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Biennial Edition

CONTEMPORARY ART REVIEW Special Edition Installation • Painting • Mixed media • Drawing • Performance • Public Art • Drawing • Video art • Fine Art Photography

KAMILA KUC TAMARA FRASER MARIANA PANCHUK MARINA SCHRECKLING MAAYAN SELA ERIKA ERDÉSZ ANNE GREENWOOD CARMEL MEIR MILAN GERGI

A work by Milan Gergi


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Be that as it may, this catalog or any portion there of may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without express written permission from Peripheral ARTeries and featured artists.


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Lives and works in Coventry, United Kingdom

Francine LeClerque I Am Your Labyrinth, Installation

Lives and works in Chicago, IL, USA

Lives and works in Portland, Oregon, USA

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Lives and works in Budapest, Hungary

Hila Lazovski

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Lives and works in Israel

Lives and works in Kyiv, Ukraine

Aby Mackie

Lives and works in Hamburg, Germany

photo by Daniela Leal

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Monique Rutten Wall based mixed media and paintings Opening ChinART Museumkwartier http://www.morutten.com

Lives and works in Israel

Lives and works in Haiburg/Donau, Austria

Special thanks to: Isabel Becker, Julia Ăœberreiter, Deborah Esses, Xavier Blondeau, Margaret Noble, Nathalie Borowski, Marco Visch, Xavier Blondeau, J.D. Doria, Matthias Callay, Luiza Zimerman, Kristina Sereikaite, Scott D'Arcy, Kalli Kalde, Carla Forte, Mathieu Goussin, Dorothee Zombronner, Olga Karyakina, Robert Hamilton, Carrie Alter, Jessica Bingham, Fabian Freese, Elodie Abergel, Ellen van der Schaaf, Courtney Henderson, Ben Hollis, Riley Arthur, Ido Friedman, Nicole Ennemoser, Scott Vogel, Tal Regev, Sarah Hill, Olivia Punnet and Simon Raab

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Kamila Kuc An artist’s statement

My practice focuses on auto-fictional filmmaking, with attention to the workings of personal and collective memory patterns. My most recent artist in residence projects (New Mexico, Morocco and Abkhazia) employ found footage film and sound. In my practice the employment of found footage brings diverse communities of citizens together in the process of re-imagining an alternative past and future. I thus see the use of orphan materials as forms of creative archiving, whereby this re-imagining of events (and histories) acknowledges the active role of the apparatus, and teh spectators. Quantum physicists believe that apparatuses reshape conceptions of memory. To this end, my films engage with the notion that recorded/found footage contributes to the invention of new scenarios.


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Kamila Kuc Lives and works in Coventry, United Kingdom Kamila Kuc, Ph.D., is a writer, experimental filmmaker and curator. Her work reflects her interest in how film, as a technology of memory, acts as a creator of memories and narratives. Kuc's films explore complex relationships between personal and collective memories, especially those which subvert the established historical narratives, as well as social and political identity constructions. She is currently the Artist in Residence at Culture Vultures, Sefrou, Morocco and at SKLAD, Sukhumi, Abkhazia. She is the recipient of many international grants, namely Arts and Humanities Research Council, UK, Arts Council of England, New Mexico Arts, McCune Charitable Foundation, New Mexico Humanities Council and most recently the National Endowment for the Humanities (USA). She is the author and editor of numerous books and articles on experimental media practices. Kuc is a Senior Lecturer and Course Director for BA (Hons) Media Production at Coventry University. Her work is held in the artinCINEMA archives.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

Hello Kamila and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. We would like to start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. You were born in Poland and you currently live in the United Kingdom; you have a solid theoretical training in history of art and film, as well as an MFA in Experimental Filmmaking. Can you talk about how this diverse education influences the way you conceive and produce your works? How does the relationship between your cultural substratum and your current life in the United Kingdom inform the way you relate yourself to art making?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Filmmaker, writer and curator. Kamila Kuc’s work reflects her interest in how film, as a technology of memory, acts as a creator of memories and narratives. Her work invites the viewers to inspect the artificially constructed concepts, namely identity, memory and history. In her latest film I Think You Should Come to America, that we'll be discussing in the following pages, she uses archival footage to explore ‘a paradoxical fascination of the Poles behind the Iron Curtain with the ideal of America as a “land of freedom”.’ The power of Kuc’s noetic approach lies in her successful attempt to trigger the viewers’ and readers’ perceptual parameters in strategic ways that challenge conventions and generate new perspectives. We are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

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It’s my pleasure. Thank you for your invitation. As you correctly deducted from my film, I was indeed born in Poland. I moved to the UK at the age of 19, where I studied art theory and film history, eventually earning a PhD in the latter discipline. I have always been engaged in media making but my adventure with exhibiting my own work started relatively late in my career as a film historian and a critic. As

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an art history student I often enjoyed reading the writings of Maya Deren, Germaine Dulac, and of course, the usual suspects, Jean-Luc Godard and Sergei Eisenstein, all of whom were filmmakers and film theorists at once. Understanding the critical underpinnings of one’s own work is what excites me most about being a filmmaker. Having a theoretical background helps me negotiate the relationship between politics and aesthetics, between form and content in my work; it also allows me to situate my films in relation to the work of others. On the subject of being a cultural mongrel: as an emigrant, I think one has a slightly more nomadic relationship to places, and therefore, to one’s own existence. One thing for sure: politics are in continuous flux and thus nothing should be taken for granted. Living with uncertainty is something that as creatives we embrace anyway, but in the current socio-economical and political climate, this is something that emigrants are particularly alert to. I will give you an example: George Otelea, my editor, concluded that in the earlier versions of I Think You Should Come to America there was more emphasis on my personal story. The final version was put together after Brexit and the United States presidential elections, and clearly, on a more subconscious level, these events induced the film with a greater feeling of fatality, which made the film more universal. The results of your artistic inquiry challenge any notions of conventional classification. I Think You Should Come to America is a fascinating mixture of quite conventional narrative filmmaking, with experimental, formalist attention to the medium of film itself. We would suggest to our readers that they visit http://kamilakuc.com in order to get a synoptic view of your work. While walking our readers through your process, can you tell

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us about some of the ideas that connect all of your work as an artist? As you correctly point out, I Think You Should Come to America is a mélange of both approaches to filmmaking (and there are many more in between). The themes that interest me are very much informed by a desire to question the established narratives, cultural myths, as well as the various ways in which these are told and recorded. Back in Poland, I remember reading about historical events (particularly those relating to Eastern Europe, Soviet Union and then Russia) and often thinking: what if this is not how things really happened? My father is a former military officer and a history buff, and we enjoy long conversations about history in general. Both sides of my family have been affected by various reversals of history, so to speak, so at some point it became very clear to me that history is not how things happened but how things were recorded. There are always multiple versions of the same event and who is to say that the official version is the most accurate? It’s official for a reason because at this moment in time it serves a particular purpose. Years later the historically comfortable fiction might be different. This is where personal and collective memory comes in as a counter-record of such official versions. Jacques Derrida talks about it in relation to the nature of the archive. I also think that nations from the former Soviet Bloc, or any countries that were not colonizers for that matter, are perhaps more skeptical towards any ‘official’ records of events. This gets more complex when we start thinking about the medium through which these events/stories are told. I am fascinated by how these recollections of memories, dreams (in the case of my latest project) and various cultural narratives, are affected by the act of recording. I explored this in my previous film Batum, where my own

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personal memories are merged with what I call prosthetic memories, i.e. the ones that are inherited by us through reading, watching, listening. Thus fiction enters the picture to further complicate things. Recently somebody referred to my films as ‘being stitched together with cultural trip-wires’, which I thought was very astute. I Think You Should Come to America is a complex film and if you don’t stay with it, you can walk away with the wrong impression. My film lures the viewer into something that is eventually demolished in the last few shots. You then realize that what you’ve been watching is a construct too, but one that you have invested in emotionally. This attention to the medium of film is central here because it is film itself that is a product of centuries of cultural oppression and misrepresentation, which in turn is imprinted on it. For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected I Think You Should Come to America: an extremely multilayered film that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once impressed us is how you combine rigorous research with distinct visual aesthetics. What was the genesis of this film? The film is an outcome of my residency with Basement Films and the Experiments in Cinema festival in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Basement Films is a unique artists’ collective that has an archive of over 8,000 (!) 16mm educational films. It was a real treat to work with them. My task as an Artist in Residence was to engage with this archive. The most interesting thing about this for me was the notion of deconstruction: you take something that already has a meaning imbedded in it and you destroy it, tear it apart in order to cerate a

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new meaning. It goes back to Dada collage. Being 16mm, the archive films I worked with already had their own visual quality. They were also loaded with meaning, which was problematic because these were films about Native Americans shot nearly entirely by white Americans. Hence, I became very interested in the question of ownership of one’s own story and the responsibilities behind creating forms of representation. Because everything is representation. Neil Diamond’s fantastic documentary Reel Injun reveals many misguided portrayals of Native Americans in Classical Hollywood film and it is worth watching for this very reason. But to return to the genesis of my film, I wanted to tell a story of my own fascination with America and Native American culture. Back in the 1990s I corresponded with a Native American man who was in prison. Our letters provided the main fabric for the film but my aim was to reveal the paradoxical picture of America as ‘a land of freedom’ that many Poles in Communist Poland had. This idealised version of America we were cultivating came from films, books, music – all of it being part of a cultural construct. Just like my film to some extent is. And this is where the research is crucial. Works of Leonard Peltier, John Trudell, Louise Erdrich’s novels, as well as Gerald Vizenor’s critical writings informed much of my film. What I am really happy about with this film is that it seems to cause emotional responses in viewers and that this emotional engagement does not stop them from appreciating the aesthetic aspect of the film, which is really part of its narrative, too. I think there is plenty of space within experimental film to accommodate an emotionally-charged response, which both in Batum and I Think You Should Come to America is largely inhanced through soundscape, designed by Rob Godman and Timothy Nelson, respectively.

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Your film is pervaded with insightful sociopolitical criticism. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated, ‘the artist’s role differs depending on which part of the world you’re in. It depends on the political system you’re living under.’ Not to mention that almost everything, ranging from Caravaggio's ‘Inspiration of Saint Matthew’ to Joep van Lieshout's works, could be considered political. Do your think that I Think You Should Come to America could be considered a political film? What is, in your opinion, the role of Art in the contemporary age? It’s a ‘what’s the meaning of life kind of a question’, and certainly a very pressing one. I agree that everything is political. I am a believer in personal being political and this is how I approach my films. I tend to start from my own stories, but since nothing is created in a vacuum, outside circumstances creep in very quickly. We touched upon it already when I talked about certain Eastern European skepticism towards political systems and official versions of history, so Orozco’s words resonate with me. I think it is also time to mention that it has always been political for women artists, more so than for men. Rebecca Solnit puts it well in her iconic essay ‘Men Explain Things to Me’ when she talks about the Women Strike for Peace organisation, but I believe it applies to women in general: ‘Most women fight wars on two fronts, one for whatever the putative topic is and one simply for the right to speak [to make, my insertion], to have ideas, to be acknowledged to be in possession of facts and truths, to have value, to be a human being.’ This goes back to my earlier question about who owns your story, who writes your narrative and who writes the dominant discourse. Yes, I think my film is political but

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not so much because it touches on the subject of politics per se but because representation is political, the same way that race is. As for art in the contemporary age I am not the one to make big claims -- but I do think that somehow we lost the ability to enjoy an honest, critical debate. Perhaps it has something to do with the overall lack of engagement with things other than our own selves because that’s what the selfie culture is about: me, myself and I. For me the role of art and film is to point towards the uncomfortable, the problematic, but it is not to offer any solutions. I also don’t agree with the Romantic idea of an artist as a divine prophet. I am much closer to the Constructivist model of an artist living in and engaging with the everyday. The sound that Timothy Nelson created for I Think You Should Come to America plays a crucial role in your film. How do you see the relationship between sound and images? I think it was David Lynch who said that ‘film is 50% image and 50% sound, if not more.’ I Think You Should Come to America would not be what it is without Tim’s soundtrack. Having worked with Tim before, we had created our own pattern: he did not see any moving image at the time of composing. He also did his own research and played the instruments himself. When I received the initial CD with the cover (Tim also designs his own covers), I was astounded by the wit of the titles that each soundtrack was given: ‘iron eyes’, ‘do you have a reservation’, ‘plastic shaman’ and so on. There is an emotional depth to this soundtrack, which at the time of Tim composing it, had not come from the images I chose. It was Tim’s own response to the subject. I guess he pictured his own film while he was creating the sound. When I started making Batum, my first step was to capture

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sounds. I first recorded Genie Kaminski, the actress and voice artist, who recited poems by Osip Mandelstam and Joseph Stalin but who also created subtle utterances that were used as a background for what the composer Rob Godman and myself referred to as ‘thinking under water.’ For this Genie ran up and down a tall flight of stairs while drinking water in between her gasps for breath. Rob merged all the sounds, we then sat in his studio to create the film’s final version. So the method of working was different but again, from the very beginning sound was crucial to the film’s overall shape. We like that I Think You Should Come to America draws from universal imagery and that it decontextualizes it. As an effect, the viewer is offered a wide range of narratives rather than univocal view. How important is it to you that the spectators rethink the concepts you explore in your films? It’s very important because the themes my films explore are not unambiguous. To offer, or impose any univocal view, would run against my idea that life does not happen as only one version. For me this is the most important task of any medium: to make the viewers think beyond what is established, to go one step further and be in charge of their own journey, create their own interpretation(s). After one of the screenings of Batum, I was asked whether I liked Stalin. The point is not whether I like Stalin or not. What’s more interesting is what Simon Sebag Montefiore does in his Young Stalin book: by publishing new research, he offers us a chance to shift our existing understanding of how things became the way they did, how Soselo, the young poet, became Stalin. And to be clear, this is also not the subject of Batum per se, but the film floats this idea of what if things

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happened differently? As for I Think You Should Come to America, pretty much every screening of the film is followed by the question of whether Daniel and I ever met and what became of our relationship. Whereas this is an obvious question and I am very happy that it is being asked, this open-ended narrative is very much part of the film’s point, least of all because it allows for plethora of interpretations. Multidisciplinary artist Angela Bulloch once remarked ‘that works of art often continue to evolve after they have been realised, simply by the fact that they are conceived with an element of change, or an inherent potential for some kind of shift to occur.’ Technology can be used to create innovative works, but innovation means not only to create works that haven't been seen before, but especially to recontextualize what already exists. Do you think that the role of the artist has changed with the new global communications and the new sensibility created by new media? For me making films is not about creating new narratives per se, but about being responsive to the circumstances of here and now, even if the films deal with the past. As Walter Benjamin said, the past is always evaluated from the perspective of the present -- so I could keep interpreting any past event over and over again and each time I might arrive at a different conclusion depending on where I am with my present, if that makes sense. Recontextualisation is the key to my work. I enjoy the process of the destruction of the already existing something and then the transformation of it into something new, something other. As for your second question, I think our notions of reality have shifted significantly and we are not so concerned with the accuracy of anything anymore because everything is so mediated. Marshall McLuhan talked about it a lot but I am more in line with

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Michel Foucault’s concept of the technologies of the self and, by extension, ways in which technology impacts our bodies and creates new bodily responses and behavioural patterns. New technologies have democratised art making and I think that’s great; with it came the change in the nature of authorship and ownership of art works. A while ago I was involved in a fascinating project titled Photomediations: An Open Book – an online platform that tells an alternative story of visual media through works found on the Internet, many of which were made by amateur artists. While searching for the content, we were overwhelmed with the amount of great work that was out there on the Internet. Many artists don’t like this as it threatens the status of an artist as this unique being and an art work as a precious commodity, but Duchamp and Warhol were already playing with this a long time ago. I am definitely in for destroying the ego of an artist, perhaps this is why I’m attracted to making works under pseudonym(s). To return to I Think You Should Come to America, the film uses numerous American educational films and we have appreciated the way you explore expressive potential and the feelings associated with archival footage. Michael Fried once stated that 'materials do not represent, signify, or allude to anything; they are what they are and nothing more.' What are the properties that you search for in the footage that you combine? In particular, what does appeal to you in found footage? It’s like Freud’s famous words that ‘sometimes a cigar is just a cigar’, but then at other times, it isn’t. I am not a film fetishist or a purist, like

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Tacita Dean. I like working with 16mm and Super8 because I feel that themes I work with, such as memory, loss, history, are suitable for these formats, or these formats are suitable for these themes, rather. In the case of my latest film, this was archival material that was at my disposal. Had it been a VHS tape archive, I would have worked with that. For the last year or so I have been working with slides. I also work in digital and post-digital formats. So in some sense the format and medium are not as important as the ideation. But one cannot shake off a particular feeling of nostalgia when it comes to film, that feeling comes with the territory, so to speak and as such, 16mm film was suitable for I Think You Should Come to America, since this piece is also a reflection on how the medium itself is used to (mis)represent the world and how technology has its own agency in it. One of the hallmarks of your work is the ability to create a direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider audience reception a crucial component of your decisionmaking process? The question of audiences, particularly in relation to experimental or artist film, however you want to call it, is a really good one. To say that an artist does not think of audiences when she/he makes a work of art is arrogant in my opinion. But it is certainly not about pleasing the audiences, but more about equipping the viewers with enough information so they can design their own journey. I don’t need the audiences to like my films, but I would like them to have some kind of a response

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to them. For that you need to create an engagement with the viewer and to do so, you need to give something of yourself. And that’s hard sometimes. During one of the screenings of a work in progress of I Think You Should Come to America, I think it was in Texas, one audience member gave me a very good feedback. He said that I was holding back, that I didn’t want to give anything of myself and in effect, the film felt too controlled, too contrived, even. I spent months thinking about it and he was right. The film had changed significantly since. Feedback is so important, feedback from friends (those who are fellow artists and those who are not), audiences, and from my students. Audiences of all sorts are crucial to the development of the work. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Kamila. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? It’s my pleasure and thank you again for this opportunity. This summer I spent a month in Morocco and another month in Abkhazia, completing artist-in-residence programmes so winter to spring I am hoping to work on these two projects. I am still doing research but I think both films will further engage with my usual themes of memory, dreams, and cultural unconscious. I am also toying with an idea of venturing into the land of installation but that is to be determined.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Tamara Fraser Lives and works in Chicago, IL, USA Through the vehicle of figural painting, Fraser’s work offers glimpses of a larger narrative – a narrative not so much incomplete as interrupted. Inspired by ambiguity, discomfort and the potential for violence and desire, her work is organized around a variety of motifs including gender, power relationships and introversion. Exploring moments of decision or regret during significant action that threatens to spin out of control, the work imparts a sense of uneasiness. It is the tension caused by the discrepancy between the promised idyll and unfortunate reality – between safety and danger, comfort and confrontation, protection and peril.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

a couple of questions about your background. Are there any experiences that particularly influenced the way you currently conceive and produce your artworks? Moreover, how does your cultural substratum inform the way you relate yourself to art making?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Rejecting any conventional classification regarding its style, Chicago-based artist Tamara Fraser's work draws the viewers through an unconventional and multilayered experience. The central themes of her work are gender, power relationships, eroticization and introversion. The body of work that we'll be discussing in the following pages captures the essence of her subjects, imbuing them with a coherent combination between realism and imagination: the tones of her palette are vibrant and thoughtful, to create perfectly balanced abstract artworks. One of the most impressive aspects of Fraser's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of questioning contemporary visualization practice: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

Thank you for having me! It’s an honor. I was fortunate enough to have Kerry James Marshall as a professor, and the lessons I learned from him are still with me. Kerry was a generous professor – generous with his time, wisdom and honesty. He critiqued my student work thoroughly and seriously. He told us that it isn’t the most talented artist that makes the ‘best’ work, but the artist who works the hardest. You have to put in the hours. I can still hear his voice in my head as I put that and his other invaluable advice to practical use – his teaching definitely influenced the way I approach my process. As for my cultural substratum, there are so many layers…but I’ve never felt that biographical details are important to

Hello Tamara and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with

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Oral Fixations, oil on canvas, 48 x 60", 2017

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understanding art. My work should stand on its own without attaching societal biases or expectations based on a conception of me and my motivations that may or may not be accurate. I hope one doesn’t need to know about my upbringing, my gender or my sexuality to fully appreciate the work.

Specificity is paramount in my practice. I have reference material for not only faces and figures but also for blades of grass, wallpaper and wingtip shoes – everything. I collect vintage photographs, news photos of violence and its aftermath, stills from theater and dance, photos of celebrities and models, midcentury modern architecture, interior spaces, landscapes, etc. etc. I also surreptitiously photograph strangers who catch my fancy. I collect anything that inspires me in some way. In Untitled (Duality I) the figure on the lower half of the canvas was a man I photographed on a subway twisting around to look at the map over his seat. I love that twist of his torso – it was the genesis of that piece.

As an introvert, I spend a great deal of time within myself – I have a rich and rewarding inner life that is limited only by my imagination. My practice is fueled and informed by this interior reality that is invisible to even those closest to me. Or rather, visible only through my work. The results of your artistic inquiry convey coherent sense of unity: before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit http://tamarafraser.squarespace.com in order to get a synoptic view of your multifaceted artistic production: before walking our readers through your process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist.

I sketch in a drawing application on an iPad with a stylus, using the layers function in the program to move the components of a piece to create the composition. I choose from the image library I’ve amassed, combining figures from different photos, rejecting some, trying others – I might use an arm from one figure on the body of another, try out different backgrounds, different arrangements. Each composition is a composite of images from several sources. The man twisting to look at the subway map that I started with in Untitled (Duality I), has an arm with a hand clasping another’s from a separate image, and a couch and a terrier from two more photos.

Specificity with ambiguity: I am an unreliable narrator making narrative paintings. A viewer must put something of themselves into the work to understand it – to complete it. Their interior world – their cultural substratum, if you will – has a conversation with my own. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article has captured our attention for the way your insightful inquiry into the themes of ambiguity, discomfort and the potential for violence and desire provides the visual results of your artistic inquiry with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through your usual process and set up, would tell us how do you select the subjects for your artworks?

I spend a lot of time on my sketches, working out all the details before I put paint to canvas. That is the time to experiment with color, composition and balance and to solve problems. Only when I’m satisfied that I have a sketch that works on every level – as an abstract composition, as a narrative, as a provocative image – do I begin to paint. We have really appreciated the vibrancy and thoughtful nuances of your pieces, that are often marked out with intense tones as Oral

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Fixation and Untitled (Duality I). However, other works as Cuffed, shows that vivacious tones are not strictly indispensable to create tension and dynamics. How did you come about settling on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how do you develop a painting’s texture? I love color. And more to the point, I’m not afraid of color. I wear bold colors and patterns, my home is colorful. I don’t play it ‘safe’ when it comes to color. That attitude is reflected in my work. Vibrant color sets the paintings apart, lends a sense of energy and hyper-reality. The first paint I put on every canvas is Cadmium Red Medium – the only pure, unmixed pigment I use. I outline the drawing with that bright, pure red. I often use the same red in the underpainting. If you look at Cuffed, you can see parts of that red outline still showing – that’s intentional. It gives energy to the painting. You can see the young man’s t-shirt had a pure red underpainting. The visceral, dangerous red under the whites drives the tension in Cuffed as much as the hot oranges and reds of Oral Fixations.The underpainting is an important component of every piece. It’s often luridly colorful – bright and psychedelic. I tend to use colors complimentary to the intended final color – I’ll have orange under a blue sky, yellow under shadows, pale blue under browns.

Untitled (Duality 1), oil on canvas, 52 x 30", 2017

the blue background. There are red outlines around the figures and angry reds snaking throughout the jewel-like blues. The couple in the foreground are literally sitting on a ‘hot seat.’

My palette tends towards warm, autumnal colors, cooled by rich greens and blues. Fields of white have hot colors underneath, influencing the pale expanses. I never use black – I mix a dark purple and apply it over a yellow underpainting. Though blue is the dominant color in Untitled (Duality I), you can see the orange sheen under

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I work quickly – I’ll often have several paintings in progress at once, so I can work on one while another is drying. Most of my paintings only have a few layers, so there isn’t much of a buildup of paint. There is some light impasto in clothing and hair. Texturally, flesh tends to be

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Cuffed, oil on canvas, 12 x 12", 2016

more painterly whilst settings and background are more linear.

Your artwork is pervaded with images rich with symbolic features, as in Reliquary and

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Reliquary, oil on canvas, 32 x 40", 2017

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All My Worst Fears Are Grounded, oil on canvas, 48 x 48", 2017

Game Night. German multidisciplinary artist Thomas Demand once stated that "nowadays art can no longer rely so much on symbolic strategies and has to probe psychological narrative elements within the medium instead." What is your opinion about it? Moreover, would

you tell us something about the importance of symbols in your imagery? I feel that symbols can reflect psychological elements. Most of the symbolism in my work

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Pieta, oil on board, 48 x 24", 2015

is ambiguous (e.g., the picnic blanket, the prosthetic arm, crowbars and scissors). They are open to interpretation – the picnic blanket is homey and old-fashioned or cheap and sentimental, a crowbar is a useful tool that can be

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used violently. They are symbols with variable meanings. Color, too, is deeply symbolic. Red is stop, danger, emergency, blood, but it’s also a red rose, red lips, a


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Port au prince, installation , West End Gallery, 2015

edges. It’s between the floorboards and at the edges of the curtains. It outlines the conservative shirts and ties of our buttonedup protagonists just as it outlines the contours of the naked flesh above. Is it passion or

valentine. Red is visceral. Red is love. Red is hot. Red is open to interpretation. In Game Night, you can see red around the

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Lend Some Assistance To The Object, oil on canvas, 60 x 48", 2017

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violence seething below the surface? I use religious symbolism in some of my work both as a reference to the importance of religious art in history, and because Christian symbols are so pervasive in our culture. My work based on religious themes is more comic – reinterpretations of traditional religious narrative art that has always felt inherently ridiculous to me, like the Sacred Conversation, or the Adoration of the Magi. In both paintings, the Madonna is the central figure, spotlighted. I’ve used an image of a movie star to depict her magnificence. Reliquary incorporates the concept of the religious relic – which can be anything from a saint’s underwear to the shroud of Turin. In this case, it is a splinter of the true cross, which was a very popular item in the Middle Ages. Many Catholic churches purchased splinters of the true cross from unscrupulous salesmen – if you gathered all the ‘splinters of the true cross,’ you’d have a forest. Thus, the relic might represent flim-flammery, unreliability or deception as easily as it represents devotion, Christ’s suffering or the Christian church entire How one interprets the symbolism influences how one understands the painting. You often play with ambiguity and we daresay that you aim to excite the observer to “finish” the painting by himself, to motivate his imagination to create his personal image in a specific situation. Rather than attempting to establish any univocal sense, you seem to urge the viewers to elaborate personal associations: would you tell us how important it is for you that the spectatorship rethink the concepts you convey in your pieces, elaborating personal meanings? It’s incredibly important. That the viewer ‘finish’ the painting themselves is exactly my intention. A viewer always brings something to any piece of art – their own attitudes and

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cultural associations inform their appreciation and understanding. My work compels the viewer to participate in the narrative, the viewer wants to fill in the blanks, wants to tell the story that they are seeing on the canvas. Lend Some Assistance to the Object depicts three figures in the driveway of a midcentury modern home. The central figure lies prone and almost nude on a rumpled picnic blanket. He is embraced by another figure, also nude or almost nude, who buries his face in the prone figure’s neck. The third figure leers out of the canvas. He is on his knees and one hand. With the other he wipes his mouth – or licks his hand. He is fully clothed in a dark suit. What is happening? Something – we seem to see the scene just after an event. There might have been violence, horseplay, an accident or something else entirely… the viewer must make sense of it without any additional input from me. Watching people interact with my work at openings and shows is very rewarding. The paintings provoke discussion amongst viewers, inspire people to talk through the specific narratives that they perceive. It reveals new layers. Another particular aspect of your work is the coexistence of naturalist representation and the abstract datum: they seem to be the tip of the iceberg of what you are really attempting to communicate. How would you define the relationship between abstraction and representation in your practice? In particular, how does representation and a tendency towards abstraction find their balance in your work? Clearly, representation is dominant, but abstraction is an important component. My paintings are not completely naturalistic. Abstraction – of color, of scale and space, of texture – is employed to heighten the emotional impact, the urgency, of a piece. I am rigorous in the sketching phase, spending time achieving balance in the composition, arranging the figures, testing color combinations. I don’t concern

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Edge Of Town, oil on canvas, 60 x 48", 2016

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Dreams Of The Abandoned, oil on canvas, 60 x 48", 2016

mention that almost everything, ranging from Caravaggio’s Inspiration of Saint Matthew to Joep van Lieshout’s works, could be considered political, do you think that your work is political, in a certain sense? What is your opinion of the role of Art in the contemporary age?

myself overmuch with naturalism – I’m much more interested in specificity. I strive to create a composition that works abstractly as well as representationally. The way your artworks urge the viewer to confront their gender biases seems to convey subtle yet effective sociopolitical criticism. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated, “the artist’s role differs depending on which part of the world you’re in. It depends on the political system you’re living under.” Not to

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The role of Art is to provoke thought and selfreflection – of some sort. There are other requirements, but it has no more important role. My work is absolutely and intentionally political. I want to challenge the systemic sexism and racism

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Sacred Conversation, oil on canvas, 48 x 60", 2016

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Game Night, oil on canvas, 24 x 30", 2017

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making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context? Honestly, I don’t consider audience reception. I please myself with my paintings. I have a point of view, a voice, and when I’m sketching, building compositions, juxtaposing images, my focus is completely on myself. My work is an expression of and a dialogue with my interior self. That said, viewer participation in my work is crucial for its success. A painting is incomplete until someone looks at it, puzzles over it, and interprets it for himself or herself. The story that each viewer tells himself or herself is an inherent part of each work. It’s the world inside my head communicating with the viewer’s inner self.

Scissors, oil on Canvas, 12 x 12", 2016

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Tamara. Finally, would you like to tell readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving?

of Western culture, provoke a dialogue about power and privilege. That is an integral component of my work, but it’s not the most important consideration. As I go through my process, I’m not thinking about a piece’s political impact. I’m much more concerned with structure, form and space, coloration, and especially narrative potential.

In my most recent work, I’ve begun juxtaposing images of different sizes, different settings, within the same canvas. The images are meant to be taken as a whole, relating to each other in some unspecified way. Oral Fixations, Untitled (Duality I) and X Marks the Spot are examples of this exploration and I have several more in the works.

Over the years your works have been exhibited on several occasions, including your recent show Behold, The World Possesses Nothing Permanent. One of the hallmarks of your work is the capability to create a direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-

I’ll be showing in May 2018 at the Buckham Gallery in Flint, Michigan – I’m hoping to feature some of this new work. Thank you so much, it has been a pleasure. An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Francine LeClercq Lives and works in New York City, USA

"There is no white picture. And there is no old picture. It is always a question of current experience and current perception." Often consisting of multiples works grouped around a specific theme, my work deals with the questions relating to the perception of art, the arrangement of the work in space, the elements of the work, whether concrete, sensory, intellectual and semantic, and the synchrony between the work, its context and the receiver. The installation [3:2] consists of more than 800 cells measuring 3 x 2 inches in reference to the photographic 3:2 aspect ratio now adopted for the LCD screens of our digital devices such as cameras, i-phones and the likes. A coat of thermochromic ink is applied to the cells, causing a nuance such that they may be perceived as an opaque black monochrome, a blur or revealing the underlying image depending on temperature and location, the proximity of bodies and heat exchange. It is an experiment whereby art is the moment of a mutual dependency fermented by an active participation of the senses.

I Am Your Labyrinth, Installation


Anne Greenwood Lives and works in Portland, Oregon, USA

Hazel Hall was an early 20th century disabled Oregon artist. She spent most of her life in the second story room of her parents NW Portland home sewing by hand and writing poetry. Her writing incorporates sights, sounds, inspiration and ponderings she gathered from outside her window including the everyday occurrences of time passing. Tapestry of Hours is made in an edition of one hundred and thirty-eight laser printed, hand-bound chapbooks and twelve special edition portfolios with chapbook and tapestry. The special edition portfolio is made of crinoline; it is machine-sewn, hand-dyed in fustic, and pressure-printed with machine-stitched text from a poem originally written by Hall and then pieced together by Anne. The chapbook cover is machine stitching on crinoline, the under print is pressureprinted, hand-stitched embroidery with pochoir and handbound using the pamphlet stitch. The decorations are handstitched embroidery sigils by Anne Greenwood and Shannon Ayuyu, they are pressure-printed on Kitakata paper. The tapestry is made of crinoline hand-dyed in madder, fustic, cochineal and indigo, with hand stitching and pochoir. The appliqué: the moon is a pressure-printed, found, hand-made doily and the poem “Loneliness”, is written by Hazel Hall, rewritten by Anne Greenwood, and printed with a polymer plate. The machine-stitched texts are cut-ups of Hazel Hall’s poetry made by Shannon Ayuyu and Anne Greenwood. The printing is all by Clare Carpenter (2016) in Portland, Oregon. The conceptual framework for my artistic practice is a blending of historical and material culture that investigates the social history embedded in objects and materials. I am particularly interested in the repurposing of textiles and book art, and imbuing these cultural artifacts with new meanings, while preserving their historical integrity. The work is at once physical and ephemeral, fusing past and present and creating new perspectives into understanding historical objects and words in a contemporary context. My practice is inquiry and experience based through active community engagement and is studio focused. I collaborate regularly across artistic disciplines in public art, installation, service and greenspace projects. These collaborations fortify my belief that exploring the life of objects and materials is closely aligned with an engaged and meaningful social art practice.


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Hands, 2017, Caption Mohawk Superfine heavyweight, ink, acrylic paint, pressure-printing & pochoir 11”x17”


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Anne Greenwood Lives and works in Portland, Oregon, USA Experimenting with a wide variety of materials and techniques to express the ideas she explores, artist Anne Greenwood's work rejects any conventional classification regarding its style, to address the viewers that we'll be discussing in the following to a multilayered visual experience. In her pages, she successfully attempts to trigger the spectatorship's perceptual parameters, with a deeper focus on a complementary dialogue between materiality, content, and the encounter with the viewers. One of the most impressive aspects of Greenwood's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of inquiring into the liminal area where past and present find an unexpected still consistent point of convergence: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

business owner sought collaboration with the community to help save a small tax-foreclosed vacant lot around the corner from our house from development. This lot became the Albina Green, a neighborhood public greenspace.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Anne and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. You have a solid background and after having earned your Bachelor of Art from the Moorhead State University, you started to work as assistant to photographer Thomas Robinson: you are also involved involved in your community as an artist and activist helping to organize public art, community relationships and greenspace. How do these experiences influence the way you currently conceive your works? In particular, how did formal training help you to develope your unique style?

The Albina Green, along with my work as assistant to the photographer Thomas Robinson, set me on a new path of thinking about the role of art in society. Thomas Robinson is an audio engineer, photographer, and historian. During the seven years I worked with Tom he founded his business Historic Photo Archive, grew his collection of original film, glass plate negatives and transparencies to over 4500 photographers, and set up a state of the art black and white darkroom capable of enlarging and printing these historical negatives. We traveled the state of Oregon procuring equipment, negatives, exhibiting, and researching images. We visited the descendents of the Wadatika band of Northern Paiute Indians in Harney County, attended the First Foods Ceremony at Celilo Village where village members of either Yakama Nation or Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Umatilla or the Nez Perce tribes reside along the Columbia River and the historic site of Celilo Falls and traveled to Mexico City locating historic negatives for the archive.

Working in my community as an artist has changed my art practice and the way I conceive my work. In 1997 I bought a condemned drug house in Portland, Oregon with my partner Mauricio Rioseco. We worked together to rehabilitate the house while connecting with our neighbors and the community. At this time, a local

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Tapestry of Hours -special edition portfolio, 2017 crinoline, machine sewn and hand-dyed in fustic with the pressure printed, machine-stitched text: edition of 12, 8”x12”x.5”


Albina Green with ‘Art in the Park details’ (located at: North Albina and Sumner Streets, Portland OR), 1998-present Public Park with metal work, landscape design, mural, pebble mosaic path, 3552 square feet


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It was these experiences, primarily, that helped me to develop my unique style. Working with Tom and developing the Albina Green gave me my first major experience with socially engaged art and how this way of working “differs from its art historical ancestors in that it is not a specific movement or style, but rather a way of defining a new social order. Thousands of existing social practice projects across the world have taken vastly different approaches to their combination of publics, methodologies, aesthetics, and environments, yet these projects all share an aesthetic of human interaction and development. The end products of such works are not commodities, but rather processes for constructive social change.” Wikipedia. My formal training exposed me to new tools and ways of thinking while igniting an excitement to learning. My unique style of working is a combination of these traditional studio practices and contemporary ways of creating opportunity for social change; in either setting I explore emotions, time, memory, and place through a wide variety of forms and materials.

art practice involves grant writing, exhibiting, teaching, and the ongoing development of The Albina Green as a creative neighborhood greenspace. I am a big proponent of spontaneity. I believe that because I have so many interests, when something intersects or coincides, it is the spontaneity of this occurrence that often sets me off on a new tangent to something different, but related. The instinctive vs. methodical methods of elaborating in my pieces often tends to relate to whether the project involves grant writing or an application process. For example, my latest project ‘Tapestry of Hours’ was funded in part by a 2016 Individual Project Grant from the Regional Arts and Culture Council and a one-month Artist-In-Residency with Caldera in Oregon. In order to receive these awards I submitted a written application with images of book mock-ups about this project and methodically approached the phases, materials, exhibitions and expenses related to its production. The process was still instinctive in its conception and elaboration, but was informed by parameters and deadlines.

Your works convey a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit http://www.annegreenwood.net in order to get a synoptic view of your work: in the meanwhile, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up? How much importance does play spontaneity in your work? In particular, do you conceive you works instinctively or do you methodically elaborate your pieces?

The production of the limited edition of books was methodical to an extent, as there were many layers to the project such as: design, collaboration, writing, hand-dying all the fabric, commissioning a letterpress printer to pressure-print on the fabric, hand-embroidering and machine stitching the text and imagery, assembling and then exhibiting and distributing the finished work. I am an intuitive person, so most of this happens when the time is right. You are a versatile artist and your practice is marked out with captivating multidisciplinary feature, ranging from book arts, social and community art engagement practices, textiles, mixed media, installation, public art, and greenspace. What did draw you to abandone your traditional photography/ darkroom work, addressing you to such interdisciplinary practice? And in particular, when do you recognize that a technique or a material has exhausted its expressive potential to self?

I have a studio practice and a community art practice. They are both process- based and project focused. I regularly work in sketchbooks writing and drawing and gathering inspiration from my life and the world around me. I have a studio with a tabletop Line-O-Scribe proofing press, screenprinting equipment, and several sewing machines. I work in my studio during the week when I am not otherwise occupied with parenting or working parttime in the Paragon Art Gallery and Portland Farmer’s Market for Gathering Together Farm. My

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I consciously decided to abandon my traditional photography/darkroom work as the technology of this medium was changing. I was not excited about learning digital photography. I love the chance nature of film photography, working in the darkroom, and the magical process of making images in this way. I also felt an inner struggle with using toxic processes and chemicals and having them entering the waterways and contaminating soil. I still do have my camera equipment, thousands of original film negatives, and have continued to take photographs from time to time. My community-based work began around this time and I was gifted a fully equipped sewing studio from my neighbor across the street. She was a professional seamstress and who had recently lost the use of her right thumb and gave me most of her tools, materials and equipment. I had grown up sewing and embroidering within traditional women’s communities in North Dakota. This transition became a return to working with more hands on materials and process, which is something I was craving. I have always been inclined toward an interdisciplinary practice, I believe. My formal training was very traditional and did not encourage this type of practice, but I did explore all the alternative processes related to photography and through my work with Thomas Robinson I began to see how art and social practices could come together for me. I recognize that a technique or material has exhausted itself for me when the process becomes drudgery and I no longer gain inspiration from the engaging with it as a medium or the technology changes and it becomes a new process entirely. For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected Tapestry of Hours, an interesting project that our readers have already started to got to know in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic inquiry is the way you provided its visual results of with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through the genesis of

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Tapestry of Hours -special edition portfolio, edition: 12, open detail, 2017 crinoline- machine sewing, hand-stitched embroidery, natural dyes, pressure printing, machine-stitched text Mohawk Superfine & Kitakata paper, ink, acrylic paint, letterpress printing, polymer plate, digital printing & pochoir, 8�x16.5�x.5 open

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Tapestry of Hours -special edition portfolio, edition: 12, tapestry front/back details, 2017 crinoline hand-dyed in madder, Osage orange, fustic, cochineal and indigo, with hand-stitching, embroidery, pochoir machine-stitched text, letterpress printing, the poem Loneliness is written by Hazel Hall and printed with a polymer plate, 34�x 22�

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Tapestry of Hours would you tell us your sources of inspiration? The genesis of Tapestry of Hours had a life of its own. My initial inspiration for this project came from Sandra Kroupa, Special Collections Librarian at the University of Washington. She introduced me to the poet, Hazel Hall. Hazel Hall was born in St. Paul, Minnesota on February 2, 1886 and moved to Portland, Oregon as a small child. At the age of twelve, she suffered from scarlet fever, and related complications, leaving her confined to a wheelchair, and her formal schooling ended in the fifth grade. To help her family financially, Hazel Hall took in sewing, but as her eyesight began to fail in her early twenties she wrote poetry. She died in Portland, in 1924, at the age of thirty-eight. Hall published three books of poetry, one of which is partially devoted to needlework poems. It was here I found a very deep connection and my vision began to unfold around what this project would become. In keeping with prior creative projects involving art, social practice and community engagement, I invited another artist, Shannon Ayuyu, to collaborate. I had met mixed-media artist, Shannon, on my previous community engagement project called “What’s in the Bag?” and was struck by her originality and intensity. Later, as I began reading Hazel Hall’s work, I recalled Shannon who also requires a wheelchair to negotiate the world. Shannon was born with a rare bone disease, Osteogenesis Imperfecta or “brittle bones.” Over the course of her life she has suffered from 200 or so broken bones and in her 28 years has endured 28 surgeries. In periods confined by recovery, she learned to embroider. Shannon connected to aspects of Hazel Hall’s history, having personally experienced how it is to feel separated from others who can engage freely in physical activity. Unlike Hazel Hall, however, Shannon is very deeply rooted and connected to her community, and her art is informed by those close relationships. In 2015 I received a Professional Development Grant from the Regional Arts & Culture Council to travel to San Francisco, California to attend the Codex International Book Fair & Symposium. This experience allowed me to look at countless unique and beautiful limited edition artist’s books, talk with artists, and meet with collectors. It was here I saw the

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incredible work of German artist Jule Claudia Mahn and her then new book Sichtvermerke. While her work looks nothing like mine, it was recalling this work and it’s foldout tapestry that gave me my initial ideas for the structure of Tapestry of Hours. In January of 2016, I spent the entire month in the remote area of Sisters, Oregon, at Caldera, as an artist-in-residency with six other artists from different disciplines. One night I sat with a musician, poet, and two writers talking about our current work and I presented a challenge I was having with how to lay out the text. Poet Sara Mumolo suggested treating the text as image and adding space in-between the letters and words creating a visual text. It was these experiences that lead me to several breakthroughs in the design of my book. I could go on and on about my influences and inspiration as it continued throughout this project. But the most significant connection of this project came in the way of guidance and subtle communication from Hazel Hall. We daresay that your works unveil the elusive Ariadne's Thread that links past to present: do you recognize a dichotomy, a contrast between Tradition and Contemporary? Or can you can recognize a proficient kind of synergy between such apparently opposite notions? I am inspired by the interaction of disparate energies. Motivated by the vitality and relationship between textile and text, I integrate language and material as a way to access timelessness, recognizing the alliance between such apparently opposite notions of tradition and contemporary. I find a unique synergy in the idea and the process of wrangling new ways of seeing or experiencing duality or dichotomy and find creativity essential to looking beyond differences. I am currently reading several books that talk about this theme in the larger context of what we experience culturally and sociologically. Jane Bennett’s book Vibrant Matter touches on seeing the vitality in how things fit together. She writes, “What is also needed is a

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Anne Greenwood sewing Tapestry of Hours 2016

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Jefferson High School Whiteness History Month Community Engagement Project with Portland Community College, 2016 social practices, found & repurposed textiles, Ritt dye, site specific installation of variable size

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cultivated, patient, sensory attentiveness to nonhuman forces operating outside and inside the human body. … Without proficiency in this counterculture kind of perceiving, the world appears as if it consists only of active human subjects who confront passive objects and their law-governed mechanisms.” For me, what is contemporary is based in tradition. So considering the source of something, and its resonance, always leads me to a point of connection (community) or coincidence. I also think that working with textiles, such as cloth or fabric and thread, gestures toward the corporeal and is a proxy for the body that it fits around. Clothing identifies and protects and is an intimate connection. “Why advocate for the vitality of matter?” asks Bennett, “Because my hunch is that the image of dead or thoroughly instrumentalized matter feeds human hubris and our earthdestroying fantasies of conquest and consumption. It does so by preventing us from detecting (seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, feeling) a fuller range of the nonhuman powers circulating around and within human bodies.” Investigating about the tension between the physical and the ephemeral, your artworks provide with tactile feature the social history embedded in objects and materials: would you say that the way you provide the transient with sense of permanence allows you to create materiality of the immaterial? Yes, I think in the projects I’m involved with - in their collaborative and inter- or multi-disciplinary natures - authorship becomes irrelevant and transmutation occurs. This changes immaterial from one form, or nature, or condition, to another material. The tactile features are literally the fabric. The objects I make are often include found fabrics, natural dyes or repurposed past projects or old ideas. I see fabric as a place or land and is inspired by the cause and effect relationships like, “How Wolves Change Rivers” narrated by George Monbiot and the ecological concept of trophic

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cascade -cause- effect- change-transformationprocess relationships. In my fabric book Over and Over I worked with old table cloths, vintage screenprinted butterfly and hand-dyed indigo fabrics, along with the theme of death, cell division, and transformation to tell a story. This book was made in an edition of three and the techniques include: applique, hand-embroidery, machinestitching, screenprinting, and natural dyes. I finished this project while in residency at Playa on the edge of the Great Basin in south-central Oregon. Your practice accomplishes such insightful exploration of the point of convergence between Folk Art and contemporary sensitiveness. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated, "the artist’s role differs depending on which part of the world you’re in. It depends on the political system you’re living under". How do you consider the relationship between artists and society? Moreover, what could be in your opinion the role of Art in the contemporary age? Thank you! Such a good question! I believe art sees the future, and it creates opportunities for deep change to occur. I just read an amazing example of this in Sarah Lewis’s book Rise- she talks about Charles L. Black Jr. who was born in 1915. He was a white American professor and authority in constitutional law. At sixteen years of age, Black encountered the trumpet playing of Louis Armstrong. He said, “Louis Armstrong, “King of the Trumpet”, was the first genius I had ever seen,” and that genius was housed in the body of a man whom Black’s childhood world had denigrated and he began staring at the gulf created by “the failure to recognize kinship.” Later Black would say that, in many ways, this was the day he began “walking toward the Brown case, where I belonged.” Black would go on to join the legal team for the 1954 Brown vs. Board of Education case that persuaded the US Supreme Court to unanimously declare segregation unlawful.” I believe art inspires on many levels; it has the power to ignite change in small and great ways all over the world.

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Over and Over, Edition of three, 2014, Repurposed textiles, screen-printing, machine stitched text, hand stitching, cotton thread hand-dyed in indigo marigold, madder root, and Brazil wood; edition of three, 13" x 12" x 1"

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Jefferson High School Whiteness History Month Community Engagement Project with Portland Community College -residency detail, 2016


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You seem to draw a lot from daily life and your connection to natural world. How much does everyday life's experience fuel yourself as a creative? In particular, how would you consider the relationship between direct experience and creativity?

vision about Art? And in particular, did you ever get inspired from your students? Teaching informs my vision through challenging my ability to explain and see new ways of working and to operate in that dual-consciousness state of mind of being inspired and bringing that process to others. Teaching relationships present many ways to learn about what is happening in the world, new perspectives, and what is needed. I am always inspired by my students. Creativity is so unique and layered. Everyone seems to have deep stores of information upon which to draw. The challenge or sometimes simply the opportunity to engage with others in a creative context can be very dynamic. I find people often have fears or triggers around selfexpression. Using ‘ice- breaker’ activities or techniques is an exciting way to open channels of connection, then communication and exploration. I find teaching to require courage, strength and compassion.

Aldo Leopold, one of the foremost American conservationist, states in his book A Sand County Almanac, “We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” and “That land is a community is the basic concept of ecology, but that land is to be loved and respected is an extension of ethics. That land yields a cultural harvest is a fact long known, but latterly forgotten.” I grew up on the high plains of rural North Dakota. I spent my childhood outside roaming the hills north of our house. Our plot of property was positioned in between burial mounds on Oceti Sakowin native lands. My father was a wildlife biologist and my mother a nutritionist. I began to see and have direct experience with these interconnected relationships of the body and between the land, insects, plants, and animals. I grew up surrounded by farm families and learning the history of this region’s first nations people. We found teepee rings, canoed the James River, and learned the families of plants and animals. This experience has informed my adult life and, as Aldo Leopold states in A Sand County Almanac, showed me “….the core ecological values where land is a community, and when we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” My exposure to the natural world was the catalyst for connecting direct experience to creativity, as nature is a process, interconnected in such a highly intelligent system. I believe this emulates the complex network of time, place and organism. In my work, I find inspiration from the patterns of daily life, changes in the seasons, phases of life and the relationships.

Over the years your works have been showcased in several occasions: you had eight solos, including your recent show Tapestry of Hours, at the John Wilson Romm Multnomah County Library, in Portland and you have also been selected to present your project Sweet Dreams for the Portland Community College first annual White‘ness’ History Month with the Jefferson High School Middle College for Advanced Studies. One of the hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context? I think this depends upon the project. The relationship of my art with my audience, its reception, and what type of language is used in a particular context depends. In the case of ‘Sweet Dreams’, Jefferson High School students have a

Besides producing the interesting works that our readers have admired in these pages, you also teach: how much does this experience inform your

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relationship to Portland Community College (PCC). They are located across the street from one another and the high school students can take classes at the college for duel credit. PCC’s sponsorship of White‘ness’ History Month proposed the creation of opportunities to understand the concept of whiteness in greater depth. PCC is deeply diverse. United States citizenship is not a requirement for enrollment. Jefferson High School has a long history of a majority African-American student body. Yet, currently, the neighborhood is undergoing massive gentrification. These are the two dominant educational institutions in my community, so my role in this project was to be the bridge. The process of engaging, creating an opportunity for relationships to form, and for creative expression to occur around and as a result of a challenging conversation about a very real situation, was the project. What we made was the transmuted experience given form. The art was the language. It didn’t matter to me if whomever saw the installation understood or received it in a particular context. The crucial components were participation or nonparticipation in the conversation about “white“ness” and taking the opportunity to engage as a community in this context. Landform: Hill, 2017 crinoline, natural dyes, cotton fabric & thread with letterpress pressure printing, hand and machine stitching, applique, 12" x 7.5"

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Anne. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving?

ceremonial embroidery. Max Dashu writes, “In a world in extremity, we are searching for the wellspring, the inexhaustible Source known to all our ancient kindreds. Many of us have been cut off from our deep roots, and especially from the ancient wisdom of women, and female spiritual leadership.”

I am now making a new series of fabric drawings with hand-stitched embroidery and natural dyes. The imagery and materials are inspired by the high plains of North Dakota, my past work as a horticulturalist and my recent participation in the four-year Blue Iris Mystery School in Portland, Oregon that will come to an end in March 2018. I have also been inspired by the writing of Max Dashu on ’Restoring Women to Cultural Memory’ and Mary B. Kelly’s book Goddess Embroideries Of Eastern Europe. I have been researching old traditions of handcraft that engage history, collaborative thinking and practice, and images of

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I will continue to work at the new Portland Community College Paragon Arts Gallery, Printmaking Studio and Fabrication Lab . This new facility just opened in 2017 and we are all learning our job duties. During the last two weeks of May, the six member gallery staff co-curated a series of

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Landform: Oxbow, 2017 SPECIAL crinoline,25 natural dyes, cotton fabric & thread with letterpress pressureISSUE printing hand and machine stitching, applique, 12" x 7.5"


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Magic Hands series -blue, 2017, linen, cotton thread, indigo, 5” x 11.5

community-based art events and activities called “Making Change.” We have the two-gallery space curated with exhibitions into the fall of 2018 and intend to work towards promoting and connecting with the larger community, possibly injecting some spontaneous programming here and there. In March 2018, I will travel to Reykjavik, Iceland, where I have a pending opportunity to present and exhibit my latest book art project at the Reykjavik City Library during The Women’s Story Circle working with the Women Of Multicultural Ethnicity Network in Iceland. I have also been invited to give a lecture and workshop at the Reykjavík School of Visual

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Arts. I will meet with The Heimilisiðnaðarsafnið / Textile Museum and ARKIR Book Arts Group and hopefully plan a collaborative exhibit exchange for 2018-19. I will then spend two months in residency at the Icelandic Textile Center in Blönduós making new work. While there, I am interested in developing ideas and new creative practices around making tapestries. I am very interested in learning about the Vatnsdæla Tapestry being made at the Textile Center, seeing how it is being made as a community project, it’s design, the materials, stitches as well as learning in depth about the Bayereux-tapestry alongside the Vatnsdæla

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Magic Hands series -violet, 2017 linen, cotton thread, indigo & cochineal, 12� x 8.5

Tapestry. I have wanted to develop a project similar to this for a very long time.

opportunities, and focus my practice on gallery representation. I will apply for the new 2018 Oregon Metro Placemaking Grant to provide financial

Upon my return I will plan an exhibition at Passages Bookshop in Portland along with the work of several members from the ARKIR Book Arts Group. Bookshop owner, David Abel began representing my artist books in the winter of 2017 traveling and showing my work to collectors, book arts gallery owners and curators nationwide. At this time I want to create new work, make connections in the international contemporary art communities for further collaboration, exhibition and residency

support for developing programming at the Albina Green Community Greenspace in Portland, and continue to work with my community.

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Erika Erdész Lives and works in Budapest, Hungary

I was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1976. I started drawing in my childhood. First I educated myself with autodidact method, but later in my adulthood I attended more drawing schools to supply the missing bases. There I learnt also anatomy, and get acquainted with painting too. In 2013 I became a member of a local artist group, The Company of New Pest Artists, and in the same year I passed a successful entrance exam to the Budapest Metropolitan University where I graduated as a painter and graphic artist. My main master was József Baksai, who added to my art development and thinking very much. My little more direct, often surreal style changed into a more symbolic one. In 2016 I won György Urbán award in Sárospatak (Hungary), then I passed in the Association of Hungarian Creative Artists. In the course of my works I usually used to think about series. Some motives are repeated often for more years. Nowadays I create some of the earlier painted pictures of me also spatially. I prefer egg tempera made by myself, just as oil but I use aquarelle and also other mediums with pleasure according to the theme. Often my pictures are on the border of paintings and graphic. I like to combine the separate technics just like lino-cut with oil, aquarelle or others. Lot of my paintings are made in monochrome or with using only a few colours just like they were graphics. Most of my pictures just like the series of Stairs and Mountains are about the human life, the relationships, symbolized by simple forms or ordinary objects


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Peripheral ARTeries meets

Erika Erdész Lives and works in Budapest, Hungary

Rich with evokative symbolism and marked out with rigorous sense of geometry, Erika Erdész's work triggers both the perceptual parameters and the cultural ones of her audience, that she walk through a multilayered visual experience. The central theme of her work are human life, the relationships, symbolized by simple forms or ordinary objects and in her body of works that we'll be discussing in the following pages she accomplishes the difficult task of motivating the spectatrship imagination to elaborate personal interpretation: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to Erdész's stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

your cultural substratum dued to your Hungarian roots inform the way you relate yourself to art?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Erika and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. You have a solid training and after your studies of Drawing and Photo School you degreed from the Institute of Graphic Arts and Design of the Budapest Metropolitan University: you also nurtured your education with a Anatomy course at the Manzart Drawing School under the guidance of András Szunyoghy. How did these experiences influence the way you currently conceive and produce your works? And in particular, how does

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Hello, and thank you for the great opportunity to present my art. Yes, I have learnt to draw for years before I found my current and real style. Many ask me if it is important to learn so much of drawing. A lot think there’s no need it for an abstract work for example. They used to say: “I also could do it.” It’s just a few lines.” But this is not true. If you do not study and do not practice, you won’t know where to draw those lines and why they are exactly there. The picture will have a completely different meaning, or it won’t mean anything. First I went to a drawing school for years where I got a very solid foundation from my teacher, 23


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Frigyes Kleinhappel, also in anatomy, and I became acquainted with painting and graphic techniques too. After that, I participated in a course of graphic artist and anatomist András Szunyoghy to deepen these skills. Then in the same year I was admitted to the Metropolitan University, where I graduated as a painter / graphic artist. In addition to others, my main master was József Baksai, from whom I learned very much also technically, but he added the most to my way of thinking. We keep in touch with him also currently and his opinion is always very important to me. He is the person for me who can be called the "Master". Under the influence of his education, my little more direct, often surrealistic style was replaced by a much more symbolic one. On my pictures I began to use simple, ordinary forms and objects to describe my emotions and thoughts, just like the paperclips, or the gears.

gesture painting is harder for me. Although the latter is not my style. The results of your artistic inquiry convey together a coherent sense of unity: before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit http://erdeszerika.hu/ in order to get a synoptic view of your multifaceted artistic production: while walking our readers through your process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist. Most of my images are about human life, relationships, emotions, difficulties that we overcome. During our life we cover million kind of stairs, mountains. Some of us need to climb higher, others need lower ones. The main questions: whether are we able to get over all kind of difficulties we met? Who knows what is destined for us?

My Hungarian roots? I think my themes are so kind of problems that anyone can encounter regardless of where she/he lives. My predecessors were Hungarian Swabians, who are characterized by strict precision. Maybe this strictness is that can be seen on my works, and that I am a terrible maximalist to myself, always striving for perfection. This is partly a good thing but partly a disadvantage because I can be spontaneous less and for example also

For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected Mountains, an interesting series that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article: what has at once captured our attention of the way you have create such insightful combination between rigorous geometry and contemporary sensitiveness is the way you have provided the visual results of your 24

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analysis with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through the genesis of the Mountains series, would you tell us how did you develope the initial idea? The Mountains and Stairs are actually one series. The main idea also here is real life with its own difficulties. As usual, I started creating them with discovering the simplest forms. The Stairs idea came first. The first flash came from a very simple school job at the University. Everyone got wood-blocks, and we had to create more kinds of compositions. I started playing with the blocks, lining them up, and create more sketches till finally I got a huge number of idea how to use these simple objects for expressing my messages, thoughts. Later I kept on painting this series with other shapes to which also simple objects gave the basic ideas. The Mountains were born at that time. Maybe you are laughing at me but the most banal objects gave the initial ideas of these pictures: just like the rivets of my belt, an egg-box etc. I think if you use these objects in the adequate way you can express a lot things of course with choosing the good colour too. You usually conceive your artworks as part of a series and some motives are often repeated for years: would tell us how do you select the themes and the subjects for your series?

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my thoughts. In the wake of an idea I get a huge number of other ones and a process, a game, that can be continued indefinitely, begins.

Yes, I mostly create series. I repeat some of the motifs until I completely walk around the theme. Thanks to this, there are some elements that come to the fore for more years. I draw my ideas from the world around me. As I walk through the street, work at my workplace, look at my window, or just look around myself, I find simple shapes and objects arousing

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We have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances of the pieces from your Stairs series that show how vivacious tones are not strictly indespensable to create tension and 23


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Port au prince, installation , West End Gallery, 2015

express with the picture. I'm the same with choosing the texture and the technique too. However, sometimes I create the same picture with two (or more) completely different techniques or just another color, with that the same picture will have a different meaning. It's a kind of game, experimentation ... in the good meaning of the word. On the other

dynamics. How did you come about settling on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how do you develope a painting’s texture? I always try to choose my colors according to what emotion I'm trying to 24

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hand, I like to observe how my pictures affect the people. So sometimes I'm a bit of a hunter for effect, but basically of course the expression of my own message is the main motivation. At Stairs I wanted to express some kind of depth and drama anyway. For this I intentionally applied strong contrasts and only very few basic colors. You are a versatile artist and you combine techniques as lino-cut with oil and aquarelle to create artworks that are on the thin border between painting and graphics: what are the qualities that you are searching for in the materials that you combine in your works? Of course, I try to choose the best materials for my works. To be able to combine the materials you need to know them. Otherwise, it will not last for a long time, even the picture may be destroyed. Some of the materials (for example egg tempera) I make myself regardless of whether I combine it with anything else or not. So I'm fluently experimenting, getting to know the materials and their qualities. It's a kind of a game, just like that I'm combining the techniques, and I enjoy it very much. While referring to reality, your paintings convey a captivating abstract feeling: how do you view the

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relationship between the real and the imagined in your work? In particular, does your everyday life's experience fuel your creative process or do your images come from your imagination? The two cannot be separated from each other in my work. The basic ideas are given by everyday life. One can express only what is somewhere deep in her mind, in her memories. Our thinking, and our fantasy is based on these. So neither the real nor the imagined can exist without the other. They are necessary to express ideas and messages from my memories and feelings through my imagination. We like the way, rather than attempting to establish any univocal sense, you seem to address the viewers to elaborate personal associations: would you tell us how much important is for you that the spectatorship elaborate personal meanings? As I mentioned above I was always interested in how pictures affect the people. I like to listen people’s thoughts about my works. Usually these thoughts are very different, but still very similar at the same 24

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time, and that is very interesting. When we try to translate the meaning of what we can see, we can only feed from our memories (just like at creating). Therefore, we will never see the same thing in the very same way. The best of course, if the artist and viewer's thoughts meet each other. The viewer will understand the image only at that time. Otherwise, it may just be a pleasant (or maybe unpleasant)

aesthetic experience for him/her. Of course, it is important for me that the message I want to express can get to the audience, since a picture gains its true meaning only if its message reaches the viewer. It’s sometimes only a feeling, another time there are full (life)stories behind them. Your artworks are pervaded with images rich with symbolic features, 24

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that often belong to everyday life's experience, as Relations. German multidisciplinary artist Thomas Demand once stated that "nowadays art can no longer rely so much on symbolic strategies and has to probe psychological, narrative elements within the medium instead". What is your opinion about it? Morever, would you tell us something about the importance of symbols in your imagery? In most cases nowadays art has a psychological background, indeed, as most of us are creating from some kind of psychological motive. However, I do not think this excludes the use of symbols. Also with these symbols you can write states of mind, tell stories of life situations and feelings. This is the base of my own art. Symbolically used simple objects are of psychological origin.

Chain

Over the years your works have been internatinally exhibited in several occasions and you had seven solo, including your recent Relations at Ăšjpest Gallery in Budapest. One of the hallmarks of your work is the capability to create a direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of

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the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context? As for all artists, it is important also for me how my works will be welcomed. I can only repeat myself again. I'm 23


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Of course, I'm also taking care how to place the pictures next to each other to better influence people. And what I care about while planning an exhibition, necessarily, is that the pictures must form one single unit. The unified concept is very important, both in messages and in style. I built also Relations accordingly. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Erika. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? In the first half of this year I mainly painted. These paintings were visible also on my previous exhibition. Since both painting and graphics are equally important for me, next time I plan to appear with my graphics before the audience. I am currently working on these. I do not know any exact date and place yet, but I hope I will be able to present further exhibitions soon, and to get some more international opportunities soon.

Relations

interested in people's opinion, I'm glad if they like them, or even have some inspiration of my works, and I find it important to have a link between the viewer and the creator through the picture (that is, to understand the viewer the messages of the image). Despite all this, when I’m working, I’m not thinking about this at all. I simply create the things inside. I'm worried about reception only when the works are placed on the wall of the exhibition hall.

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Carmel Meir Lives and works in Israel I'm interested in socialism, the connection and reaction between people. I express my exploring through installation with active participation of the crowd, performance video art and photography.

works. The reality in israel is very complex, both in the exterior relationship with our neibours, and in the interior, betweem ourselves. People from all over the world have come to a place, with the only thing that unites them is the jewish title. The amount of cultures, habbits, languages.. it made a big mix that created the hetrogenic society that we have today, and there are still many strugles along the way. Israel is still quite conservative country.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Hello Carmel and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. Are there any experiences that did particularly influence the way you currently conceive and produce your works? And in particular, how does your cultural substratum inform the way you relate yourself to the aesthetic problem in general?

We are very much in a 'survival' atmosphere, and there are still many tabus. So when it comes to my creations, i’m sure that all of it exist in me. When i look at my works I see it all. East, west, conservative, liberation, home, gender. We are all full of layers. And I have many questions, and sometimes the creation supply me answers. I'm attracted to the uncumfortable zone, things that people would prefer to deny or avoid. I find it interesting, appealing. I like being surpried, and try and give the unpredictable a place in my creation.

Hello Peripheral arteries, thank you for having me. There was not a particular experience, but many I guess. I'm full of contradictions. That made me who I am today. I moved a lot as a child, and keep on moving as a grown up, and never had roots in that way. I found from an early age the power of communication, or the lack of it, and I can see the influence of it nowadays, with the way I create and address my

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And I say – installation participation, 2015

the time more and more. Its hard for me to plan in advance, so I will use whatever euipment i have at the momennt normelly, or find a magic solution.. sometimes it's the problems and the fuckups that reveal a whole new perspective. I dont really have a recepee, i'm just playing. In that sense, i couldn't put my finger on a specific equipment that i prefer. i love it all. In the

Would you like to tell to our readers something about the evolution of your style? In particular, would you shed light on your usual process and set up? What technical equipment do you prefer? My style is very dynamic, it evolves every day, as i am evolving. I like to explore in all fields and keep my options open and learning all

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equipment could take an hour. Sometimes more. Then the developing. Its an active process. I love the fact that I always forget a bit what happend there before I see the final resolt. I get a rush. It's full of magic.

photography world i enjoy very much the analog cameras, in Mi Chali I used the sinar 4x5, and loved every minute of it. First because of the cuality of the photos. the amount of information you get in every photo is unbelivebe. And as well, of course, is the whole ceremony that this camera demands. It's super romantic. Like a jump in time. Just to make it ready with all it's

The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to

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get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once caught our attention of your artistic is the way you have been capable of creating an autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through the genesis of your works, would you tell us your sources of inspiration? And how did you select the themes you explore within your practice?

In Mi Chali, I was asking my sister for a while to come and join me, and she was kind enough to finally agree and be in front of the camera. I'm very much in love with the human body, and in hers in particular, and was really just happy for the chance to have her. We didn’t plan what we would do, and it was a great fun. I clicked just a second before she was ready. But what is ready, really..

I always prefer to work with things that I love. Or hate. Things that I have a certain emotion to. So we can discuss. it's the idea that moves me, and usually the material will join it. My materials are normally readymades, that i would twist a bit. sometimes though, It's completely backwards and there is a material that interest me, and once i start to work with it we arrive together to a conclusion of how it will be demonstrated, the idea of it. My inspiration comes from daily life experiences, and for me every moment is an opportunity to collect ideas. The street, the people, the clouds, the food. Life! I don’t so much think all the time of what I want to say, or create for that matter, I just act and things are happening. And I let them be. I'm fascinated by liquids of all forms. Whether they came from a body or from a fridge. I had a period of about a year that I was working with milk, during school. First I started with it out being white liquid, which only as a material, I find beautiful, then I moved to industrial disgust, and continued into nourishing and motherhood. It was really interesting to get to know it. Learn its weaknesses, it's resilient, smelling it, touching it. Each material contains so much options. Once you choose, the game is to extract it to its finest symbolism.

We would like to know about And I Say, an extremely interesting work: would you elaborate a bit about this piece? In particular, do you aim to address the viewers to elaborate personal interpretations?

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And I Say is a piece that invites the crowd to participate, and create. Each person can have a moment and to share its vision. They can bring the photo back to its origin, like a puzzle, or find a new way of putting the parts and create their own personal image. In this way, every participant is also the creator. So yes, I would very much like the viewers to elaborate personal interpretations. That's the essence of that work. To think for themselves, take decisions of pose and structure, make a statement. I give the platform, and the rest is up to them. Even if only for a moment, it is theirs. And we get the interpretation of an individual. Once they're gone, someone else can give its sight, but the energy is collected by all who chose to take part. My wink in that piece is for those who will choose to reveal the original photo. They will discover a girl that takes out her underwear out from her butt. It's the reminder that we are, after all, only humans. Sometimes we all get panties in our ass. What role does play the notion of body in your process?

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I can say that I'm very aware of the conditioning that I grew up with as a woman in the western world, and I'm working on myself all the time to try and shake it. It's a work in progress and I struggle with it both in my personal and professional life. I'm sure unconsciously it plays a role, though I must admit there wasn’t any agenda that involved it, only my appreciation to this body that I find very feminine. I do find attraction to what sometime may considered to be 'ugly' or un attracted in the human body according to the norms.. I'm just curious of what is it – this amazing machine called body. In Restoration, I did had an agenda, and that is some kind of a laugh at us women in this era. With all this laser removal, and having no bushed hair being the fashion for the past two decades, women have removed it all. Now though, the fashionable wind is starting to blow towards more natural style. So it will be hard to keep up with the fashion for those who gave up their hair completely. I just thought it's funny. In your artist's statement you have remarked that the main attraction is before the "ACTION": could you explain this concept for our readers? The camera can create an uncomfortable feeling. I know I have it. We become very selfaware. People are experts of how to show their good side, how to have the perfect smile, the perfect pose. Because it stays. It stops time. It contains a moment that later we can come back to if are sad or happy, and look at our amazing life. It’s a memory. I'm not arguing of course with our need to preserve moments, I'm just interested in exploring this conditioning. For me it's more interesting to find the unaware soul behind the mask, before thinking of being in front of the camera. Perhaps she

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Egging – drawing party, 2014

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Egging – drawing party, 2014

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was thinking that her foot itches, or that she's tired, or how much fun she had last night at a party. In that moment, it is her. In genuine. And that is what I want to capture. Us. Before the awareness slide to our mind, before we think of how we would come out eventually, and what others will think about us. For me this is when the magic happens. In that moments we are back on being real. No games, no tricks. Humans. And being human also means that sometimes we are ugly. And smelly. And tired. Sometimes we have pain in our back and as well, sometimes, we have to take a shit. It's real. Why the hell to deny it? Photographer Thomas Ruff stated that "once nowadays you don't have to paint to be an artist. You can use photography in a realistic way. You can even do abstract photographs". What is your opinion about the importance of visual arts in the contemporary art? For me, visual art is important such as any other art. It’s a tool. If I find that in order to give birth to an idea I need a camera, I will use it. The same with the red color for that matter, or cucumbers. I don’t see a hierarchy of any kind, to any side. We are collecting options, and options help us to accurate ourselves, to precise. One of the hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of

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Crytic – funeral participation, performance, 2016

what type of language is used in a particular context?

crowd and therefor my work will adapt to them, and not them to it. I find the combination with what interest me and the people that are to attend. I'm very fund of ceremonies, and in a way for me these events are kind of ceremonies. It could be

When I know who will address the work, I find a good structure to start. I'm very much interested in the participant of the

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An event that was made during my final year of school, with professional artists (teachers in the school), who were to give their impression and critic on the work All the participants received a black umbrella, and were invited to a funeral. The ceremony hostess, after opening words, invited the critics, one by one, to come to the stage and read a text that was made for them, without their knowing. They were forced to become part of the work, the main attraction, rather than just observers. For the last part, the head of school was asked to come and say Kadish (a jewish prayer to unite the soul of the dead with god), while the participants have been asked to open their umbrellas, and out from a water tube behind them that was pointed up, came down rain.

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Crytic – funeral participation, performance, 2016

more traditional, as a funeral (Crytic), or having a drawing party (Egging).

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Carmel. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving?

I have the people in my mind. I want to communicate with them.

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I'd love to move around the world and challenge my mind, and others. I'm still discovering myself in the process, and new ways to create, and I like it very much. I wish myself to keep going. At the moment

water are a lot in my mind. I think I will play with them for a while. An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Monique Rutten That is the iconography I use in my work as well, as long as it strengthens the work in its deeper meaning. This is however not an imposed meaning, but an interpretation of expression and thus subjective. Sometimes it is easy to recognize the symbol, it is meant to streghten the image. Some examples of this which you can see in my painting are the deer and the antlers of the deer. For me this is a connection with the higher, the spiritual. But nothing is exclusively holy, the antlers grow out of control and are also controlled by a darker side. You see a devilish figure in the back who doesn’t only show lovely virgin imagine. The boys of the seminars are in a costume, a straight-jacket for twelve year old boys. Are they being told that the woman is a prostitute or a holy angel? They were given a specific picture and they grow up in a strange world without woman. The truth is some of these many young boys were sexually harassed by the catholic church as well. The other painting: You must listen to the leader, or the Dutch childrens song ‘’1, 2, step in size’’ is inspired by the fanfare in my own youth. It tells a story of fitting in with a silent protest. The painting: Children play everywhere, is meant a bit ironically. The danger sign in the background shows how double the work is.

Tentoonstelling Strijp S, april 2013


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Peripheral ARTeries meets

Mariana Panchuk Lives and works in Kyiv, Ukraine Mariana's artworks are always meaningful. This is a distinctive feature of her art. Naturally, each of the drawings has its own significance for the author. Nevertheless, the viewer is given a possibility of finding their own association and freedom to realize their own perception. Very often in the same figure a separate person finds his/her own outlines of the images that are totally opposite to the vision of another individual. Thus, her works reveal what lies in the subconscious mind of the beholder, as a reflection of the inner world, not only the artist's but also the viewer's.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

a reflection of the inner world, not only the artist's but also the viewer's: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Adressing the viewers to a multilayered visual experience, artist Mariana Panchuk's work provides the viewers with an intense, immersive experience: her works that we'll be discussing in the following pages, are always meaningful and successfully attempt to trigger the viewers' perceptual parameters walking them through the liminal area in which inner world and perceptual outside reality find a consistent point of convergence. One of the most impressive aspects of Panchuk's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of revealing what lies in the subconscious mind of the beholder, as

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Hello Mariana and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your multifaceted background. You have a solid formal training and after having graduated with a Bachelor's Degree you as a pattern and graphic designer at the printing complex: how did these experiences influence the way you currently conceive your works? And in particular, how does your cultural substratum inform the way you relate yourself to art making and to the notion of beauty? 23


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me a lot. So, while I was still studying design and working on my first noncreative work, I began to develop my own style. The very first work, the starting point if I can say that, was “Andrew”. I started working on this artwork spontaneously without any planned results, but at some point, I found out that a human’s face was coming through. At that time my works were black and white, made with ballpoint and gel pens. They were completely abstract. But the pattern design job that I found after graduation influenced the development of my artistic style. Looking at works that were created during that time I can see that they are becoming less abstract and have much more colour and welldefined motifs, such as floral and animal. Eventually, I decided to quit my office job and devote more time to my development as an artist. When I decided to present my first exhibition and suggested proposed to do it in my institute, teachers and students supported this idea. But the person who had the final decision denied it, arguing that my work did not quite fit the format of the educational institution. The institute is focused on applied art and design, and they wanted to see more of my works like “South Africa”, for example, because it’s like pattern design. Ironically, when I came to the

Hello Peripheral ARTeries team. First, let me thank you for choosing me to be included in this magazine issue and for giving me the opportunity to talk a little about my work and myself. I have loved drawing since early childhood and I knew that it would be my life’s purpose. I had a wonderful teacher in the children’s art school I attended who encouraged my passion for art. We know that choosing a career in the visual arts is a significant risk in terms of job security and income, at least it is so in my country. Therefore, when the time came to pursue my higher education, I decided for a compromise between my passion for drawing and the realities of life, and I went to study industrial design at the Kyiv State Institute of Decorative and Applied Art and Design named after M. Boychuk. I enjoyed my studies there – I was very interested in the field and was actually considering becoming a designer in the future, but a craving for art kept pulling me back to my true passion. One time I was given the task to redraw ten variants of graphic tree images which could be used as symbols in industrial design project presentations. I did only three and then I got bored of copying so I set my imagination free and created my own. The teacher encouraged my creative approach and that also inspired 24

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one of art galleries in Kyiv with an exhibition proposal, I was told that my work is more applied arts and would be a better fit fabric prints. They thought it was still too early for me for me to have an exhibition. It turns out that the institute refused because my works were too artistic and the gallery because they were too design-like. I think young artist should have the opportunity to introduce their work to public at various stages of their development, so the public can see their growth. But that situation gave me a huge stimulus for progress. I had known it before but then I got even more convinced that you should make your own path, and not try too much to adjust to what is expected from you. Also, I got a feeling that I was ready to create something new. Then the work "Maybe You Are� was born, which became a beginning of a new stage in my artistic development. Since then, my works have deviated from decorativeness and have become more conceptual, shifting my priorities from visual pleasure to the representation of an idea. From the moment I found my own style in 2010 my creative activity has gone through three main stages. I am changing and so is my art. Your works convey a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we

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Do you remember

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Heaven In Your Eyes

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would suggest to our readers to visit http://www.marianapanchuk.com in order to get a synoptic view of your work: in the meanwhile, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up? In particular, are your works painted gesturally, instinctively? Or do you methodically transpose geometric schemes from paper to canvas? In my early work, the creation process used to be completely spontaneous from beginning till the end. Before starting I would not even think about topic or title. I would simply put a sheet of paper in front of me and let my hands create, putting aside any expectations over the final result and watching what was coming out. Now, before I begin I already have an idea and a notion of the form I want it to be expressed in. But while working on the detailing I still want to keep the randomness and let the subconscious mind take over. I make a very rough pencil sketch just to define the location of the focal points. Occasionally, stains or lines appear accidentally while I’m drawing. I never worry about it. I just accept this new direction and continue drawing, building on this new element. Sometimes random blots fit the place perfectly, and it only increases the expressiveness of the artwork or gives 24

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it a new meaning. It’s also worth to notice I always work with music. Music has an enormous impact on my state of mind. Sometimes it happens that you are overwhelmed with emotions and you feel the need to splash them out on paper. After a while, the mood changes and those emotions which were the source of inspiration change into others. But the artwork is not finished yet. In that case I put a music that would get me in the right headspace and remind me of all that things that were moving me so much. Do you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist? At different periods of my life I reveal diverse topics in my works. But I think that the idea that unites all my art in general, and one of my purposes of creating my works, is to show that a person sees what they want to see. Or rather, they behold the reality through the prism of their own experience and beliefs. And what they see reflects their inner state and identifies their personality in some way. For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected City and Journey, a couple of interesting works that our readers have already SPECIAL ISSUE

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Dreamer

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started to admire in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic research is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics: would you walkour readers through the genesis of City and Journey? Moreover, how did you select your subjects in general? These two works were created during a period of acute lack of travels. At that time, I was striving to do it with all my heart, I was dreaming a lot about faraway countries, beautiful unexplored places. But at that moment I didn’t have the opportunity to fulfil my wanderlust. Consequently, my unrealized desires found an outlet and were reflected in my drawings. In general, analysing my art and the prerequisites for its creation, I made the observation that, mainly, in my works I reflect either things I miss or my accumulated emotions and feelings which haven’t been expressed in verbal or other form. It turns out, that my selection of the subject is guided by the need to release that emotional tension. Your artistic practice seems to aim to look inside of what appear to be 24

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You Are In The City


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seen, rather than its surface, providing the spectatorship with freedom to realize their own perception: we like the way OBSERVER, rather than attempting to establish any univocal sense seems to urge the viewers to elaborate personal associations: when discussing about the role of randomness in your process, would you tell us how much important is for you that the spectatorship rethink the concepts you convey in your pieces, elaborating personal meanings? You know, even though each art piece has its own personal meaning for me, I am always interested to hear what the viewer sees in my works, how they understand them. Occasionally their vision is in line with mine but sometimes they see a totally different content and show me something that I didn’t notice in my work. In any case, I never impose my vision. There is no right or wrong perception. Everyone has distinct and subjective one. In some way, my artworks are produced to help the spectator reveal what is hidden in their subconscious mind, to analyse themselves a little bit. Indeed, it’s important for me not only to make an audience enjoy and evaluate the aesthetic, but rather to lead them to thinking. Therefore, often, before

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telling what a particular work means to me, I listen to the viewer first. We have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances of the pieces as DO YOU REMEMBER? and GARDEN, that show that vivacious tones are not striclty indespensable to create tension and dynamics. How did you come about settling on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how do you develope a texture? Sometimes I settle on my colour palette intuitively, spontaneously, building on my emotional condition, like in “Garden”. But in some works, colour accents are chosen consciously. For example, most of my new works are monochrome with some accent of colour. It has symbolic nature and becomes the abstract transmission of personal meanings. As for “Do You Remember?’, this is a very nostalgic work for me. It was created under the influence of memories about very happy time in my life, a beautiful moment and place. There I tried to pick a colour palette that would maximally convey the reality and environment that surrounded me at that moment. I can say that from all 24

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my older works this is the most thought-out in terms of colour, and here it reflects not only the emotional state, but also the material reality. This work is less detailed than others, but this is the colour that is the most important transmission tool there. Talking about texture, I start with watercolour patches first, and then detailed drawings with ink and feather.

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important for me to completely abstract from the outside world and focus only on my own intuition. I noticed that the best works are those that are created exclusively for myself, regardless of anyone and without any expectations that somebody will appreciate it. From my experience, those works are the strongest and find the highest response from the viewers.

Over these years you participated to several group shows, including your recent solo "UNSPOKEN" at La Dolce Berlin, Berlin, Germany. One of the hallmarks of your practice is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context?

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Mariana. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? Thank you too. I am already thinking about my new project, and I already have some ideas for the topic. As for a visual aspect, I would like to start working with larger formats. My works are very detailed and take quite a lot of time to create, and I am drawing them in relatively small paper formats. Creating something big would be a kind of a challenge for myself. Also, I want to experiment with technique a bit.

It is significant for me that my art resonates with the audience, and it's always interesting to know how people perceive and what they see in my works. But, when I'm in the process of thinking and creating, it's

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Aby Mackie Lives and works in Barcelona

Aby Mackie is a Barcelona-based artist whose wall-based sculptures are unified through a materials-led methodology combining storytelling and social commentary. Recurring themes can be identified as materialism, consumerism, value and memory. Each series investigates the interconnectedness of these themes through the language of materials. Often in Barcelona, the contents of entire homes are either thrown onto the streets or auctioned off at Encants Vells market upon the death of a final occupant. The creation of Mackie’s work is driven by the selection and repurposing of objects and textiles from these two practices in order to explore ongoing cultural concerns. This roots Mackie’s artistic process in the everyday existence of the unrecognised, uncelebrated, unknown lives of Barcelona’s residents. Mackie is captivated by the unobvious silent material witnesses to a life lived; a worn bed sheet, a stained tablecloth, a moth-eaten gown. Such artefacts bare the marks and physicality of human nature, possessing a poetic power. They are simultaneously valuable in their uniqueness and worthless in their deteriorated, decontextualized state. Each piece created from these objects is therefore both the artist’s personal expression of the hidden memories embedded in the original items, and a way to explore the recycling and re-contextualising of meaning and value in contemporary society. The experience and memories of others, imagined and real, fuse seamlessly with Mackie’s own through the salvation, destruction and discordant juxtaposition of materials. A rich mix of influences can be seen through Mackie’s work in terms of concept (the found object sculpture of Picasso, Miro, Tapies, Grau-Garriga), techniques and materials (Anatsui) and subject matter and aesthetic sense (Basquiat, Schwarz), inviting the viewer to create their own connections and interpretations and encouraging a personal storytelling through materiality. Wall based sculptures (work in progress). Mixed media. Embroidery, stitch and paint. 2017


Born in 1977 in Leicester, U.K. Aby Mackie earned her first class BA in textile design at Nottingham Trent University, followed by a Masters of Arts in fine art, photography and methodology. It is from this place of material and technical diversity that her work has evolved over the years. https://www.facebook.com/armario.barcelona/ Her art, design & collections can also be found on her website: www.abymackie.com


B-Site Festival / Error 404 502 410 & “Dust”/ Manheim 2015 / Germany


Marina Schreckling The in Berlin born german artist found her living and working place across detours thru India and North Rhine – Westphalia 2008 in Hamburg. The passion for painting manifested thereby during the childhood, always focused of the human being. Beside a few experiments it stayed to that topic. 2016 she received the international art award „Duc de Richelieu – Diamond“ 2016 in the Ukraine with the submitted conceptual artworks „Hellenism And Pessimism“. Topic and thoughts behind the series is the fact that we owe the Greeks great philosophers, tragic dramas, comedies, the Olympics, mathematics and not to forget the idea of democracy. Today, the cradle of Europe and democratic states is in crisis and solidarity, even beyond national borders, is more in demand than ever. She also recieved the Woman Award 2017. The prize awarded to women of contemporary art at the „Woman´s Essence Show 2017“ in Paris named for Berthe Morisot. Cause she was the first woman at the group of impressionistic artists and joint their first exhibition 1874 in Paris. At the art show, among other, was the aquarelle painting „Sacrifed“, a hinted androgyne Jesus. The artist also participated in „Damned“ 2016 in Detroit. Damned is an exhibition of those extraordinary creations that often emanate from within these prodigious moments to many times reveal enlightenment within our darkest of hours. „Twisted Head“, which is also a german metaphor for to fall in love, was one of the artworks in the show. It´s a aquarelle painting with the effect of movement and a passant appearing face which looks like wrapped in shrouds. A whole story of lifetime. „Rage Directly Articulated“ is a triptych made from acrylic on wooden panel. The artwork has scars from a knife and shows the result of uncontrolled rage, with the symbol of a tortured and eliminated person. The show „Kommunikation“ was curated by the artist 2016 in the Gallery Mytoro in Hamburg. Art as a universal language that works across borders. 2017 the artist curate a dark art event „Darkerkant“ aboard the Cap San Diego in the port of Hamburg. In the show, which based on a ( black ) romantic art salon, you´ll find gloomy works of artists, whose art have a eerily - demonic and macabre character. Her preference to liquid colors and its own dynamic, brought by the functional interaction of eyes and haptic perception to a form, is recognisably in the artwork, which showed in former national and international exhibitions. So it seems natural, aquarelle painting takes up much space in the artistic realization. Also the surface character is a important factor at the informal – intuitive painting process. Beside this alienation various materials as kraft and parchment paper and plaster is used and even collages made from aquarelle fragments arise. One more field of attention ist the painting with acryl on canvas or at large size on wooden panel. The surface condition produced with primer plays a big role for the color gradient during the implementation. Often a brute technique is used to give the paintings a transparency, lightness and ruinous character while unstick the color partial. The technique with a reduced painting manner, in which a single face or figured image comes upon, corresponds contentual with the artworks, which thematically elucidate the inner psychic to the outside. It avails the metaphor of the innards, the mystery, the human being between the tension of deep emotions and vehemence and also in relation to social issues. Spiritual abyss, inner psychic shall elucidated to the outside, the personality structure, which constitutes the human beeing and the revelation of the unspeakable shows up by transforming into a visualized language and the artworks also often remind to be part of a fugitive dream sequence.


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Marina Schreckling Lives and works in Berlin, Germany

Marina Schreckling's work are based on psychology and symbolism to draw the viewers through a multilayered visual experience. Her body of works that we'll be discussing in the following pages are marked out with an ambivalent quality that combine figurative and abstraction, with a particular attention on themes of mystery and the human being between the tension of deep emotions and vehemence. One of the most impressive aspect of Schreckling's work is the way it forces the viewer to the revelation of the unspeakable : we are very pleased to introduce our readers to her stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

the way you relate yourself to art making in general?

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I grew up in a house where art played a big role and my creativity was greatly encouraged. Already as a teenager many artists were in the circle of friends and acquaintances whom I could look over the shoulder and who taught me in different techniques. The greatest influence in my artistic career was surely the fact that art was always something natural, a part of life.

Hello Marina and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of questions about your background. The passion for painting manifested thereby during your childhood, always focused of the human being: are there any experiences that did particularly influenced your evolution as an artist? And Moreover, how do your cultural substratum dued to your travels among Germany and India inform SPECIAL ISSUE

Negative experiences, comparable to the salt that we need to live, are necessary to create the depth and possibility to transform these depth 23


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into art. One can say that negative experiences always have a great influence on the artistic work. I call them the aggro – muses. Hopefully there are not to many.

For this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries we have selected Twisted Head and Sock It To Me, Red As Blood!, a couple of interesting artworks that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your work is the way you provided the visual results of your artistic inquiry into the the inner psychic to the outside with autonomous aesthetics: when walking our readers through the genesis of Twisted Head and Sock It To Me, Red As Blood! would you shed a light about your usual process and setup?

The journeys, especially the impressive landscapes of India, had a great influence to a spiritual view of the world. This certainly has an influence on the artistic work, but finds itself in the works rather in a subtile way. The results of your artistic inquiry convey together a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit http://schreckling-paintings.de in order to get a synoptic view of your multifaceted artistic production: while walking our readers through your process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist.

“Twisted Head” belongs to a small series of watercolors with the same name. In German, "twisting the head" means falling in love. Liquid color is thrown onto the paper and shaped with wipe technique. This captures the rotational movement, which also means, the face gains substance. A subtile metaphor that also stands for man, which gains substance through love.

The central idea is always the human being in its different facets and the generell question, what is humanity? Guess this question becomes more and more relevance in our days.

Suck it to me, red like blood!" stands for interpersonal relationships and roles. Here the devote attitude of the 24

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woman is only pretended. A role in which she manipulates. "Sucking blood" can stand for vampirism. But it also stands in German for exploitation.The picture raises the question, kneels she before her SPECIAL ISSUE

master, or does she eat her counterpart alive? In this artwork, the canvas is primed with textured paste. Subsequently, various-colored layered acrylics are 23


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applied, which have been partially scraped down, to give the artwork plasticity and to bring the effect of blood vessels. This brachial method, even used to highlight the work, plays also with opposites.

the cosmos. I use yellow, orange, and red tones in layers under dark brown and black, so the darkness glows and vibrates from below. Maybe this color palette brings an spiritual element into the paintings.

You have a preference to liquid colors and we have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances of your pieces, that are often marked out with intense tones as the ones from your Rage Directly Articulated and Sacrificed that create both tension and dynamics. How did you come about settling on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how do you develope a painting’s texture?

The selected paintings are exemplary for both color palettes. "Rage Directly Articulated" could also be titled "End Of Sweet Nothing". Thematically a triptych that shows the same tormented male person. It expresses the pain, vulnerability and anger when left, till to the destruction and annihilation. Here are clean cold colors chosen, gray shades up to almost white. To bring out the cold, the colors are underlined by graphic accents. The expression of rage and destruction can be found in the red cross, with which the person is extinguished.

On one hand, the choice of color is determined by the psychological make-up of the face or figure that I paint, always with regard to the subject. But the personal color palette also becomes important. The, as I have seen in hindsight, are similar to the colors in woven fabrics of the Incas.There, among other things, every color represents a vibration in

Sacrificed" is a watercolor, but nevertheless created with the personal color palette. Liquid color, which floated on the water surface, was shaped in such a way that the implied face of a female Jesus emerged. The personal color palette turns inside out. The warm colors are on top and a deep darkness shines from inside. 24

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through the liminal area where the concepts of beauty and ugliness blurry their elusive borders to urge the viewers to dive into a deeply rooted aesthetic and empirical perception: would you tell us how much important is for you that the spectatorship rethink the concepts you convey in your pieces, elaborating personal meanings? And

As you have remarked in your artist's statement, the technique corresponds contentual with the artwork, which avail the metaphor of the innards, the mystery, the human being between the tension of deep emotions and vehemence. We like the ambivalent quality of your works, that walks your spectatorship SPECIAL ISSUE

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how much importance to play metaphors within your imagery?

attempt to stop it, in a kind of youthism in the external appearance. As the poem "Memory of Death", by Oda Schäfer begins: Death is like a core in you ...This painting for example is the metaphor, the decay is unstoppable and we are in a certain way living dead. You can see "Love To Pieces" as a metaphor for many relationships in our consumer society, which in part is so degenerate that even relationships will be consumed.

I think, that a picture tells the spectator primarily about himself. Because we perceive our environment through the glasses of our previous experience. In the first, to me it is important that the paintings generates questions and set the "inner" dialogue in motion. My works are generally reduced. A face, a figure and a statement. Similar to a sentence that stands for something. A metaphor. This is the way in which I elaborate artistic themes and try to hit the point.

Your artwork are pervaded with images rich with symbolic features, belonging to childhood imagery. German multidisciplinary artist Thomas Demand once stated that "nowadays art can no longer rely so much on symbolic strategies and has to probe psychological, narrative elements within the medium instead". What is your opinion about it? Morever, would you tell us something about the importance of symbols in your imagery?

Mainly The Hair´s Well Done!”, was inspired by a visit of the catacombs of Paris. The catacombs are quarries beneath the city. They supplied stones and plaster for the construction of Paris for 2,000 years. The cemeteries in Paris were closed and until the beginning of the 19th century the bones of 6 million people were taken to the tunnel network. Paris in the underground filled with dead and on the surface of the city Haute Coutiere as a symbol of luxury, stands very well for the conflict between human decay and the

In the latter case, I agree, but I believe that the subconscious and psychological aspects are manifested in symbols, such as dream sequences. This is the language of the psyche. 24

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Only when the symbols from the depth of the subconscious assume shape on the surface, can we work with them. From my point of view, they are essential for what Thomas Demand said, examining the psychological and narrative elements. The quality of the symbols may have changed, they are not abstract and reduced, but they come from an archaic knowledge, as in SPECIAL ISSUE

some of us the fear of spiders is deeply rooted. Your works address their perceptual parameters to collide with their perceptual ones and shows subtle still effective relation to social issues. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated, "the artist’s role differs depending on which part of the world you’re in. It depends on the political system you’re living under". 23


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Not to mention that almost everything, ranging from Caravaggio's Inspiration of Saint Matthew to Joep van Lieshout's works, could be considered political, do you think that your works is political, in a certain sense? what could be in your opinion the role of Art in order to sensitize the viewers in our unstable contemporary age?

new view to a topic, also to break borders and arouse the society. In my opinion art is one of the best medium for the society to develope itself and in this sense it is a great responsibility. Over the years you have showcased your works in several occasionsand you receved the Woman Art Award, the Duc de Richelieu Award and the Palm Art Award. Moreover, you are going to participate to Darkerkant: so we would like to ask you a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decisionmaking process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context?

I agree with Gabriel Orozco, our environment, the society in which we live and the experiences we make are crucial to our vision of the world. Or, as I had read in the sense of the words by Jaques Derrida; "We are all inhabitants of our language". My works are partly critical and socio critical, such as "Mainly The Hair´s Well Done!" I also think that the relationship between politics and citizens of a society is mutually dependent. A simplified example, if politics cares to less for education, culture, and ethics, leads it to a brutalization of society, which inevitably leads politics to restrictions of freedom for the individual and so on...

I didn´t recieve the Palm Art Award, but now I am nominated the second time. Darkerkant is an international art show that i curate. It takes place on the 13th and 14th October aboard the Cap San Diego in the port of Hamburg. In the show, which is based on a (black) romantic art salon,

Once released art will always have the remit to focalize and bring up a 24

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you also find, among gloomy works by artists whose art has an eerie demonic and macabre character, some of my artworks.

these considerations do not flow into the process of single works. The process takes place between three actors, the topic, the material and the artist.

In this romantic flow, writers also describe melancholy figures with abstruse-exaggerated behavior or even grotesque phenomena in their own words. The dark art event is embedded in the atmospheric sound worlds and soundscapes of the Hamburger dark wave band "Tonchirurgie" and contains a special act of the performance artists "LuMyia Shira Brie" from France.

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Marina. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? I guess if you´re an artist you´ll never be satisfied with stasis, even if you´re satisfied with your current work, development, searching for and how to create a tighter definition of the topic of the artwork is an imperative. Personally for me it means, to go further to descripe the deep and dark aspects of human innards in contrast to lightness in a dynamic technique.

In order to return to the question. The consideration for the decission, to base the show on a romantic art salon, was the fact, that in times of Romantic, you found discussions about art in the salons. In the age also literature und music as concept music followed the movement and were represented. To round out the picture, there also musicians and authors aboard Darkerkant. Hopefully it will hit the point and stimulate the audience to interact and to a discussion on art.

For the next year, an new idea takes place for an art exhibition, which I will curate again. But I do not want to tell to much about it right now. I like to say a big thank you to you! At An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

The concept of Darkerkant includes reflections on the audience. As a rule, SPECIAL ISSUE

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Peripheral ARTeries meets

Maayan Sela Lives and works in Israel I'm a young artist based in Israel who focuses on watercolor and acrylic painting. I am fascinated by different cultures,places, colors and sound My works are usually conceptional portraits with a vast use of colors My goal is to reach as many people with my art and evoke emotions and memories from my viewers

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

questions about your background. Are there any experiences that particularly influence the way you currently conceive and produce your works? And in particular, how does your cultural substratum inform the way you relate yourself to art making?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Focussing on photography, watercolor and acrylic painting, Maayan Sela's work draws the viewers through a multilayered journey through different cultures and places. Her body of works that will be discussing in the following pages accomplishes the difficult task of addressing the viewers to extract and recreate personal narrative from her captivating portraits: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to Sela's stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

Hey and thank you for having me. I think everything I create comes from deep within me so in a way all my experiences influence my work but I think the best works I've done came from difficult times and challenges in life. It is only when my emotions are at peak that I feel so overwhelmed and I have to find a way to let them out from me and into the world. Coming from Israel and growing up in such a cultural mixture defiantly gave me the opportunity to meet a variety of people and their cultures and

Hello Maayan and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: we would start this interview with a couple of

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Maayan Sela

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colors, and as noticeable in most of my art work, I love the colorfulness. The results of your artistic inquiry convey together a coherent sense of unity: before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit https://www.facebook.com/MaysPho tographyArt in order to get a synoptic view of your multifaceted artistic production: while walking our readers through your process, we would like to ask you if you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist. I think the main connection of all of my work is that I want it to touch other people, and I really don't mind in which way, as long as they see my art and it makes them FEEL something. A lot of times you see art and it's really beautiful or impressive but it is your emotion that stamps a memory in you. The body of works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article has at once captured our attention for the way they combine rigorous balance with captivating aesthetics: when walking our readers through your usual process and set 24

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up, would tell us how do you select the subjects for your portrait series? I usually have a vague idea or concept in my mind before I sit down and paint it. I let my heart and soul take the lead, clarify what I feel and what I want my work to feel like and then I build a concept around it, trying to express that feeling. After that I carefully pick the expression or position of the figure and usually get to the colors while painting, experimenting with different shades. While referring to reality, your artworks, as the interesting Don't look back, convey such captivating abstract feeling: how do you view the relationship between the concepts of the real and the imagined playing out within your works? In particular, does your inspiration come sfrom everyday life's experience or rather fomr your imagination? I think it's a good mixture of both everyday life and my imagination. I have a lot of interesting dreams when I sleep and I give them a lot of meaning, they guide me in a way. I'm a day dreamer so in a way the imagination is a part of my everyday as it is. My works become vivid in my mind earlier than in reality. I like that thin line between reality and the dream world, it gives a mysterious effect that captivates us as we try to figure out where is it taking us to or where is it coming from.

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Maayan Sela

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We have really appreciated the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances that as overload shows that vivacious tones are not indespensable to create coherent

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balance between tension and dynamics. How did you come about settling on your color palette? And how much does your own psychological make-up 23


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Maayan Sela

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determine the nuances of tones you decide to use in a piece and in particular, how do you develope a painting’s texture?

Art will always be a way to express something, it is a usefull tool and everyone who has the acsses to it can decide what to do with it. At the end of the day I think the role of art is to express what we can't express with words. I think in our world today it is a powerfull tool to say what is "not allowed" to say, to protest, to let your opinions be heard and to raise awareness to different things if that is what we wish to do. Creation will always be there, as art can take many forms, and it is important to pay attention to the details when we wish to hear what it has to say.

I have a weird obsession with colors, I like colorful things so I feel obligated to make colorful art but it also has to be in a certain order or else it'll freak me out. I do have a progress with the choice of colors while painting, depending on the concept and emotions I want to show I'll decide if I want more cold colors or warm, a variety of colors or maybe just a few and so on, but naturally I'll always prefer to use a lot of different colors. Your favourite locations are outdoor spaces, including lakes, deserds, field as well as lonely spaces: what does fascinate you of these locations?

We like the way your works seem to excite the observers to „finish“ the painting by themselves, motivating their imagination to recreate the narrative conveyed by your images. Rather than attempting to establish any univocal sense, you seem to urge the viewers to elaborate personal associations: would you tell us how much important is for you that the spectatorship rethink the concepts you convey in your pieces, elaborating personal meanings?

Everything that is pure comes from nature. You need to go back to mother earth to hear the universe whispering. Being outside, especially by myself gives me time to balance my body and soul, to breathe in the pure energy of life and let it fill me with all that I need, connect me to my inner self. Mexican artist Gabriel Orozco once stated, "the artist’s role differs depending on which part of the world you’re in. It depends on the political system you’re living under". What could be in your opinion the role of Art in our unstable, everchanging contemporary age?

As I said before, the urge to touch people's hearts is the connection between all my art works so it is really important to me that people will go through a process when they come across my paintings. Through a 24

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personal journy in your mind you remember the art better, and you actually take something out of it with you. If i have the ability to make you think about something in a different way, to look at something differently or

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to find out something new- be sure I'll do my sincere best to use it. One of the hallmarks of your work is the capability to create a direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of 23


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component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context? I do and I don't. I don't tend to change my work for the audience but I do think about the audience when I come up with an idea for a painting. I want to express how I think and feel and that's the main reason I create right now, but I also think it is useless if I can't share it with others and get them to think about things. If I made anyone think about something he never did, then my work here is done. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Maayan. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving? Thank you for having me. I'm starting to study in Bangkok in less than a month so I'm going to be focusing my energies on that for the close while, and hopefully have some really interesting projects in the process. I have a few ideas for the next series of paintings and I'm always experimenting and trying to get better as an artist and as a person.

mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator peripheral.arteries@europe.com

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Milan Gergi Lives and works in Haiburg/Donau, Austria Milan Gergi was born at 6. November 1964 in Croatia,he is Croat and autodidact.He was studying theology,later was working as religion teacher and that time period influenced his works,he is often painting sacral themes.To his favorite belongs"Old Master"M.G. has been painting since1993,he is using various kind of technics,for example oil on canvas,wood glas;pastel,watercolor,acrylic,chalk.He prefers the portreits,but to his works belongs also still life and many other themes.Milan has been participated on many successfully expositions in Austria and abroad.He is member of more painter groups in Austria and Croatia.The artist is living and creating in Austria,in small town in distance of 45 km from Vienna, in Haiburg/Donau.

An interview by Josh Ryder, curator and Melissa C. Hilborn, curator

like to tell us something about your background? You are self taught and you haven’t attended an art school. When did you start making art and why? Which artists have inspired or influenced you the most?

peripheral.arteries@europe.com

Milan Gergi's work conveys both refined figurative representation and spirituality. In the body of works that we'll be discussing in the following pages, he effectively challenges the relationship between the viewers' perceptual parameters and their cultural substratum to induce them to elaborate personal associations, offering them a multilayered aesthetic experience. One of the most impressive aspects of Gergi's work is the way it accomplishes the difficult task of celebrating the beauty of nature: we are very pleased to introduce our readers to his stimulating and multifaceted artistic production.

At the beginning I welcome all friends of art.My life in beautiful country Croatia, then for years in Austria, has naturally influenced my work.My artistic qualities I inherited from my father. Er as a gifted Hoby painter (glass painting ), has taught me how to deal with color, perspectives, golden section ... More life Theology as theology student (Monch-OFM), has occupied me with art history. One year I have studied "Old writing (caligraphy) at un.pr. Marijan Jakubin in Zagreb (seminar work). Before 25 years I started painting with self-study. As an ex-monk and teacher of religion, I have many contacts with artists. Ante masters have inspired me and influenced

Hello Milan and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: before starting to elaborate about your artistic production would you

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Uri Batson

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my work between others. Bukovac, MCMedovic, F.Kovacevic, G. Klimt, A.Tadema, Munkacsy, A.Brunovsky, E.Fuchs...

conventional classification. Before starting to elaborate about your production, we would suggest to our readers to visit https://www.atelier-gergi.com in order to get a synoptic view of your multifaceted artistic production: would you tell us something about your usual set up and process? How does each piece come to life?

The results of your artistic inquiry into the relationship between emotions and experiences convey together a coherent sense of unity, that rejects any

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"AlteMeister" (still life, figurliche works), pure realistic representation I have chosen realism as long as I experience the world realistically, so long as I want to meet my art realistically.Timegenetic, contemporary art, (postmoderne), gives me the possibility

People with education in the art have some own knowledge as a burden. Painting is, for me, a responsible process therefore without preparation goes gahr not.Motivisch I am influenced by works

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Uri Batson

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to practice pluralism, make simbiose of traditional and modern, decorative and functional, international and national, national and regional.I try to follow "basic principles" modern painting (Diderot) "concept of non-imaginable, make visibly

what we can understand, but what is not visible and what we can not make visible." With a mechmall, exhausting profession (health care PH), my art did not let my life be monotonous g but rather turbulent.In my artistic process (figurative painting) I

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out selection.

take the possibility not only with optical impressions and concerns, but also thoughts, problems and emotions. The artistic process consists of several steps: First I choose a theme, then different ideas come from which I choose one with format selection (one picture or several in Ziklus). Form and technique accompany certain color selection (depending on topic). Then start with a sketch. For each process plays the time an important role, if I do not have so much time to make a work classically (longer drying time), then I make background with color which is drying faster zb. "I love to create something." That is the pleasure that means I live. I feel deeply connected with tradition.

You are a versatile artist and you use various kind of technics, including oil on canvas, wood glas, pastel, watercolor, acrylic and chalk: what are the qualities that you are searching for in the materials that you select for your artworks? I use different materials, as you have said nicely, do not necessarily have to be the most expensive, and use the selection. The good foundation I try to extend my life from my works. What significance have for you the colors that you use? Do you expect the viewers to react in a specific way? Are you particularly interested if you try to achieve to trigger the viewers' perception as starting point to urge them to elaborate personal interpretations?

The works that we have selected for this special edition of Peripheral ARTeries and that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article. What has at once captured our attention of your artistic research is the way you provided the visual results of your analysis with autonomous aesthetics: do you think that there is a central idea that connects all of your work as an artist? In particular, how do you select your subjects?

I choose and look at my color according to feeling. The color is for me auxiliary with which I put dramaturgy into the picture, depending on this where I give the accent. The visitors make no bigger differences between epochs, breastfeeding subjects or Gats, but in the observation of concrete picture react different zb. Dr. Norbert Mendecki has written for my painting "Jesus": "The representations of Jesus are like living. They tend to prayer:" You who have suffered for my sins, have mercy on me. "You can look at images and meditate." Spectators, personal interpretation can be solved without my influence.

Vileich gives a central idea that connects my work as an artist, it is not "... the love wrapped in beauty.", As has been said, Giovanni Sergantini.My subjects I choose occasionally from eg. Exhibitions according to subject, Manchmall to feel (my wife), then comes your own thought-

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You often focus on spiritual themes: how did your interest in this subject first arise? St. Franciscus Spirit (OFM) is the main motor which puts all the energy into operation. We like the way your still life works celebrate beauty of nature: despite the reminders to traditional figurative approach, your works is marked out with a stimulating contemporary sensitiveness. Do you think that there's still a contrast between Tradition and Contemporariness? Or there's an interstitial area where these apparently opposite elements could produce a proficient synergy? Contrast between tradition and contemporaries, only these contrasts have come well, are connections between the two epochs, are proof that pluralism reigns in art. Your works appeals us as being meticulously planned. Do you paint your image from your imagination of from real life? I often paint on the model (not austere). How does the relationship between your cultural substratum dued to your Croatian roots and your current life in Austria inform the way you relate yourself to the notion of beauty and to the aesthetic problem, in general?

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Uri Batson

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In all the European area, today's beauty ideals are the same. My slavish-cultural background has integrated well into Austrian life. In today's art, the aesthetic identity is no longer a dominant factor (today's artists often choose the shapes which are wide away from aesthetic interpretative models), only my opinion is the Old Aesthetic (essential) paradigm is just as accurate for painting (I'm not saying all the time Genoscopic art). Over the years you have exhibited your artworks in several occasions, both in Austria and abroad. One of the hallmarks of your work is the capability to create direct involvement with the viewers, who are urged to evolve from a condition of mere spectatorship. So before leaving this conversation we would like to pose a question about the nature of the relationship of your art with your audience. Do you consider the issue of audience reception as being a crucial component of your decision-making process, in terms of what type of language is used in a particular context? My relationship with the audience is very important to me, but I choose my kind of language in certain context alone, the audience does not play along. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Milan. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving?

create from Eissen and paper combined (paper stick to Eissen skeleton), of course realistic design "old masters" in contemporary design.

My future plans are sculpture, I have made beautiful preparations. The sculptures

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Peripheral ARTeries Art Review - Biennial Edition  
Peripheral ARTeries Art Review - Biennial Edition  
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