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www.PersianTribune.ca • Volume 2, Issue 4

THE VERSATILE ECHOES OF

RHYTHM AND VIBES BAND A PERSIAN AFFAIR......!!!

FREE TUITION FOR UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES IN ONTARIO

CARIBBEAN PARADISE AT EXOTIC

ANTIGUA & BARBUDA "FINAL DESTINATION: HOLLYWOOD"

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH IRANIAN AMERICAN ACTOR

NAVID NEGAHBAN

SIMIN KERAMATI, THE ARTIST WITHIN ISSN 2291-580X

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IN THIS ISSUE FEATURE STORY NAVID NEGAHBAN

"FINAL DESTINATION: HOLLYWOOD"

SIMIN KERAMATI THE ARTIST WITHIN

PEOPLE

PROFESSOR EMERITUS ALI JAVAN

EDUCATION FREE UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE TUITION FOR LOW-INCOME STUDENTS

COMMUNITY EXHIBITION OFFERS A MANIFESTO OF HOPE FOR SYRIA

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CANADIAN TECHNOLOGY - ETI

FILM REVIEW

BUSINESS

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TRAVEL ANTIGUA AND BARBUDA

MUSIC LAW

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CULTURE, ETHICS AND FAMILY LAW OF ONTARIO

HEALTH

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REAL ESTATE EVENTS OUT AND ABOUT WITH PERSIAN TRIBUNE

ENVIRONMENT

WILD PACIFIC SALMON FACE AN UPSTREAM BATTLE FOR SURVIVAL

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IT COULD BE ‘HORMONE HAVOC’

HOW TO WIN AT REAL ESTATE

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RHYTHM AND VIBES

UNABLE TO LOSE WEIGHT?

POLITICS

BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER SINCE DAY ONE

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FROM THE PERSIAN KITCHEN:

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PERSON OF THE MONTH:

A PERSIAN AFFAIR

BEEF KOKKINISTO

A TURNIP SOUP - SHALGHAM

ART

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FOOD & WINE

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LETTER FROM EDITOR It is hard to believe that 2016 is joining the yesteryears of our lives, but it is also refreshing to embark on a New Year and with that to welcome a new beginning. As the year changes, we should reflect on our lives to see if we have changed as well. We should ask ourselves if are we are wiser or do we still have the same priorities and outlook on life as before? Perhaps we feel somehow wiser due to some experiences gained during the year. Or maybe we just got older and sadly NOTHING has changed about us.

Volume 2, Issue 4

I believe this time of the year is the time for self-evaluation, when we take a look at ourselves in the mirror of our own judgement, to find out if we really like what we are looking at. Do we see any room for improvement, physically and mentally? It is a time to honestly evaluate ourselves and plan revisions for needed improvements. After all, it is important for all of us to love what we see in that personal mirror. So you can call each New Year a milestone of self-improvement which we should embrace honestly. As we embark on another year I would like to wish you all this, “may the New Year bring you more health and happiness than ever, more wealth and prosperity than you can manage and most important of all, more calm and peace of mind that you can imagine”. In this issue of Persian Tribune magazine, you will read about an important initiative about free tuition for the universities and colleges in Ontario, launched by the Ontario Ministry of Education under Hon. Reza Moridi MPP. This issue also features Navid Negahban, an inspiring Iranian American actor who shares his lengthy and tremulous journey to Hollywood and talks about his shinning achievements in this exclusive interview. “The Artist Within” is an article about the impressive and creative works of Toronto based Iranian visual artist Simin Keramati, who has a distinct approach to visual art. In this issue you also get to know about the musical group of “Rhythm and Vibes“, who are marking their successful presence on the Iranian Canadian music scene. And finally if you are looking for that paradise on the earth, look no more since it has been found and it is called Antigua and Barbuda. Read about this gem of the Caribbean and plan your trip there soon. So as you look at yourselves in that “self mirror”, I hope that you love what you see and I wish that love increases daily in the New Year.

Publisher: Persian Tribune Inc.

Editor-in-Chief: Kiumars Rezvanifar

Senior VP Marketing Communications: Silviu C. Apostolide

Creative Director: Ramin Deravian Art Director: Courtney Boyden

Managing Editor: Courtney Boyden

Graphic Designers: Alireza Bibak Hoda Gharaie

Associate Managing Editor: Teresa Tiano

Account Executives: Arman Hedayat Nooshin Riahy David Zand Behrouz Ziaci

Contributing Writers: David Akhlaghi Silviu Apostolide, MBA Courtney Boyden Nicole Spina Dr. Filiz Çakır Phillip Robert Atkinson Naz Deravian Doris Pontieri Chris Priftis David Suzuki Bryon Wilfert Dr. Reza Moridi, MPP Jay Chauhan Nima Shirali Azad Imanirad Vera Tzoulas Dr. Jeff Brown Theresa Beer

Special Projects Jacques Reiss

Printing: Quatro Canada

Associate Editor: Artmiz Rahimi Copy Editor: Arezou Amin Research: Artemiz Rezvanifar Senior VP Marketing Communications: Bill Dennis

Web Management: Ramin Emadi Director of Marketing Development: Dawn S. Marvasti

Happy New Year, Kiumars Rezvanifar Editor-In-Chief kiu@persiantribune.ca

Persian Tribune magazine is published twelve times a year by Persian Tribune Inc. It is distributed free of charge in libraries, business and cultural centers in GTA. Persian Tribune magazine is an independent publication and its contents imply no endorsement of any product or service. Opinions expressed are those of the writers. The contents of this publication may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission from the publisher. Canadian Head Office (Toronto) Persian Tribune magazine 25 Valleywood Drive, Suite 12 Markham, ON L3R 5L9 Canada

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Dubai Office Ms. Roya Devon royadevon@outlook.com 0097-150-734-8005

Paris Office Mme. Niloufar Manii 9, rue de Chartres 92200 Neuilly Sur Seine, FRANCE

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Tel: (905)763-1061 Fax: (905)763-8972 Email: contact@persiantribune.ca visit us at www.issuu.com/persiantribune Printed in Canada. ISSN 2291-580X. All rights reserved.


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•ART

SIMIN KERAMATI THE ARTIST WITHIN By: Doris Pontieri

"I am not a female artist from Middle East in exile, I am an artist."

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recently had an opportunity to interview this eloquent, sensitive artist and was captivated by the inspiring way she shared the story of her life as an artist with me. Her statement above is truly how she feels. She will not be defined by her past, nor will her artwork, even though her history plays a huge part in the choices she has made on her journey to where she is now and is reflected in her art. Living and studying in Tehran, where she received her Masters in Fine Art from The Art University of Tehran, Simin worked out of her art studio there for fifteen years. Three years ago, she made the decision to move herself and her son Aria to Canada. Her mother and brother already lived here so she had visited several times and connected with Toronto. She tells me that this city became very special and inspiring to her and

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MARINA ABRAMOVIC IS PRESENT, ME AND VERMEER’S GLASS OF WINE FROM THE SERIES “THE BLUE BACKGROUNDS” Size: 142cm x 172cm

Technique: Acrylics and spangles on canvas Year: 2014

she loved the artist community that exists here. She also believed that it would be good for both her and Aria to make Canada their home. She shares her ideas and her choices with Aria who is only 12 years old, but has fond memories of his life in Tehran, and is happily growing and making history and memories here in his new

TITLE: EDGE OF THE BLADE FROM THE SERIES “THE EDGE OF THE BLADE” SIZE: 150CM X 150CM TECHNIQUE: ACRYLICS, GOLDEN LEAVES, AND SPANGLES ON CANVAS YEAR: 2012


•ART reach the place they can call their new home, a safe haven for their loved ones where they can rebuild their lives. She shows her audience that these people are part of us, part of our humanity. Showing the different faces that immigration can take. She is currently a part of an exhibition comprised of 15 artists at the Azad Art Gallery in Tehran. This show centres on women's issues and Simin's installation at this exhibit is one of her video art pieces.

TITLE: THE ARTIST IS POSING FOR YOU FROM THE SERIES “THE EDGE OF THE BLADE” SIZE: 150CM X 150CM TECHNIQUE: ACRYLICS, GOLDEN LEAVES AND TEXTILE ON CANVAS YEAR: 2012

home, Canada. She speaks of how deep he is and how he can see the issues she speaks with him of, and how he continues to inspire her.

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ooking at some of her paintings, I was moved by the bold choices, both social and political that have influenced her and have been the theme of many of her works. She grew up confronted by big events such as revolution and war. And although she paints with beauty and confidence, her artistic voice is that of someone who has lived through these events, with a deep understanding.

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TITLE: MUSIC AND FLOWERS STILLS FROM THE VIDEO ART, YEAR: 2010

Her newest series titled "Identity" is socially charged and themed with aspects of changing our lives, about confronting different situations. How do you find your identity in your new environment but also hold onto who you are, who you have always been? She says its like looking at yourself twice and learning to adapt.

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hat is next for Simin? Well, as she explained to me, she loves to read, to hear and to watch the life around her which will inevitably take her to her next artistic journey. Something we can all look forward to sharing with her. 

Doris Pontieri is an award winning artist and art teacher. Her work is featured in many galleries in Canada and U.S. Since being invited to exhibit at the Louvre in Paris, she has been awarded the medal for Outstanding Artwork by the Paris Society of Arts, Science and Letters, one of the oldest societies in France.

n 2014 Simin received a grant from the Canada Council For The Arts to produce video art titled "Between All The Physical Objects". This poinent work depicts the real life struggles of people trying to escape the ravages of their lives and find safety for their families. Fleeing war torn countries attempting to survive until they can TITLE: ANDY WARHOL, ME AND CARAVAGGIO FROM THE SERIES “THE BLUE BACKGROUNDS” SIZE: 114CM X 152CM TECHNIQUE: ACRYLICS AND SPANGLES ON CANVAS YEAR: 2014 PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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ALL GOvERNMENTS LIE: TRuTH, DECEpTION AND THE SpIRIT OF I.F. STONE

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•FILM REVIEW

Persian AffairHOW FAR WILL YOU GO FOR SURVIVAL,

WHEN ALL YOU HAVE LEFT IS YOUR CULTURE

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his irresistible story directed by Farbod Khoshtinat, is a glimpse at the unfortunate truth of what could happen when an Iranian family leaves everything behind to gamble on a better future. The film challenges our romantic notions of immigration, and asks the question “is pursuing the American dream worth the risk?”

FILM REVIEW FILM REVIEW E

very year, out of the vast majority of people applying to get into the United States, only 55,000 people are selected to enter the country, by luck of winning the Diversity Lottery. While they ignore all the hardship and challenges that may arise from migrating, they start their move focused only on the glamour advertised by Hollywood. A Persian Affair concentrates on one family out of many who have gone through this, and will reveal how their unrealistic expectations will collapse upon their arrival. The dream to make it to the top turns into a battle of survival, leaving them alienated from society, resulting in hatred from all sides.

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his movie is a cautionary tale about doing the wrong things for the right reasons. This film highlights the mental, physical, and moral costs that arise for an Iranian family that comes to America with nothing to fall back on. Had they known about the sacrifices that they had to make, would they still have said yes to their prize? A Persian Affair pivots around the topic of survival of eastern values in the west. 

FILM

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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EXHIBITION NOW OPEN AT THE AGA KHAN MUSEUM

Syria: A Living History

EXHIBITION . FILMS . LECTURES . PERFORMANCES

Experience a story of spirit, resilience, and creation as told through 5,000 years of art and culture.

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•COMMUNITY

EXHIBITION OFFERS A MANIFESTO OF HOPE FOR SYRIA

SYRIA By: Dr. Filiz Çakır Phillip

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he devastating civil war in Syria has captured the world’s attention. In response to this, the Aga Khan Museum offers a world premiere exhibition that tells a different side of Syria’s story, one that reminds us of the artistic achievements and cultural diversity of both ancient and present day Syria.

ogether, the selected works show a continuously strong and deep interest in both human and animal imagery in the arts of Syria, regardless of the artists’ differing belief systems or ethnic backgrounds, celebrating the rich multi-cultural heritage of the country.

The Aga Khan Museum in Toronto has created an unprecedented collaboration – with seven of the world’s most prestigious private collections and institutions including the Musée du Louvre in Paris, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Atassi Foundation in Dubai, the Berlin State Museums, and the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto – to bring together works that will be exhibiting together for the first time in this landmark project, Syria: A Living History.

To further the experience, the Aga Khan Museum is offering a compelling lineup of lectures, performing arts, and a symposium to further educate, enlighten, and foster positive dialogue about Syria’s past and uncertain future.

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s co-curator, I am honoured to be part of the creation of such an important exhibition. With this project, we hope that people will gain a better appreciation of Syria’s priceless contributions to the world’s heritage over the ages and in turn, better understand the urgency of securing an immediate resolution to the ongoing conflict.

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rofesser Maamoun Abdulkarim, Director-General of Antiquities and Museums, Syrian Arab Republic delivered a lecture on October 16 focusing on Syria’s exceptional architecture and cultural artistic heritage. Dr. Ross Burns, led a lecture on November 13 sharing his insights about the city of Aleppo. Beyond fascinating educational programming, Syrian artists will perform as part of our fall performing arts season with such artists as Syria’s first opera singer Lubana Al Quntar, composer Kinan Azmeh, and visual artist Kevork Mourad.

Syria’s cultural history is a long and complex one, making this a challenging exhibition to co-curate. Telling the story of 5,000 years of arts and culture was probably the most difficult part of conceptualizing this exhibition.

The elegant Damascus panels that adorn the interior of Diwan, the Museum’s restaurant, provide the perfect backdrop for a unique series of special concerts and themed events. In addition, a special menu featuring Syrian dishes have been introduced at Diwan to complement the exhibition.

Through artifacts, paintings, and works of stone, woodwork, ivory and silverware, the exhibition highlights the diverse cultures within Syria – Mesopotamian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Persian, Ottoman, and Arab.

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here are so many fascinating pieces in this exhibition, but here are some highlights. First, an example of Syria’s material cultural heritage that has faced many dangers through the centuries – a stele with a depiction of a prayer from Tell Halaf Syria from the 10th and 9th centuries BCE. This piece bears the marks of a Second World War bombing raid in Berlin, Germany. On the contemporary side, we have paintings by Elias Zayat and Fateh al-Moudarres that merge personal experience with reflection on modern-day Syria. All of the contemporary artworks featured are on loan from the Atassi Foundation in Dubai, and we are honoured to be able to partner with them.

s you can see, this project goes way beyond just an art exhibition. Here we have an entire institution coming together to promote a dialogue to address to a global crisis that affects millions.

Furthermore, UNESCO has extended its patronage to this exhibition and its related programs. The Aga Khan Museum shares a common goal with UNESCO: to protect, preserve, and promote Syria’s remarkable culture and heritage. We hope that this project will provide the public with a glimpse into the amazing cultural diversity of Syria’s history, and spark further understanding and action to resolve the Syrian crisis. Syria: A Living History opened at the Aga Khan Museum on October 15, 2016 and runs through February 26, 2017. 

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•MUSIC

By: Azad Imanirad

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t may intrigue one’s curiosity to ponder Toronto’s place in a cultural world generated by the Iranian diaspora living abroad. Once every two years Toronto is put on the map as a premiere artistic hub, as the host city to the Tirgan Festival. It is an up and coming local scene rarely seen in any other city. Some may argue London—after all, the BBC and MANOTO have become main arteries at the heart of entertainment and media, but rarely do underdogs get a chance to be featured on their platforms. Toronto’s Iranian art scene is a tale of underdogs—a David and Goliath of sorts if you will. In this case, Goliath is a limbo of sorts; a transition in methods of production, performance, and distribution not just for Iranians, but for the international music industry and the lack of a supporting financial structure which encourages immigrants to pursue art. The Davids, in this case alluding to Iranian artists, suffer, like NIMA many other indie artists, to gain exposure through this transitional conundrum and finance their art in a predominantly Western market.

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Rhythm and Vibes is one such band and is on the rise on local Toronto stages. Like other artists, the band’s vision for the future tries to be optimistic but also appears pragmatic. The trio all hold full-time jobs as they selffund their journey through the tumultuous terrain of the music industry. “We’re dedicated to our art and we’re dedicated to our fan base. We see as ourselves as an alternative band. We understand that in the Persian community as it is, alternative art and the identity it brings with itself might take time to flourish. We’re willing to pay the price.” states Nima, the band’s producer and guitarist.

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ith a growing fan base since their opening gig at the Zemestaneh event held by University of Toronto’s Nawrenj Iranian Association, the band captured Persian Tribune’s attention after being chosen as fan favourites by the audience. Sara Ahamdieh is the band’s lyricist and vocalist,

SARA

SIAVASH


•MUSIC

originally trained and bred in Tehran’s music scene, she found solace in singing to help her cope with immigration and homesickness after moving to Toronto. The lyrics she wrote came with a pinch of nostalgic love and loss, a sense of yearning every emigrant feels during their flight to a new land. She brings with herself a degree in Farsi Literature from Tehran and a Bachelor’s degree in Theatre Production from Humber College in Toronto. Humble and seemingly shy in person, Sara’s stage presence is charismatic and naturally colourful. She has previously held down a stable fort acting as Hod-Hod in Soheil Parsa’s workshop production of the Attar’s Conference of the Birds on the theatrical stage. It seems that as Sara settles down more in the city, the nostalgia in her lyrics are slowly fading and becoming moments recognized in the present, as is the case in their latest single Roya Bāzi.

Hoping for the release of their first album sometime soon, producer and guitarist Nima Ahmadieh spoke about the rewards and challenges of producing work in the current Iranian market: “The amount of work that is being presented in the Iranian market is absolutely mind boggling, so it becomes very important to get yourself out there as much as you can.”

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Persian Tribune believes that ultimately this band will be an indie household name in the very near future. They will be featured as part of the prestigious Ferdowsi Norooz event held annually in Toronto, and their first music video for “Seda Kon Mara” is already out on social media.

he band’s talented and energetic percussionist Siavash Sadr Mahdavi joined the sibling duo on the Cajón 3 years ago. When asked about future prospects, he optimistically calls on a process of “organic growth” as the force to take their music international. “Audiences are evolving—very rapidly. Listeners and musicians desire a change, hence I am optimistic when I see such enthusiasm for our genre of work.” Sadr Mahdavi attributes this newfound acceptance to Namjoo and other alternative artists as pioneers of the independent scene who came out of the box of traditions first.

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erhaps the lack of investors or strong media outlets for the indie scene are lacking, and deserving bands the likes of Rhythm and Vibes suffer in terms of time and creativity as a result. “We all have jobs which support our music career, and at times it becomes impossible to balance the two and keep doing what you’re doing to get the word out” says Nima Ahmadieh. Yet the band perseveres.

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t seems that as the more the band goes through the process of organic growth, their minor chords are overtaken by majors—as if the power of newfound human connection overtakes the feeling of yearning after separation - rhythm and vibrations to connect with!  PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•EDUCATION

FREE UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE TUITION FOR LOW-INCOME STUDENTS

By: Dr. Reza Moridi, MPP

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he 2016 Ontario Budget made history.

The approximately $134 billion budget introduced the single largest modernization of the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) ever. Under the new Ontario Student Grant, average tuition will be practically free for students with family incomes of $50,000, or lower, starting in the 2017–18 school year. Our government is committed to making post-secondary education accessible based on a student’s ability to learn, not their ability to pay. That’s why we support a progressive student financial assistance program that ensures, virtually no student pays the full sticker price, and the students with the highest need get the most support. These additional changes will mean the Ontario Student Financial Assistance Program will be delivered in a smarter, simpler, and more transparent way for students.

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ll students, regardless of background or circumstance, should be able to afford to go to college or university in Ontario. Students from low-income households that never thought university or college was an option for them, will now have access to a brighter education like never before. This major transformation will break down barriers to higher education and help ensure all Ontarians can access post-secondary education, and is a key part of the government’s plan to invest in people and support economic growth. The province is investing in tomorrow’s highly skilled workforce today by: • Transforming student assistance to make average college and university tuition free for students with financial need from families with incomes of $50,000 or lower, and making tuition more affordable for middle-class families. • Providing non-repayable grants, which will exceed average college and university tuition, to more than 50 per cent of students from families with incomes of $83,000 or less.

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• Ensuring that students from families with incomes of less than $50,000 will have no provincial student debt. • Increasing access to interest-free and low-cost loans for middle and upper income families. • Expanding financial support for mature and married students. • Ensuring all students will be the same or better off under the new Ontario Student Grant as under the Ontario Tuition Grant. • Improving access to post-secondary education and training for First Nation, Métis and Inuit learners through continuing the Province’s three-year, $97 million investment. The Ontario Student Grant will provide additional support for full-time mature and married students, and eligibility will no longer be tied to the number of years a student has been out of high school.

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his predictable, upfront grant will allow families to plan for their children’s education on the basis of net price – the difference between the sticker price of tuition and what a student actually needs to pay. The government will work closely with the post-secondary sector to develop planning tools that more accurately calculate the net tuition and net price of a university or college education. By supporting students from low and middle income families as they pursue a university degree or college diploma, our government is helping to build the highly skilled workforce that will generate economic growth, improve social mobility and create long-term, sustainable prosperity for our province. 


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•TRAVEL

By Nicole Spina

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ocated between the Caribbean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, Antigua and Barbuda is a twin-island country and the largest of the English-speaking Leeward Islands. Since it has an annual rainfall average of only 45 inches, it is a true paradise

because of its continuous sunshine. There is such a rich history to Antigua and Barbuda that it

gives the island a strong and unique character. From my visit to the Museum of Antigua and Barbuda in St. John’s, the island’s largest city and capital, I was enriched with deep history regarding the first settlements of the Siboney dating back from about 2400 B.C., the Arawaks in 35-1100 A.D., the Caribs and the first European contact by Christopher Columbus during his second European Voyage – just to highlight a few of the topics it covered. There were Arawak historical pieces, models of sugar plantations and colonial artifacts to enhance the teachings of the country’s development. While in St. John’s, I could see the magical and magnificent St. John’s Cathedral from miles away – you can’t miss it. The city is also a dynamic hub for shopping and dining and has a lively farmers market on Friday and Saturday mornings with tropical fruits and colourful folk crafts. 18

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•TRAVEL

From Half Moon Bay Beach with its lush green hills providing impeccable surrounding views to the soft, white sand and turquoise water of Frye’s Beach to Jabberwock Beach with its variety of popular watersports (kitesurfing, windsurfing and paddling to name a few) – the beaches have no limits. Well-preserved coral reefs, walls and shipwrecks surround the southern and eastern coasts of Antigua and the entire coast of Barbuda, providing perfect conditions for snorkeling and shallow diving. With little current in most places, an average water temperature of 25°C and underwater visibility ranging from 50 to 140 feet, it is an excellent place to spot tropical marine plants and animals. My favourite snorkeling spot was Cades Reef, a contained designated underwater park where the water was crystal clear and marine life colourful and lively. The islands are ideal for sailing and yachting with its many picturesque harbours and constant trade-winds. More than 70,000 people come to the islands for the Classic Yacht Regatta and Antigua Sailing Week, the Caribbean’s biggest sailing event. I booked a berth with lessons on a race boat during Sailing Week and even chartered my own boat on the last day to explore the scenic anchorages. I captured a handful of postcard-perfect photographs when I rented a car to explore the lands on my own. Roadside stops included rolling meadows where sugar mills stood with swaying sugar canes, beautiful bunches of fig trees and verdant rainforest views where I even made a pit stop to try out the thirteen zip lines and aerial walks the Antigua Rainforest Canopy Tour had to offer. I even tested my limits and went bungee jumping for the first time. There were many unique spots to dine to try Antigua and Barbuda cuisine along my driving journey too. Popular dishes included fungie (similar to polenta), seasoned rice, ducana (sweet potato dumpling), saltfish and lobster. The islands are known for the black pineapple, where the fruit is so ripe it is ready to eat when the skin is still dark green.

There are many travel opportunities for Canadian travellers through partnerships with Canadian airlines (Air Canada and West Jet Vacations), new developed properties to allow for more airlift to the islands and a new airport in Antigua. Canadian visitors are currently the third largest source of visitors to the islands.

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•POLITICS CANADIAN TECHNOLOGY - ETI By: Bryon Wilfert

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limate change and rising emissions have made parts of the world, a nightmare for people – bronchiole congestion, and eye irritation as examples. Having returned recently from China, the pollution problem and the associated issues with it have become a major social, political and environmental issue. In a report from Yale and Columbia Universities, entitled the Environmental Performance Index, China in its overall ranking, which deals with air quality, including such factors as agriculture, water and climate change was 116 out of 128. India came in at 125.

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hina is considered one of the world’s leading polluters and leads in a number of categories such as CO2, sulphur dioxide, mercury and arsenic emissions. Cities in China are often ringed with coal-fired power plants, metal smelters and heavy industry plants. City airports in Beijing and Shanghai are sometimes closed because of the poor visibility from pollution. The estimated labour lost and health care costs associated with pollution impact the Chinese economy up to 10 percent in terms of potential growth. Emission Technologies International Inc., (ETI), is a Canadian technology company, with an on-board hydrogen generator (E2). It uses electrolysis to disassociate water into hydrogen and oxygen gas that is then fed into any four-stroke engine running any fossil, bio, or hydrocarbon fuel, resulting in more complete combustion.

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ow many times have you been driving or idling behind trucks or buses with their thick, black smoke coming out? The E2 greatly reduces the diesel small and particulate matter from the exhaust, making those experiences a thing of the past. The reduction in environmental impact alone is significant. The technology is particularly designed for older engines where the largest improvement in combustion efficiency will occur. TheE2 System will extend the life of reliable, older engines. This is achieved through combustion

efficiency, which vastly reducing carbon deposits in the engine and producing a cleaner and revitalized engine. Running cleaner engines means decreased maintenance expenses and cleaner, longer lasting oil which leads to engine longevity and cleaner output.

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his Canadian technology allows for the addition of hydrogen and oxygen gas that will support combustion of any fossil or biofuel. The E2 Systems can work in conjunction with environmentally friendly fuel sources to create an even more environmentally friendly system. It gives natural gas engines that essential boost in engine power they require. A major plus for the device is that no manufacturer will void the warranty for an aftermarket product. No modifications to the normal operation of the engine take place, however, more combustion will result in more efficient, cleaner operation which leads to longer engine life. Owners of companies that employ the device will appreciate a 5 to 25% increase in fuel economy. The age and condition of the engine are large factors that may improve results.

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here are two simultaneous benefits to using the E2: not only will it reduce emission through improved combustion, but also it will completely eliminate the emissions that would have been created by the fuel that isn’t consumed at all to begin with. Canadian technology is helping to respond effectively to climate change. China is certainly a market that requires help in assisting in the battle against pollution. The respiratory issues are significant and reducing emissions in Chinese cities will help to achieve environmental goals set by the central government in improving air quality and the quality of life for its citizens. 

The Honourable Bryon Wilfert, P.C.,ICD.D is a former MP who was Liberal Party Critic for Foreign Affairs/Defence. Currently Senior Strategic Advisor at Tactix Government Relations/Public Affairs in Ottawa. PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•FEATURE

"FINAL DESTINATION: HOLLYWOOD"

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH IRANIAN AMERICAN ACTOR

NAVID NEGAHBAN

Photo: NJ Bourque

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•FEATURE

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AKING IT IN HOLLYWOOD IS AN ULTIMATE DREAM FOR ALL ASPIRING ACTORS AND ACTRESSES. FOR THOSE LUCKY ONES WHO HAVE HAD THEIR DREAMS COME TRUE, THE ACTUAL “MAKING IT IN HOLLYWOOD” COULD ALSO BE AN INTERESTING OSCAR WINNING MOVIE.

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AVID NEGAHBAN’S ARTISTIC JOURNEY FROM IRAN TO HOLLYWOOD COULD BE VIEWED AS SUCH. THIS TRAVELLED ACTOR WHO HAS MADE IT TO PRIME TIME TELEVISION AND THE SILVER SCREEN AROUND THE GLOBE SAT DOWN WITH PERSIAN TRIBUNE TO TALK ABOUT HIS COLOURFUL LIFE.

By: Courtney Boyden

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•FEATURE

THANK YOU NAVID, FOR TAKING THE TIME TO SIT DOWN AND TALK TO US TODAY. FOR THOSE READERS WHO DON’T KNOW YOU, WOULD YOU BRIEFLY TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF, WHERE YOU WERE BORN, YOUR FAMILY, ABOUT YOUR CHILDHOOD AND UPBRINGING, AND YOUR EDUCATION?

Thank you for having me here! I was born in Mashhad, Iran. I am the oldest of 4 children, 3 brothers, and a sister. I grew up with a dad whom I would go to with my problems, and every time he would say, “it’s your problem, solve it". Years later, I found out that he had always dealt with my problems behind my back, but had me believe that I was dealing with them myself. He forced me to go and find a way to solve my problems. After I got my high school diploma, I left Iran at age 20 for America to pursue my acting, but instead I ended up in Germany through Turkey and Bulgaria. It took me 8 and 1/2 years to get to America.

AT WHAT AGE DID YOU REALIZE THAT YOU WERE INTERESTED IN THE ARTS, AND WHAT CAUSED YOU TO SPECIFICALLY CHOOSE ACTING? I was the family clown and loved to entertain ever since I could remember, but I will never forget the day I fell in love with acting. I was 8 years old and it was the end of

Photo: NJ Bourque

year school play at Beheshte Koodak elementary school in Mashhad. I was playing an Akhond (a Muslim Clergy) who was marrying a couple. I had to audition for the part because they had wanted a fifth grader, and I was in first grade. The moment I stepped out on the stage and opened my mouth, all the parents who were sitting very seriously started to laugh. It was an amazing feeling and right then and there, I fell in love with acting!

WAS YOUR FAMILY SUPPORTIVE OF YOUR ARTISTIC ENDEAVOR SINCE THE MAJORITY OF IRANIAN PARENTS PREFER THAT THEIR CHILDREN BECOME DOCTORS OR ENGINEERS? Are you kidding me?! To them I was the dreamer, the kid who never grew up. I will never forget, I got my massage therapy license and graduated top of my class. My grandpa was visiting from Iran and had pain in his neck. I worked on him and after 5 minutes he told me: “My dear boy that was great! However, you put your life on hold and spent your money to learn how to massage people. You could have learn this job at our local bathhouse for free”! A few years later I got him cast in a short film I was doing. Every morning while we were filming, I would take his hand as he shuffled slowly from the parking lot to the set over the bridge in Balboa Park in San Diego. After a few days into the shoot, he told me with a mischievous smile: “ Do you remember when I used to take your hand and walk you to the school? Now look at us. But you know that you got your talent from me and I think that I would have been a great actor!” I 24

• PERSIANTRIBUNE

FIRST PLAY 8 YEARS OLD


•FEATURE love that he got a chance to feel me. The film went to a few festivals and he always called it his film!

HOW DIFFICULT WAS IT TO PURSUE YOUR DREAM OF ACTING DURING THE WAR ERA IN IRAN, AND WHAT WERE THE CHALLENGES? I didn't see any opportunity during that time. That's why I left. I was just starting out and had no credits. You can say that I was just a closet actor in Iran. A dreamer who had to hide his dream because he wasn't being taken seriously. So I left to find myself and to find out if my dream could become reality.

ONCE OUT OF IRAN, YOU STARTED YOUR ACTING CAREER IN GERMANY. PLEASE TELL US ABOUT THAT SINCE IT SEEMS THAT EVERYTHING STARTED FOR YOU THERE. When I was in Iran, through a friend of mine, Ardeshir, I was introduced to mime. He was deaf. Ardeshir, took me to the coffee shop/theater, where all of his deaf friends used to get together and tell stories or do pantomime. I fell in love with mime. I used to go there to learn from those wonderful performers about how to express myself. It was fascinating. When I got to Germany, I ended up in Kaiserslautern. The theater company in the city was getting ready to do “Sunday in the Park With George”, and they were auditioning to find someone who could mime George's emotions while he was traveling through his memories

and remembering what his life was. I got the part and that was the start. I did a few more plays with the theater company and just kept moving forward.

WHEN DID YOU ARRIVE IN U.S. AND HOW HARD WAS IT TO GET YOUR ACTING CAREER UP AND RUNNING IN THIS “NEW LAND OF OPPORTUNITY”? I landed in America, in January of 1993. My English was very limited so I couldn't get a job as an actor. My uncle, Mehdi Sani and his wife Farzaneh, took me in and let me stay with them until I was able to learn my way around. I don't think that I would have been able to survive without their help the first few months. Many times, I thought about going back to Germany, but I kept telling myself like a gambler at a poker table, one more hand, one more month, and that kept me moving forward. The very first job I got was washing cars. As soon as I was able to speak a few words of English, I started driving a Taxi, then a Shuttle, and then I bought a Shuttle and turned that into a limo service. Meanwhile, I went back to school to learn English and took acting classes to learn the different techniques. Because of my past experience in Germany, I was able to work as an acting coach, and during that time I heard about an audition. They were looking for a Buster Keaton kind of a character to play a mute trombonist. You

AMERICAN SNIPER

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•FEATURE see, the universe gives gifts and prepares you for your future even without you knowing that it is happening. You just need to stay open minded. I got the part. It was a 20 minute short film called “Boundaries” written and directed by Greg Durbin. The film won numerous awards and I was nominated for the best actor at the Method Fest, which was an actor driven film festival. That was the beginning of my career, after almost 8 years in America. We shot the film on 35 and it took us almost two years to finish that film. Now you can shoot and finish the same film in less than 2 months!

WHAT WERE YOUR CHALLENGES AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME THEM? I think that the biggest challenge was me being me! No really. I couldn't speak the language. People couldn't pronounce my name. I looked different. I was struggling financially. I felt very misplaced and lost. I changed my mindset and instead of looking at my problems all at once which made them look impossible to overcome, I dealt with each of them individually. It took time but I always kept reminding myself what my grandma used to say, " The world is like a mirror, if you smile, it will smile back." So I learned about being the hero in my own movie called Life! You know how the hero goes through the hell and comes back out smiling? That's me, or at least it’s the character I am playing in my life.

Photo: Ali Saeed 26

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WHAT ARE THE OTHER PROJECTS THAT YOU HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN? Well so far, I’ve worked on more than 200 projects. If our reader friends are interested to find more they can find the list on the IMDB.

PLEASE CORRECT US IF WE’RE WRONG, BUT WE BELIEVE YOUR BIG BREAK CAME WHEN YOU GOT INVOLVED WITH THE PRODUCTION OF THE HOMELAND TV SERIES. HOW DID THAT HAPPENED? You are absolutely right, but for me, I look at it as a kind of a graduation. I had worked with Howard Gordon on 24. I saw Howard at a book reading event. I walked up to him and told him that I had read his new project and I loved it and want to play Abu Nazir. He promised to talk to the rest of the team. A few weeks later, I had a meeting with Howard and Alex Ganza, and a few weeks after that I was cast to play Abu. That started an amazing new chapter in my life.

YOU WERE THE RECIPIENT OF THE BEST ACTOR AWARD AT THE 2011 NOOR IRANIAN FILM FESTIVAL, TELL US ABOUT THAT. HOW DID IT FEEL TO RECEIVE YOUR FIRST AWARD IN THE IRANIAN COMMUNITY OUTSIDE IRAN? The Noor Film Festival takes place in Los Angeles, and the award was for my portrayal of the late Shah of Iran,


•FEATURE

I couldn't speak the language. People couldn't pronounce my name. I looked different. I was struggling financially. I felt very misplaced and lost. I changed my mindset and instead of looking at my problems all at once which made them look impossible to overcome, I dealt with each of them individually. It took time but I always kept reminding myself what my grandma used to say, "The world is like a mirror, if you smile, it will smile back." So I learned about being the hero in my own movie called Life!

Photo: Ali Saeed

“Stoning of Soraya M” was Ali the husband. Ali was by far the most difficult character so far. For about two weeks after the movie was done I was unable to look at myself in the mirror because I couldn't stand what I was seeing in my own eyes. I remember that I got a call from my mom crying and when I asked her why, she told me that she just finished watching the movie. I told her " Mom, that's not a movie for you. Why did you watch it?" She said: " Pesaram (my son), I am not crying because of the movie, I am crying because I know what you had to put yourself through to play that character!" My MOM! I could never hide anything from her. I miss her. “Baba Joon” was a different story. That character was almost therapeutic for me. To play the father, Itzhak, in Baba Joon, I channeled my younger brother Vahid who was an RN in Iran, and passed away a few years ago. I left Iran and he stayed. Every time I asked him to come to Germany when I was there, he said: “you left, who is going to take care of mom and dad if I leave?” He sought

Mohammad Reza Pahlavi in a movie called “Liberation” written by Justin and Michael Younesi and directed by Michael Younesi. I was fully surprised and overwhelmed. It was a beautiful feeling.

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED FROM THE VARIETY OF CHARACTERS THAT YOU HAVE PORTRAYED? HOW DO THEY AFFECT YOU? FOR EXAMPLE PLAYING AHMAD IN “THE STONING OF SORAYA M” OR THE ROLE OF THE FATHER IN THE MOVIE “BABA JOON”? Wow, You are talking about two of the most difficult characters that I have ever played. The Character in the

Photo: Yoray Liberman PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•FEATURE my father's approval and respect but he never got it the way he deserved to. Not until after he passed away, and even then it was always a "but" even though he was one of the most genuine and spiritual people that I have ever known. He had no filter and he said what he meant, and he meant what he said!

wine to the production table and I said to the producers: "what a surprise seeing you guys here!" Then I pointed to my table and said "The wine is from all the Afghani people at my table. They want to thank you for caring about what happened to them and making a movie about their suffering."

Just so you know who he was, when they were emptying his closet at the hospital, after he passed away, they found a note on the inside of the door written by him that said "God, please forgive the ones who harmed me because I forgive them, Because at the time that they were causing me pain they were lost and they thought that they were doing the right thing."

I believe if a movie is being made about a region and people from that region and what happened to them and how they suffered, the least we can do is to pay them the respect by seeing and listening and acknowledging them.

That was my brother! I used his picture in that movie, showing the time when we were kids. He is the one sitting next to me in the boat pointing at me. This movie gave me a chance to honor him.

HAS THERE EVER BEEN A SITUATION THAT YOU’VE HAD TO CULTURALLY CORRECT THE PRODUCERS OR A DIRECTOR ABOUT THE CHARACTER THAT YOU WERE PORTRAYING? AND IF SO HOW DID THEY REACT TO THAT? A few times. Some took it and some didn't. You can never blame someone for not knowing. But there is a change coming. The world is becoming smaller and people are becoming more familiar with each other.

IN MOST OF YOUR PROJECTS YOU PLAY A CHARACTER FROM THE MIDDLE EAST, HAVE YOU EVER FELT OR FACED ANY PREJUDICES TOWARD YOURSELF OR YOUR CHARACTER ON THE SET? Are we talking about the times that I got stopped at the airport security or the border check point because officers thought that they might have seen my picture on the most wanted list? It doesn't usually happen on set. I have only experienced it twice. Once when I was mistaken by the security guard as a local troublemaker when we were on the location overseas and I was dressed in my costume. The second time, it was many years ago. I had a smaller part in a big project on location. Most of the time there is a reception dinner when you work overseas. So they invited all the actors to dinner in a very fancy and expensive restaurant but none of the Iranian, Afghani and Arab actors with the minor roles got invited. So I gathered “our” group, the ones who weren't invited, and we went to the same restaurant, sat at a table next to the group of actors who were invited, including the producers and the director. Then I sent two bottles of 28

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YOU HAVE PLAYED ROLES AS IRANIAN, AFGHAN, ISRAELI, SYRIAN AND MOSTLY MIDDLE EASTERN CHARACTERS. MOST ACTORS ARE WORRIED ABOUT BEING TYPE CASTED. IS THIS AN ISSUE WITH YOU? Not at all! We are in America, a country that was built by the immigrants. If you look deeper into the communities, you will realize how colourful they are. I just had a pleasure to play Dr. Souhel Najjar in a movie called “Brain On Fire”. He is one of those Middle Eastern characters that I have played. This man saved lives and it was fascinating to become him. There are so many stories to be told from those regions. I have a deep understanding from those regions and I think I can create a more truthful character than someone who has never been there.

WHAT HAS BEEN THE MOST CHALLENGING ROLE AND WHICH HAS BEEN THE MOST ENJOYABLE ROLE THAT YOU HAVE PLAYED? I enjoyed all the roles that I have played. I might have not liked the final product, but each of those characters taught me something about life. The most


•FEATURE ago you wouldn't have been able to see what you see on the screen or Internet today. We shot a whole movie on IPhone and IPad a few years ago. There is no more excuse for not telling or sharing your story.

WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE FOR THE PEOPLE WHO WOULD LIKE TO GET INVOLVED IN THIS LINE OF WORK? Don't do it for fame or money. Do it because there is nothing else you want more. But remember if you decide to do it, then be deaf to all the negative feedback. Believe in yourself and stay truthful to who you are. You are special as who you are so don't copy and be you!

WHAT ARE YOU WORKING ON CURRENTLY AND WHAT IS NEXT ON THE NAVID NEGAHBAN’S BUCKET LIST? I am working on a few projects at the moment. I am developing and producing two films in the US and I am also working on three projects in Germany and the UK. I will be more than happy to tell you about them when they are done. Next on my bucket list? I have a project that I would like to direct and maybe skydiving.

challenging one thus far has been Ali from “the Stoning of Soraya M.”

BESIDES ACTING WHAT ARE YOUR OTHER INTERESTS? I have done many things in my life. From cleaning rooms and washing toilets to managing a clothing company and owning my own business. In general, I am very curious and hungry for knowledge. So I am always on the search. I love to work with my hands, restoring antique furniture, wood carving, painting, traveling and seeing places that I have never seen before. People fascinate me, I love to learn from them. I love driving and shooting pool, and most of all daydreaming!

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST INSPIRATION AND WHO IS YOUR ROLE MODEL? My biggest inspiration has always been discovering. Discovering the big WHY! “Why am I here?” As for a role model, I think a role model is the one who inspires you what to be, or not to be. That changes as you go through your journey. Everyone who has crossed my path inspired me in some way and each of them became my role model even if it was only for a split second.

THE WHOLE WORLD IS CHANGING RAPIDLY AND THE ARTS AND THE ENTERTAINMENT WORLD IS NOT AN EXCEPTION, DO YOU SEE A CHANGE OF ACCEPTANCE IN HOLLYWOOD ABOUT THE FOREIGN BORN ACTORS IN THAT REGARD? Of course. With all the different platforms, it's easier for the storytellers and filmmakers to tell their stories. Hollywood is waking up, and it also helps when you see how curious the audiences have become. Even 5 years

Photo: NJ Bourque

DO YOU HAVE ANY MESSAGE FOR OUR READERS AROUND THE GLOBE? I used to take the 73 toll road. Every time I passed the tollbooth, in those days when they had an attendant, there was this toothless black man with a beautiful old face filled with history who used to collect the money. Every time he saw me, after collecting the money, he would say with his toothless smile: "Have a Fantastic day no matter what...." I always made sure that I passed by his booth. He would make my day. I miss that smile but I never forgot how he made feel. So, Have a FANTASTIC day no matter what...Wishing you all what your heart desires. Be truthful to yourself and kind to others. Don't assume anything. See things for what you feel they are not what you think they are. Smile because the world is the mirror!  IMDB: Navid Negahban Facebook: Navid Negahban Instagram: navidnegahban Twitter: @NavidNegahban PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•HEALTH

UNABLE TO LOSE WEIGHT? IT COULD BE ‘HORMONE HAVOC’. By: Dr. Jeff Brown

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s a physician that specializes in weight loss and wellness I am frequently asked: “Doc, would I benefit by hormone replacement? Is it safe?” After a careful and critical review of the available scientific research, along with first hand experience of almost 30 years I can confidently recommend the use of hormones with the following provisions: 1. That only bio-identical hormones be used 2. Only hormones that are deficient need to be replaced. 3. Hormones should be replaced in a manner that does not inhibit the body’s innate ability to make its own hormones. 4. The prescribing physician must have skill as well as experience in the use of bio-identical hormones. 5. Natural hormone replacement is most effective when part of a unified approach to wellness that includes lifestyle modifications. A hormone is a chemical substance with a precise shape produced in your body by a gland. Hormones travel all over your body performing specific regulatory functions when recognized by their target receptor. This binding is analogous to a ‘lock and key’. Just like with your car, the wrong key will not start your engine.

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io-identical hormones are chemically identical to your own natural hormones; unlike commonly prescribed ‘synthetic’ hormones there is indeed a perfect fit. Because of this fit, they are recognized by the body and perform their function accurately. They can be metabolized into other useful chemicals and appropriately eliminated from the body. All of the body’s systems require a balanced hormone system. When the body is out of balance it will let you know, communicating by way of unwanted symptoms and illness. I have found that the clinical use of bio-identical hormones can restore balance, which appeases the body, eliminates symptoms, helps to prevent illness, and reverses many of the signs of aging. It is also an important consideration to investigate if you are having difficulty losing weight no matter what you have tried.

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am encouraged by the growing interest and support of colleagues that recognize the benefits of bio-identical hormones in treating a wide range of issues, beyond the obvious hot flashes and night sweats such as obesity, infertility, premenstrual syndrome, painful, heavy, and irregular periods, polycystic ovaries, fibroids, endometriosis, chronic fatigue, and colitis to name just a few. Much has been said in the media about the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). This was a study designed and funded to provide answers and reassurance about the use of conventional hormone replacement. The study was originally scheduled for 8.5 years but researchers abruptly put a halt to the study after only 5 years when it became clear that the participant’s health was in danger.

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y own medical oath of “Do no harm” is what fueled my initial investigation into the use of a safer alternative. If you have been told in the past that your alternative to hormone related problems were to ‘grin and bare it’, or to simply acknowledged and accept the risks of conventional hormone replacement therapy it is time to think again. For those who are experiencing symptoms that may be related to hormonal imbalance, I encourage you to be fully informed by your treating physician and to make yourself completely aware of your options, If you are experiencing ‘hormone havoc’ or are presently taking synthetic hormones; given the choice between a more natural bio-identical hormone or the synthetic alternative, which one are you going to choose? 

Dr. Jeffrey Brown, M.D., has more than 15 years’ experience in the practice of anti-aging medicine and the use of bio-identical hormones. A frequent media contributor, Dr. Brown is a columnist for The National Post and a regular expert on the television program Diagnosis MD. He is a member of the Bariatric Society, the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, the American Thyroid and the Natural Hormone Society. PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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GOL LIN

•BUSINESS

GOLD LINE – BRINGING PEOPLE TOGETHER SINCE DAY ONE

By: Courtney Boyden

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wenty five years ago, Ata and Neda Moeini started a journey that would lead to what is today a true immigrant success story. With determined optimism and shrewd business know-how , the Moeinis created a unique and distinctly Canadian communications company that has, at its heart, the welfare of the diasporas communities. GL began by selling low-cost calling cards from the basement of the Moeinis modest home, back in the early 1990’s. In less than 2 years, the company grew to own over half the Canadian prepaid long distance calling card market, but that was only the starting point. Entrepreneurship is in Ata Moeini’s DNA – he wakes up every morning, with a million and one ideas and improvements on existing products and services, with one common theme throughout; how can I help newcomers connect with their homelands, and make the process easier and more cost/time efficient? This spirit of innovation and creativity has led to the expansion of GL into internet telephony, web printing, digital signage, cloud hosting, HD radio, live streaming digital TV, Wi-Fi…. basically, anything that helps connect newcomers with home.

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aybe the passion and drive comes from the fact that returning back home to their native Iran has not been an option for the Moeinis, and so keeping the connection is so very important. It brings the reality of distance and absence so much closer to home for them, and feeling this first hand, gives them an added motivation to make the distance less tangible for others. The secret to their success is quite selfless - their motivation has never been financial gain, but rather a desire to fill

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the needs and gaps that exist in products and services that aim to make life easier for the end-user, particularly newcomers to Canada. This entrepreneurial couple tapped into realities that immigrants had to deal with on a daily basis, and provided them with solutions – inexpensive and reliable means to call home, customer service in their own languages, facilitating problem resolution, 24 hours a day. He has also been a realist, and kept pace with technology advancement, using the power of the internet, and tapping into the potential of targeting services to an ever increasing global immigrant population.

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o how did Gold Line grow? Not long after establishing the calling card business in 1991, and its overwhelming success, the Moeinis realized that in order to keep up with their calling card needs, they needed their own printing establishment, and so they created Card Express Printing – now able to do fast, high end quality printing, they offered the service to others in the community, and beyond, so GLPrint and GLTrade Print came into existence. GLPrint provides Web2Print solutions to the online consumer, and caters to individuals and private enterprises like real estate companies, who need “variable data” printing for their agents. GLTrade Print caters to businesses, and today, their clients include key Canadian entities like the RCMP and government offices like Global Affairs Canada, Parks Canada and Industry Canada, a testament to their quality and reliability. Then came GLWiZ, a platform to watch entertainment and news content from home - today, GLWiZ is the


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•BUSINESS

largest multicultural TV streaming service in the world, streaming over 1000 channels, 50,000 hours of On-Demand in a multitude of languages. The GLWiZ App is now available on all platforms and can be enjoyed anytime, anywhere on any device. In an attempt to make the product less expensive for the end-user, GL decided to rely on advertising revenue, but was unable to find multicultural ads, so they created GLADExchange, the largest advertising platform for multicultural targeted advertising. GL went from a telecommunication company to Group of Gold Line, a global technology company, dedicated to research, development and implementation of multicultural solutions all the time aware of the fact that distances are becoming less and less relevant, and connections, more and more important.

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ther notable products include their data centre management and colocation services, GLCloud,

their telephony trunking services, GLSIP, and their long distance line exchange service NOC. They have an in-house, state-of-the-art data centre at their headquarters, which supports local tech companies. More recently, they have been experimenting with HD Radio via Radio.GL, a 24-hour Persian radio channel playing the latest Persian music from all over the world. And as if that wasn’t enough, every day GL provides catered Persian home cooked lunches to their staff, giving the GL headquarters in Markham a very unique feel - one that is a testament to the Moeini’s mantra of bringing people together.

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n a world where migration is the norm, borders have become less binding and distances less important, and in a country where our individuality makes us stronger, the Moeinis continue to serve their local and global community, push the boundaries and continue creating meaningful ways to connect to what matters – be it work, home, friends or family. 

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•WINE

DAVID’S

Wine Pick OF THE MONTH By: David Akhlaghi

Executive Director at The Wine Cave

KALIMNA ® BIN 28 SHIRAZ

“Another impressive wine from this vintage – these 2013 wines have positively surprised from barrel to bottle, evolving and building beyond initial expectations.” “Will give the 2010 Bin 28 a run for its money”… compliments of that pugnacious Barossa/ McLaren Vale fruit-sourcing double-barrel!”

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in 28 offers a showcase of warm-climate Australian Shirazripe, robust and generously flavored. First made in 1959, Bin 28 is named after the famous Barossa Valley Kalimna Vineyard purchased by Penfolds in 1945 and from which the wine was originally sourced. Today, Bin 28 is a multi-region, multi-vineyard blend, with the Barossa Valley always well represented. VINEYARD REGION: Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, Pathway, Langhorne Creek .

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GRAPE VARIETY: 100% Shiraz WINE ANALYSIS Alc/Vol: 14.5%, Acidity: 6.4 g/L, pH: 3.62. MATURATION: 12 months in seasoned American oak hogsheads. VINTAGE CONDITIONS; After a dry South Australian winter, reminiscent of 2006, vines were in water deficit at the beginning of spring and therefore became accustomed to dry conditions quite early. Early budburst was noticeable across many regions and windy conditions during flowering were, in some regions, responsible for variable fruit set and lower than average yields come vintage. COLOUR: Deep dense red. PEAK DRINKING 2017 – 2032 NOSE; Classic, dark. A black aromatic theme – graphite, flint, char, black jelly bean… A sensitive yet apparent veil of oak – ever so shy, compliant. Scents from the baker – Christmas pudding, replete with brandy and Cointreau-soaked currants; And from the chef – roasted meats, jus, pan-scrapings. PALATE: Full and expansive. An immersion of flavor saturation and a textural continuum across the palate. Mouth-coating sweet tannins and balanced acidity…never confronted by any threat of new oak. Black olive and chocolate notes resonate with an abundance of fruits – plum, prune, blackberries, wild blueberries… Persistent length and flavor, finishing firm and assertive. 


•BUSINESS

HOW TO MOTIVATE A SALES TEAM

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ne of the biggest challenges for any company is to have a motivated sales team – a group of people who wake up every morning thinking “let’s go to work and make it happen” as opposed to “I got to go to work and put up with it”. In this article we’ll look at what discourages a sales representative and what easy catalysts are available to the leaders to keep the motivation going. A sales person is demotivated by their biggest fears and frustrations. There are various points of origin that fall into three categories. The first category is characterized by lack of success within the sales process and includes such things as: • falling behind the sales quota; • having low or no new pipeline; • having “all the eggs” into one large opportunity; • being stuck in a long sales cycle deal; • getting “lost” on cold calling for the sake of having a strong funnel and not getting to work on the real opportunities; and not being able to close the large and strategic sales opportunities. The second category is regarding customer relations and include such things as: • falling behind due to a large number of customers requests; • having to spend time on customer support calls; • wasting time with very demanding low value customers; and • dealing only with customers who are looking to get the cheapest possible prices.

By: Silviu Apostolide, MBA and promote increased sales. Following are several strategies to consider. You can implement a sales support structure with CRM tools, sales methodology, or a well determined sales cadence. Creating customer service policies and having the sales management get involved with the deals is also possible.

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arketing campaigns by email or social media that support the sales goals can be most effective. And there can be gains from shopping the competition’s practices to find winning strategies. Of course one on one coaching, sales training programs and career development/planning for the associates can be energizing. And when possible elimination of unnecessary administrative tasks that create negative stress and pressure are particularly useful. Finally recognition programs for top players and option to work from home part-time might also be considered. Implementing one or some of the above recommendations will lead to building a strong and happy sales team that really knows the customer. As well, the sales team will be able to do effective prospecting and plan for sales with accurate deal qualifying and forecasting abilities leading to winning opportunities. And most importantly you will address Maslow’s psychological hierarchy of needs – within a sales context – for your sales team. The sales person will feel safe, will have a sense of belonging, and will feel respected, trusted and confident. Ultimately, your sales team will feel motivated and realize their goal. 

The third category includes other obstacles such things as: no work-life balance; having a micro-manager as a boss; and being stuck on administrative tasks like getting pricing, legal approval and order placing delays. Generally motivating a sales force more effectively it is not just about their paycheck. If any of the points above apply to your sales associates you can look into creating relatively non-expensive activities that will inspire them PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•FOOD

BEEF KOKKINISTO

By: Vera Tzoulas & Chris Priftis

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lso known as Reddened Beef Stew, this dish is a staple in every Greek home during the cooler months of the year. The beef is browned on all sides to seal in the juices and then added to the tomato sauce, along with spices and herbs, for a full and intense flavour. It is stewed for hours at a low temperature – and will test your patience with its aromatic pleasure - until it is ready to eat! Served on a bed of al dente spaghetti, it is a melt-in-your-mouth delight, with each and every bite. We love to top it with grated Mizithra or Kefalogravieria cheese. Parmegiano-Reggiano works well too. We hope you enjoy! {Serves 4-6}

INGREDIENTS 250 ml Greek olive oil 1 Kilo Stewing Beef cut into 4 cm cubes, we use beef chuck 1 large spanish or yellow onion, finely diced 4-6 Cloves Garlic, smashed 400 ml full bodied dry red wine 2-3 bay leaves (fresh if you have) 2 tsp fresh oregano leaves (or 1 tsp dry) 1 tsp ground cinnamon (or more – according to your taste buds) 3-4 whole cloves (optional) 3 800ml cans of crushed tomatoes Water to cover the beef Sea Salt & Pepper to taste DIRECTIONS Heat a large, heavy bottomed, pot over medium high heat and pour in half the olive oil. Season the beef with course sea salt and freshly ground pepper. When the oil starts to smoke, place beef cubes into the pot. Sear on all sides until well browned. Do not move around frequently. Allow for each side to really 36

• PERSIANTRIBUNE

brown before turning! Once all side are well browned, remove the beef from the pot and set aside in another dish. Meanwhile, to your hot oil, add the chopped onions and some sea salt. Stir frequently. After a few minutes, add your garlic. Don’t burn your garlic! Stirring often, for about 5 more minutes, until your onion and garlic has softened. Add your browned beef back into the pot and stir in your red wine. Allow the wine to gently simmer for a few minutes for the alcohol to evaporate. Add your bay leaves, oregano, cinnamon and cloves and stir again. Next, add the other half of the oil, your crushed tomatoes and water, just enough to just cover your beef. Add some more sea salt and pepper, stir. Turn heat to high and bring to a boil. As soon as your stew starts boiling, reduce the heat to medium or medium low (depending on your stove top) and simmer for 3-4 hours. Check the pot every 30 minutes or so to make sure there is enough liquid and give it a little stir. The Kokkinisto is done when the sauce has reduced and thickened, and the beef melts at the sight of a fork! (Note: When we say add salt, we mean a couple of big pinches. Wait until the last half hour or so of cooking when the sauce is thick to taste the Kokkinisto and adjust the salt to suit your taste. You can always add more salt but you can’t remove it.) Kali Oreksi - Bon Appétit!  VERA TZOULAS AND CHRIS PRIFTIS ARE FROM FAT LAMB KOUZINA, featuring Greek-Mediterranean cuisine providing a weekly catering menu, catering for dinner parties, special events and culinary skills classes. Their focus is to bring back local, healthy and really delicious foods to you and your family. For more information contact FAT Lamb Kouzina at: www.fatlambkouzina.com


From the Persian Kitchen...

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•FOOD

A TURNIP SOUP

ot a hacking chest doesn't burn. cough? Eat some turnips. Most stores 2. Add the turnips, potatoes, cut off the turnip greens, and apple. Add the turmeric, which is a shame because not cinnamon, pepper and remainonly are they tasty (something ing 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Stir to By: Naz Deravian along the lines of kale, muscoat and cook everything for tard greens and arugula) but about 8 minutes. they are packed with vitamins and minerals - vitamin K, calcium,vitamin A, and beta carotene to name a few. 3. Add the stock Add that to the vitamin C and potassium in the bulb, and and bring liquid the medicinal properties in onion, garlic, turmeric and to a boil. Once at cinnamon; and you have the makings of a this-will-curea boil reduce heat you-soup. If you can't find turnips with the greens, you to medium-low. could use some cilantro or parsley. We enjoyed the soup Add the greens. for lunch and it soothed, it comforted, it nourished, it Cover the pot, brought us all to the table. and simmer for 15-20 minutes or {Serves 4-6} until all vegetables are tender. 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus a little more for garnish 1 medium brown onion, diced 4. Puree the soup 1 teaspoon fine grain sea salt, divided in a blender or 3 cloves garlic, minced in the pot with 1 bunch turnips about 1 1/2 pounds, cubed, save one small an immersion bulb thinly sliced for garnish (optional) blender. Adjust 3 baby yukon gold potatoes or 1 medium russet potato, peeled seasoning accordand cubed ing to taste. Serve the soup with a little drizzle of olive 1 medium granny smith apple cubed or apple of choice oil. Sprinkle a little salt on the sliced turnip and place on 1/2 teaspoon turmeric top for a little crunch. 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon black pepper njoy right away! The soup will keep in the 2 cups vegetable or chicken stock refrigerator for up to 3 days or in the freezer for up to a month.  1 bunch turnip greens, washed really well, stems off, roughly chopped or greens of choice, about 1 cup cilantro or parsley loosely packed

SHALGHAM

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1. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add onion and 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook for 5 minutes. Stirring occasionally, until onion softens. Add garlic and cook for 2 minutes, stirring so the garlic

Naz Deravian is the 2015 International Association of Culinary Professionals Award Winner for her Narrative Culinary Blog Bottom Of The Pot - Adventures In Cooking Persian Food And Beyond and 2014 Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Finalist. www.bottomofthepot.com PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•LAW

CULTURE, ETHICS and

FAMILY LAW of

ONTARIO By: Jay Chauhan and Nima Shirali

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ntario inherited English Law which solves family problems in an adversarial legal system requiring each party to make allegations against the other, resulting in hostility and considerable anguish to the spouses and children. Society suffers as the next generation is caught in the conflict of parents or lawyers eager to win. To minimize conflict over divisions of property, Ontario has streamlined family law by creating the “net family property” law concept which requires dividing the property gained in the marriage between husband and wife equally from the date of marriage to the moment of separation. Notwithstanding significant changes in family law in the last 30 years, the legal business for family lawyers is flourishing in Ontario where the breakup of families is now reaching an unprecedented amount of about 45 percent. In Ontario and in Canada, especially in urban

centres, further compounding factors include the social background of immigrant families which continue their cultural traditions. There is little education provided in the understanding of these cultures to lawyers and legal institutions. Whilst the society is proclaimed to be multicultural, the legal process is still catching up with the multicultural reality. Many lawyers are left with their own ethics and initiative to understand and deal with cultures in transition. There is usually very little said in the court about the culture of the litigants. The traditional cultures with a strong sense of family are less tuned into the adversarial resolution but have no choice in the matter.

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n traditional cultures where the family structure is more stable with less of a likelihood of separation, the loss of the expectation of permanent marriage creates extreme disappointment and a greater degree of hostility when the marriage breaks down. More often than not it is left to the conscience of

Many lawyers are left with their own ethics and initiative to understand and deal with cultures in transition. There is usually very little said in the court about the culture of the litigants.

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•LAW

Ontario and Canadian society need to give this issue a much higher priority to maintain the quality of life in the country. Our mandate as lawyers in a self governing profession leaves the initiative to us to come up with ethical solutions to this dilemma.

the lawyer to decide on solutions to the legal problems compassionately or to use it to express hostility and frustration whilst making personal gain.

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n more traditional cultures in which women have not gained economic self sufficiency, males play a more dominant role in the family and this role is expressed both inside the family and in social interaction with the outside society. Females with lesser financial means and resources, both in ethnic and Anglo-Saxon cultures, face considerable disadvantages in the adversarial process even with the legislated appointment of the Director of the Family Responsibility Office.

An appropriate methodology for problem solving requires moving towards a mediation type of resolution and developing other resources sensitive to clients with different cultural backgrounds who are engaged in such legal processes that are often alien to their cultural norms. The mediation panel should be comprised of a lawyer, a social worker and a psychologist.

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roken families and the consequent loss of productivity in the economy, along with the damage caused to children, are excessive. It can leave children scarred for life. There is enough statistical evidence that confirms a high correlation between crime and broken families. Ontario and Canadian society need to give this issue a much higher priority to maintain the quality of

life in the country. Our mandate as lawyers in a self governing profession leaves the initiative to us to come up with ethical solutions to this dilemma.  Day Chauhan is called to the bar in several jurisdictions and is a consulting lawyer and has been a Deputy Judge in Richmond Hill for 24 years. Nima Shirali holds a master's degree in political science. PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•REAL ESTATE

HOW TO WIN AT REAL ESTATE THE TRUTH ABOUT THE 5 MYTHS By: Robert Atkinson

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his market is HOT and homes sell in a heartbeat. Information is critical if you want to get that home or sell yours for more. Here are 5 myths that can cause you to make HUGE mistakes if you don’t know the TRUTH: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Working with the Seller’s agent gives you an edge. You keep the deposit if the buyer doesn’t complete the transaction, Having multiple agents for buying will get better service. a Mortgage pre-approval means it’s guaranteed. The price is the price.

Working with the Seller’s agent gives you an edge is likely the biggest myth. Buyers often believe that if they deal with the selling agent they can get a reduction in the price since the agent can eliminate one commission. A friend of mine was going through a divorce several years ago and the “ex” had a shark for a lawyer. My friend was trying to save some money so rather than get his own lawyer he just approached the lawyer his “ex” hired. This is the same mentality one makes when working without their own representation. Hire your own “shark” to fight for your best interests because you know the seller’s agent is doing that for the seller! 40

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You keep the deposit if the buyer doesn’t complete the transaction is a partial myth. If you are selling and the buyer cannot complete the transaction you do have some rights to the deposit money, but it’s not as simple as cashing the cheque and putting the home back on the market. Only if you cannot sell the


•REAL ESTATE a lot of wasted time and frustration in this tough market. Lenders like to assess buyers based on their proven ability to earn money and pay bills on time. Lenders also worry about the ‘what if ’ scenario’s and one of the biggest ‘what if ’s’ incurs when one pays too much for the home and the ability to pay the bank back is compromised? Lenders want to assess both the buyer AND the property. Until there is an offer the bank can’t guarantee they will lend the money.

home for the same or greater price, or there are some monetary damages can you begin to grab the cash. You will definitely want your lawyer to give the best strategy.

Having multiple agents for buying will get me better service is like going into a clothing store and asking different clerks to help you put together the perfect outfit. All the clerks have access to the same products and a successful clerk will move along to a more serious customer to serve rather than spending their precious time with someone who isn’t committed to the process. Agents work on commission and perform best with their time and expertise when they have the highest chance of being rewarded.

Mortgage pre-approval means it’s guaranteed is another myth that can cause you

The price is the price is true to a point but inexperienced buyers can get caught at closing if they’re not careful. From the buyers perspective there may be hidden costs when they assume items such as home alarm systems, hot water tank rentals, furnace rentals and AC rentals. Also if you take a mortgage for more than 80% you will need mortgage insurance which gets added on to the mortgage. This insurance also has HST which must be paid outside of the mortgage, ouch! Add to that movers, lawyers, and land transfer taxes. You need to have about 1% to 3% of the purchase price set aside for these items. If you have questions about real estate contact a qualified professional for advice. 

Robert Atkinson is a Real Estate Sales Rep with Century 21 Leading Edge Realty Brokerage in Markham. For more information visit his website at www.RobertAtkinson.ca

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

• 41


Photo: Alaska Region U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

•ENVIRONMENT

WILD PACIFIC SALMON FACE AN UPSTREAM BATTLE FOR SURVIVAL By: David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation senior communications specialist Theresa Beer.

So what's going wrong? Climate change is amplifying a long list of stressors salmon already face. Sockeye salmon are sensitive to temperature changes, so higher ocean and river temperatures can have serious impacts. almon have been swimming in Pacific Northwest Even small degrees of warming can kill them. Low river waters for at least seven million years, as indicated flows from unusually small snowpacks linked to climate by fossils of large saber-tooth salmon found in the area. change make a tough journey even harder. During that time, they've been a key species in intricate, interconnected coastal ecosystems, bringing nitrogen ceans absorb the brunt of our climate pollution — and other nutrients from the ocean and up streams and more than 90 per cent of emissions-trapped heat rivers to spawning grounds, feeding whales, bears and since the 1970s. Most warming takes place near the eagles and fertilizing the magnificent coastal rainforests along the way. For as long as people have lived in the area, salmon have been an important food source and have helped shape cultural identities

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But something is happening to Pacific coast salmon. This year, B.C.'s sockeye salmon run was the lowest in recorded history. Commercial and First Nations fisheries on the world's biggest sockeye run on B.C.'s longest river, the Fraser, closed. Fewer than 900,000 sockeye out of a projected 2.2 million returned to the Fraser to spawn. Areas once teeming with salmon are all but empty. Salmon define West Coast communities, especially Indigenous ones. The West Coast is a Pacific salmon forest. Today, salmon provide food and contribute to sustainable economies built on fishing and ecotourism. West Coast children learn about the salmon life cycle early in their studies. Salmon migrations, stretching up to 3,000 kilometres, are among the world's most awe-inspiring. After spending adult lives in the ocean, salmon make the arduous trip up rivers against the current, returning to spawn and die where they hatched. Only one out of every thousand salmon manages to survive and return to its freshwater birthplace. 42

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•ENVIRONMENT

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eyond creating poor environmental conditions for salmon, climate change increases disease risks. Warm conditions have led to sea lice outbreaks in farmed and wild salmon, and a heart and muscle inflammatory disease has been found in at least one farm. Scientists researching salmon movement through areas with farms are finding wild fish, especially young ones, with elevated parasite levels. Diseases that cause even slight deficiencies in swimming speed or feeding ability could make these marathon swimmers easy prey. Some question whether wild salmon will remain a West Coast food staple. For the first time, the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program has advised consumers to avoid buying chinook and coho from four South Coast fisheries. Researchers also predict changing conditions will drive important food fish north by up to 18 kilometres a decade. Disappearing salmon don't just affect humans but all coastal ecosystems and wildlife. Eighty-two endangered

DISAPPEARING SALMON DON'T JUST AFFECT HUMANS BUT ALL COASTAL ECOSYSTEMS AND WILDLIFE. EIGHTY-TWO ENDANGERED SOUTHERN RESIDENT KILLER WHALES DEPEND ON CHINOOK SALMON TO SURVIVE. AS CHINOOK STOCKS GO DOWN, THE LIKELIHOOD THAT THESE WHALES COULD BECOME EXTINCT GOES UP.

southern resident killer whales depend on chinook salmon to survive. As chinook stocks go down, the likelihood that these whales could become extinct goes up.

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lthough the federal government has committed to implement recommendations from Justice Bruce Cohen's inquiry into Fraser River sockeye and to follow the Wild Salmon Policy, reversing this dire situation will take widespread concerted and immediate action. A weak provincial climate plan that fails to meet emissions targets and acceptance of new ocean-based fish farm applications won't help wild salmon. We need to move fish farms out of the water and onto land. Salmon are resilient and have survived ice ages and other challenges over millions of years. They've survived having their streams paved over. They've survived toxins dumped into their environments. The question is, can they — and the ecosystems that depend on them — survive climate change and fish farms and all the other stressors humans are putting on them? 

Dr. David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author, and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation. He is Companion to the Order of Canada and a recipient of UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for science, the United Nations Environment Program medal, the 2009 Right Livelihood Award, and Global 500. Dr. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and holds 27 honorary degrees from universities around the world. He is familiar to television audiences as host of the long-running CBC television program The Nature of Things, and to radio audiences as the original host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks, as well as the acclaimed series It's a Matter of Survival and From Naked Ape to Superspecies. His written work includes more than 52 books, 19 of them for children. Dr. Suzuki lives with his wife, Dr. Tara Cullis, and family in Vancouver, B.C.

Photo: Kent Kallberg

surface, where salmon travel, with the upper 75 metres warming 0.11 C per decade between 1971 and 2010. Although ocean temperatures have always fluctuated, climate change is lengthening those fluctuations. A giant mass of warmer-than-average water in the Pacific, known as "the blob", made ocean conditions even warmer, with El Niño adding to increased temperatures. Salmon have less food, and face new predators migrating north to beat the heat.

Learn more at www.davidsuzuki.org PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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Hire Robert, an agent who puts your needs above all others. Buyers and Sellers need an agent they can TRUST when they want to make a move, I’m that agent.

Robert Atkinson | Sales Rep Century 21 Leading Edge Realty Inc. www.RobertAtkinson.ca


•EVENTS Out and About with

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

HUNGARIAN- IRANIAN ART EXHIBITION Photo: Balazs Kralovanszky

HUNGARIAN- IRANIAN ART EXHIBITION Photo: Balazs Kralovanszky

HUNGARIAN- IRANIAN ART EXHIBITION Photo: Balazs Kralovanszky

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

HUNGARIAN- IRANIAN ART EXHIBITION Photo: Balazs Kralovanszky

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

IRANIAN BUSINEES LEADERS GALA Photo: Tak

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

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•PEOPLE

PERSIAN TRIBUNE

PERSON OF THE MONTH

Professor Emeritus Ali Javan Inventor of the first gas laser, long time MIT professor in the fields of laser technology and quantum electronics. 1926-2016

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rofessor Ali Javan was born in Tehran, Iran in 1926. After graduating from Alborz high school and studying Physics at Tehran University, he went to the United States in 1949. He studied and worked at Columbia University with Nobel prize-winning physicist Charles H. Townes. Not having received either a bachelor’s degree or a master’s degree, Javan earned his PhD in physics at Columbia in 1954, with Townes serving as his thesis advisor. In 1958, he developed the working principle of the first gas discharge helium neon laser. In the following two years, he worked at Bell Laboratories to build it, along with colleague William Bennett. In 1960, while working at Bell Laboratories, Javan invented the world’s first gas laser. The technology would be applied to telecommunications, internet data transmission, holography, bar-code scanners, medical devices, and more. On Dec. 13, 1960, Javan and his Bell Labs colleagues used the laser light beam to place a telephone call, the first time in history that a laser beam had been used to transmit a telephone conversation.

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Javan was already an internationally-acclaimed scientist when he went to Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston in 1961. Javan would spend the next four decades working to drive advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics.

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rom 1978 to 1996, he was the first Francis Wright Davis Professor of Physics, and was emeritus professor of physics from 1996 until his death. He sought to be at the scientific forefront, making the next important advance. Javan also developed the first method for accurately measuring the speed of light and launched the field of high-resolution laser spectroscopy.

While at Columbia, he also studied music, continuing a lifelong passion for the arts that he often connected to his ground breaking scientific work. “Physics and music — you find the same spirit in both of them,” Javan once wrote.

H

e once told an interviewer why he worked so tirelessly to answer difficult and diverse scientific questions: “There is something very beautiful at the end of the line that you're looking for. There's an aesthetic element.”

Javan was the recipient of numerous awards. In 1993, he was presented the Albert Einstein World Medal of Science in recognition for “his more than 30 years of research into the physics of lasers.” In 2006, he was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Javan’s original 1960 helium-neon laser device is currently on display at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History.

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e was a passionate teacher who developed lifelong bonds with generations of students, not only sharing his passion for science but for music and the arts. He wanted students to be well-rounded individuals conversant in more than just physics. Javan loved to ride around Cambridge on his bicycle, his daughter Lila Javan recalls, often stopping to buy flowers or chocolate to bring back to his family. “He was a supportive, fun father who was also a great teacher”, she says. MIT Professor Emeritus Ali Javan, the institute's first Francis Wright Davis Professor of Physics, died of natural causes in Los Angeles on Sept. 12, 2016 at the age of 89. 


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PERSIAN TRIBUNE Volume 2, Issue 4  

Persian Tribune magazine is the first entirely English language monthly print & online magazine that targets the rapidly growing Iranian com...

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