosystem, complete with multinational and home- grown companies, employing highly skilled professionals, academics and technicians.

An AdvAnced business environment

INVESTORS

ABOUT TO Health!

Discover a target-rich environment for building a diverse health investment portfolio at attractive valuations.

TO Health! is an industry-led promotion cooperative focused on raising the profile of the Toronto region’s Human Health & Sciences (HHS) cluster.

Tap into a strong, geographically concentrated ecosystem complete with vibrant universities and colleges, worldrenowned research hospitals, established companies and growing start-ups.

BUSINESSES Take advantage of an advanced, low-cost business environment

TO Health! actively promotes and builds profile for the entire Toronto region HHS cluster by highlighting its strengths and successes and recognizing industry leaders within the cluster. TO Health! also assists groups with their own promotional outreach through TO Health! brand affiliation and resources, which can be used to powerfully present the region as a highly attractive place to live, work and invest.


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A Great Place to Live and Work

W

ith over 8 million people and climbing, the Toronto region is the only growing metropolitan region in North America, welcoming about 100,000 new residents each year. Canada’s skills-based immigration system ensures that many are highly skilled. With robust technology and transportation infrastructures, an excellent quality of life, and one of the world’s most educated and culturally diverse workforces, the region is a highly attractive business location and longterm investment option. Residents enjoy a high quality of life, with big city career and leisure opportunities, without the sacrifices normally associated with big city living. The Toronto region boasts one of the lowest costs of living in comparison to other global cities. Based on factors of safety, livability, cost of living, business

“Toronto has been ranked by The Economist’s Intelligence Unit’s 2015 Safe Cities Index as the #1 Best Place to Live.”

environment, democracy, and food security, Toronto has been ranked “#1 Best Place to Live”.

ABOUT TO Health!

TO Health! is an industry-led promotion cooperative focused on raising the profile of the Toronto region’s Human Health & Sciences (HHS) cluster. TO Health! actively promotes the cluster by highlighting its strengths and successes, recognizing industry leaders and connecting the region’s public and private sector networks. www.tohealth.ca

inVesTORs

Businesses

TALenT

Discover a target-rich environment for building a diverse health investment portfolio at attractive valuations.

Take advantage of an advanced, low-cost business environment with generous tax incentives and government support. Gain access to centralized healthcare data and a large, diverse pool of potential clinical trial patients. Over 50 multinational pharmaceutical medical device and digital health companies have their Canadian headquarters in the Toronto Region.

Be a part of vibrant clinical research networks and a thriving, independent clinical research community with access to over $1 billion in annual research spending, producing global caliber basic and translational research.

Tap into a strong, geographically concentrated ecosystem complete with vibrant universities and colleges, world- renowned research hospitals, established companies and growing start-ups.

Enjoy life and work in a growing, dynamic and culturally diverse, cosmopolitan region with one of the lowest costs of living of any city in North America.


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Canada’s Cost and Tax Advantages Pharmaceuticals Canada offers a dynamic and innovative environment for pharmaceutical companies, with Canadian pharmaceutical product manufacturers employing 27,000 people in 490 establishments in 2013.

O

ne of the keys to Canada’s success in the pharmaceutical industry is a competitive environment for business costs and business taxes. In its 2014 study of global business locations, Competitive Alternatives1, KPMG found that Canada offers the lowest business cost structure and

the lowest business tax burden among the G-7 countries for pharmaceutical products firms. Details of these findings are presented below, reflecting business costs and taxes for an independent prescription drug manufacturer. CANADA’S COST HIGHLIGHTS Pharmaceutical manufacturing operations located in Canada enjoy a 12.0 percent saving on total labour costs relative to their U.S. counterparts, with lower employee healthcare costs being a major contributor to the savings. For leasing of industrial facilities, costs in Canada are

very affordable—36 percent lower than the G-7 average for this prescription drug manufacturer. Low utility costs add to Canada’s cost advantage. For this firm, Canada’s industrial electricity costs rank as the second lowest in the G-7, while natural gas costs are more than 50 percent lower than in five of the G-7 countries. When all cost factors are combined, Canada has the lowest business cost structure among all G-7 countries, with total business costs 4.6 percent below the U.S. IMPACT OF EXCHANGE RATES The 2014 edition of Competitive Alternatives was released in March 2014. The results from that study, including the results reported here, reflect exchange rates that were in effect in the fourth quarter of 2013. These results are sensitive to exchange rate changes. During 2014, the U.S. dollar appreciated in value relative to most global currencies, including the Canadian dollar. For the model pharmaceutical firm, Canada’s cost advantage relative to the United States increases from 4.6 percent to 7.6 percent at January 2015 exchange rates. The stronger U.S. dollar significantly increases Canada’s cost advantage for international pharmaceutical firms. 1 Competitive Alternatives, KPMG’s Guide to International Business Location Costs and Competitive Alternatives, Special Report: Focus on Tax.


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Cost Competitive Clinical Trials EFFICIENT CLINICAL TRIAL ENVIRONMENT Canada offers an efficient and responsive regulatory system for clinical trials that is also cost competitive. Canada has multiple mechanisms in place to expedite clinical trial set-up time. These include efficient regulatory review processes, a patient enrollment process aided by numerous Canadian research networks, efficient clinical trial monitoring, and collaborative industry, government and academic partners. EFFICIENT CLINICAL TRIAL SET-UP AND PATIENT ENROLLMENT Canada has an efficient regulatory process that fosters the prompt launch of clinical trials. Set-up times are among the best in the world. Health Canada targets a 30-day review of clinical trial applications. In 2013, Health Canada achieved 99% of their target for all applications received. Canada has several large research networks that provide an effective way to rapidly access investigators, sites and patients across the country via a coordinated approach. These include NCIC Clinical Trials Group, Canadian HIV Trials Network, Maternal Infant Child & Youth Research Network, Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Network, Canadian Cardiovascular Research Network, Network of Networks, BC Clinical Research Infrastructure Network, and Alberta Clinical Research Consortium. Trial sites are close to Canada’s major population areas as well as to most of those in the US. The Canadian population is clustered around the Canada/US border,

with 75% of Canadians living within 160 km of the border, and 90% of the population living within 200 km of the border1. Similarly, many if not most of the largest population centers in the US are located near the Canadian border2. This mutual proximity leads to more efficient trial management by significantly reducing the travel burden and cost when monitoring and inspecting multiple sites for trials conducted in both countries. COST-COMPETITIVE ENVIRONMENT FOR THE DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT OF CLINICAL TRIALS Given the large expense of designing and managing global clinical trials, an important consideration are the annual operating costs of administrating clinical trials centers, both for those business costs relating to real estate and personnel. On this, two independent sources point to Canada’s strong competitive environment as a location in which to establish such centers: The Financial Times’ fDi Benchmark database3, an FDI tracking tool that can assess the relative competitiveness of more than 600 locations across over 65 sectors for hundreds of data points, reveals that most major Canadian cities are sig- nificantly more affordable to establish and run clinical trials centers than their American and European key counterparts. As well, KPMG’s ‘Competitive Alternatives 2014’4, an annual report that compares business costs and other competitive- ness factors in more than 100 cities in ten major countries and over a 10-year horizon, puts Canada as 15.9 points ahead of the U.S.

on business costs engaged by a representative operation modeled on a clinical trials management firm. Building on already competitive labour and facility costs, the Canadian government has established major grants that support companies who perform their research and development activities in Canada. These grants are administered through major government granting agencies such as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and the National Research Council (NRC). The Canadian government has established tax credits which are awarded to companies that conduct research and development activities. The Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SRED) tax incentive program can amount to tax credits of 15% to 20%, and/or refund for a company’s expenditures spent on eligible research and development work conducted in Canada5. Additionally, Canadian provinces also provide additional tax credits specific to research and development conducted in their territory. The overall tax savings of the SRED program is between 15% and 32% (includes federal and provincial tax credits) depending on the province. National Geographic website, http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/ travel/countries/canada-facts/ (accessed 9 October 2014). 2 BBC website. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/ hi/americas/country_profiles/1198865. stm (accessed 9 October 2014). 3 fDi Benchmark from the Financial Times Ltd 2014, http://www.fdibenchmark.com) 4 KPMG Source: http://www. competitivealternatives.com/highlights/ indsummary.aspx?id=886) 5 Canadian Revenue Agency website, http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/txcrdt/sredrsde/menu-eng.html (accessed 22 September 2014). 1


LIFE SCIENCE IS A HUMAN RACE 78% of global CEOs rank human capital as the #1 priority*

Making the next breakthrough isn’t about luck. It’s about talent, pure and simple. The brightest minds, specialized education, the insatiably curious – all blended in this unique sector of the knowledge economy. The race is always on in Life Sciences, and Mississauga, Ontario – Canada, is where great companies build winning teams. What else do you need to know?

VISIT WINTHEHUMANRACE.CA TO START NOW. *Source: PwC 15 th Annual Global CEO Survey 2012


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Mississauga, Canada Tried, Trained, and Talented win the humanrace.ca Where great companies build winning teams Exceptional talent, innovative companies and the convergence of the supports for the life sciences industry are propelling this leading economic cluster forward. For Mississauga, Ontario Canada this is a multi-dimensional, key sector employing thousands of knowledge workers. The work of our life sciences companies benefit the world with new scientific discoveries, new processes and new drugs and inventions helping people live longer, better lives. Mississauga values a strong global business future, fostering a prosperous and sustainable economy that attracts and grows talent. Our City provides firms with access to a skilled talent force with 66 per cent of resident workers having postsecondary education, higher than the national average. The City is surrounded by 21 of Ontario’s finest, postsecondary institutions, most notably, the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) campus that offers one of the few Master of Biotechnology and Master of Management of Innovation programs in Canada. The University of Toronto Mississauga’s four-storey Terrence Donnelly Health Sciences Complex houses the Mississauga Academy of Medicine, one of the

most advanced sites for training family medicine and community-based primary care physicians in Canada. The complex includes laboratory space for life sciences research and expanded facilities for the Biomedical Communications Program. In 2015, UTM received $5.9 million in combined funds to establish a Centre for Cancer Stem Cell Therapeutics, an initiative led by Professor Patrick Gunning in the Department of Chemical & Physical Sciences. The centre, which will be funded by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Ontario Research Fund and UTM, aims to develop new therapeutic compounds that will target some of the deadliest cancers, such as leukemia (blood cancer) and glioblastoma (brain cancer), which are thought to originate from cancer stem cells. Continued Growth and investment Future growth of Mississauga’s Life Sciences Sector is gaining strength and global exposure as leading national and international companies such as Therapure Biopharma Inc. and Ipsen Biopharmaceuticals continue to invest and expand operations in Mississauga. Therapure, a multiple award-winning biopharmaceutical company that focusses

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on the development and manufacturing of complex biological therapeutics and technologies is expanding in Mississauga. Therapure is investing $20 million to accelerate the design, development and commercialization of its PlasmaCap Expanded Bed Adsorption technology. This project will generate 91 new jobs at Therapure and additional jobs through the company’s supply chain. In spring of 2015, Ipsen a French-based, global biopharmaceutical company opened its Canadian headquarters in Mississauga, creating approximately 40 new full-time jobs. Ipsen will join Mississauga’s growing biomedical cluster and provide innovative specialty therapeutics in the areas of oncology, neurology and endocrinology to Canadians living with these debilitating diseases. Today Mississauga is Canada’s sixth largest city with a population of 752,000 and is one of Canada’s leading life sciences clusters with close to 400 companies employing over 25,000 knowledge workers. Companies like AstraZeneca, Roche, Alphora Research, Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline, Baxter, Bayer and Amgen are just several of the world renowned companies that call Mississauga home. This sector is strong, vibrant and a leading business component in the City that attracts highlyskilled scientific, technical and management personnel with post-secondary education from in and around Mississauga. To learn more about Mississauga’s life sciences sector, visit www.winthehumanrace.ca.


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Hamilton’s Collaborative

Provides Results

in Life Sciences & Health Innovation

Discover Canada’s leading research & education cluster combining life sciences and commerce

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada


Putting Evidence

Practice into

The Global Impact of Hamilton’s Health Research

It begins with research Hamilton, Canada is an urban hotbed for life sciences research and development. Renowned for its nimbleness and deep collaboration between its life sciences institutions and business sector, it transforms the lives of people around the world. The life sciences focus in Hamilton ranges from award-winning laboratory science and clinical trials to health policy development and product development – delivering a truly global impact.

The Synapse Consortium is a global leader within Canada’s biotech industry. Hamilton, Canada hosts one of the world’s top-tier life sciences clusters, including major research institutions such as McMaster University, Mohawk College, Hamilton Health Sciences and St. Joseph’s Healthcare. Hamilton’s Chamber of Commerce, the Bay Area Health Trust and the Innovation Factory, link life sciences research and innnovation with business. The City of Hamilton’s economic development department has identified Synapse as a key growth cluster within the municipality.

synapselifescience.com

Research in Hamilton is enriched by a comprehensive network – the Synapse Consortium, brings together a network of world-class research institutions and life sciences-related business organizations all based in Hamilton. McMaster University, its academic health science centre partners Hamilton Health Sciences and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, and Mohawk College together form an integrated and nimble engine for research that has placed Hamilton at the forefront of life sciences developments for more than 50 years. Collaboration between these organizations unifies a diverse range of expertise – creating a unique platform for life sciences development unlike any other in Canada. McMaster University is ranked within the top 50 universities in the world for medical and health research and education by several international ranking systems. Hamilton Health Sciences is the second largest research hospital in Canada. St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton is leading in innovative health research ranging from minimally-invasive surgery to the latest developments in mental health.


The City of Hamilton is the home of an intellectual and physical environment that fosters a thriving life sciences cluster connecting researchers, business, healthcare providers and education.

Mohawk College, a premiere learning centre for applied arts and technology, conducts ground-breaking research in digital health. Established in 2002, Bay Area Health Trust collaborates with the Hamilton life sciences ecosystem as part of the Synapse Consortium to develop profitable private sector business opportunities and partnerships in support of health, education, and research for local and global markets. Hamilton is Canada’s leading edge in life sciences research.

Ground-breaking laboratory science Preventing the spread of infectious disease is an integral part of saving the lives of thousands of people in the event of a global pandemic. McMaster’s Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research is at the forefront of developing innovative diagnostic practices as well as novel antimicrobial and antibiotic agents – working to detect and address these threats – such as tuberculosis, SARS and other respiratory diseases. The McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, which investigates the underlying cellular and molecular origins of human cancer, has developed a drug screening program that uses reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells to identify

novel therapies for conditions from malignancy to neuropathies including pain. Across Hamilton, researchers are also working on identifying the role of gut bacteria or microbiota in the maintenance of health, including the brain. The Farncombe Family Institute for Digestive Health Research at McMaster University is finding the links between intestinal conditions and both chronic functional and inflammatory intestinal disorders including gluten sensitivity and psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. Research teams at Hamilton Health Sciences and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton are also studying the connection between probiotics and the brain. Through the development of novel diagnostics and treatments on the leading edge of science, the work of Hamilton life sciences researchers begins at the lab bench and ends with saving the lives of people most in need of care around the world.

Leading clinical studies around the world Improving the nature and function of health care around the world is often the result of research that integrates both laboratory and clinical findings across a large population.

Hamilton Health Sciences, a leading research hospital, is ranked #2 in Canada among healthcare research institutions. A leader in evidence-based healthcare delivery and translational research, HHS has a strong research expertise in a broad range of areas including cardiovascular, thrombosis, cancer, and child mental health. It is clear that collaboration among the researchers, academics, funders, as well as the start-up community across Hamilton, can lead to innovations and advances. With an integrated approach that embraces the entire research continuum, Hamilton accelerates and enhances life sciences research, from basic discovery to improved patient care.


Dr. Martin Kolb, Respirologist at St. Joseph’s Healthcare hamilton, measures a patient’s lung capacity as part of a study. Continued from page 3

The Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) is a joint initiative between Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University. Over the years, the PHRI has developed unparalleled expertise in epidemiology, population health and clinical trials. To date, PHRI studies have enrolled more than 1,000,000 participants worldwide.

health care throughout the world,” states Dr. Stephen Collins, Associate Dean, Research for the Faculty of Health Sciences at McMaster University.

“Hamilton is steeped in a strong tradition of life sciences research that not only integrates its academic institutions, its hospitals and the community, but also has a global reach, informing and improving

Serving as the hub for clinical trials and epidemiological studies on a worldwide scale, Hamilton life sciences researchers are leading the way in cutting-edge health care research.

In this past year alone, Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University researchers from the Population Health Research Institute have captured the interest of international media with a global study demonstrating that a weak hand grip is linked with a greater risk The work of Hamilton researchers at the Populaof having a heart attack or stroke. Building upon this tion Health Research Institute is some of the most study with further research could determine whether globally impactful work in medicine. Studies led by PHRI Executive Director Dr. Salim Yusuf – the second concerted efforts to improve an individual’s muscle strength could reduce the risk of illness or disease. most cited researcher in the world (2011) – have produced substantial changes in global guidelines The world’s largest trial of autoimmune renal disease for the prevention and treatment in heart disease. also has a home in Hamilton, and is made possible His epidemiological work involving more than 85 through a close partnership between McMaster countries has uncovered that most heart attacks University, Hamilton Health Sciences and St. Joseph’s result from similar risk factors, regardless of region Healthcare Hamilton. The PEXIVAS trial focuses on or country. ANCA-associated vasculitis, a disease that causes blood vessels to become inflamed – resulting in Hamilton is globally recognized organ and tissue damage from restricted blood flow. The study seeks to determine whether a new plasma for biotechnology strengths in exchange-based treatment can serve as an improved treatment for the disease. the health sector

As a premier academic and research healthcare organization, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH) is committed to making a difference in people’s lives and creating a lasting future for our community through integrated health services and internationally recognized programs. Our threefold mission is to provide dynamic research, revolutionary methods in health sciences education, and the highest standard of patient care in a spirit of compassion, innovation and commitment.


Transforming care delivery

One example is the collaborative Hamilton-wide effort converging around the design of a technological intervention that will assist patients following cardiac and vascular surgery via in-home remote monitoring and communication. Mohawk College, a premier College of Applied Arts and Technology, is home to the mHealth and eHealth Development and Innovation Centre (MEDIC). MEDIC, which has partnered with McMaster University, academic hospitals in Hamilton and provincial organizations such as eHealth Ontario, provides tooling, testing, teaming and training services in a wide range of digital health topics that are of interest both globally and within Canada. Known as SmartView, this partnership between Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Mohawk College, and the Population Health Research Institute blends cutting-edge eHealth technologies with world-renowned clinical trials. Through a multinational study, SmartView is testing stateof-the-art mobile technology and related digital devices to allow patients to monitor their clinical progress from their homes. The new system allows patients to take automated in-home measurements and provides them with direct electronic access to their post-surgical care team. The SmartView system will be the first comprehensive solution of its kind in Canada. Continued on page 6

investinhamilton.ca Hamilton’s Economic Development Office is the central point of contact for business assistance. Services include: • Site-selection assistance • Information and research • Coordination of City services • Lab & office search & development • Provincial incentives access

economicdevelopment@hamilton.ca

While life sciences researchers in Hamilton are improving patients’ quality of life by creating new diagnostics, medications and treatments, Hamilton is also leading the way in transforming how health care is delivered to patients.


The Clinical Research Laboratory (CRLB) and Biobank is a 12,000 square foot facility that supports Hamilton Health Sciences research, as well as independently contracted clients, with accessioning, reception, storage and analytical areas. CRLB has vast expertise in the shipping, receiving, storage and analysis of large numbers of samples from more than 85 countries, representing every region of the globe. Continued from page 5

Whereas SmartView strives to bring technology into the homes of patients, the St. Joseph’s Health System has succeeded in bringing a new, integrated model of patient care that bridges hospital and home together with community service centres. The pioneering Integrated Comprehensive Care project offers a bundled model of care that was successfully tested in St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and has won a Canadian leadership award for innovation in improving outcomes. The program focuses on providing patients with a continuity of care that stretches across each step in the patients’ journey. The same care team accompanies the patient at each point of care.

“The structure of patient care is truly evolving,” said Dr. Kevin Smith, CEO, St. Joseph’s Health System.

“This will eradicate silos and ensure that the system can wrap holistic care around the patients as well as the providers, building confidence in care along the way.” As the Province of Ontario moves to adopt the Integrated Comprehensive Care project across the province, this new system of care breaks the boundaries of traditional health care to deliver a reimagined patient experience for the 21st century. Setting the stage with ground-breaking laboratory studies and reinventing medicine with international clinical trials and care delivery initiatives, Hamilton life sciences researchers are consistently pushing the envelope of science, medicine and health care in their community, across Canada and around the world.

Dr. Stephen Collins Associate Dean, Research, Faculty of Health Sciences Director, Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute McMaster University

President & CEO, St. Joseph’s Health System CEO, Niagara Health System

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Dr. Kevin Smith


Hamilton Health Sciences and IBM have created a new centre for health technology innovation in downtown Hamilton. The facility will give area healthcare providers, researchers, innovators and entrepreneurs access to advanced technology tools and expertise to improve patient outcomes, and help accelerate the development and commercialization of new healthcare solutions.

Redefine what’s possible The creation of a new collaboration centre marks the next stage in the city’s growing partnership between Hamilton’s life sciences organizations and industry. Developed by IBM and Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS), the initiative features both a virtual and physical location to bring innovation, health care and technology together. The two organizations are joining forces to help area hospital clinicians, researchers, academics and entrepreneurs accelerate the development and commercialization of new healthcare innovations. IBM is contributing access to an array of its Watson cognitive and analytics software, expertise in cloud computing and high-performance computing infrastructure, and a network of global collaborators. HHS, with its cadre of more than 1,500 principal investigators and research staff, is providing practical industry expertise and a “real-world” test environment.

These advanced technology tools and industry expertise will improve healthcare outcomes, put Hamilton on the map as a hub for healthcare innovation in Canada and serve as a platform to transform entrepreneurial ideas into tools that integrate seamlessly into existing health care systems. Combining Hamilton’s excellence in the life sciences with IBM’s leadership in information technology, this collaboration assists the innovative life sciences solutions from development to market. The initiative supports clients from the Hamilton region and beyond to collaborate with IBM and HHS professionals to meet the needs of patients and health care facilities on a global level.


McMaster University Mohawk College Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton employee statistics, 2015

equivalent a The of 205.5 soccer fields

Selection b Site Magazine named

Hamilton the ‘Top Investment City in Canada’

a 30 minute commute, c Within Hamilton has easy access to

a highly skilled, well-educated and productive labour force of over 1 million people


Hamilton has a robust supply of top-notch facilities for researchers


The David Braley Health Sciences Centre on McMaster’s Health Campus in downtown Hamilton opened in 2015 as a centre for health sciences research, education and clinical service.

Hamilton’s state-of-the-art life sciences facilities... As one of the top cities for life sciences research in the world, Hamilton also offers top-of-the-line life sciences facilities that help to foster research, innovation and entrepreneurship. Similar to the world-class research carried out within the city, life sciences facilities representing the Synapse Consortium act as shared spaces between higher education institutions and health sciences organizations that thrive in the unique, collaborative environment offered within Hamilton.

The recent development of the 37-acre McMaster Innovation Park (MIP) positions Hamilton to develop new commercial partnerships in the life sciences field. Centrally located close to McMaster University, Hamilton Health Sciences, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and Mohawk College, MIP offers laboratory incubator space to meet the demand of health sciences activity within the city. A recent example of a successful international partnership involves health sciences, engineering and science researchers from McMaster University and Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology. Together, they are working to develop novel technologies for cell therapy and point-of-care diagnostics.

Mohawk College’s MEDIC facility includes state-of-the-art infrastructure to support digital health software development.


McMaster University’s Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Learning and Discovery is the home of major institutes on infectious disease, stem cell and cancer research as well as its Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine.

In addition to McMaster’s campus facilities, Hamilton Health Sciences and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton provide a combined 51,040 square feet of research laboratory space, facilitating laboratory research in a variety of life sciences disciplines. Both hospital systems also feature a strong capacity to support clinical trials, with a total of 2,069 beds used to care for patients diagnosed with a wide range of illnesses. From cardiology and respirology to cancer

care and mental health, Hamilton Health Sciences and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton serve as regional centres of care for a large proportion of medical specialties. With an integrated infrastructure network that supports scientists, clinicians and life sciences entrepreneurs from beginning to end, Hamilton serves an ideal location for investment, research and innovation in the life sciences.

McMaster University is renowned worldwide for its innovation in both learning and discovery. Several international ranking systems consistently put McMaster among the top 100 universities in the world and specifically among the top 50 globally and top four in Canada for medicine and health. McMaster, the birthplace of evidence-based medicine in Canada, has a student population of 26,000, and more than 170,000 alumni in 140 countries.


HAMILTON

A collaborative ecosystem between life sciences & business The value of Hamilton as a hub for life sciences and innovations rests upon the synthesis of ground-breaking discoveries within an ecosystem that supports commercialization and entrepreneurship. After an idea is validated in the labs and successfully tested through clinical trials, it can be commercialized through strong, prosperous partnerships with the private sector. Working as a cohesive whole, members of Hamilton’s Synapse Consortium provide substantial support to those seeking commercialization of life sciences research and innovation.

Bridging industry and life sciences At the intersection of health, life sciences and business, Bay Area Health Trust (BAHT), part of the Synapse Consortium group of organizations, is an

example of the successful partnership between life sciences institutions and the ‘for profit’ private sector. Leveraging its unique partnership with Hamilton Health Sciences and McMaster University, BAHT promotes entrepreneurship and invests in growth-oriented business opportunities related to the education, healthcare and life sciences domains. Within these markets, BAHT maintains a diverse portfolio of independent commercial business interests as well as an active asset management and international consulting business. In one portfolio, BAHT specializes in clinical trial logistics with a focus on serving research organizations and commercial bio-tech businesses locally in Hamilton and throughout North America. These organizations conduct pharmaceutical clinical trials and BAHT expedites their trial medications to the right people at the right time and in the right dose, on an international scale. Bay Area Health Trust has managed trials with up to 15,000 patients over multiple years and in

Established in 2002, Bay Area Health Trust creates health care related businesses that provide services for local and global markets. The profits generated by these businesses support health care and health care research in our communities.


over 25 countries with extreme precision, while emphasizing flexible custom solutions. BAHT is also a leader in privacy and the digitization of critical records in Canada for a variety of clients within the life sciences and healthcare domains. In conjunction with these activities, it also provides secure storage, transport and destruction, document and records management plans, as well as data management consulting. As part of its asset management portfolio, BAHT is responsible for a network of approximately 650,000 square feet of commercial real estate in and around Hamilton as well as a significant portfolio of land for development. With a focus on servicing the life sciences sector, activities include property management, project management, and contract management. BAHT’s energy services line of business also collaborated with Hamilton Health Sciences to develop the largest energy cogeneration project supporting health care facilities in all of Canada, an endeavor that generates millions in annual savings.

Supporting life sciences entrepreneurship At times, these services are ingrained within Hamilton life sciences institutions themselves. For example, the McMaster Industry Liaison Office serves McMaster University, Hamilton Health Sciences and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton to help move research into society through commercialization.

This office helps researchers to negotiate agreements with industry, obtain industry and commercialization funding, and protect intellectual property. At other times, commercialization services are the focus of Synapse Consortium organizations themselves. The Innovation Factory is a not-for-profit Regional Innovation Centre, funded by the Ontario Network of Entrepreneurs, that helps startups to commercialize their ideas. With a strong focus in the life sciences field and experts on hand with years of moving innovations from the lab to the market, clients have access to industry-leading support as they create and grow into thriving businesses. In 2014, Innovation Factory developed the Synapse Life Science Competition – focused entirely on helping talented researchers and innovators to commercialize their health-related ideas. A selected group of participants in this program gain access to mentorship and highly sought-after market intelligence reports, as well as targeted training on developing business documents, navigating regulatory challenges, and implementing commercialization strategies. “Starting a company is tough, especially in the life sciences, and it can be tricky for individuals to navigate the supports available,” says David Carter, Executive Director at Innovation Factory. “In Hamilton, we’re lucky to have a welcoming community of world-class institutions that continue to open their doors for entrepreneurship. Part of our job at Innovation Factory is to connect entrepreneurs to those supports to help them grow. Together, we’re strengthening Hamilton’s next generation of job and wealth creation by helping these life science entrepreneurs bring their ideas and research to market.”

Hamilton has become a hub for the health and life sciences, so there are more and more life science ideas coming through Innovation Factory’s doors. These ideas are – of course – sprouting from the immense clinical and research-based talent we have in our city, but they’re also migrating here from other parts of the province. This is because our globally recognized researchers, state-of-the-art institutions, and thriving life science ecosystem are unmatched. Innovation Factory offers access to these exceptional resources, as well as to our roster of seasoned life science business mentors and tailored life science programming.


Mohawk College’s annual digital conference “Apps for Health”.

A Hamilton success story Dr. Jim Mahony, Hamilton life sciences researcher and CEO of Advanced Theranostics Inc. (ATI), connected with Innovation Factory in 2013 to commercialize a point-of-care diagnostic device for infectious diseases that his company developed. The device is highly affordable, portable and does not need any other laboratory equipment to provide effective diagnostics. ATI’s technology allows the device to diagnose the presence of infectious diseases in 20 minutes anywhere they receive care – including patients’ homes. This removes the risk of widespread transmission of infectious diseases created when patients travel to and congregate in clinics. ATI entered and won the inaugural Synapse Life Science Competition in 2014, taking home $30,000 in cash and in-kind resources to advance the development of this device. Over the last 18 months, Innovation Factory has incubated and supported ATI’s development of the device. Early this year, ATI secured

$2 million in funding from investors outside of Canada to further the development of its device, and to prepare for preclinical and clinical testing in advance of a product launch in early 2019. ATI’s success is expected to yield a company based in Canada with revenues in excess of $50 million and over 100 employees over the next 5 years. By ensuring that life sciences experts in Hamilton can translate their world-class research and innovations successfully across Canada and around the world, Innovation Factory works with experts from across the Synapse Consortium to bring ideas, concepts and processes to fruition. Through an environment of partnership and collaboration combined with a strong relationship to industry, life sciences in Hamilton thrives through commercialization – bringing novel products, services and technologies to the people who need them most.

Mohawk College’s mHealth and eHealth Development and Innovation Centre (MEDIC) is the only applied research centre of its kind in Canada. MEDIC works with companies, hospitals, governments and non-profits across Canada and around the world to help encourage and assist in the adoption of technology into healthcare.


Testimonials

Affinity Biologicals Inc.

“Affinity Biologicals Inc. is a manufacturer of laboratory products and medical devices and we export most of what we make. Since our time in Hamilton we have grown from 300 sq. ft. of lab space to our current 28,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility. We stay in Hamilton because of the relationships we have with the research community at the Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute and McMaster University, ease of access to the to the US border, a well trained workforce and local trades and service providers who understand our unique needs. Research and development is an important part of our success and Hamilton is a world class centre for research in thrombosis and blood clotting disorders. “The relationships we have with researchers in Hamilton allows us to keep current with advances in the science of blood clotting disorders, changes in therapies, and best practices in the clinical laboratory. The city of Hamilton actively encourages and facilitates cooperation and communication between academia and industry to foster growth and success.” - Hugh and Patty Hoogendoorn Affinity Biologicals Inc.

Stryker Canada

“Stryker Canada has been a strong and consistent supporter of the life sciences industry in Hamilton, and believes that the burgeoning ecosystem in this city will be of longterm benefit for health care advancements on a global scale.” - David Murphy, Stryker

Message from the Mayor Fred Eisenberger Known as Ontario’s fastest growing economy, Hamilton is a shining example of revitalization and growth. Home to some of Canada’s leading experts in health and medicine, Hamilton’s reputation as the “Ambitious City” draws in part from its leadership in the life sciences. Driven by the need to solve health care issues that affect millions of patients around the globe, the world-class research of Hamilton’s life sciences experts directly leads to new treatments, medications and care practices. And staying at the cutting-edge of scientific discovery allows our city to continually make impacts internationally. Discovery that is a community effort. Hamilton’s collaborative life sciences environment features strong partnerships between research institutions, facilities and support services, as well as industry and entrepreneurship, which allow for the commercialization and widespread dissemination of our life sciences discoveries. This publication has highlighted Hamilton’s life sciences work and in particular the Synapse Consortium–a spectrum of Hamilton-based organizations that work together in order to innovate, reinvent and transform the field of life sciences on a global scale. On behalf of the City of Hamilton, I welcome you to join us in our journey of research and entrepreneurship. Sincerely, Fred Eisenberger Mayor, City of Hamilton


Proud Partners

hamilton chamber of commerce your voice in business


Perspective

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Life ScienceS

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Globally Recognized Universities and World-Class Research Hospitals Canada is regarded as a leader in scientific research. The Council of Canadian Academics published findings in 2012 that Canada was ranked fourth in the world in terms of scientific expertise4, based on a survey of top- cited international researchers.

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hese researchers ranked Canada highly for originality, impact and scientific rigor, demonstrating that Canada is internationally recognized for the integrity and importance of its scientific research. Additionally, Canadian universities consistently rank among the top in the world. In 2014, QS World Rankings placed the University of Toronto, McGill University, University of British Columbia and McMaster University in the top 50 Universities in the world for medical research. Canada is home to many world-class research hospitals, including Princess Margaret Hospital, which ranks in the

top five hospitals in the world supporting cancer research and is an indispensable site for any cancer clinical trial, as well as the Ottawa Heart Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, The IWK Health Centre, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and Toronto Western Hospital, to name just a few. Canadian health research centres are world-renowned

for being on the cutting edge of research and development, bringing in high levels of government grants and private research dollars, and staffed by some of the top talent globally. These include Sunnybrook Research Institute, the Montreal Neurological Institute, the Montreal Heart Institute and the BC Cancer Agency.

CANADA’S KEY STRENGTHS IN THE MEDICAL DEVICES INDUSTRY  Diversified, export-oriented and innovative sector  Networks of world-class researchers  Active in the areas of biotechnology, advanced materials, aerospace, microelectronics, telecommunications, software and informatics


Kingston HealtH ReseaRcH

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Kingston’s research community works in partnership to advance discovery and translate knowledge into patient-centered care:

Founded in 1841, Queen’s University at Kingston, Ontario is one of Canada’s leading research-intensive institutions, combining quality and intensity in research with excellence in undergraduate and graduate education. www.queensu.ca

The Kingston General Hospital Research Institute (KGHRI) is dedicated to building innovative partnerships and pursuing excellence in patient-oriented research through a collaborative approach that leverages the combined strengths of all partners in translating knowledge into effective therapies, treatments and best practices. www.kghri.ca

Research Contact: Dr. Roger Deeley, Vice-Dean (Research), Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen’s University Vice President, Health Sciences Research, KGH and President, KGHRI deeleyr@queensu.ca c/o Gladys Smith 613.533.6627

The Hotel Dieu Hospital Research Institute is a research development, enhancement, support and promotion centre, with a wide range of leading and exciting ambulatory care research activities. www.hoteldieu.com/research-institute

The Providence Care Research Institute is committed to supporting and fostering opportunities for teaching and research in a wide range of settings – creating, sharing and applying knowledge, and training the next generation of health care professionals. www.providencecare.ca

PARTEQ Innovations works with researchers at Queen’s University and Kingston’s hospitals and the business and venture capital communities, helping to bring the benefits of scientific discovery to the public while returning proceeds to inventors and their institutions. www.parteqinnovations.com


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Kingston HealtH ReseaRcH

Kingston’s health sciences research community in downtown Kingston, Ontario (Photo Credit: Suzy Lamont)

Health sciences in Kingston: Novel research in a smart city

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ith its leafy streets, scenic waterfront and historic limestone downtown, Kingston is a wellpreserved jewel of a city. But don’t be fooled by its small-town feel. A compact, integrated and walkable research campus, teeming with multidisciplinary discovery opportunities, has made this smaller urban centre a

magnet for some of the world’s brightest (even Nobel-winning!) research minds. Kingston’s health sciences research community, encompassing Queen’s University, Kingston General Hospital, Hotel Dieu Hospital and Providence Care, comprises a distinctive discovery hub that nurtures multidisciplinary

approaches to big problems. From national and international networks to innovative boutique labs, clinician-scientists team up with colleagues in natural sciences, engineering, computing and social sciences to encourage new perspectives, to advance knowledge, and to train the next generation of clinicians and scientists.


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Kingston HealtH ReseaRcH

Discovery for a Global Community Using multidisciplinary teams to tackle difficult problems, our researchers are working to improve lives in some of the poorest regions in the world, with unique and game-changing results.

partnering with a Canadian company to develop a rugged hybrid technology capable of providing modern-day radiotherapy in areas with unreliable infrastructure.

Fostering mobility:

Amputees worldwide gain mobility thanks to work by the Human Mobility Research Centre on the low-cost prosthetic Niagara Foot

Maternal health: New approaches to monitoring maternal health include the maternal health clinic at Kingston General Hospital, which treats pregnancy as a “stress test” for disease prevention. The clinic tests women for heart disease risk factors and provides resources and tools for maternal and family health. Globally, researchers are using cellphone apps to monitor pregnancy health, screen for cervical cancer and distribute blood pressure medication.

Family health in conflict zones: By documenting and reporting on the complex, long-term, and often invisible consequences of war and natural disasters on individuals, families and communities, researchers are helping international organizations to improve the science and practice of delivering

humanitarian aid, and to mitigate the impact of trauma and its after-effects. The Canadian Institute for Military and Veteran Health Research is studying how the helpers in those conflicts – military personnel – are reintegrating into family and civilian life, with an aim to better understand how to facilitate these transitions. They are also studying the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder, and interventions for homeless veterans.

Universal access to care: Improving global health means understanding barriers to care. For example, a recent global study co-authored at Queen’s has shown a widespread lack of access to radiotherapy for cancer that costs millions of lives and billions of dollars in lost economic growth in low- and middle-income countries. Medical physicists here are addressing that need,

For nearly 20 years, the Human Mobility Research Centre has helped amputees worldwide through its work on the Niagara Foot, an innovative, low-cost prosthetic foot. The centre’s biomechanical and materials analysis experts have helped to optimize the foot’s functionality and durability. At the same time, this work is helping to groom the next generation of biomedical innovators.

Community-based rehabilitation: Drawing on clinicians, researchers, educators, persons with disabilities, and policy analysts in local and global communities, and based in Queen’s School of Rehabilitation Therapy, the International Centre for the Advancement of Communitybased Rehabilitation aims to maximize community participation and citizenship of persons with disabilities. Recent projects have focused on health and education access for children and youth in Bangladesh, and familycentred work in combating the stigma of intellectual disability in the Democratic Republic of Congo.


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Kingston HealtH ReseaRcH

Studies in molecular biology are changing the way we understand and treat disease

Big Data, Big Discoveries Game-changing technology is increasingly opening new avenues of discovery, providing researchers with the ability to easily gather and study large data-sets in a myriad of formats and for a broad range of health research areas.

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he Centre for Advanced Computing at Queen’s University specializes in secure, advanced computing resources and support for academic and medical clients, and provides scientists in Kingston with access to several new technologies and processes for capturing and understanding big data.

Genomic sequencing for customized treatments:

Monitoring a potential health crisis:

The Next Generation Sequencing Lab, located at Kingston General Hospital, allows researchers to look at many different genes at once, using minuscule bits of DNA. This groundbreaking technology enables rapid analysis and interpretation, generating an exceptional amount of knowledge using very small samples. Cancer scientists are using this knowledge to better understand the genetic mechanisms of the disease, leading to improved, customized treatments, while other researchers are finding ways to use the data to create individualized treatment plans for patients with rapidly evolving illnesses.

Breast and prostate cancer are often headline news – but liver cancer remains a largely hidden disease, even though the death rate from liver illnesses has risen by nearly 30% over the past decade. Scientists here are studying the links between cirrhosis and liver cancer from both a clinical and population perspective by leveraging information in large patient databases, enabling them to elucidate the looming impact of this disease on our healthcare system. It’s expected that the incidences of these diseases is expected to peak in 2020.


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Kingston HealtH ReseaRcH Providing evidence for treating chronic diseases: Kingston is home of the Chair and Principal Investigator of the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network, which is collecting patient information from electronic records of primary care doctors across Canada. The goal is to facilitate research into the prevalence and treatment of many common chronic diseases, to help health professionals and policy-makers make better decisions. The Network is using complex algorithms to combine data from different systems in a consistent and anonymized format, enabling the study of common chronic diseases such as diabetes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and depression. Technology tells a story: Using the Ontario Cancer Registry and parallel sequencing technology, researchers are investigating important biomarkers in cancer, and documenting changes in the incidences and treatment of this insidious disease. The registry is a computerized database that contains detailed information about all Ontario cancer patients, including diagnosis, treatment and pathology reports. Big data enables researchers to identify the specific impact of disease on populations and our health system

Clinician scientists are using patient databases to study disease links from a clinical and population perspective

Interdisciplinary Hubs:

new ideas, new approaches

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ingston is home to national and international networks of researchers who take a crossdisciplinary, patient-centered approach to discovery. Here, it’s not unusual to find computer scientists and engineers working alongside oncologists and orthopedic surgeons, developing innovative materials, tools and treatments that inform best practices and improve care.

biomechanical, imaging and computational modelling expertise of their colleagues to develop better approaches to treatment of wrist, shoulder, ankle and knee problems. Chemical engineers are working alongside surgeons to generate replacement tissue such as ligaments to treat joint injuries.

Human Mobility Research Centre (HMRC)

The international team within the Q-CPU lab includes respirologists, epidemiologists, cardiologists, hematologists and neurologists, all working together to ensure a better quality of life for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), the obstruction of lung arteries, which can lead to fatal right heart failure. Working in a network of six clinical trial centres across the Americas, this group will further define the basic mechanisms that underlie PAH, with an aim of identifying and testing possible treatments, and eventual translation to patient trials.

Offering labs within two hospitals as well as meeting rooms and even a computerassisted surgery suite, HMRC creates unique opportunities for clinicians and scientists to collaborate. A surgeon can come out of surgery with a question, such as how to improve a procedure, and then do the research or work with a scientist who can help them develop a solution. Collaboration and cross-disciplinary teams are the norm – for example, orthopedic surgeons are leveraging the

Queen’s Cardio Pulmonary Unit (Q-CPU)


Kingston HealtH ReseaRcH Centre for Neuroscience Studies (CNS) The CNS has an international reputation for its crossdisciplinary neuroscience research programs, with cutting-edge facilities and a diverse team that

includes clinician-scientists, physiologists, molecular biologists, psychologists, mathematicians, physicists and computer scientists. Working across university and hospital settings, enabling novel, patient-oriented studies, CNS researchers are global leaders

41 in understanding sensory, motor and cognitive control of behaviour. Their work offers potential for novel and effective treatments, technologies and approaches for treating and ameliorating neurological disease and psychiatric disorders.

In-hospital exercise physiology labs enable novel research into combined heart-lung disease Canadian Frailty Network Canada’s health system, along with those of many other countries, must be prepared to understand and manage an increasingly aging population. The multidisciplinary Canadian Frailty Network promotes evidence-based research, knowledge-sharing and clinical practices that improve healthcare outcomes for frail elderly Canadians, their families and caregivers. The network collaborates with patients, industry, academic institutions and patient-advocate partners to mobilize research and support training of highly qualified personnel to focus on the urgent care needs of this vulnerable population.

Gastrointestinal Diseases Research Unit (GIDRU)

Laboratory for Percutaneous Surgery (PERK)

With a multidisciplinary team of clinician-scientists from the departments of Medicine, Surgery and Pathology, and Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, GIDRU focuses on collaborative research and training opportunities to facilitate bench-to-bedside discovery. The hospital-based facility includes state-of-theart laboratory space, as well as office and meeting areas to facilitate collaborative discovery. GIDRU teams study a wide spectrum of factors influencing gastrointestinal diseases, from pain mechanisms in irritable bowel syndrome to new treatments for C. difficile.

The PERK Lab specializes in brachytherapy, a radiation therapy technique that involves placing one or more radioactive sources next to or within a tumour. The advantage of this technique is that radiation doses to the rest of the patient are greatly reduced so that higher doses of radiation can be safely directed to the tumour. However, accurate placement of the radiation sources is key to effective treatment. To address this problem, scientists here are working to combine modern imaging techniques with 3D printing to generate custom templates that can be used to precisely and reproducibly guide the placement of the radioactive sources for a patient’s treatment.


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Kingston HealtH ReseaRcH

Globally recognized lab facilities provide discovery, training and commercialization opportunities

From Innovation to Application

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ingston’s integrated health sciences hub supports a broad base of collaborations with industry. These partnerships are driven by a common goal of translating research into novel and effective treatments, devices and practices that benefit patients and their families. Areas of strength include allergy, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and respiratory diseases, neurosciences and cancer clinical trials. Leading research is also being done in urology and hemophilia. This research environment is ideal for national and global partnerships, offering: A highly collaborative, multidisciplinary environment; A sustained focus on the invention and integration of novel technologies and approaches; In-house expertise for protecting and commercializing promising research; Vital mentoring and training of next-generation highly qualified personnel.

Areas of industry activity include: Cancer: The world’s first clinical trial of a new viral cancer therapy is a recent example of work being led by The Canadian Cancer Trials Group, a national cancer research cooperative based in Kingston. Its Canadian network spans more than 2100 investigators at 80 member institutions, and it has collaborated in cancer clinical trials with more than 40 countries worldwide. Housed in the Queen’s Cancer Research Institute, its multidisciplinary research spans population studies of cancer, through tumor biology and clinical trials, to health services research. Neurosciences: Transformational work in neurosciences, using novel technologies in robotics and eyetracking developed at Queen’s, is offering new approaches to understanding and treating a broad range of disease and injury. KINARM, developed by Kingston’s BKIN Technologies Ltd., is the world’s first robotic

system for precisely measuring the effects of brain injury. Used at more than 60 research institutions worldwide, this patented system is now used by doctors at all three of Kingston’s hospitals for exploring the neurological effects of chronic and critical illnesses, from stroke, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson’s Disease to cardiac arrest, kidney failure, and major surgery. Eye-tracking technology is being used in conjunction with outpatient clinics at Hotel Dieu Hospital to better understand diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disease, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, stroke and dyslexia. Cardiac: Cardiologists pursuing novel work in imaging are working with industry partners to develop better methods for detecting the sources of persistent atrial fibrillation, a debilitating and difficult-to-treat disease; and to enhance clinical use of compact, handheld cardiac ultrasound devices, leading to faster diagnosis and treatment.


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Kingston HealtH ReseaRcH Mental Health: A strong focus on mental health in Kingston’s institutions includes participation in the industry-supported Canadian Biomarker Integration Network for Depression (CAN-Bind), one of the world’s leading depression research networks. Two Queen’s researchers are part of this 200-strong, pan-Canadian team looking at finding better ways of matching a particular treatment to a specific person. Respiratory: New insights into cardiac and respiratory diseases are being developed through exercisebased research that focuses on the interrelationships between heart and lung. Unique laboratory facilities and industry partnerships are helping researchers explore new approaches to diagnosing and treating the breathlessness associated with cardiorespiratory diseases such as COPD, asthma and heart disease. Musculoskeletal: Bone and joint research at the Human Mobility Research Centre draws on expertise across many disciplines and sectors, from computer imaging and gait analysis to tissue engineering and orthopedic surgery. Industry-academic collaborations include studies in computer-assisted surgery, engineered tissue and bone replacements, and wear-resistant materials for prostheses. Industry contact: Seth Chitayat, PhD MBA Director, Health Research Partnerships chitayat@queensu.ca 613-449-0693

Cancer researchers are developing new testing methods to improve prostate cancer diagnoses Allergy: The 140-seat Environmental Exposure Unit at Kingston General Hospital is considered the gold-standard for allergy testing in North America. This unique facility enables high-throughput testing for allergy vaccines and drug candidates. Critical care: Multidisciplinary investigations into patient care and practices in critical care units, led out of the Clinical Evaluation Research Unit at Kingston General Hospital, are an area of growing interest for industry. Groundbreaking work includes studies in nutrition, ventilator-associated pneumonia and end-of-life care.

Nationally networked research: Researchers in chronic pain and gastrointestinal disease are developing novel approaches and technologies for diagnosis and treatment, often with commercial partners. Now this work is being scaled up through two multimillion-dollar Chronic Disease Network initiatives being co-led by Kingston-based investigators. The Chronic Pain Network will identify new treatments to manage and prevent chronic pain; and the IMAGINE Network will look at how gut bacteria and diet cause inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and anxiety and depression that are associated with these disorders. These national networks are funded under CIHR’s Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) program.


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Applied Research at St. Lawrence College helps local businesses to stay competitive

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hen Ivan and Daniel MacKinnon decided it was time to automate their fast-growing craft brewery in Bath, Ontario, they turned to Applied Research at nearby St. Lawrence College to make it happen. “We would have had to hire someone or find the time to develop it ourselves, neither of which we would have been able to do until years later,” says Ivan MacKinnon, who co-owns MacKinnon Brothers Brewing Co. with Daniel and now two other partners. Automation was essential to the brewery’s ability to meet growing demand for its beer and to ensure consistency of taste from one batch to another. Working under the supervision of three faculty— experts in electrical and computer programming— two third-year students in the college’s Energy Systems Engineering and Instrumentation and Control Engineering programs developed the new automation system and tested it. They also installed it then taught brewery workers how to operate it. The new system has shaved hours off each brew and MacKinnon Brothers is now better able to produce consistently flavoured beer, a necessity in an industry where image is everything. MacKinnon Brothers Brewing is one of more than 500 small- and medium-sized businesses that are working with the province’s colleges on

market-driven research activities, according to Colleges Ontario. At St. Lawrence College’s three campuses in Kingston, Cornwall, and Brockville, several such collaborations are underway that will help businesses become more competitive in their industries, says Cam McEachern, the college’s director of applied research. “At St. Lawrence College, our applied research projects continue to grow, in both the number of small and medium businesses we are able to work with, and the number of projects we take on each year,” McEachern says. “Applied research projects have given our students and staff the opportunity to apply their skills and have valuable outcomes for the small regional businesses we have worked with.” Another one of those businesses is Octane Medical Group, a Kingston biomedical firm that designs automation systems for cell therapy companies. Octane enlisted

a St. Lawrence College Biotechnology graduate and professor to compare quality differences between umbilical cord-sourced bloods—the starting material for stem cells—that are provided by two different sources. Being able to identify ideal inputs and optimization for stem cell bioreactors, which are in high demand by clinics treating patients with leukemia and other blood disorders, enables Octane Medical Group to design systems that accommodate a wide spectrum of patients. Nuala Trainor, Octane’s director of biological programs, says harnessing the skill of students and the expertise of their faculty is a great way to scope out future potential hires while saving the company a lot of time and money. Says Trainor: “It allows us to do more testing without necessarily having to expand our workforce until we get some preliminary data to decide whether or not the project is essential.”


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Canada: A Leader in Health IT Canada, a global leader in Healthcare IT1, is home to one of the most internet-savvy and technologically sophisticated populations in the world. Canada is highly competitive globally and is also an ideal location in which to establish a Health IT business.

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he Health IT space is an important and rapidly growing field within the Information Technology and Healthcare sectors in general and remains a priority for Canada as demonstrated by a strong commitment from public and private sectors. Canada’s healthcare sector is one of the country’s most information-intensive industries. With nearly 400,000 general practitioners, along with specialists, nurses, pharmacists, healthcare professionals, more than 700 hospitals and 1,600 long-term care facilities. Managing health information across these areas has created a wealth of expertise in how Health IT can be leveraged to reduce inefficiencies in the healthcare system. The healthcare industry is the largest vertically-integrated industry in Canada. Canada spends about 11.2% of GDP on healthcare, and is growing at an annual compound rate of 7%. Healthcare spending in Canada reached $211 billion in 2013, an increase of $35 billion or 19% since 2008. (Canada Health Infoway) Canada is also ideally positioned for selling into the largest Health IT market in the world – the United States. Canada has adopted several international standards, such as the Classification of Health Interventions (CCI), Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM), Health Level 7 (HL7), and

others which makes it easy for Canadian Health IT companies to develop products equally marketable in domestic as well as international markets. Some examples of multinationals making successful and profitable investments in the Canadian Health IT market include Microsoft; Agfa; General Electric (GE); Philips Healthcare; IBM Canada Healthcare; Siemens Canada; and McKesson Canada. National and Provincial Commitment The Health IT sector in Canada enjoys broad public and private support. Health IT accounts for about 2% ($4.2 billion) of all healthcare ($211 billion) spending per year2. Canada’s Federal and Provincial governments remain committed to leveraging information and communications technologies (ICT) to move Canada’s healthcare system to a high quality and affordable model of healthcare delivery. The National and Provincial focus on improving healthcare delivery has created a favourable environment for businesses involved in the development and/or delivery of Health IT products and services. Health IT is a good investment opportunity for foreign companies due to long term growth prospects and strong government backing for the sector. Several Canadian Health IT companies, such as Telus Health, Logibec, QHR Technologies,

PointClickCare, and CGI Group have also successfully sold solutions into the US, as have the Canadian operations (and subsidiaries) of multinational companies like IBM-Canada and GE Healthcare Canada. As of December 31, 2013 the Federal government had provided over CAD $2 billion to Canada Health Infoway for funding 294 projects. (Canada Health Infoway) 1 DISCLAIMER: In 2013, the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD) contracted Branham Group Inc. to prepare a report and this companion brochure on the Canadian Health IT sector, based on primary and secondary sources of information. Readers should note DFATD cannot guarantee the full accuracy of any information in this document, nor does it endorse organizations listed herein. Before using it, readers should independently verify the accuracy and reliability of any information, as required. 2 Branham Group, 2013.


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Availability of Skilled Labour Canada’s Health IT talent pool is highly educated. Its robust educational infrastructure boasts many leading programs in IT and offers several programs targeted specifically to Health IT at the Masters, Bachelors and college levels.

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anada has 32,540 workers trained in Health Informatics and Health Information Systems. (COACH Canada) Canada is among the top ten places in the world with respect to people and skills availability,1 with an ICT workforce that is educated, multilingual, dedicated to client needs, and relatively young. Moreover, Canada’s progressive immigration policies attract and facilitate entry into Canada for foreign business people and technology workers.2 Favourable Tax Regime and Business Environment Canada’s corporate tax structure is very attractive to companies looking to generate revenues in Canada or repatriate profits in to or out of Canada. Canada is ranked the best place in the G8 with regards to corporate income tax rates. (Canada Broadcasting Corporation) In 2013 the average combined Federal and Provincial tax rate was 26.1% (as compared to the US, where the combined tax rate was 46.7%)3. Canada’s technical R&D tax credit regime is amongst the most advantageous amongst all G8 countries. In 2012, Canada provided more than $3.6 billion in SR&ED investment tax credits to over 23,000 businesses performing R&D4, second only to France. Health IT Clusters Over the years, the following locations have evolved into

key Health IT clusters: Canada technology triangle TorontoWaterloo-Hamilton (Ontario), Vancouver (British Columbia), Ottawa (Ontario), Montreal (Quebec), Waterloo (Ontario), Calgary (Alberta), Winnipeg (Manitoba), and Halifax (Nova Scotia). The solutions provided by Canadian Health IT vendors cover several technology areas including Picture Archiving and Communication Systems, Drug Information Systems, Digital Imaging, Electronic Medical Records, Wireless/ Communications, Laboratory Systems, Clinical Information Systems, and Administrative and Financial Systems. The Top 10 Canadian Health IT companies generated over CAD $9 billion dollars in revenue in 20125. These include CGI, Telus Health Solutions, xwave (Bell), Logibec Groupe Informatique, MediSolution, TECSYS, Klick Communications, Nightingale Informatix Corporation, Imaging Dynamics Company, and Clinicare. Leading multinationals located in Canada include Microsoft, Agfa, GE Healthcare, Philips Healthcare, IBM Canada Healthcare, Canon Canada, Cerner, Siemens, and McKesson. A Culture of Innovation Extensive collaboration between industry and government research institutions and nonprofit industry associations is helping to bring cutting edge technology to the market.

Leading edge technology is currently being researched, developed or implemented in biosensors, system on chip (SOC), information security and service delivery platforms. Further, Canada is home to several research-oriented universities and vibrant industry associations that support Health IT innovation. Examples of these include MaRS with its vibrant Digital Health practice, JOLT accelerator and Utest incubator, the University of Waterloo (The Waterloo Institute for Health Informatics Research – WIHIR), McGill University, Centre for Global eHealth Innovation (Toronto General Hospital and University of Toronto), Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR), Electronic Health Information Laboratory, and Communications Research Centre Canada (CRC) and Health Technology Exchange (HTX.ca). McMaster University, which together with Hamilton Health Sciences developed OSCAR, an open source EMR and patient engagement platform.

1 AT Kearney. “Building the Optimal Global Footprint”, AT Kearney Global Service Location Index. 2 Information and Communcations Technology Council. 3 KPMG. Tax Facts, 2012-13. 4 Department of Finance Canada. Government Tax Expenditures and Evaluations 2012, Ottawa 2013. 5 Branham Group. Listing of Top 300 Canadian Technology Companies, 2013.


Nova Scotia Open for Research

Canada’s ocean playground offers a relaxed lifestyle in a beautiful province steeped in history. Nova Scotia is home to Dalhousie Medical School, Nova Scotia Health Authority and IWK Health Centre. These institutions have forged a strong and innovative research partnership. This academic health sciences network is the foundation of a vibrant teaching and research enterprise, committed to improving the health of our Maritime community, and beyond. Nova Scotia extends a warm welcome to health researchers, sponsors, industry and government partners from around the globe. Come play with us!

http://medicine.dal.ca/ http://www.nshealth.ca/research http://www.iwk.nshealth.ca/research


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Evolving Medtronic in a Time of Healthcare Transformation

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edtronic is evolving by innovating in new ways and collaborating with new partners globally to bring meaningful innovations to market, finding ways to align value among the health system’s stakeholders and increase access to care around the world. Recognizing that no one can solve the world’s healthcare challenges alone, Medtronic is committed to working in partnership with others so that we can all witness the benefits of value-based healthcare. Since Medtronic’s inception six decades ago, our Mission has remained the same: to alleviate pain, restore health, and extend life for people around the world. We have worked hard to be at the forefront of medical device innovation, challenging ourselves to develop high-quality technologies that positively impact people’s lives. We have accomplished a lot — today more than 62 million people benefit from our technologies each year, equating to two people every second. CREATING MEANINGFUL INNOVATIONS Our goals to improve clinical outcomes, expand access, and optimize cost and efficiency are fundamental to all healthcare systems around the world. Meaningful innovations at the therapy, procedural and system levels are those that deliver better patient outcomes at appropriate costs, lead to enhanced quality of life, and can be validated by clinical and economic evidence. Medtronic explores many ways to apply

this outlook along the full continuum of care. For example, Medtronic designs and develops innovative medical devices for diagnosing, monitoring, and treating various cardiovascular conditions. Two of these technologies have Canadian roots. The Arctic Front Cryoablation system, manufactured in Montreal, is designed to treat atrial fibrillation, a leading cause of stroke. Reveal LINQ, a miniaturized insertable cardiac monitor first invented in London, Ontario, helps clinicians detect atrial fibrillation in patients who have had an unexplained stroke. Our latest technology, Solitaire, can retrieve a blood clot from the brain of patients experiencing an ischemic stroke. STRIVING FOR ALIGNED VALUE-BASED HEALTHCARE At Medtronic, we believe our technologies, the data and insights they create and our

expertise can be combined in partnership with hospitals, payers, and governments to help establish aligned, value-based healthcare models that can deliver better patient outcomes — while maintaining or reducing costs. We began our evolution by introducing a concept called “economic value,” incorporating it as a cornerstone of our business strategy in 2012. In short, we saw a shift in what our customers expected from us and responded by conducting numerous economic studies on our devices. An assessment of insertable cardiac monitors, for example, estimated that from 2002-2011, Ontario saved $7.1 million annually by avoiding visits to the ER and other costly diagnostic tests through the use of insertable cardiac monitors1. Sadri A, Winsor P. The effect of late adoption of Canadian innovations: A case for implantable cardiac monitors. Healthcare Management Forum. Spring/ 2014 27(1S):S46-S51. 1


Perspective The Future of Healthcare Requires New Approaches To further increase value to our customers, in 2013, we created the Medtronic Integrated Health Solutions (IHS) business that moves beyond devices to focus on system-level services and solutions. Today, Medtronic IHS helps hospitals and health systems align value across the care continuum by delivering more efficient and improved care to patients. In Ontario, IHS worked with Brampton Civic Hospital’s Diabetes Education Centre to find solutions to increase the number of new patient visits, boost capacity for classes, and decrease the number of no-shows. By delivering Lean Academy Training, developing performance bench marks, and value

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stream mapping, the centre was able to realize 2,600 hours of process efficiencies, freeing up time to conduct 33% more patient visits, while reducing wait times from up to two months, to less than 3 weeks. Only through collaboration and partnership can we all achieve the benefits of value-based healthcare. LEADING THE VALUEBASED HEALTHCARE EVOLUTION While Medtronic remains focused on developing technologies and services that can realize more value from the existing health systems, we are also actively leading and participating in efforts around the globe aimed at re-architecting healthcare delivery and payment systems to better reward patient outcomes in the future. Many around the world refer to this

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movement as “value-based healthcare.” These efforts are in their earliest beginnings and will be defined and evolve over time. Medtronic’s goal is to ensure that the power of technology is considered and leveraged within healthcare systems as a means by which to deliver better patient-centered outcomes. We seek to be an engaged and collaborative industry leader committed to seeing that value-based healthcare efforts are successful for patients, caregivers, and payers. This along with our Further, Together mindset of driving healthcare evolution in partnership is a transformative opportunity for Medtronic to enhance the value we bring to healthcare and work with organizations striving to change the future of healthcare with us. Let’s take healthcare Further, Together.

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LIFE SCIENCES AND HEALTH TECHNOLOGY

GREATER MONTRÉAL, THE PLACE WHERE RESEARCH AND BUSINESS MEET The industry at a glance:

THE HIGHEST CONCENTRATION OF LSHT BUSINESSES IN NORTH AMERICA Greater Montréal’s Life Sciences and Health Technology (LSHT) sector is a key economic driver. Over the years, the region has grown to become one of the biggest LSHT hubs in North America.

• Greater Montréal is Canada’s largest research hub and home to numerous contract manufacturing organizations (CMOs) and contract research organizations (CROs) as well as providers of related services. • The region has made a name for itself internationally in areas of excellence such as: • oncology, • cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, • neuroscience and mental health, • infectious diseases, • aging, • precision medicine, • cellular therapy and regenerative medicine.

Did you know?

GREATER MONTRÉAL'S LSHT INDUSTRY – FACTS AND FIGURES • More than 45,000 LSHT jobs, ranking Greater Montréal 6th among North American metropolitan areas • 600 organizations, including 300 public and broader public research organizations, employing 12,000 researchers and professionals • Two new state-of-the-art mega teaching hospitals with world-class research centres: the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) and the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM) • 11 universities with over 27,000 students enrolled in LSHT programs, including McGill University, Université de Montréal, and École des Technologies Supérieures • A 14% cost advantage for businesses in the LSHT sector over other cities • A dynamic ecosystem supported by Montréal InVivo, an industry cluster that engages stakeholders on issues of shared interest

A high concentration of global industry leaders ABBVIE BIOMÉRIEUX BRISTOL-MYERS SQUIBB CHARLES RIVER GLAXOSMITHKLINE MEDTRONIC MERCK NOVARTIS OTSUKA PHARMASCIENCE PFIZER ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS SANOFI SERVIER SHIRE VALEANT VERTEX ZIMMER


AN ARRAY OF ATTRACTIVE TAX AND FINANCIAL INCENTIVES 1. Scientific Research and Experimental Development (SR&ED) tax credit program 15% from the Government of Canada and 14% refundable, from the Government of Québec 2. Financial assistance for job creation and training 25% of eligible costs to implement a training program and 50% of costs incurred to create a human resources department 3. ESSOR fund for major projects Refundable and non-refundable contributions, as well as loan guarantees 4. Tax holiday for qualified foreign researchers and experts Provincial income tax exemption for five years

A LOOK AT FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES IN GREATER MONTRÉAL Greater Montréal’s LSHT industry is dominated by multinationals: the region is home to over 200 foreign subsidiaries employing close to 20,000 people. About half of those subsidiaries report to parent companies in the United States, with the remainder belonging to European or Asian firms. The industry is also bolstered by local companies with a strong international reputation.

WHAT MAKES GREATER MONTRÉAL THE PERFECT PLACE FOR THE LSHT INDUSTRY? • A strategic geographic location with direct access to international and NAFTA markets • A deep pool of bilingual, highly qualified workers • Canada’s capital of higher education • The lowest operating costs in the LSHT industry among North America’s 20 biggest cities (KPMG, 2015) • Highly competitive, targeted tax incentives that meet industry needs • Top city in North America for hosting international events (Union of International Associations, 2015)

VANCOUVER

MONTRÉAL TORONTO

LONDON PARIS

BOSTON NEW YORK WASHINGTON LOS ANGELES

380 Saint-Antoine Street West Suite 8000 Montréal, Québec H2Y 3X7

t 514-987-8191 f 514-987-1948 www.montrealinternational.com

SOURCES: Montréal InVivo, 2015 Statistics Canada, 2015 Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2015 Montréal International, 2015 Department of Finance Québec (Ministère des Finances du Québec), 2016


CANADIANS INNOVATING FOR THE WORLD

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MANUFACTURING EMPLOYEES SITES IN CANADA NATIONWIDE

Through innovation and collaboration, Medtronic helps to improve the lives of millions of people each year. We’re now among the world’s largest medical technology, services and solutions companies, serving physicians, hospitals and patients in more than 160 countries. With a presence in Canada since 1968, we are proud to employ over 1,600 people across the country, in our three regional offices, and at our two manufacturing sites. One of our many Canadian innovations includes our cryoablation technology, which is manufactured in Quebec and exported all over the world. We continue to partner with Canada’s world-class research community to bring new innovations to the world that will help us achieve our mission to alleviate pain, restore health, and extend life. Learn how we are taking healthcare Further, Together at Medtronic.ca. 1. Data on file © 2015 Medtronic. All rights reserved.

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