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ASSOCIATION FOR LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS WITH PERKINS+WILL

Designing the Future Ready School


It is so much easier to be a complacent educator. Being innovative takes a kind of persistence and passion for their students that is inextinguishable. Courtney O’Connell, 5 Habits of Innovative Educators

Cover: The Brimmer and May School, Hastings Innovation Center


TABLE OF CONTENTS / SPORTS + RECREATION....................................................... 2 Stephen Sefton, Associate Principal HIGHER EDUCATION............................................................ 10 Yanel de Angel, Associate Principal THE CLASSROOM................................................................ 18 Andrew Grote, Associate Principal HEALTH + WELL-BEING........................................................ 26 Jennifer McGrory, Senior Associate SCIENCE + TECHNOLOGY..................................................... 34 Jeffrey R. Zynda, Principal WORKPLACE....................................................................... 42 William Harris, Principal


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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL /

What's certain is that the world is changing faster than at any time in human history. Philip Stephens, State Versus Citizen in Tomorrow’s World

DESIGNING THE FUTURE READY SCHOOL Entry into PK-12 education represents the first steps in the lifelong

We discussed how these authentic connections and developments

continuum of learning. Architects need to continually look to

have changed the way designers think and how we prepare our

models outside PK-12 to ensure that the design of educational

children for post-secondary education and the workplace by

environments respond to emerging developments and transitions

examining environments that are specifically designed for invention

into higher education and the continually changing workplace.

– creating the perfect zones for self-directed, project driven and

As a group of practitioners, who design the physical space for

multi-disciplinary exploration.

education, we must understand innovations in science, research,

We must prepare today's children for relentless change, fierce

sports and recreation, workplace, and health and wellness to

competition, unstoppable innovation, and rapid globalization. I

know what the future holds for our students. Buildings designed

invite you to explore in the pages that follow some of the ideas and

now, for a 50-year life, must have the flexibility and foresight to

innovations that will make this possible.

accommodate future learning models. During a day long symposium hosted by Perkins+Will and A4LE, we brought together Perkins+Will Subject matter experts in Science+Technology, Sports+Recreation, Health+Wellness, Higher Education, Research and the Workplace to gain a better understanding of future design trends.

Brooke Trivas K-12 Practice Leader, Principal


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL /

Brooke Trivas, Principal and the K-12 Northeast Practice Leader, has brought programming knowledge, interdisciplinary approach, and design and management expertise to her clients for over 28 years. Brooke is an expert in leading large scale public projects involving a broad spectrum of constituents. She brings leadership capabilities to each phase of a project through her capacity to listen to and understand her client’s goals, budgets and design requirements. Brooke leads Boston’s Social Purpose and Service+ programs, as well as the Diversity and Inclusion initiatives; she also sits on the Perkins+Will global Diversity Council. These serviceoriented initiatives allow Brooke to inspire and provide opportunities to thousands of students and underserved communities. Left: The Brimmer and May School, Hastings Innovation Center

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Sports + Recreation

SPORTS + RECREATION


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Sports + Recreation

Stephen Sefton, Associate Principal Stephen is recognized for bringing innovation and creative solutions to a wide variety of sports and recreation clients. With a focus in large-scale spectator facilities, he has developed designs that transform local communities into thriving designations. He works closely with clients and the design team to create solutions that are responsive, sustainable and unique to each project. Stephen lectures on professional and intercollegiate athletics and regularly presents at conferences throughout the country.

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TOPIC 1 /

SPACES FOR INCLUSION

Research shows us that active people perform better in all aspects of their lives. And active kids are better prepared to succeed in school and in the future. That is why, when we design spaces for sports and recreation, we should push ourselves to create inviting, dynamic spaces where everyone feels welcome, to encourage active lifestyles in as many people as possible. Our designs aim to provide the setting for students to communicate across cultural boundaries, create new relationships, and foster lifestyle changes that help inspire healthy lives.


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Sports + Recreation

Phillips Academy, Andover, Snyder Center

Angus Glen Community Centre and Library

Sports and Recreation in our schools are becoming increasingly

The gymnasium, once a closed-off and exclusive space for

diverse. The gender gap is closing, and racial and ethnic diversity

athletes, is now a transparent environment where others can enjoy

is rising. This is an exciting time for schools, who are looking

the athletic performance taking place inside. This simple move

to incorporate sports for women - from rugby to bowling - as

transforms the space into something that can be experienced by

well as sports like sled hockey that can be played by those with

everyone, creating a more welcoming, inclusive feeling.

disabilities. Even new sports like Qudditch are on the rise and appeal to a broader more diverse segment of the population.

Another aspect to creating spaces that promote wellness for all is celebrating traditionally back-of-house spaces like sports medicine,

Buildings for sports and recreation can reach an incredibly diverse

rehab, and nutrition. By visually celebrating spaces that emphasize

cross-section of people. That is why it is so important for these

a holistic approach to health and well-being, we can emphasize

buildings to create a hub for student life while promoting health

performance.

and wellness. These buildings are for everyone.

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Sports + Recreation


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Sports + Recreation

CLOSING THE GENDER GAP IN SPORTS Historically, males have participated in High school athletics at higher rates than females. However, since 1991, the earliest year for which we have data, the gender gap has declined for 8th, 10th, and 12th graders. Source: Child Trends of Monitoring the Future data

Mohawk College, David Braley Athletics and Recreation Centre

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Sports + Recreation


CASE STUDY

PHILLIPS ACADEMY, ANDOVER SNYDER CENTER

A key driver for the design of the Snyder Center was to create a building for everyone, that appeals to all students, and not just athletes. A big idea is the social circulation element that unifies the different activity spaces - from squash courts to locker rooms and sports medicine - and connects to the larger campus. Graphics throughout the building highlight different activities including dance and diving beyond the traditional sports. The result is a highly-active space utilized by the entire student population. At night, students need to be told to leave so that security can lock up the building. It is a perfect example of the building's success in creating a true hub for student activity.


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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Higher Education

HIGHER EDUCATION


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Higher Education

Yanel de Angel, Associate Principal Yanel’s experience has focused on Higher Education environments, including planning, design, construction documentation, project management and integration of sustainable strategies. Yanel’s planning and design expertise in Learning Environments, Residential and Student Life projects has allowed her to conceptualize buildings as teaching laboratories. She is recognized across the firm for her ability to successfully lead technically and organizationally complex projects. She was a founding member of Perkins+Will’s Project Delivery Board, a group that strategizes on maintaining a culture of innovation and a leading edge in project delivery, and is a member of the Perkins+Will Diversity Council.

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TOPIC 2 /

TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Nearly 70% of high school students will go on to study at an institution of higher education. As part of this continuum of learning, there is a critical exchange of information that needs to take place between K-12 schools and colleges and institutions in order to propel students forward and prepare them for the challenges that will face us in the future. Many key trends in Higher Education have direct relevance to K-12 facilities, and many design strategies can be applied to learning environments at any grade level.


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Higher Education

Integrated Education The new learning paradigm blurs the boundaries between disciplines and is centered around the student experience. Colleges and universities are seeking to create a learning experience that is focused on synergies and affinities between a network of students that extends beyond a single department and sometimes beyond a single institution. Flexible learning Learning happens everywhere, between classrooms and online, which makes it more critical to create communities of students. To support this "anywhere and everywhere learning", it is important to provide flexible classrooms, shared study spaces, and think CREATE Singapore

about common areas differently. Everything can be programmed to support learning. It is important to provide spaces that students can shape to fit their needs - a 'hackable' environment that is flexible enough to accommodate a variety of activities. Environmental Stewardship Most colleges and universities have adopted a climate action plan to reduce energy use and cut greenhouse gas emissions, among many other sustainable strategies. Education is a critical component of combating the effects of climate change; buildings

Culture of Wellness 36% of students suffer from depression. To support a holistic approach to wellbeing, it is important to address physical, mental, and spiritual aspects of a person's health. This has led to an increase in spaces for meditation and respite, and more programs to promote healthy eating and exercise.

can serve as a teaching tool, showing real-time use of energy

Clarity of Mission

and water to create an understanding of our consumption and its

Clear strategic definition can improve recruitment, faculty focus,

impact on the environment.

and alumni message. Institutions can tell their stories through clear brand messaging, which is more than just graphics but is about spatial organization and expression of heritage and context. Spaces can be choreographed to tell your story. Faculty and students need to understand what you stand for, so they can see themselves as part of your legacy.

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Higher Education


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Higher Education

30-PERSON COMMUNITIES are the basis of design in our Keene State College Living+Learning Commons. This size generates feelings of connectedness and aids in recruiting and retention.

Keene State College, Living+Learning Commons

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Higher Education


CASE STUDY

KEENE STATE COLLEGE LIVING+LEARNING COMMONS

At Keene State College, the development of the space programs for common use were intentionally distributed both horizontally and vertically to encourage crossover between students and the broader campus community. The horizontal programs are for the more public interactions, with the vertical spaces being more private. One cue that draws together communities is locating an open and inviting house kitchen opposite the social lounge. Another cue is that the faculty teaching in the classrooms opted to forego office space in lieu of a collaboration lounge outside of the classrooms full of interactions and follow-ups to foster student success.


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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / The Classroom

THE CLASSROOM


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / The Classroom

Andrew Grote, Associate Principal Having served as a designer, project manager, and project architect for higher education and cultural institutions, Andrew has led national and international projects, ranging in size from $10M to $200M. As Technical Director, Andrew is committed to the integration of design and technology in delivering innovative projects to our clients. He works closely with clients to understand and visualize their unique needs, while coordinating the efforts of the project team and consultants to achieve elegant design solutions. Andrew has demonstrated his commitment to higher education, serving as guest critic at several colleges and universities, and as a lecturer at the Boston Architectural College and Northeastern University School of Architecture.

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / The Classroom

TOPIC 3 /

RE-IMAGINING THE CLASSROOM

The modern classroom is hands on, where each student is focused on their own interest. This supports the shift that is happening from a consumption-based education model to one of creation. What spaces are required to support this hands-on learning? It's more than just spatial creativity; it's about providing classrooms that can be reconfigured, moving from teacher-centered classrooms to more egalitarian models to support wide engagement. Here are key trends impacting the design of the classroom:


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / The Classroom

Microlearning Microlearning offers students greater control over their own education and gives learners the amount of information required to achieve a specific objective. Multi-experiential spaces support this by creating varying zones for direct instruction, collaboration, individual space, and active movement allowing students to work their way through experiences within a single room. High Velocity Learning This concept involves increasing the speed in which information is quickly shared while emphasizing student exploration and asking students to self-correct, self-improve, and self-innovate. This type of learning is best supported by high tech spaces where flexibility shapes the program and where zones ranging from collaboration Pitt River Middle School

areas, independent study nooks, and think tank stadium seating are transformed by furniture and objects.

The Middle Grades Creating the best learning environments for the middle school years—a time when students are going through physical, intellectual, emotional, and social changes—requires thoughtful design. To support students' development, we need to provide a variety of spaces, areas for social learning, and highlight the students' creativity visibly throughout the space. A New Look at the Arts As new curriculums reflect the new economy, education must expose students to interdisciplinary subjects to develop and present their own ideas. The spaces where students learn must ignite their senses by providing a shared in-person experience and a place for all to imagine, learn, empathize, and be entertained.

Skills + Field Experience As advances in robotics, autonomous transport, artificial intelligence, and genomics continue, the future workforce will need to align its skillset to remain relevant. New curricula creates more room for students to partner with companies, be guided by professionals, and collaborate on projects - further developing the skills needed to thrive. Virtual + Augmented Reality New virtual and augmented reality tools have the potential to disrupt teaching and learning as we know it. To support this new technology, spaces need to be easily reconfigured and collaborative and often incorporate moveable walls, projectable surfaces, theatre lighting, and easily-accessible technology.

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / The Classroom


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / The Classroom

THERE ARE ABOUT 100,000 EXISTING PUBLIC SCHOOL BUILDINGS IN THE UNITED STATES many built over 50 years ago and more than a few built over a 100 years ago. These schools were built for a different time, economy, culture and population. It’s time for a new model. Source: Report from the 2015 National Summit on School Design, American Architectural Foundation

Campus International School

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / The Classroom


CASE STUDY

WENTWORTH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CENTER FOR SCIENCES AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

The transformation of The Center for Sciences and Biomedical Engineering shifts the pedagogy from a classroom plus lab model to an integrated teaching environment, where all teaching occurs in the lab and its surrounding collaboration spaces. The dynamic organizing element of the project is the Forum, the space between the existing and the new buildings. This multilevel open space is a see-and-be-seen space as well as a large informal meeting environment. Glass walls provide views into the labs, an open stair creates a clear path of travel, and daylight through a new clerestory washes the new environment in natural light.


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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Health+Well-being

HEALTH AND WELL-BEING


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Health+Well-being

Jennifer McGrory, Senior Associate Jennifer is a Senior Associate in the Boston office of Perkins+Will. She is highly skilled at creating dynamic interior environments for a wide range of clients, from corporate and commercial to non-profit and higher education. Jennifer believes that change in the workplace is an opportunity for a company to reinforce cultural beliefs and ethos in the built form. As a WELL Accredited Professional, she helps to create healthy environments that encourage personal, social and professional growth. Jennifer is a member of the Perkins+Will Women in Design group, championing diversity and inclusion in the workplace, while also encouraging mentorship amongst all career levels.

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Health+Well-being

TOPIC 3 /

HEALTH AND WELL-BEING FRIDAY

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13.8 MILLION missed school days a year due to asthma alone

5-10%

of teachers are burned out at any given time

Children spend 15,600 hours in a classroom from Kindegarden to high school graduation. 1 in 3 students is obese 1 in 4 has health problems

17%

of students meet current recommendations for physical activity


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Health+Well-being

Indigo, New Headquarters

There are 6 dimensions to wellness: physical, emotional, spiritual,

Below are key strategies that can contribute a healthy school and

intellectual, environmental and social. The spaces in which we

improve the wellbeing of your students:

work, learn, and play should support all aspects of health. This is especially important for schools, where children spend so much of their time during a period of their lives where so much physiological, social, and emotional growth and development is taking places.

Increase Physical Activity

Institute Instant Recess Policy

Improve Nutrition Programs

Promote Quality Drinking Water

Focus on Indoor Air Quality

Fortunately, the building industry has developed wellness standards

Increase Access to Natural Light

like Fitwel and WELL that can guide design to create healthy

Use Healthy Building Materials

places. Most of these standards have traditionally been targeted

Add Active Academics to the Curriculum

towards the workplace, but there are many principles we adopt as

Support Active Transportation

standard practice and would benefit the design of our schools.

Promote Active Design

Stress Less

Support Social and Emotional Learning Programs

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Health+Well-being


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Health+Well-being

AMERICANS SPEND 87% OF THEIR TIME INDOORS Source: Indoor Environment Group, Energy Analysis & Environmental Impacts Division

Confidential Biotechnology Client

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Health+Well-being

7 HEALTH IMPACT CATEGORIES IMPACTS COMMUNITY HEALTH

REDUCES MORBIDITY + ABSENTEEISM

SOCIAL EQUALITY FOR VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

INSTILLS FEELINGS OF WELL-BEING

PROVIDES HEALTHY FOOD OPTIONS

INCREASES PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PROMOTES OCCUPANT SAFETY


CASE STUDY

FITWEL

Perkins+Will is the first company to pursue Fitwel certification for all of its North American offices. Fitwel, a new evidencebased design standard developed by the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), enables positive impacts on building occupant health and productivity through improvements to workplace design and policies. Fitwel certification assesses building and workplace features—like the design of stairwells and outdoor spaces, proximity to public transit and fitness facilities, indoor air quality, and healthy food standards—against a baseline of criteria that create a health-promoting environment. It is administered by the Center for Active Design (CfAD).


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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Science+Technology

SCIENCE+ TECHNOLOGY


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Science+Technology

Jeffrey R. Zynda, Principal Jeff is widely known for his innovative approaches to laboratory design, the advancement of supporting technologies, and his ability to lead clients toward “next generation” designs. His leadership and insight spring from the programming, planning, design, and construction of more than 7 million square feet of research space in the United States and Europe. This experience has provided Jeff with a clear understanding of each client’s scientific needs, and the talent to translate those needs into novel research design ideas. From private corporations to public institutions, his knowledge is broad and deep, providing his clients with targeted solutions to design challenges.

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Science+Technology

TOPIC 5 /

CONVERGENCE IN SCIENCE+TECHNOLOGY

Empowering the next generation of Science leaders begins with an understanding that we are evolving beyond STEM to a broader convergence of disciplines that will define the future of education and discovery. This “convergent agenda� brings together traditionally separate areas of science into new transdisciplinary forms, which requires a new approach to the design of physical spaces. Environments that foster convergence must transcend the commonly held visions of teaching and research laboratories to embrace a wider range of activities that support education and discovery for 21st century science.


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Science+Technology

Louisiana State University, Patrick F. Taylor Hall

Technically-driven environments should be celebrated as inspiring

Teaching and research laboratories should aspire to promote

spaces that facilitate inquiry and accelerate discovery. Just as we

transdisciplinary learning and discovery. This can be accomplished

realized the importance of the arts in STEM education to give us

with straightforward strategies:

the STE(A)M approach, the value of design in spaces for science is equally important as it is the creative ingredient that can change

experimentation and simulation

a student’s perspective on scientific problem-solving. The future of educational laboratories will look less like conventional rows of

laboratory benches and fume hoods and more like a creative artist’s workshop with enabling tools for science.

Hands-on educational spaces that equally embrace

Adaptable teaching and research spaces that provide a flexible framework for change

C ollaborative spaces that facilitate learning both inside and outside of the laboratory

Spaces that inspire occupants of the building, as well as the campus community to engage in Science

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Science+Technology


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Science+Technology

CONVERGENCE is the merging of approaches and insights from historically distinct disciplines

Louisiana State University, Patrick F. Taylor Hall

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Science+Technology


CASE STUDY

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY PATRICK F. TAYLOR HALL

Patrick F. Taylor Hall provides a new home for all of LSU’s future engineers, and celebrates the many accomplishments of various engineering departments. Large capstone labs and integrated fabrication shops support interdisciplinary student design teams for engineering competitions and senior projects. These spaces are intentionally designed with an emphasis on transparency and with minimal physical boundaries, placing Engineering on Display throughout the building.


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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Workplace

WORKPLACE


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Workplace

William Harris, Principal With over 35 years of architectural design and planning experience, Bill serves as the Regional Practice Leader for Science + Technology. Bill has helped almost every major Bio/Pharma company, and a host of scale-ups and start-ups, to meet demanding goals for research, innovation and production. His vision for integrating workplace, art, culture and science, along with his unique blend of strategic and tactical design solutions, make a difference in the success of his clients. While focused primarily on Science+Technology, Bill brings an understanding of academic, business, commercial, community and cultural project types in order to make great environments for people.

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Workplace

TOPIC 6 /

LEARNING IN LABS AND WORKPLACE

Understanding the business of corporations and future employers of our students should help inform our education. What qualities are companies looking for in their employees? What do they think they need in 10, 20 years from now? Companies, whether banks, technology, or research firms, are all interested in making employees more innovate, more creative, and more effective. This allows companies to be more competitive by developing their product faster, and taking on a larger share of the market. How do you design spaces that can accomplish that kind of activity? How to create and engender innovation in students?


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Workplace

Translate adjacencies into building-wide social networks. As planners and designers, we are accustomed to diagramming functional requirements into chunks that allow us to size and locate programmatic elements into a design. Tossing away such thinking helps us consider a higher order, by looking at the social networks connecting people to functional requirements. Create meaningful separations. Today’s workplaces focus so intently on openness and collaboration that we forget how separations can be beneficial, especially when required for safety or environmental controls. Provide a flexible and robust infrastructure. We cannot predict future tools—but the power, data, gasses and utilities required to operate those tools can be reasonably

Sarepta Therapeutics, New Research Headquarters

anticipated. Allow your buildings and spaces to be engines of discovery. As disciplines converge—chemistry, biology, engineering,

Don’t fear noise…plan for it!

mathematics and so many more—allow those activities and people

Design to enhance mentality and community as much as the

to converge. Think three-dimensionally where possible.

operations of technology and equipment.

Celebrate movement, food, coffee, air and daylight.

Offer choice.

Comforts like these keeping people happy, healthy, and productive,

Our environments impact our creativity not just in configuration

which are themselves essential elements in encouraging and

and characteristics, but also in their diversity. Sometimes a change

supporting collaboration and integration.

of perspective—literally and figuratively—unlocks discovery.

Force transparency.

Finally, create community.

There’s a reason people love going to the aquarium. It’s lovely to

Going back to our very first principle, about building-wide social

watch things happening. We have nothing to hide—and everything

networks—design must revolve around the user. Discovery can

to gain—from physical transparencies, which allude to emotional

happen on its own, but in a community it really thrives.

transparencies.

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Workplace


DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Workplace

GENERATION "C" is an emerging group of consumers who demand control and have the power to choose like never before.

Takeda, Research+Development Headquarters

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DESIGNING THE FUTURE-READY SCHOOL / Workplace


CASE STUDY

TAKEDA R+D HEADQUARTERS

Design for opportunities where people can run into one another by chance, and for an office that encourages engagement across disciplines. Takeda’s top priorities were to design the space to promote opportunities where people can run into one another by chance, and for an office that encourages engagement across disciplines. Our design creates a first class, high quality biotech/ life sciences laboratory and office building that incorporates these priorities. The space utilizes a 40/60 percent mix of laboratory to office area, and distributes a variety of work spaces to accommodate different working styles throughout each floor.


IDEAS+BUILDINGS THAT HONOR THE BROADER GOALS OF SOCIETY

Designing the Future Ready School  

A Day Symposium with Perkins+Will and the Association for Learning Environments

Designing the Future Ready School  

A Day Symposium with Perkins+Will and the Association for Learning Environments