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Inside Dalton NEWS McGuinty steps down as premier After nearly $250,000 worth of improvements, Evergreen Park is now a focal point of the McKellar Heights community. – Page 3

CITY HALL NEWS

Young people and officials gathered last week to discuss how youth can play a more important role in the city. – Page 4

COMMUNITY NEWS

With approvals and legal battles settled, the city and its partners get down to work at Lansdowne Park. – Page 7

Ottawa South MPP makes shock move amid turbulent times at Queen’s Park Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - In a surprise move after nine years as premier of Ontario, on Oct. 15 Ottawa South MPP Dalton McGuinty announced he is stepping down as premier. McGuinty asked party president Yasir Naqvi, MPP for Ottawa Centre, to convene a leadership convention at the earliest opportunity. McGuinty said he will remain leader and premier until a new Liberal leader is found and he will remain as the MPP for Ottawa South until the next election - a role he has held for 22 years. “As the party and government of relentless progress, we’re always looking for new ideas and ways to renew ourselves,” McGuinty’s speech read. “And I’ve concluded that this is the right time for Ontario’s next Liberal Premier and our next set of ideas to guide our province forward.” The evening announcement came amid opposition accusations that McGuinty mislead the legislature over power plant cancellations that will cost taxpayers upwards of $230 million and pressure from teachers’ unions over his efforts to freeze their wages and take away their ability to strike. But McGuinty cited party “renewal” and the opposition’s blocking of a public-sector wage freeze bill as his reasons for stepping aside. See PROROGATION, page 9

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STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

Ottawa-Centre MP Paul Dewar, Rachelle Viinberg, a silver medallist in rowing at the 2012 Olympics, and Colin Carrie, parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Health, help cut the ribbon at the grand opening of the Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre on Oct. 15. Several members of Viinberg’s family, including her mother, have undergone cancer treatment.

Expanded centre to offer cancer care support Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre aims to grow even more in next five years Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news – A new ally in the world of cancer care has opened its newly expanded doors in Ottawa, giving patients the opportunity to access new therapies to compliment conventional cancer treatments. The Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre opened last year in the unassuming brick building on the northeast corner of Bayswater Avenue and Somerset

Street. Now, it has expanded to nearly triple the size. On Monday, Oct. 15, Ottawa medical representatives and special guests helped cut the ribbon to officially open the centre, a non-profit extension of the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine. “This is the culmination of an incredible effort by many, many people,” said Dr. Dugald Seely, founder and executive director of the centre. “The OICC provides a comforting environment where all

aspects of a person are treated,” he said. “Choice is respected, but our therapies are not alternative and we do not provide a substitute for conventional care – we respect the technology and strength of Western medicine.” The therapies offered by the centre, for example, could be used to reduce the effects of chemotherapy or to help a patient regain their strength and maintain their health following a bout with cancer. Therapies ranging from physiotherapy

to nutritional counseling are available. Seely said the goal of the next five years is to expand the facility even larger – to four or five times its current size. There are currently several facilities of this type in the Toronto area, but this is the first one to open in Ottawa. Bob Bernhardt, president and chief executive of the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, congratulated Seely for achieving his goal, saying he had “marvelously realized that dream.” See HEALTH, page 12


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Ottawa lights up the night for research Gabrielle Tieman

PHOTOS BY GABRIELLE TIEMAN

Thousands turned out in support of blood cancer research during Ottawa’s Light the Night Walk on Oct. 13. Here, Karen’s Krusadors – friends and family of Karen Hebb – take part in the fundraising event.

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EMC news - Four thousand balloon clad, banner-wielding and cheering participants raised almost $350,000 for blood cancer research during Ottawa’s Light the Night walk Saturday evening, Oct. 13. “Canada has more than 100,000 people living with or in remission from blood cancer,” said Andrea Swinton, the executive director of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Canada. “Since our first Ottawa walk in 2010, we have raised over $1 million for research.” The third-annual event featured a leisurely walk along the canal where participants carried illuminated balloons to light the path - white for survivors, red for supporters, and gold in memory of those lost. When Lesia Maruschak was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2010, she said information about the disease fed her fears. Now one of this year’s honoured heroes for Light

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NEWS

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Evergreen Park gets long awaited upgrade Steph Willems Steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news – A west end community park has become much more than empty greenspace following the construction of playground and fenced dog run. Before the $240,000 investment, Evergreen Park, located at the corner of Denison Drive and Ernest in McKellar Heights, contained only a couple of rotting benches and was more a destination for dog walkers than neighbourhood kids. Now, it can fulfil its intended role of a community focal point. “It had been like that for

years,” said Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs. “The community used it for barbecues and eventually decided to put in a rink for winter use as well as a play structure. They went into fundraising mode and applied for a city grant.” A playground costs about $30,000 to build and even with a grant, the residents of the small neighbourhood would have had to raise half that cost themselves. Hobbs told them there was a better way. Each city councillor has a cash-in-lieu of parkland fund, which comes from developers who aren’t able or willing to provide public parkland as part of their development. In

lieu of this, they hand over a certain sum – determined by a mathematical algorithm – to go towards improving existing parks. In the case of Evergreen Park, more than enough funds were available to give residents the installations they desired, among them a playground and gazebo to serve as shelter for all types of events. A fenced-in dog run was constructed to allow the park to continue to be used as an off-leash dog park, even with the added children’s component. “When I came into this job in 2010, there was $1 million in the fund that was up to the councillor’s discretion

to spend,” said Hobbs. “I said (to the residents) that we have money in the cash-in-lieu of parkland fund to use for their playground … . When I took their idea to (the department of) parks and recreation, they came up with other ideas, like the gazebo for parents.” Initial hesitation with the idea from dog owners was resolved by the inclusion of a dog run, a first for the area.

Hobbs said both parents and dog owners agreed with the design of the park. “They all want to be good neighbours,” she said, adding there was always an emphasis on getting every desired component of the park rolled into the one project. “My rationale is to make it right the first time. We’re not likely to come back in a couple of years to do step two, and so on.”

Another first for the area will be an experimental dog waste receptacle, which will serve as a pilot project for the city. Dog owners are always encouraged through signage to pick up after their dogs, but this waste container makes the act of cleaning up after one’s dog a cleaner, more convenient prospect. A grand opening party had to be cancelled due to weather on Oct. 14. It will now take place on Oct. 21.

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Youth Summit gives a voice to city’s students Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - Youth are often told they are the future, but the message sometimes rings hollow when delivered across a generational gap. The Oct. 12 Youth Summit held at city hall gave students from across the city the opportunity to hear from young people who have single-handedly made a difference for themselves and the world. Organized by Mayor Jim Watson, Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury and a host of partners, the summit featured keynote addresses from former

governor general Michaelle Jean, organ donor advocate and recipient HĂŠlène Campbell, and local entrepreneur David Hale. In introducing the assembled youth to the forum, Watson encouraged them to mingle with students from schools in other areas of the city. “You see your friends all the time,â€? said Watson, who apologized for delivering a clichĂŠ. “It sounds corny, but you are going to be our future leaders.â€? Fleury, the city’s youngest councillor – elected in 2010 at age 25 – referenced himself as he spoke of the varying R0011677817-1018

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levels of community involvement youth can take on. In his case, he said he wanted to work for the betterment of his community through municipal politics, though he mentioned there are many ways to effect change in one’s community. When Jean left her position as governor general in 2010, she formed the independent non-profit Michaelle Jean Foundation to encourage organizations to collaborate with disadvantaged youth. Her goal is to empower youth to change their neighbourhoods through arts initiatives. “What kind of community do you want to make as socially engaged citizens?â€? she asked the participants. “I’m touched to see how seriously you are responding to this. You are part of the solution to the issues in your city.â€? In her many international trips as governor general, Jean made a point of conversing with youth. The perspective they showed and the clarity with which they described local issues gave her hope, she said. “I’m always mesmerized to see how many young people use their artistic abilities‌to build bridges between communities, ethnic groups, languages and creeds,â€? she said. “The arts allow us to transcend

STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

Entrepreneur David Hale told those in attendance at the youth summit that each person needs to find their own path – there isn’t a formula for success the divisions of the past.� Campbell, a familiar face to Ottawa residents, shared her story of how a diagnosis led her to form a social media campaign advocating for organ donor awareness, leading to a surge in organ donation and bringing the issue into the public eye. In her case, the campaign began out of necessity – at least, that’s how she felt about it. Once told she was in need of a double lung transplant, she took what looked like the right steps to achieve her goal; it was her determination drove that initiative and resulting successes. On the business side of

things, entrepreneur David Hale, who grew up on a farm in Munster, described the physical and emotional steps he took before branching out on his own. Currently he is the founder and CEO of the Ottawa-based digital innovation agency, Soshal Group. Hale and his partners build social media, mobile marketing, and e-commerce programs. Clients include the Canadian Medical Association, United Way Centraide Canada, Carleton University, Algonquin College, CHEO and the Ottawa Senators, with plans to branch out nationwide. Hale told the students he hates motivational speeches because it puts the focus on the speaker and distances the viewer. Everyone has different ideas and for each of them there are different ways to achieve the goal. “I want you to forget about me tomorrow,â€? said Hale, preaching the persistence and drive needed to achieve what you want. “Think about ‌ the plan, the methodology, the way of making it happen. The real opportunity in front of you isn’t years from now, it’s tomorrow – the work ethic or ideologies you need to succeed. You need to do something about it immediately.â€? The youth MCs for the

event, Gabrielle Fayant and Stephan Mukunzi, are examples to young people taking their first steps in pursuit of their goals. Having graduated secondary school, Fayant is a youth representative on the Ottawa police department’s youth advisory committee and a federal urban aboriginal initiative, and is currently studying psychology and aboriginal studies at Carleton University. Mukunzi is active in the city’s program to offer opportunities for youth living in low-income housing. He is studying political science at the University of Ottawa. Both share the view that forums like the Youth Summit can provide a kick-start for young people, leading to social awareness and community involvement. “Through the discussions we have we’ll hear the real opinion of youth: what they’d like to see approved, and how the city should use its budget,� said Mukunzi. Fayant agrees. “It’s so important to get grassroots opinion on issues and apply those issues to policy and procedure. It’s empowering.� Fayant thinks the forum will, among other things, help youth choose to incorporate volunteering and social initiatives into their lives.

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COMMUNITY

Your Community Newspaper

Carlington community gears up for an active year Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC community - The Carlington Cup neighbourhood shinny tournament will be back for another year in 2013, just one of the things decided on by the Carlington Community Association at their planning meeting last week. Last winter’s Carlington Cup turned out to be such a successful event that it will now be remembered as the inaugural tournament and the action this winter will be focused on the community’s focal point, Alexander Park. With cold weather on its way and rink time not too far behind it, association president Josh McJannett wanted planning to begin early so that everything will be in place once

blades hit the ice. “It was a really cool process last year,” he said. “A number of the volunteers from last year are still willing to help out.” The rink draws its volunteers with the help of the Alexander Community Association, which operates in conjunction with the Carlington Community Association. Funding from the city allows for some paid positions at the rink, which serves as an opportunity for local youth who have first aid training. While planning matters filled the agenda at the Oct. 9 meeting, there was some community association housekeeping to attend to. A recent vacancy on the board has the association looking for an eligible community member to fill the position. Another item the

association is moving forward with is its fundraising proposal – a way of financing community events and initiatives. A fundraising committee was struck this past June to discuss ways to make the association more financially stable. “Our mandate is growing, and membership fees won’t be enough,” said McJannet. The committee is leaning towards enticing local business and non-profits into sponsorship arrangements for events, as well as some level of online representation on the association’s website, a strategy that has already been carried out by the Hintonburg Community Association. “I think we’ve got a good proposition there,” said McJannett. “Things are really going in the right direction

JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

From left, Adele Melanson, Sue Sullivan, Sarah Dalle, Diane Ritchie and Micheline Lane from the Carlington Community Association are prepping to clean up Alexander Park on Oct. 13 before planting donated tulip bulbs from the National Capital Commission. – I think that’s good value to a businessperson.” Specifics on just what that content will look like will be decided by the committee and put forward to the rest of the board membership for approval. This past weekend, members of the association and a number of volunteers were busy cleaning up Alexander Park as part of their “Greening Carlington” initiative. In addition to picking up litter on Saturday, Oct. 13, the volunteers planted a number of tulip bulbs to add some colour to gardens during next year’s

spring thaw. “We’ve done a clean-up for a number of years, but this year is different,” said board member Sarah Dalle at the planning meeting. “We received a donation of tulips from the NCC in the spring and spent the summer months figuring out where to plant them.” A lengthy list of residential properties, schools and churches will benefit from the bulbs, as will the volunteers, who were each given some bulbs to plant at home. A final order of business at the planning meeting was an update from the fledgling de-

velopment committee, headed by Phil Bartlett. As with many other community associations, the Carlington Community Association is ramping up its focus on planning and development matters. The development committee is working on its mission statement and will monitor rezoning proposals. The current state of Merivale Road was a main issue at the meeting. Though designated as a Main Street, it is used as a thoroughfare, said Bartlett. He would like to see ways of reducing speed on that stretch discussed.

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Lansdowne deal finally done Redevelopment moving forward after council votes 20-3 in favour of plan Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - The ink is now dry on the deal to renovate Lansdowne Park. City council voted 20-3 to give its final approval to the multi-million-dollar deal with the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group, paving the way for one of the largest construction projects in the city’s history to begin on Oct. 15. The deal, four years in the making, will see the city’s Frank Clair Stadium receive major overhauls to enable the return of a Canadian Football League team. Construction of an underground parking garage will make room for a mixed-use development including an office tower, condos, shops and a cinema. The portion of the site between the Aberdeen Pavillion and the Queen Elizabeth Driveway will be transformed into an urban park with a water feature, orchard, and public event space. The vote wasn’t unanimous. The councillor for the ward in which the park sits, Capital Coun. David Chernushenko, voted against the final report, as did Gloucester-Southgate Coun. Diane Deans and Somerset Coun. Diane Holmes. Holmes said she is concerned that the city is handing over the reins of a piece of public land to private developers. Deans said the partnership is the most difficult, complicated deal the city has ever entered into and she is not certain it’s a good thing for taxpayers. “Ultimately I think our taxpayers are going to be paying the price for many, many years to come,” Deans said. Chernushenko said that despite his opposition to the project, he acknowledges it will be moving forward and has been focused on making it the best it can be. “We need to make sure it works for them (Glebe residents) and that it was not on their backs this was built,” he said. Chernushenko called on his council collegues to support important transportation

and transit plans that will be essential to making the development work, including a planned $17.5-million footbridge over the Rideau Canal, connecting the Glebe and Old Ottawa East. “There will be a cost to it, but it’s essential,” he said. Mayor Jim Watson said it was a proud moment for him because it shows council can get things done at city hall. “Public said stop dithering and start digging,” Watson said. “Waiting for perfection is going to kill any project … It hasn’t been easy, but in the end, it will be magnificent.” City manager Kent Kirkpatrick said the rigorous design review panel process “established a new level of urban design” for the city. “(It is) expanding our understanding of what’s possible in Ottawa,” Kirkpatrick said. Orleans Coun. Bob Monette, a longtime supporter of the project, said the redevelopment and the addition of football will make Lansdowne a tourist destination. Watson reiterated his argument that the public-private redevelopment will replace 0.73 hectares of asphalt with public spaces and a park. He said the project will also “close the gap” between the communities of Old Ottawa South and the Glebe. Football is scheduled to begin in 2014, and the timelines will be tight. The project has faced 18 months of delays due to the design review panel asking for tweaks to the project and two legal challenges brought forward by the Friends of Lansdowne and the Lansdowne Park Conservancy. Kirkpatrick said the construction schedule will be a “complicated dance” that will mainly hinge on the construction schedule for the parking garage, but the timing allows for typical delays that might result from weather or other minor issues.

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EMC news - Mayor Jim Watson was all smiles on Oct. 11 as he officially handed off Lansdowne Park construction duties to the Ottawa Sport and Entertainment Group. As part of the event, he and OSEG partner Roger Greenberg signed a ceremonial wall plaque finalizing the partnership between the city and business group. While some preliminary work has already been done on the project to redevelop the city-owned property, contractor Pomerleau Inc. was scheduled to begin work in earnest on Oct. 15. As Watson and Greenberg,

joined by city councillors and other OSEG partners, gathered to sign the plaque, they had two items dug out of the archives to set the tone for the historic moment. Both Russ Jackson’s helmet and a 1976 Grey Cup football were present, reflecting some of the history the partnership said it is looking to re-establish. “This is an important day in the history of our city,” Watson said. “It’s exciting to see what has started over the summer.” With the south side bleachers torn down, it’s left the north-versus-south-side bleacher arguments on pause until the new stadium is complete. “Memories like that have

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and international experts in design and engineering have been consulted in the planning stages of the project. “The park has a special place in our heart,” Greenberg said. “We’re really at the end of the beginning.” Mid-2014 is the target for completion of work on the stadium, with the remainder of the redevelopment work to be complete by the summer of 2015.

sustained us a group,” Greenberg said, reflecting on the 1976 Grey Cup game. “It’s returning those memories.” Frank Clair Stadium, once completed, will play host to Canadian Football League and professional soccer teams, as well as the Ottawa 67s. The plans for the park include underground parking, shops, homes, restaurants and recreational facilities. Watson said that national

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OPINION

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Women’s hockey to be feast for starved fans

H

ockey starved fans will soon be treated to a feast, when Ottawa plays host to the 2013 IIHF Ice Hockey Women’s Championship next April. The games will take place at the Nepean Sportsplex and Scotiabank Place from April 2 to 9, with the world’s top 10 teams competing for the world championship. The tournament comes as welcome news to a city struggling with the loss of

revenue from the National Hockey League lockout. There’s no telling how long the lockout will last – it could range anywhere from a month to an entire season. Fans have been placed once again in the middle of a dispute between owners and players over revenue sharing, a conflict that has left casualties among hotels, restaurants and other businesses that depend on money generated by NHL games. The women’s world hock-

ey championship is expected to generate $30 million in economic activity, according to Cyril Leeder, president of Senators Sports and Entertainment, one of the hosts of the tournament during a press conference on Oct. 11. The games are also expected to bring in an estimated 200,000 spectators, he said. Spectators who will rent hotel rooms, purchase food at restaurants and buy gas at gas stations, boosting the city’s

economy and encouraging temporary job creation. The last time a Canadian city hosted the women’s world hockey championship, in 2007, the games generated $29 million in the city of Winnipeg. The games also promise some exciting hockey, with the best players in the world competing for their countries. Some of these players will be putting on the Team Canada jersey for the first time and competing for their

country on an international stage, an honour that overshadows any medal count or the amount of money generated by the tournament. Fans will also be treated to a revival of the long-standing rivalry between Team Canada and Team USA, traditionally two of the best teams in women’s hockey. The tournament will also serve to inspire a new generation of hockey players, some of whom may aspire to one day compete on a na-

tional and international stage. Let’s face it, women’s hockey does not receive the same amount of coverage or support as men’s hockey. If the NHL lockout wipes out the 2012-13 season, people won’t be distracted by the playoffs, giving a boost to the profile and fan base of women’s hockey. The federal government has announced it will support the tournament to the tune of $500,000 – a welcome investment in our national sport. The women’s world hockey championship serves as a reminder that NHL hockey isn’t the only game in town.

COLUMN

Life in a super-sized society CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

W

e may not be getting better but we’re certainly getting bigger. You realize this every time you go shopping. Look how big the shopping cart is – way bigger than it used to be. It’s like you’re pushing a truck down the aisle. The stuff you put in it is big too. And we should have mentioned how big the store is. If you walked from one side to the other without stopping to put any big items in your big cart it would still take you five minutes. The store is big because it has a big selection – not just groceries, but chairs and TV sets and toys and pharmaceutical stuff. Some of those things are bigger than you expected to find in a grocery store, but fortunately you have a big cart. You pay your big bucks and wheel the big cart out to the parking lot, which is really big. Most of the cars in it are big too. That’s a good thing for carrying big groceries, maybe not so good in other respects. In fact, there are a whole lot of respects in which big is questioned, but not by too many people yet. When “big� is used as an adjective in our society it means “good.� Then you drive onto the big highway that goes where small neighbourhoods used to be. It would all be alarming if you suddenly arrived from a place where things were smaller, but those of us who have been around here for a while have got used to all this bigness. Look what we’re getting in Ottawa: more big buildings, a big development at Lansdowne Park, a big casino. You don’t see politicians

bragging about the small things they’ve created. They may have forgotten how to do that. Big is all around us. When we go to the movies it is to a big building with many big theatres inside with wide seats and ample legroom. When we order snacks at the movies the small popcorn is huge and so is the small drink. It is no surprise that people are getting to be pretty big too. A lot of experts worry abut that, but how do you expect people to stay small in such a big environment? Not that everything is big. Some things that we wish were big aren’t, such as parking spaces. And then there are airplanes. About the only place where we are treated as if we were small is on airplanes. The seats are narrow and the legroom is only adequate for children. Those of us who are not children feel as if we have accidentally stumbled onto the wrong plane, a children’s plane. Maybe somewhere on the tarmac is the proper plane, a grown-ups’ plane with seats that fit us and aisles where two grown-ups can walk by each other. But on this airplane we just feel too big now. The feeling intensifies when we are brought a meal. It is on a tiny tray with little utensils wrapped in plastic which we find there is no place to put once removed. Our fingers are too big to perform the tasks demanded of them. We are all thumbs and the thumbs are too big, too. You know the feeling. As you wrestle with all of this your shoulders collide with the shoulders of the person next to you. Somewhere inside one of the bits of plastic are a tiny plastic fork, a tiny plastic knife, a tiny salt and a tiny pepper and something to wipe up any food you might spill if you are ever able to get it unwrapped. You wish, while you struggle, that you were in a giant movie theatre with a small (big) popcorn and a small (big) drink and that the movie theatre could fly. You appreciate bigness suddenly, except for your own.

Editorial Policy Ottawa West EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to Ottawa West EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

Web Poll THIS WEEK’S POLL QUESTION

Will the NHL lockout affect whether you attend Ottawa 67’s and Women’s World Hockey Championship games?

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

Are you ready for garbage collection to move to every other week?

A) Yes, I will look to attend these games

A) Yes. I’ve been making use of my green bin since day one.

30%

B) No – I would be attending these

0%

events anyway.

B) It’ll take a bit of extra effort to remember – I need those text alerts!

C) No. I only spend my money on NHL-level hockey.

C) No. I’ll need to dig my green bin out of the garage.

15%

D) I never go to hockey games, so it doesn’t matter at all to me.

D) I guess I’ll have to put up with the smell – I’m not going to play along with the city’s game.

55%

in place of watching the Senators.

To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Tackling life in an effortless way

E

veryone says you can’t aspire to be superwoman. But I have a friend who really seems to do it all, and more. I love this friend. I can’t be her, but I love her. She has four children, including a newborn and a toddler. In her day job, she runs a communications department. While on maternity leave, since July, she has filled her pantry cellar with preserves. At a glance, I’d guess there are 100-plus jars of jam, chutney, pears, peaches and fruit cocktail in there. She’s done this while breastfeeding full-time and working on her MBA – you know, in her spare time. “Doesn’t it make you sick?” an elderly relative asked me recently. On the contrary, it makes me inspired.We recently spent the weekend at her house. I took advantage of an extremely comfortable gliding rocking chair and foot stool, rocking my baby to sleep constantly, while she served me gourmet coffees and delectable homemade muffins. (I have no idea where they came from. They just sort of appeared). On the morning of Thanksgiving, I asked if I could help. “Nope,” she replied. “I’m good. And just so you know it’s not going to be all stressful until lunchtime. I’m just going to pop in and out of the

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse kitchen as needed, but you probably won’t even notice me cooking a turkey.” Fine with me. Had I been cooking, everyone would know it. It would be chaos for four hours and the turkey would very likely come out overcooked and two hours late. So I went out for a walk in the sun, and then retired to my rocking chair for the morning, sipping gourmet coffee after delectable gourmet coffee. I started watching the way she worked and thinking about the secrets to success in life. And by success, I mean accomplishing a lot in a day, being healthy, having four healthy children, earning a good income and developing oneself academically – all things which my friend is doing at the same time, in an effortless way. I noticed a few things. For one, she is extremely good at thinking ahead. Her brain is like a little computer database, ticking off tasks as they’re completed. She’s also great at taking advantage of snippets

of time, which most of us, frankly, would spend lounging in a rocker. Early morning, after feeding the baby, when everything is “under control” (ie: kids have breakfast that had been prepared the day before and guests are rocking comfortably with gourmet coffees in-hand), she goes for a 20-minute run. It’s efficient, she’s cleared her head and she’s powered up for the day. She pops the (extremely contented, I might add) infant into a bouncy chair, while she chops up something for tomorrow night’s dinner. Then she takes a pause to go feed the baby, have a conversation with guests, set up a craft for her older offspring or read to her toddler. The toddler and guests now entertained, the baby now full, she slips into the kitchen (almost unnoticed) and, I kid you not, whips up a pumpkin cheesecake pie from scratch. The secret, she tells me, is she made the pastry a few days ago in anticipation. Then she rests. We chat

again, she probably brings me another gourmet coffee – or, depending on the time of day, a slightly stronger cocktail. While I’m in the bathroom for a moment, (I’m guessing), she whips up some stuffing. But I realize her secret is that she’s actually not “doing it all,” as I thought at first glance. She makes trade-offs between things that are important and those that really don’t matter; she’s actually extremely good at letting things go and also at delegating tasks that can be delegated. If the turkey isn’t served up perfectly, no matter, at least it got to the table and it’s delicious. If the kids need to spend some time with a babysitter while she works on an essay, that’s what needs to be done. If I have two hands to tackle the dinner dishes, she fully expects, or asks, that it be done. I came home from my weekend away well-rested and full, not to mention inspired. I spent the next two days baking and making soup and working on that book I’ve (actually, never) wanted to write. I went for brisk walks in the mornings and tried doing things in snippets like my friend does. I’ve accomplished a lot and, you know, it feels good. Next on my to-do list? Purchase one of those gliding rocking chairs. After all, it’s all about balance.

Prorogation puts legislature on hold Continued from page 1

“It has nothing to do with that, and everything to do with a decision that Terri and I have made,” McGuinty told reporters late Monday night. “It’s time for us to return to our own lives, and it’s time for me to make an effort to renew the leadership of our party.” Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson, who served as a provincial cabinet minister under McGuinty, said the premier never forgot his Ottawa roots when he went to Queen’s Park and as a result, the city has benefitted from hundreds of projects that would not have happened without his support, including hospitals, schools and infrastructure projects. McGuinty also asked Lt.Gov. David Onley to prorogue the legislature “to allow those discussions with our labour partners and the opposition to occur in an atmosphere that is free of the heightened rancour of politics in the legislature.” Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak expressed

FILE PHOTO

Premier Dalton McGuinty announced he was stepping down as leader of the provincial Liberal party durning a caucus meeting on Oct. 15. his thanks to McGuinty for his service to Ontario. But he criticized McGuinty’s decision to asked for the legislature to be suspended, saying it prevents “critical work” that needs to be done to address job creation and the province’s debt. With files from Metro News

In Pierre Poilievre’s latest column submission “Give Workers the Freedom to Choose” we stated: According to the Ottawa Sun, PSAC spent $1,694,900 million on political action in 2011. It should read: According to the Ottawa Sun, PSAC spent $1,694,900 on political action in 2011. R0011683486

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

9


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Residents get emerald ash borer wake-up call Forum discusses ways to halt spread of destructive Asian beetle, save trees Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Experts are banking on a predator wasp to beat a bug that’s devastating Ottawa’s ash trees. More than 50 concerned residents gathered at a Federation of Citizens’ Associations of Ottawa-Carleton forum at the Overbrook Community Centre on Oct. 9 to hear about the devastating impact the emerald ash borer has had on Ottawa’s tree cover – and what could be done to slow it down. Currently, there is no way to stop the beetle, which burrows under the bark of ash trees, eventually killing them. Pesticide injections at a cost of a couple hundred dollars per tree every two years can prolong a tree’s life, but so far, there is no way to completely beat the bug. But there is hope, and the experts asked for residents’ help to “hold the line” until it can get here.

That hope will come in the form of a wasp – the emerald ash borer’s natural predator in Asia. While the city has spoken very cautiously about the possibility of introducing a stingless wasp, experts at the Oct. 9 forum said the wasp is the only hope for North America’s ash trees. “It’s the way forward,” said Bruce Gill, a federal research scientist with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. “It’s not a common pest in China because they have a predator … We need to restore the natural balance.” The wasp is being tested in several states south of the border, but it could be more than 10 years before it might be brought to Canada. A federal agency could make an application to try that method here or a specific city could apply and go through the paperwork. The process is so complicated, Gill said he’s crossing his fingers than some of the wasps will eventually fly

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

The Federation of Citizens’ Associations held a forum on the emerald ash borer at the Overbrook Community Centre on Oct. 9. north and arrive in Canada as a “naturally occurring species.” Until then, treating trees will be critical, said Joe Meating, whose company, BioForest, produces the main (and

Green Bin Tip

#17

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until recently, only) pesticide used to combat the emerald ash borer in Ottawa. “We’re buying time for predators to be introduced,” Meating said. Early treatment is key, he said, or there may be nothing for the wasps to save, if and when they are brought to Canada. Even if the wasp never comes here, it’s not worth waiting to treat or cut down infected trees, said Sean Barker, director of the Eastern Ontario Arborists. “It’s definitely going to cost more later,” Barker said. Another local arborist, George Lamirande of Dav-

ey Tree, said the longer the borers are left to decimate a tree, the more hazardous and therefore costly it becomes to remove. Furthermore, leaving an infected tree until it absolutely must come down provides a food source for the beetles to continue to multiply in that area. “It’s critical for it to get out of the way,” Lamirande said. WAKE UP CALL

The experts said this year marked a big wake-up call about the emerald ash borer, which was first identified in Ottawa in 2008.

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

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“I learned it takes a shock to the system to get people to notice,” Barker said. Before 2012, there were “a lot of whispers in the background,” but this year his company has had three times as many bookings for free treatments or removals. Many of the residents in attendance wanted to know what they could do as neighbours and community associations to help fight the problem. Barker and Davey said they are seeing – and encouraging – a trend of community groups organizing a group treatment, where a company is hired to come and inject or remove infected trees in a concentrated area, such as along a street. The neighbours are often able to negotiate group discounts that way because the process is more efficient, Barker said. Besides that, neighbours can just help spread the word, all the experts said. It is estimated more than 20 per cent of the tree cover in Ottawa is ash, and many of those trees are on private property. Educating neighbours about what they can do to combat the big is essential, Lamirande said. The city has been putting about $2 million per year into treating and removing city trees infected with emerald ash borer, and earlier this summer city council approved an extra $1 million for this year. Environment committee co-chairman Keith Egli attended the event and delivered news that the committee will be looking for $4 million in funding to combat the emerald ash borer in 2013. While James O’Grady of the Federation of Citizens’ Associations said he was happy to hear that the funding could be going up, he added it won’t be enough. The city will still have to remove the dead trees and replant new trees, and those costs will only rise.


NEWS

R0021415106

Your Community Newspaper

Tree canopy project looking to gauge value to community Old Ottawa South pilot to catalogue types, numbers Michelle Nash

This year, the start of the school year saw more than its share of uncertainty. Bill 115, the recent provincial legislation, imposed a controversial labour outcome on school teachers and this has created a tense mood in many of our schools.

michelle.nash@metroland.com

While our elementary schools have seen a minimal effect on the voluntary withdrawal by teachers on organizing student extracurricular activities, the biggest impact of Bill 115 has been at our high schools. The result has been 11 of our Board’s 26 high schools do not have teacher participation for extracurricular activities. Here in Bay Ward this has unfortunately meant no fall season sports activities at Woodroffe High School. The deadline for fall sports has passed but the deadline for organizing winter sports is October 30. At this time there are no signs that teachers will take on voluntary extracurricular activities this winter any more than they did in the fall. Taking Action to Help Our Students

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Carleton University student Erika Rose is one of the students who helped former Ottawa forests and greenspace advisor committee chairwoman Heather Hamilton on Oct. 11 with a tree-identifying project which will help count the tree canopy in city parks. Hamilton’s goal is to point out the ecological services a tree can add to the city’s structure. ago, he and other members of the neighbourhood planted around 300 trees in Brewer Park, along the river, in an effort to protect the habitat. The only thing is, at the time, they did not keep a record of what species were planted, so now they are taking note of the diversity, which is a difficult task, Scott Danford and Dan Cooper from the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority are also helping with the project. “Sometimes it can be very hard, these guys are the experts, it is great to have them,” Lascelles said. Erika Rose, a fourth year environmental sciences student at Carleton is one of the students participating. For Rose, being out in the field is the best kind of experience she can get and hav-

ing the opportunity to do her research in Brewer Park, her neighbourhood, is even better. “I thought it would be cool to do something in the neighbourhood where I interact and live,” Rose said. “It is better than just reading about it. Here you are in the field, learning first hand.” The project, Hamilton said is something neighbourhoods

across the city can also start. “Anyone can do this, as long as you can access some sort of expert for the identifying,” Hamilton said. “Certain aspects are not difficult, and some keen naturalists could do it.” The group will complete the Brewer Park and Windsor Park counts, Hamilton said, by mid-October.

In response to the uneven availability of extracurricular activities in our high schools your School Board Trustees have taken a leadership role in directing senior staff to facilitate and expedite volunteer parents and community members who wish to help out with extra-curricular sports and activities. In Ottawa we are fortunate to have many skilled and talented persons who have expertise in sport coaching and mentoring. We have heard from some folks out there but would love to hear from individuals who can offer their time to make a difference in the lives of students. Volunteers can be parents or members of the community at large. Are you or someone you know interested in helping with extracurricular activities at Woodroffe High School? There is no doubt that coaching a high school team of any type is a very high level of commitment for a volunteer. It’s more than standing on the side of a field with a whistle. It also entails such things as booking venue time and tracking performances, for example. We welcome volunteers who can meet this challenge. Volunteers will be required to complete an application and related documentation. The principal at Woodroffe High School, Renald Cousineau, will contact qualified volunteers and provide information regarding access to the school, equipment, team recruitment processes and any other necessary information. If you think you are able to make a difference don’t hesitate to contact us at www.ocdsb.ca.

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We all want to see our students get the most from their school years. We, as a school board, are working hard to find solutions to ensure that all our students have equal access to a great school experience. We look forward to working with our community partners to help our students beyond the classroom.

R0011663159_1011

EMC news - A tree canopy project taking place in Old Ottawa South plans to identify types of trees growing in area parks and the value the trees offer the neighbourhood and city. On Oct. 11, a group of Old Ottawa South residents, Carleton University students, officials from the Rideau Valley Conservation Authority and Heather Hamilton, a former forests and green space advisory committee chairwoman, gathered to count the tree canopy in Brewer Park. Hamilton said she got involved because she was looking for a fun community project and since the city is only taking stock of street trees but not in parks, it was just right. “We’re filling in the gap.” she said. The objective of the project, which is also taking a canopy count in Windsor Park, is to use the data collected to prepare a report which will include information on all the trees in the park. The report will include location maps and global positioning system data, pictures, species and size of the trees. “It would be nice for us to get a picture from both the neighbourhood and city perspective,” Hamilton said. “To see how much parks are contributing to the overall health of the city.” She explained such factors as a tree’s contribution to controlling storm water run-off, air pollution and local weather temperatures. “Without trees, it would be hotter, more polluted and your basement might be flooded,” Hamilton said. The catalyst for this project has been the emerald ash borer. The beetle has burrowed itself in ash trees all over the city and as a result thousands have been lost. For Mike Lascelles, chairman of the Ottawa South Community Association environment committee, this project will help the neighbourhood have a better understanding of what types of trees are in the parks and whether any existing ash trees are healthy. This canopy count will help the Old Ottawa South community have an idea the amount of trees that will potentially be lost in the parks. “We can put a plan together to replace the trees, if need be,” he said. “Things are really in tough shape there (at Windsor Park), with 30 to 40 emerald ash that are on death row, wind damaged trees and vandalized trees.” Planting is nothing new for Lascelles and the environment committee. More than 15 years

Welcome to Severn Avenue Public School! Bay Ward Public School Trustee, Theresa Kavanagh is proud to stand with student Jaden and Principal Hanif Jamal on a recent visit to this outstanding school. Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

11


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Casino vote wins despite councillors’ concerns Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - One of city council’s most impassioned debates on Oct. 10 resulted in the city lending its support for a possible new casino in Ottawa. The 19-5 city council vote means the city will “signal its interest” in a possible new gambling facility somewhere in Ottawa to the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation, an agency of the provincial government. Any actual proposals from private developers willing to build a casino wouldn’t arrive for another year. Rideau-Goulbourn Coun. Scott Moffatt, one of the councillors who voted “no,” said the casino fix is in. He was leaning towards supporting the idea, but he said that the more research he did, the more he realized it was a bad move for the city and particularly his rural ward, where people are supportive of the employment and entertainment options at the Rideau Carleton Raceway. Representatives from the raceway have said they will submit a bid to expand the facility into a casino, but Mayor Jim Watson has signaled his preference for a more urban gaming facility. Paul Godfrey, chairman of the gaming corporation, has said he wants to bring casinos “where the people are.” “It’s impossible for me to support this and support the

Rideau Carleton Raceway,” Moffatt said during the city council debate on Oct. 10. He said he has no faith in the gaming corporation. “They show no drive to take into consideration what we said (during the finance and economic development committee) on Oct. 2 about the Rideau Carleton Raceway,” Moffatt said. “Unless we only say, ‘Rideau Carleton Raceway,’ they will come back with anything but.” No one on council was willing to move a motion to limit the lottery corporation’s search to areas outside the city’s core or specifically the raceway site. Bay Coun. Mark Taylor was similarly reticent about supporting the proposal, but while he said he will treat the lottery corporation “as an adversary,” he voted in favour. The councillors who voted against the casino motion said there are too many unknowns. From the possible location to the amount of revenue the city could stand to see from a casino, a lot of information is yet to come. Capital Coun. David Chernushenko said there wasn’t any evidence or research in favour of a casino that could outweigh the cacophony of negative comments from his constituents. “Once a big project gets going, it becomes awfully hard to apply the brakes,” Chernushenko said. Innes Coun. Rainer Bloess

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“(The college) sees its mission as being threefold: education, research and community service,” said Bernhardt. “It’s really the research and community service that’s the strongest focus for the OICC in Ottawa.” Bernhardt again stressed that

for the idea of a casino. “Don’t kid yourself. This vote matters,” said Deans, who voted against the motion along with Moffatt, Chernushenko, Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury and Beacon Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney. “I don’t believe we should be handing over our city’s future on such as fundamental issue to the OLG,” Deans added. Part of the problem is that neither city staff nor councillors fully understand the level of input the city will have into where a new casino would be

located. The city definitely has veto power over OLG’s casino proposal; the city has the final say on rezoning any land that a proponent wants to build a casino on. But what is more vague is the city’s level of influence over suggesting where it would prefer to see a casino. The gaming corporation will run a call for proposals and choose the best casino plan and location. Orléans Coun. Bob Monette wanted to know whether council could have any input before that decision

while the doctors at the centre believe that tailoring treatment for an individual is beneficial, they do not believe that “integrative care is a silver bullet that cures cancers,” rather, it is seen as a way of improving the lives of those being treated. A strong supporter and inspiration for Seely was Dr. Shailendra Verma, medical

oncologist at the Ottawa Hospital. Verma called the opening an event that has been greatly anticipated, not just by the naturopathic community, but by patients, researchers and medical practitioners alike. He recalled meeting Seely 10 years ago and discussing how naturopathic practices could fit into

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said he had a “cynical feeling” about the issue and asked why Ottawa wouldn’t have started discussing this topic sooner, like many other Ontario municipalities. Still, he voted in favour of looking at a potential casino. “This is really going forward somewhat blinded,” Holmes said before voting in favour of continuing the process. That miffed Gloucester-Southgate Coun. Diane Deans, who said she couldn’t understand the logic of her reticent council colleagues who were still willing to vote

is made. For instance, he asked if the city could be presented with the top three options, allowing council to indicate to the gaming corporation which one was most likely to be approved. Bidding processes don’t work that way, the mayor said. He said it’s possible the gaming corporation would bring forward its second-favourite proposal in the event the city rejected the top bid, but city manager Kent Kirkpatrick said he will have to talk to the gaming corporation to clarify the process.

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the general health community. “I said this is an area that has created so much tension for centuries, and it’s time we closed this gap,” he said. “It really is important to understand how best to take care of humans. What we needed was an approach that was really big on communication, big on evidence, big on methodologies.” Seely took that advice and went on to garner the necessary medical knowledge and credentials with which to create the Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre. Both Ottawa-Centre MP Paul Dewar and Oshawa MP Colin Carrie, parliamentary secretary to the federal minister of health, voiced their congratulations to the founder for this addition to cancer care in Ottawa. “In our system of health care, we need innovators, and this is innovative - building on what we’ve done before,” said Dewar. “We need to keep going down the path of innovation and supporting patient care. And yes, reducing costs – it’s not just about the money, and we do need the money – but how it’s spent, how we innovate and how we coordinate.”


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EMC COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER G RECIPE BOOK PROMO 6 X 218 R0021659337 SLS=4923

Your Community Newspaper

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Simply e-mail or mail in your favourite summer recipe (with a picture if possible) by November 5, 2012. Be sure to send it with your name, address, and phone number. If chosen, we will publish your recipe in our

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Employees of participating sponsors and their immediate families and Performance Printing / EMC employees are not eligible to compete in this contest. 2. Contestants must abide these general contests rules and all specific rules applied to contests to be eligible to win available prizes. 3. Prize winner selection is by random draw. Winners must correctly answer a skill-testing question to win. Prize winners will be contacted by telephone. 4. Winners must bear some form of identification in order to claim their prize. 5. There is no cash surrender value to prizes and they must be accepted as awarded. 6. The EMC and participating companies assume no responsibility whatsoever damages, be they physical or monetary, injury or death, as a result of this contest or any part of it. 7. The EMC and participating retailers reserve the right to limit the numbers of entries received from any particular contestant(s). 8. The EMC and the participating companies reserve the right to change, rearrange, and/or alter any of there contests policies at any time whatsoever without prior notice. Also these contest rules are subject if necessary to comply with the rules, regulations, and the laws of the federal, Provincial, and local government bodies. 9. Ads will be published September 20, 27, October 4, 11,18, 25, 2012. 10. One entry per household.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Your Community Newspaper

Phoenix Players put new spin on classic, creepy tale Produciton of The Death of Dracula arrives just in time for Halloween Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC entertainment - Just in time for Halloween, an updated take on the classic story of Dracula will be hitting the stage at the Gladstone Theatre. Long before the Twilight films made vampires brooding and sexy, Bram Stoker penned a blood-curdling novel that aimed to terrify its audience, making vampires something to be feared. That famous work of Victorian-era horror, published in 1897, hasn’t lost its ability to send chills up readers’ spines, nor has its atmospheric presence faded from film and stage. The epic struggle between good and evil is the basis for the Phoenix Players’ adaptation of Canadian playwright Warren Graves’ The Death of Dracula, opening at the Gladstone Theatre on Oct. 25. The original Dracula

doesn’t lend itself easily to a theatre production, so Graves had his play begin at a later point in the novel, when the ship carrying Dracula is wrecked on the English coast. “It takes all of the major players in the Bram Stoker (novel), but is slightly different,” said director Jo-Ann McCabe. “You can’t do the entirety of that Gothic novel in one play,” she said. “This play starts with Dracula arriving in England and his ship crashing onto the rocks of the U.K. It picks up in the asylum run by Dr. Seward, with all of the people who will be affected by Dracula. In the original book, Harker goes to Transylvania to (do business) with Dracula … . None of that part is in this play.” The eight-member cast of The Death of Dracula has been having a blast rehearsing the script, which is at times steamy, scary, and humorous, all the ingredients of a fun play – for both actors and au-

STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

The cast of Phoenix Players’ The Death of Dracula take a pause in rehearsing, prior to their first show on Oct. 25. From left, Art King, Brigitte Aube-Harrison, Ron Langton, Jake Smith, Tina Prudhomme, Aaron Lajeunesse, Bill Brown, William Morrison and André Dimitrijevic. dience. “I really like Warren Graves’ writing, it’s terrific,” said McCabe. “We all have a lot of fun rehearsing. As you can imagine, there are a few sick jokes thrown about.” McCabe praises the energy and talent of her cast, saying, “the young people in this show are giving it their all. …

There’s wonderful energy to work with.” Communication and collaboration between actors comes naturally and is encouraged, making for a steady flow of ideas and resulting in a better outcome onstage. All of that energy will come together onstage at the Gladstone Theatre, a venue

the Phoenix Players moved into last year. Now in its 11th year, the community theatre group is enjoying their new space at 910 Gladstone Ave., calling it “a theatre for theatre people.” “We felt it was time – we needed to blossom out,” said McCabe. The move coincided with a

decision to increase their performances from four times a year to nine. The Death of Dracula runs from Oct. 25 to Nov. 3, with 8 p.m. start dates. Tickets can be purchased online at www. thegladstone.ca/phoenix.html or by calling the box office at 613-233-4523. Tickets are also available at the door.

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SENIORS

Your Community Newspaper

Old, tilted silo had striking Italian look MARY COOK Mary Cook’s Memories heard of glass buildings? Who ever heard of towers made completely of windows and some with elevators going up the outside? We’d think how odd Emerson was, not like the rest of us who were content

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to buy him big pads of plain white paper and he spent hours drawing buildings. We would watch him at the old pine table at night drawing towers of glass. Poor Emerson, we’d say. Who ever

to look through the Eaton’s catalogue or play cars. No, Emerson drew buildings. The book was all about some strange building in Italy, called the Tower of Pisa. Emerson was spellbound, not because it was so tall and was built in some strange country, but because it had a lean to it. He sat at the table every night gazing at the Tower of Pisa and even drew it on his white sheets of paper. Little did we know at the time what he had in mind. “We have one just like it.

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Right here on this here farm,” he announced after about three nights of gazing at the pictures in the book. No one paid him any heed. It was the next day -- a Saturday. Emerson, after his chores had been done, came in to the house and gathered up his sheets of paper and the book on the Tower of Pisa and headed outside. “I have something to show you,” he announced to anyone within earshot. Earl and I were the only ones interested and we followed Emerson with his sheets of paper through the summer kitchen. He headed right for the silo. There was an old stump beside the silo -- I wouldn’t go near it with a 10-foot pole because that’s where the chickens got the axe. Emerson knew I hated that part of the barn yard, so he went down the hill a few paces and beckoned Earl and me to follow. The silo was in front of us. Emerson held up his pencil and squinted as he leveled it in his eyesight. “See how the silo tilts? Just like that one in Italy. I wouldn’t be one bit surprised if whoever built it used the same plans as the tower in Italy. And maybe even had a hand in helping building this one here.” While that made perfect sense to me, Earl was much less impressed. “The one in Italy is made of stone,” Earl said. “This here silo is made of old pieces of lumber and Emerson, you know as well as I do that the reason it’s tilted is because it’s over 100 years old and was built on a bit of a hill.” Besides, he added, “our great grandfather built the silo when he came from Germany. This here silo has nothing to do with a building in Italy.” Now, as well as liking to draw buildings, Emerson also liked to hold funerals for anything that passed away on the farm. Dead birds found out on the grass, even a frog that was found in a rain barrel at the back of the house, were all subjected to Emerson’s idea of a fitting funeral. Again, Audrey and Everett refused to have any part of Emerson’s idea of a proper

For more information, please call Jeanne at 613-599-5700 ext. 23 or email kanataallergy@gmail.com

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I

t all started when Emerson brought the book home from the Renfrew library. While the rest of us picked story books, mine with pictures, Emerson always wanted a book about buildings. Now, there wasn’t a large choice of books on buildings at the Renfrew library, and that day Emerson found one, all about some huge structure in Italy, it changed his life drastically. Emerson loved buildings. Mother managed somehow

burial, but Earl and I being the youngest of the children, were riveted to any crazy scheme our brother had that would add a bit of excitement to our lives on that farm in Northcote. I had no idea if Emerson made it up or if it was actually in the book from the library, but he said funerals were held in front of the Leaning Tower of Pisa and from now on, any funeral he would be conducting would be in front of our old wood silo. Just like they had in front of the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Well, as luck would have it, a few days later, Mother had ordered Everett to get some chickens to take into her customers in Renfrew. That meant a trip to the stump behind the silo. Emerson decided these poor chickens needed a proper funeral and we would all meet behind the silo as Everett wielded the axe. I was having no part of it. Earl, who was as squeamish as I was when it came to beheading the chickens, said he had chores to do and the last I saw of Earl he was heading for the barn. I was already getting on an apron in the kitchen and looking for something to do. Emerson showed his disgust by stomping outside with his papers in hand, heading for the silo, looking for something to bury. There wasn’t a dead bird or any other dead critter in sight and he had to give up on the idea of holding a funeral in front of the silo that day, because Everett said if he came within a country mile of the stump, Emerson could help with the slaughter. Well, Emerson was as squeamish as Earl and me and the only thing he was interested in burying or holding a funeral for was something that was already dead. We were all saved from another discussion about future funerals held behind the silo, because like everyone else who borrowed a book from the Renfrew library, Emerson had to take the book about the Leaning Tower of Pisa back in a week or pay a cent for every day it was overdue. It was the last we heard of the likeness between our old tilted silo and some stone tower in Italy.


Your Community Newspaper

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STAY IN THE SWIM THIS WINTER City of Ottawa Pools offer something for everyone! The City of Ottawa invites you to escape from the cold into one of our indoor pools. Winter is a great time to improve skills, learn something new, or take on a new fitness challenge. City of Ottawa pools offer something for all ages! Parents and their infants/ toddlers can enjoy some time together in swimming lessons for children ages three months to three years. Classes focus on water orientation, building confidence, socialization, and learning through games. Important water safety messages for parents are incorporated throughout the program. Water safety starts with learning to swim. City of Ottawa pools offer swimming lessons for children of all ages. Pre-schoolers and children can progress through the Red Cross program improving their swimming strokes and skills, making new friends, and developing skills that can lead to a life-long appreciation for water-related activities. Youth and adult lessons are also available for those looking at taking on a new challenge or improve on existing skills.

Lifeguards needed Are you a young adult looking for a challenging part-time job? Become a Lifeguard! The City of Ottawa offers all of the required courses to become a Lifeguard and Swimming Instructor and employs hundreds of youth in the community who have completed the required training.

Aquafitness classes Looking for a new fitness challenge? Try Aquafitness! Water provides excellent resistance training while minimizing impact. A great activity for cross training, or as a fun alternative to your existing fitness program. In addition a wide variety of lane, public and wave swims are available and offer the perfect reason to escape the cold and enjoy all that City of Ottawa swimming pools have to offer. For more information about program opportunities or public swimming times contact your local community pool or visit ottawa.ca.

FOOD

Your Community Newspaper

Tips, trivia and why Louis XV liked cold soup

O

ccasionally instead of passing along a recipe, I write a column filled with kitchen shortcuts and helpful tips. If I’ve come across some interesting bit of food trivia, I’ll include that as well. This week, I’ll take you from graham wafer crusts to King Louis XV of France. • When you need to press a graham wafer crust into a springform pan, sometimes it’s hard to find just the right tool. If you use your fingertips, they get greasy and covered with crumbs. A fork doesn’t get right to the edge of the pan, and it flattens only a small area at a time. • One of the best tools is a round potato masher, the kind that has square holes, not curved lines of wire. The curved shape fits the edges of the springform pan and the large size covers a bigger area with each impression. • Another handy item to keep on hand in your kitchen is a box of thin latex gloves, the kind that food preparers use in commercial establishments. Put on a pair of gloves whenever you’re handling a

PAT TREW Food ‘n’ Stuff messy mixture in the kitchen. Whether you’re pressing crumbs into a springform pan, shaping meatballs, working with dough or mixing meatloaf, they’ll let you get right in there with your hands, yet keep them clean.A word of caution:, don’t re-use gloves that you’ve used on raw meat, fish or poultry. Throw them out to avoid possible contamination of other foods. • To tenderize beef stew, add one or two tomatoes to the pot. Tomatoes contain an acid that breaks down meat and tenderizes it naturally. • If your glass or plastic cutting board slides across the kitchen counter when you’re using it, dampen a dish cloth, and lay it on the counter under the cutting board. This also works on the large plastic sheets when rolling out pastry on them.

• If you have one of the large rectangular glass or plastic cutting board, measure its length and width. Many are just the right size for rolling out dough into a rectangle for making pastries such as cinnamon rolls. They’re also handy for making French bread when the dough needs to be shaped by rolling it back and forth on a flat surface. • Which brings us to King Louis XV of France. According to one story, he was so afraid of being poisoned that he had several servants taste his food before he ate it. By the time the soup reached him, it was cold. He liked it so much that he had it served cold from then on. That – supposedly – is why the creamy French potato soup, vichysoisse, is always served chilled.

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Howl-O-Ween Pugstock raising rescue cash Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

HOWL-O-WEEN

Maroosis said she’s hoping the Howl-O-Ween Pugstock will raise over $4,000, which is what the event brought in last year. An all-breeds event, animal owners are invited to dress up with their pets. “This is probably one of our most fun events,” said Maroosis, who currently has four pugs calling her house home. The Halloween-themed fundraiser, which only costs $2 for admission, helps to pay for vet bills, surgeries, food, leashes, brushes and other necessary items. “Any of the money that comes in…goes directly back to the pugs,” she said. “Things we need to keep the pugs healthy.” A number of contests will be held throughout the afternoon, including one for best costume, the pug with the curliest tail, the oldest dog, and the most wrinkles. “It’s a hoot,” said Maroosis. There will be an agility demonstration, and pugs will be invited to test their dexterity after the show. As well, the fundraiser will feature a number of vendors, veterinarians, a pet photographer, a pug café, a silent auction, raffles, and an adoption corner. “We bring our foster pugs with us,” said Maroosis. “(People) they can come and meet the foster pugs.” If families aren’t quite ready to make a commitment, they can apply to become a foster home – the rescue supplies foster families with everything needed. “It’s always something we’re in desperate need of,” she said.

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The eighth-annual Howl-O-Ween Pugstock raises funds for Under My Wing – Pug Rescue. It’s an all-breeds event and dogs and their owners are invited to dress up in costume. The organization rescues pugs from across the province and into parts of Quebec, working with other shelters to offer the dogs their best shot at a new life. Currently, Under My Wing is working to adopt out two more senior pugs – Jaydee, 9, and Ziggy, 10. Jaydee, a female, was an owner surrender and has been with the rescue since the beginning of September. The little tan-and-black pug is described as a cuddler who enjoys her walks and is an “enthusiastic eater.” Ziggy, a male, has been at the rescue since mid-August. An owner surrender, the mostly black pug is loving, enjoys human companionship and belly rubs, but isn’t needy. “He’s just kind of a quiet guy,” said Maroosis, adding adopting a more senior pet is a great route for many people. “When you adopt an older dog you know what you’re getting,” she said, adding pugs live to an average age of 15. “(They’re) just content to be with you.” Visit the website at undermywingpugrescue.com for more information.

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EMC news - The eighthannual Howl-O-Ween Pugstock is sure to be a tail-wagging good time this year. The event will take place at the Ron Kolbus Lakeside Centre on Sunday, Oct. 28, from noon to 3:30 p.m. The Howl-O-Ween Pugstock is a fundraiser for the non-profit Under My Wing – Pug Rescue, which takes in abandoned pugs and helps find them a forever home. The rescue organization is always in need of foster homes and donations, said Diane Maroosis, volunteer foster co-ordinator. This past year, Under My Wing had to close its doors because they were packed full. “It was the first time we had to close our intake,” said the Bridlewood resident. “It was pretty frantic. We had a lot of pugs.” She added they were able to reopen shortly after thanks to a number of adoptions.

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Under My Wing – Pug Rescue is run entirely by volunteers and has re-homed 238 dogs since it was founded in 2006. Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Parkwood Hills event showcases plans for west-end community Jennifer McIntosh

The project, funded in part by NROCRC, the South Nepean Satellite Community Health Centre and the city, asked residents to take pictures and create other artworks to showcase the good and the bad of the west-end neighbourhood. Knoxdale-Merivale Coun. Keith Egli, who works with the Parkwood Hills stakeholders group – a mix of property owners, NROCRC staff and residents who have been working to identify resources and service gaps in the com-

jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news - Residents and staff from the Nepean, Rideau and Osgoode Community Resource Centre (NROCRC) showed their plans for the Parkwood Hills community at a celebration on Oct. 13. The celebration – held at Sir Winston Churchill Public School on Mulvagh Avenue – showcased the community art gallery, which included works from the community voice project.

munity, said projects like community voice help him to do his job. “I was on board immediately when I heard about the project‌this summer,â€? Egli said. “It’s great to see residents so engaged and interested in the community.â€? One of the key areas of concern, Egli said was the Emerald Plaza branch of the Ottawa Public Library. The Emerald Plaza – housed in a strip mall near the intersection of Merivale Road and Meadowlands Drive is a small, but

Where Canada Comes Together

Touchdown! The Grey CupÂŽ Coming to Rideau Hall To mark the Grey Cup’s 100th Championship Game, come see the Cup at Rideau Hall from October 21 to 24, 2012. One of Canada’s best known trophies, donated by Earl Grey, 9th governor general of Canada, will be on display. Sunday, October 21:

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Monday, October 22:

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Tuesday, October 23:

11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Wednesday, October 24:

9 a.m. to 12 noon

well-used branch. “Every year during budget time I hear from people who are worried it might close,� Egli said. “I am here to tell you it won’t close; if I have anything to say about it, it will double in size.� Some of the concerns also included those of 11-year-old Charlie Senack, who painted a scene near the Tim Horton’s and Wendy’s restaurant on the corner of Merivale and Meadowlands. The scene shows a lot of garbage on the ground near a bus shelter and the bus caption says the lack of available garbage cans mean a lot of trash gets left on the road. Other suggestions that came out of the community voice project were things like more after-school activities and a women’s group. Janis Lacroix, who works with the stakeholders group, said the purpose of the group is to brainstorm around resources in the community, come of with solutions to problems and identify barriers. Some successes have been the Get Moving fitness group for women and the Parkwood Hills Youth Advisory Group. Residents have also established a wish list for Inverness Park, which would include some benches for conversations, a serenity corner for Tai Chi and Yoga and an area to play games like backgammon.

JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

Ananya Jain does some crafts during a showcase of the community voice project at Sir Winston Churchill Public School on Oct. 13

1 Sussex Drive, Ottawa Parking is available in neighbouring streets. Limited parking on site is available after 4 p.m. via Sussex Gate. Earl Grey, Governor General of Canada, 1904-1911 Photo: Library and Archives Canada, C-017372

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Tega Homes proposes 32-storey condo tower for Parkdale Rezoning application for 218-unit building adds to growing list of new developments steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - The Mechanicsville section of Parkdale has quickly become a hotbed of condominium development, with yet another proposal for a high-rise tower submitted to the city. A development application from Tega Homes was recently submitted for a 32-storey mixed-use condominium building at the northeast corner of Parkdale Avenue and Burnside Avenue. The site is adjacent to the site where a 28-storey condo tower was approved in late June, and a block north of a 29-storey proposal that will be debated by the city’s planning committee on Nov. 13. Those earlier proposals were submitted by developers Urbandale and Richcraft Homes, respectively. The zoning bylaw amendment submitted by Tega encompasses properties at 111, 115, and 121 Parkdale Avenue and 71 Burnside Ave.,

and asks for increased height (from 37 metres to 105 metres) and reduced setbacks on all sides of the property. The application shows a total of 218 residential units placed in a diamond-shaped tower, with a podium consisting 10 work/live units on the second floor and several ground-floor retail units totaling 450 square metres. Parking spaces for 194 vehicles would be divided into 173 tenant spaces, 18 visitor spaces and three commercial spaces. The accelerated pace of development applications in this area, coupled with the looming but long-term redevelopment plan for Tunney’s Pasture has made intensification and traffic volume a hot topic in Mechanicsville. Mechanicsville Community Association president Guy Lachapelle said he and his members are aware of the applications and have scheduled to meet with representatives of the developer on Oct. 18 to

ask questions and gather further information. A meeting with Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs will follow, along with a public consultation to be held in the community at some point after that date. Until more is known, the community association is holding off on stating its position on the proposal. “We’re aware of (the proposal) and are following it very closely,” Lachapelle said. “We have a great interest in what will come out of this.”

Hobbs said at this early stage she is eager to hear feedback from the community as the first step in the process. She also expressed her gratitude that the community association re-formed in such a “timely” manner, in order to have a say in planning issues affecting their neighbourhood. The Oct. 18 meeting with representatives from Tega will include participation from members of the neighbouring Hintonburg Community Association. Parkdale

to the intersection at this point, a mention that will no doubt still debate within the community. Earlier this year, Tega Homes proposed a 36-storey condo for the block just north of Parkdale Market, despite the eight-storey height limit described in the Wellington West Community Design Plan. That application was later withdrawn and re-submitted as a proposal for two buildings, an 18 storey tower and a smaller, eight storey structure. That application is still pending and has yet to go to committee. R0011655298

Steph Willems

Avenue, which has become a notoriously crowded route to and from the Queensway, runs through both communities. A traffic study submitted by Stantec Consulting shows current traffic at the intersection of Parkdale and Scott Street approaching capacity at peak periods, with 2015 projections (which takes into account new residential units) indicating the intersection “will begin to experience capacity constraints,” with some movements exceeding the city’s proscribed volume-tocapacity ratio. The study suggests upgrades would have to be made

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

23


SPORTS

Your Community Newspaper

West Ottawa Soccer club hires first-ever CEO Son of former national team coach to help lead growth of burgeoning organization WHY NOT JOIN IN THE FUN

Blair Edwards blair.edwards@metroland.com

Scouting and Guiding Youth

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Bring in your pumpkins on Wed. 24 October before 9:00 p.m. or on Thursday morning to Westgate Shopping Centre 1309 Carling Ave. The pumpkin display table will be setup near Kardish Foods . Please ensure that your pumpkin is clearly identified with Troop information and contact person . For more information please contact Doug Cody at dougcody@hotmail.com

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EMC news - The West Ottawa Soccer Club has hired its first-ever chief executive officer to manage the rapidly growing organization. “The operation’s so large now we need a professional to look after the day-to-day operations of the club as well as take the club to the next level,” said Brian Mason, president of the soccer association. “The club’s growing and it’s just an awful lot of work.” Bjorn Osieck will assume the post of CEO after spending the past six and a half years at the helm of the British Columbia Soccer Association, the third-largest soccer governing body in the country, with roughly 150,000 registered players, coaches, officials and volunteers. Prior to that, Osieck was executive director of operations for the Saskatchewan Soccer Association from 2003-06. “I am thrilled to join forces with Brian Mason and the entire WOSC board and staff team to serve the club’s growing membership base,” said Osieck in a press release. “Much has been said in recent years about what we collectively have to do to ensure Canadian soccer’s future success at all levels and I firmly believe that clubs like the WOSC are the grassroots engine to drive the needed changes in the years ahead.” Osieck holds a business administration and a master’s degree in sports administra-

tion from York University in Toronto. His father, Holger Osieck, was the head coach of Canada’s soccer team when it won the 2000 Gold Cup and is now the head coach of Australia’s men’s team. The creation of the CEO position comes two years after the Kanata Soccer Association and Goulbourn Soccer Association voted to merge, creating the second largest soccer club in the country. The new CEO will handle day-to-day management of the club as well as work to create strategic alliances with the municipal and provincial governments and forge ties with other soccer bodies such as the Ontario and Canadian soccer associations. Osieck will also be asked to continue efforts by the club to foster long-term player development, by providing programs that move away from scores and standings and instead concentrates on basic skill development, especially for players between the ages of four to 12. “It’s not all about winning; it’s about developing the athlete,” said Mason, adding that no scores will be kept of games played by children between the ages of four and 12. “It’s being met with some resistance from certain groups,” said Mason. “It depressurizes the game completely.” Osieck will also be responsible for working with the city and local businesses to develop soccer fields as soon as possible, said Mason. “We’d love to partner with the larger companies in the west end,” said Mason, adding that no potential partners have been identified yet. “We’re open to partnering with whoever we can.” Heading up West Ottawa

Soccer was an opportunity too exciting to pass up, said Osieck. The game of soccer is undergoing a grassroots revolution in communities, he said, with clubs starting to join forces to deliver better programs and facilities. “You see less and less of the small organizations and you see more and more of the larger organizations,” he said. “It’s just a professionalization of the game.” Osieck said his immediate priority is to establish stronger relationships with other soccer clubs such as the Nepean Hotspurs and Ottawa South United as well as governing bodies such as the Ontario Soccer Association. The city’s soccer associations must work together and present a unified voice to make it easier to work with municipal decision makers, Osieck said. “We need to look also inside the club,” said Osieck. “Make sure we have the best and appropriate array of programming.” Long term player development is another priority, he said. Players might have temporary success built on size or strength, but might not necessarily develop the necessary skills for later years, such as playing on junior and national teams, said Osieck. “They can’t compete anymore because everyone is strong and fast,” he said. “But (meanwhile other players) have developed soccer skills.” Skills such as balance, coordination, running, throwing and kicking. The soccer association needs to provide programs that develop those skills without fear of failure, he added. That won’t happen if teams focus on scoring and winning, said Osieck. “Soccer is the world’s game,” he said. “But (it) is alive and well at the community level. It’s the beautiful game.”

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Your Community Newspaper

soléa: STEPPING OUT OF PAIN AND INTO STYLE When Ian Colquhoun and his team opened soléa in Ottawa at 943 Carling Avenue ten years ago, they had no idea how the community would take to the concept of offering both pedorthic services of a Certified Pedorthist and the largest selection of fine comfort footwear in Ottawa at one convenient location. After a decade and thousands of satisfied clients with happier feet, they have their answer. First, for the uninitiated, a Certified Pedorthist is a welltrained health care professional who specializes in the use of footwear and supportive devices to address conditions that affect the feet and lower limbs. These specialists can analyze and correct gait and posture problems with the use of orthotics, customcrafted footwear inserts that, when properly designed and manufactured, can bring relief to a host of foot, leg, back pain and mobility issues. soléa Derek Gilmer, C. Ped. (C), C. Ped. Tech. and their clients are fortunate to have the talent, dedication, and services of Derek Gilmer, C. Ped. (C), C. Ped. Tech, one of the few Ottawa area Certified Pedorthists who holds both designations of Canadian Certified Pedorthist and Certified Pedorthic Technician. What this means is that at soléa, the person who assesses your foot issues is the same person who designs and manufactures your orthotics and who trains the staff to help you select the proper footwear for your orthotics. This fall, Derek is offering complimentary consultations to clients of soléa Pedorthic Services and they are now available on an appointment basis. Just about every client of soléa Pedorthic Services is amazed at the relief from pain that their new orthotics provide. Rather than feeling tired and drained at the end of their day, they walk with renewed energy that’s testament to a freedom in mobility they may not have experienced in years. They have learned what the soléa team has known for years-proper foot alignment may help provide the foundation for pain-free leg, hip, lower back and upper back mobility. The drive to satisfy the demand for comfort footwear that is both stylish and functional came from the need to serve both women and men who require orthotics but don’t necessarily want to wear orthopedic looking shoes. The success of any orthotic appliance is based not only on the skills of the pedorthist but on the quality and fit of the shoe it is to be inserted into. To this end, soléa researches and holds all the shoe and accessory lines it carries to a very high standard. Such well known names as Finn Comfort, Mephisto, Dansko and Gabor, to name only a few, are not only stocked at soléa, but carried in full seasonal offerings for those who desire comfortable footwear year round. As well, Certified Pedorthist, Derek Gilmer trains each soléa sales associate to help ensure the best match for the client of orthotics and shoe. For those with discriminating taste, soléa provides shoes that look decidedly fashionable without sacrificing quality or function.

REDEEM THIS COUPON AT TIME OF PURCHASE

UNLIKE MOST ORTHOTICS CLINICS THAT RELY UPON COMPUTER-GENERATED ORTHOTICS AND THAT OUTSOURCE THEIR MANUFACTURING, THE CLIENTS OF SOLÉA PEDORTHIC SERVICES BENEFIT FROM HANDS-ON, TECHNICAL EXPERIENCE AND LOCAL MANUFACTURING CRAFTED BY HAND.

This level of service ensures unmatched quality control and a superior quality of product and ensures a maximum level of mobility improvement. There is a fast turnaround time of ten working days for most custom made orthotics.

But no matter where you might have received your orthotics, you’re more than welcome at soléa. Rather than choosing from a limited selection of footwear at an ordinary shoe retailer, at soléa you can select from a wide array of styles and fashions, chosen to meet most budgets. And, at soléa, you can be assured of the highest levels of professional and personal service that will help maximize the benefits of your custom orthotics by correctly matching them to the right shoe.

soléa is located at 943 Carling Avenue at Sherwood Drive, just west of Dow’s Lake and easily accessible from the Queensway via the Parkdale Avenue exit or a short walk from the Carling Avenue O-Train station. The pedorthic clinic is by appointment only and the phone number is 613-728-6905. soléa has free parking and is open Mondays through Wednesdays from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm, Thursdays and Fridays from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm and is also open Saturdays from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm and Sundays from 12 noon to 5:00 pm. soléa can be reached at 613-728-6905 or by email at info@solea.ca or you can visit the website at www.solea.ca to view soléa’s services and extensive lines of fine comfort footwear. Leave your pain behind and step out in style with soléa.

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soléa | 943 Carling Avenue, Ottawa 613.728.6905 Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

25


SPORTS

Your Community Newspaper

Women’s world hockey championship countdown begins Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com

EMC sports - Hockey fans in Ottawa are just six months away from having a unique chance to see the world’s most talented female hockey players in action. From April 2 to 9, Ottawa will host the 2013 International Ice Hockey Federation Women’s Championship at Scotiabank Place and the Nepean Sportsplex. The event will feature the top 10 women teams from around the globe vying for the world championship. At a press conference on Oct. 11, the federal government announced it was supporting the event to the tune of $500,000. “Hosting the 2013 IIHF Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship will not only provide an economic boost to the Ottawa region, it will also demonstrate that Canada is truly a leading sport nation,� said Bal Gosal, minister of state for sport. He said the government was pleased to support an event that will offer Canadian athletes the opportunity to compete against the world’s best on home soil, as they continue to be a huge inspiration piration to a younger generation ation of hockey players. �Hosting this amazing event will keep p the momentum going ng around women’s hockey while al-

lowing players to compete in a world class tournament here at home,� he said. The announcement came as countries around the world marked the first International Day of the Girl. Bringing the women’s world championship back to Ottawa will inspire younger generations of girls to try hockey and stay in the game, said Fran Rider, president of the Ontario Women’s Hockey Association. The first-ever women’s world championship was hosted by Ottawa 23 years ago, with Canada claiming its very first women’s championship gold medal. “This is going to be a tremendous event for the people of Ottawa,� said Mayor Jim Watson. “To have the best women hockey players in the world coming to compete in our home town is not only great for the teams, but it is going to be even better for those young girls who are aspiring to participate in the national, international and Olympic level. It is going to inspire the next generation of young hockey players to get involved.� On hand for the announce-

EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Meghan Agosta, left, member of Team Canada since 2004, Mayor Jim Watson, Bal Gosal, minister of state for sport and 2010 winter Olympics gold medalist Tessa Bonhomme attended an event to announce a federal funding boost for the 2013 Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship on Oct. 11. ment were Canadian players Meghan Agosta and Tessa Bonhomme, who have been involved with the national team since 2004. two-time A two ti Olympic gold medalist and top scorer in history of women’s the his college hockey in the colleg United States, Agosta Unite said wearing the sa Canada jersey is always both an

honour. “It is not a right. It is a privilege,� she said. “Playing for the national team has always been my dream, ever since I was six years old, and to be able to put on that jersey the first time was a dream come true.� Agosta hopes she can en-

courage as many young women to be as successful as she has been. “If I can inspire somebody to do something special, then I will be honoured,� she said. “It is not about the gold medals that we have won, it is about inspiring somebody to do something special in their

lives.� For Bonhomme, women’s hockey has come a long way. Twenty years from now, she hopes women will have a fully-functioning professional league, one that not only has a high-level competition that there is now, but one that also has packed rinks. “We have the product and we showed it in Vancouver,� she said. “We are on our way there. It just takes time.� The 2013 IIHF Ice Hockey Women’s World Championship is being hosted in partnership by Hockey Canada, the Ontario Women’s Hockey Association and Senators Sports and Entertainment. “We look forward to seeing fans fill our arenas to watch the top female players from across the globe take to the ice this April,� said Cyril Leeder, president of Senators Sports and Entertainment. He said he expects the tournament to be another record-setting event. “The 2013 IIHF Women’s World Championship here in Ottawa will be the largest congregation and celebration of women’s hockey ever staged,� said Leeder. “We have a number of high-level goals for this event and one of them is to set an attendance record and to establish a new record of 200,000 people attending this event that will surpass the record set in Winnipeg in 2007.�

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RENFREW HYDRO INC. POWER LINE TECHNICIAN / MAINTAINER or 4th or 3rd year APPRENTICE Renfrew Hydro Inc. maintains and distributes electrical power to approx. 4,200 residential and commercial customers within the Town of Renfrew. While we are currently seeking a certified powerline technician maintainer, we will consider candidates who are a 3rd or 4th year Apprentice to assist our crew in their day to day operations. Under the direction of the Crew leader, the power line maintainer or 4th or 3rd year apprentice will be responsible for all duties related to overhead, underground and distribution circuits, 44kV and below. Qualified applicants who meet the following criteria will be considered: • • • • • • • • • •

Grade 12 diploma Journeyman Powerline Technician Certification licensed to work in Ontario or be a 4th or 3rd year Apprentice Valid Class “D” Drivers License with a Class “Z” Air Brake Endorsement with an excellent driving record Competent in the construction, maintenance, troubleshooting and repair of the electrical distribution, both overhead and underground. Ability to read and interpret distribution system construction drawings and supporting documents. Knowledge of E&USA Safety Rules, Occupational Health & Safety Act and its regulations and Reg.22/04, Utility Protection Code Current certificate in CPR, First Aid and WHMIS would be considered an asset. Must be physically able to perform the essential duties for year-round outdoor line work including regular standby duties and responding to emergency call-outs in all elements. Must have strong written and oral communication skills Must be able to establish and maintain effective working relationship with internal/external customers and electrical industry partners.

The successful applicant is expected to reside within 15 minute normal travel time of the Town of Renfrew. Renfrew Hydro Inc. offers a competitive wage and benefits package in accordance with the Collective Agreement. Qualified applicants should forward a complete resume stating their education, work experience and references in confidence by __October 31, 2012 ____ to: Renfrew Hydro Inc. 29 Bridge St. Renfrew, Ontario K7V 3R3 Email: info@renfrewhydro.com Attention: President We thank all applicants for their interest; however only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Youths!

Adults!

Seniors!

Earn Extra Money! Keep Your Weekends Free!

Routes Available! We’re looking for Carriers to deliver our newspaper!

• • • • •

Deliver Right In Your Own Neighbourhood Papers Are Dropped Off At Your Door Great Family Activity No Collections Thursday Deliveries

Call Today 613.221.6247 613 .221.6247 Or apply on-line at YourOttawaRegion.com 308527

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

27


HELP WANTED HOMEWORKERS NEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!! Full & Part Time Positions Are Available - On-Line Data Entry, Typing Work, Home Assemblers, Mystery Shoppers, Online Surveys, Others. No Experience Needed! -

CLASSIFIED

PETS

REAL ESTATE

DOG SITTING Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily Marg 613-721-1530

Income Properties: Brand new semi-detached, leased, $199,000. 1200 sq/ft bungalow, 6 years old, leased, $229,000. Triplex, fully leased, 5 years old, $449,000. Call Jim Barnett 613-217-1862.

www.ontariojobsathome.com

Night crew, part/full time, experience preferred Moncion’s Independent,, 671 River Rd., Ottawa. 613-822-4749.

Part-time, Residential Cleaner wanted. Barrhaven area, female preferred, English speaking. Please call (613)302-8473.

FOR RENT

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

Need a car or truck and can’t get financed? Whatever your credit issues we can help. Guaranteed financing is available to everyone regardless of credit history. Call today, drive tomorrow. Call Joseph 613-200-0100.

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

Offering diplomas in: HEALTH PROGRAMS, SOCIAL PROGRAMS, BUSINESS PROGRAMS, TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMS

ONE CALL MINTO HAS IT ALL

75 Albert Street, Suite 101 | Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7

CALL TODAY!

FROM EAST TO WEST YOUR NEW RENTAL HOME AWAITS YOU!

1-866-401-3748

CHOICE

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

SERVICE QUALITY

nannyformama@gmail.com

LIVESTOCK

LOCATION

Applehill Stables 6115 Prince of Wales Drive offers riding lessons (beginner-advanced), leasing, boarding with huge indoor arena. 613-489-2446 email applehillstables@rogers.com

MORTGAGES

CL380008

$$MONEY$$ Consolidate Debts Mortgages to 90% No income, Bad credit OK! Better Option Mortgage #10969 1-800-282-1169 www.mortgageontario.com

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

Consolidate your Debts. 1 monthly pmt, including credit cards, taxes, collection agencies, garnishments, etc. GMC Consulting 24 hrs, Toll Free 1-877-977-0304. Services Bilingues. gmyre@debtzero.ca

$1350

MUSIC

NOTICES #1 in PARDONS Clear your criminal record! Start TODAY for ONLY $49.95/month. Our accredited agency offers fastest, guaranteed pardon. For FREE consultations call 1-866-416-6772 www.expresspardons.com REMOVE YOUR CRIMINAL RECORD 100,000+ have used our service since 1989. BBB A+ rating. US Waiver allows you to travel to the US, or apply for a Record Suspension (Pardon) - professional & affordable Call 1-8-NOW PARDON (1-866-972-7366) www.removeyourrecord.com

PERSONAL ALL YOUR FRIENDS and coworkers married? They have no single friends to introduce you to? Time to turn to a professional. Misty River Introductions can help you find your life partner. www.mistyriverintros.com 613-257-3531 TRUE Advice! TRUE Clarity! TRUE Psychics! 1-877-342-3032 or 1-900-528-6256 or Mobile #4486 (18+) 3.19/min. www.truepsychics.ca

$1150

On Street Verifier

$1050

WANTED

$950

Metroland Media Group & the EMC are looking for an Independent Contractor to ensure that our products are being delivered to the public. Audits will take place Thursday evenings & Fridays. The successful individual will have a vehicle, use of computer with ms-excel & excellent interpersonal skills. For more information and to apply please contact traci.cameron@metroland.com 0301.332055

World Class Drummer. From Five Man Electrical Band, is accepting new students for private lessons. Call Steve 613-831-5029. www.stevehollingsworth.ca

PETS Yellow Labrador Retriever pups, born Aug 2, 12. Vet checked, vaccinated, ready to go. Shawville 613-223-5015

28

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

www.trilliumcollege.ca

FT Live-in Caregiver for Senior. Ottawa West. Private home with accommodations, dental benefits. Secondary School Educations. Minimum 1 yr experience. $10.75/hr Call Raya (613)317-0293 email:

FINANCIAL / INCOME TAX

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

The power to change your life.

2003 Pontiac Grand Prix SE 4 door, 195,000kms. 6 cylinder 3.1, full load. Lady Highway Driven. Has GT look. $2500.00 or OBO as is. Kevin 613-485-6680

Terrific like new, 3,500 sq. ft. log home, on 90 waterfront partly treed, private acres. 4 car garage, over 1,200’ level waterfront. $799,000. Gerry Hudson, Kingston (613)449-1668 Sales Representative Rideau Town and Country Realty Ltd, Brokerage (613)273-5000.

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

CL383049

FOR RENT

FOR RENT

CL383361

Overhead Door Technician Established overhead door company looking for experienced technicians/installers. Welding and electrical ability an asset. Top wages/great benefits. Send resume to jordan@alparsons.on.ca or fax 613-798-2187.

VEHICLES

www.emcclassified.ca

TRILCOSTW1230

Your Community Newspaper

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS


CLASSIFIED

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

LOST & FOUND

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

GARAGE SALE

LOST & FOUND

CL418629_TF

MISSING CAT SUBSTANTIAL REWARD

Fort McMurray

02725&2$&+ '5,9(56 „ 6,7( 6(59,&( %86 '5,9(56

LOST IN BRIDLEWOOD NEAR FOXLEIGH

LADOO

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GARAGE SALE

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Eastern Ontario’s Largest Indoor Flea Market

Ladoo is 2 years old and requires monthly medication. Her family is heartbroken. One member of her family is ailing and is desperate to ďŹ nd her and bring her home. Substantial reward offered for her safe return or information leading to her return. If you are caring for her, the family is deeply grateful but is missed terribly and her medical treatment is critical. Please contact 613-592-4960 any time day or night.

150 booths Open Every Sunday All Year 8am-4pm Hwy. #31 – 2 kms north of 401

Mchaffies Flea Market

CL382625

CL385124

Network

and Ou Building! tdoor

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www.emcclassiďŹ ed.ca

175277_0212

Your Community Newspaper

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

ADVERTISE ACROSS ONTARIO OR ACROSS THE COUNTRY! For more information contact your local newspaper.

AUTOMOTIVE

EMPLOYMENT OPPS.

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A-Z DRIVERS WANTED

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HELP WANTED

FOR SALE

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MORTGAGES = =44! ! ' : 3 : 6 & 4L " : B : = ' 4& : B : 5 : ( = ' 5 Q " Z * 8[ "" = ! '5 '-II'I11'0030 H30 6 J ((()$$ & ) & H" S 3 32J) 999 : 3 : 1 $ ? ?4= ' < : : + : @ : $6 ) 9 .G 93.-)11K & H J) ! & : : ( 88 B4 4 % ! $ ? ?4=: "" < # '5 '-..'3-3' 2/: ((()& ) & H"% S ./2/J)

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Connect with Ontarians – extend your business reach! www.networkclassified.org Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

29


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Your Community Newspaper

Your Community Newspaper

1018.R0011684148

BASEMENTS

AIR CONDITIONING

LEAKING BASEMENTS!! We come to you!

613-761-8919

&REE %STIMATES s !LL 7ORK 'UARANTEED

CUSTOM BUILDS GARAGE BUILDERS

SPRING SALE

SPECIALS

all sizes & styles available 8x10 delivered & installed

We can tear down and rebuild.

Single Car 12 x 20 H^c\aZ 8Vg &%m'%

Only $9900 Only

00 9999.00

$

for only

$1650 $1690

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*Does not include pad.

613-220-2316

613-422-4510

0324.359174

ALL SIZES AND STYLES AVAILABLE

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ELECTRICAL

ELECTRICAL

EAVESTROUGHS

GLAVINA DRYWALL

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CALL SIMON 613-715-2398 glavinadrywall@gmail.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT

ELECTRICSOLUTIONS ELECTRIC SOLUTIONS

DYNAMIC HOME RENOVATIONS

License #7005601

Father/Son-in-law Father/Son-in-law DROPPING RATES To Build Clientele

Knowledge of All Electrical Matters Accepting Small or Largee FREE Jobs to Build Our Name ESTIMATE S Many References

BATHROOMS KITCHENS PAINTING DRYWALL INSTALLATIONS R0011291721

R0011291686

HOME IMPROVEMENT

43

FREE ESTIMATES ~ ALL WORK FULLY GUARANTEED SENIORS DISCOUNT

YEARS

613–601–9559

613-858-4949

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REN VATIONS BRASK9EAR S %O XPERIENCE /VER SPECIALIZING IN

613-566-7077

Guaranteed Workmanship

613-733-6336

Drywall Carpentry All Types of Installations Painting Remodelling Basements P lumbing Renovations & Bathrooms Serving the Nepean & Barrhaven Area.

CALL ROBERT 613-862-7870 2EFERENCES !VAILABLE „ &REE %STIMATES

INSULATION R0011291745

M. Thompson Construction and Home Improvement

"ATHROOMS /NLY

“A Beautiful Bathroom That Won’t SOAK Youâ€? UĂŠ >ĂŒÂ…Ă€ÂœÂœÂ“ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ ÂˆĂŒVÂ…iÂ˜ĂŠĂ€i“œ`iÂ?ˆ˜}° UĂŠ ÂœÂ“ÂŤÂ?iĂŒiĂŠL>ĂŒÂ…Ă€ÂœÂœÂ“ĂŠĂ€iÂ˜ÂœĂ›>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂƒĂŠĂ•ĂƒÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠ ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ-VÂ…Â?Ă•ĂŒiÀÊ-ĂžĂƒĂŒi“Ê>ĂƒĂŠĂƒiiÂ˜ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠ /6° UĂŠ Â˜ĂŒiĂ€ÂˆÂœĂ€ĂŠÂŤ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŒÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ Ă€ÂœĂœÂ˜ĂŠ ÂœĂ•Â?`ˆ˜} UĂŠ ÂˆÂ˜ÂˆĂƒÂ…i`ĂŠL>Ăƒi“iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂ?>Ă•Â˜`Ă€ĂžĂŠĂ€ÂœÂœÂ“Ăƒ° UĂŠ iĂ€>“ˆV]ĂŠÂ…>Ă€`ĂœÂœÂœ`ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂ…i>ĂŒi`ĂŠyÂœÂœĂ€ÂˆÂ˜}° UĂŠ Ă•Â?Â?ÞÊ Â˜ĂƒĂ•Ă€i`]ĂŠ ĂŠ ÂœÂ“ÂŤÂ?>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŒĂŠ Ă€ii°

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Fine attention to detail, excellent references, reliable, clean, honest workmanship

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HOME IMPROVEMENT

R0011653591-1004

613-720-0520 mtthompson@rogers.com Mike Thompson

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UĂŠ/Â…iÀ“>Â?ĂŠ >Ă€Ă€ÂˆiĂ€ UĂŠ VÂœ >ĂŒĂŒĂƒ

Custom Home Specialists R0011291821/0301

FALL SAVINGS

10% Discount

"˜iĂŠ >Â?Â?ĂŠ iĂŒĂƒĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ /…ˆ˜}ĂƒĂŠ9ÂœĂ•ĂŠ7>Â˜ĂŒĂŠ

œ˜i°°°ĂŠ " t Fully Insured • Independently Owned and Operated in Ottawa since 1998 * Electrical work performed by ECRA contractors

HOME IMPROVEMENT

R0011651627

Finish Basements, Bathrooms, Kitchens, Drywall, Painting, all Types of Flooring, Additions, Repairs, Doors & Windows, Decks, All Types of RooďŹ ng – Build Houses

613-723-5021 ottawa.handymanconnection.com G%%&&(%',+'"%(%-

s 0LUMBING s /DD *OBS AND MORE

s &REE %STIMATES s "EST 2ATES s 3ENIOR $ISCOUNTS

Brennan Brothers Ltd.

R0011641276

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(OME -AINTENANCE 2EPAIRS 2ENOVATIONS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

“Evening & Weekend Service�

R0011303110

HANDYMAN PLUS s #AULKING s $RYWALL s &LOORING

Home Services

Convenient & Affordable Home Repairs “Your Small Job Specialists� We Install!! Home Improvement Products s Plumbing Service We install & repair s &AUCETS s 3INKS s 4OILETS s $RAIN 5NBLOCKING s Handyman Service s Carpentry Service s Dishwashers Installed

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Golden Years

s #ARPENTRY s +ITCHEN "ATH 4ILING s 0AINTING

HOME IMPROVEMENT MasterTrades Home Maintenance & Repairs

PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL BASEMENTS ALL TYPES OF FLOORING REPAIRS ADDITIONS

BILINGUAL SERVICE

estimates@electric-solutions.ca info@electric-solutions.ca

DRYWALL FRAMING DRYWALL INSTALLATION & FINISHING EVERYTHING FROM NEW BUILDS TO SMALL REPAIRS

Garages Built & Installed

Call for FREE Estimate

R0011449402

GARDEN SHEDS SPRING

Tony Garcia 613-237-8902

0315.R0011315133

Call Ardel Concrete Services

s #ONCRETE WORK s 'ARAGE mOORS s &LOOR lNISHING s 7ALKWAYS $RIVEWAYS s 2EPAIRS 2ESTORATIONS s 0ARGING EPOXY COATING s #ONCRETE CRACK INJECTION

Seniors Especially Welcome " " ! " ! " "

R0011291831

SINCE 1976

613-843-1592 Toll Free 1-855-843-1592 www.insultech.ca

A+ Accredited

Read Online at www.emconline.ca 30

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

R0011368359

FOUNDATION CRACKS WINDOW WELL DRAINAGE WEEPING TILE

R0011369064

* Solar Pannels Wind Gen/Inverters Equipment * Geothermal Systems Commercial & Residential * Air ďŹ lters Commercial & Residential * Electric Motors * Variable Frequency Drives * Air source Heat Pumps (House & Pool) * Commercial Refrigeration AC & Chillers * Custom Built Electrical Panels * Steam HumidiďŹ ers * Motor Soft starts * Thermography * Air Balancing * Motor Controllers & PLC * Geothermal Supplies G%%&&)+%.'(

R0011291791

WWW.KINGSCROSS.NET (613-271-0988 ex 3) denis.laframboise@gmail.com Sales & Service

(613) 627-1034 1034

CONCRETE

COMPUTER SERVICES


BUSINESS DIRECTORY

Your Community Newspaper

Your Community Newspaper

1018.R0011684148

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

HERITAGE LAWN CARE

R0011677913

(613)623-9410

613

Cell: (613)978-3443

R0011557527

R0011291147

free estimates

www.axcellpainting.com

PLUMBING

ROOFING

BH ROOFING Residential Shingle Specialist

/$ -2 $# . (1' -2/ *2+!(,& $ )0 ,# *-4 / (,0

613-596-4349 www.dsplumbing.ca

The

R0011400731-0517

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed. $25 OFF 2 Year Warranty on Replacement Labour & Materials. Or Installation Of Live Phone Service. s Outside Hose Valve (frost free hydrant) Appointments Available 24/7. With Coupon Only. Other Offer. Not Valid With Any Expires 6/15/12

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ROOFING

Quality Workmanship Fully Insured • Free Estimates Written Guarantee on 15 Years of Labour

Before you decide to call any plumber, make sure you know the facts. Find out what most plumbers hope you never find out! 3-(# 1'$ -01*5 (01 )$0 .$-.*$ + )$ $3$/5 # 5 4'$, "'--0(,& .*2+!$/ ** -2/ '-2/ ./$ /$"-/#$# -,02+$/ 4 /$,$00 $00 &$ 1

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Getting It Right...The First Time • Asphalt Paving • Concrete Work • Interlocking Stone Specialists • Retaining Walls • Walkways & Steps

West: ROB 613-762-5577 East: CHRIS 613-276-2848

15% discount

PLUMBING

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REACH UP TO 279,000 HOMES EVERY WEEK CONTACT: SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca OR: KEVIN AT 613-688-1672 or email kevin.cameron@metroland.com Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

31


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

A little rock goes a long way Algonquin College kicks off annual United Way Campaign Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

As part of the $120,000 pledge by the college, students have their own fundraising goal of $5,000. In a press release, Algonquin president Kent MacDonald said the college’s United Way campaign has the highest student participation of all Ottawa postsecondary institutions. Last year, students raised $50,000 for various charitable campaigns in October and November alone. The college’s United Way team was set to host a Casino Night at the Woodroffe campus on Oct. 18. The final tally will be announced at a touchdown event on Nov. 30.

SUBMITTED

Algonquin faculty playing Axl Rose and Slash from Guns N’ Roses form the air band Iced Tea and their band won Judge’s Choice.

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Real God. Real People. Real Church. 7275 Parkway Rd. Greely, ON 613-821-1056

ĂœĂœĂœ°Ă€Âˆ`i>Ă•ÂŤ>ÀŽ°V>ĂŠUĂŠĂˆÂŁĂŽÂ‡Ă‡ĂŽĂŽÂ‡ĂŽÂŁxĂˆ

www.parkwayroad.com

Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM

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Join us Sundays at 10:30

The West Ottawa Church of Christ

A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

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Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

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Gloucester South Seniors Centre

DȖÞĜ_ĂžĹ˜Âś Ĺ˜ Č–ÇźĂŒsĹ˜ÇźĂžOĘ° Ç‹sÄś ǟÞŸĹ˜ Ĝʰ _ÞɚsÇ‹ÇŁs OĂŒČ–Ç‹OĂŒĘł

4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011292837

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Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service 43 Meadowlands Dr. W. Ottawa

613.224.1971

“Worship the Lord in the Beauty of his holiness...� R0011292835

Dominion-Chalmers United Church 355 Cooper Street at O’Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

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ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

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Sunday 7 pm Mass Now Available!

St Aidan’s Anglican Church

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

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Holy Eucharist 8:00 am & 10:30 am 10:30 am - Play Area for Under 5 934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth) 613 733 0102 – staidans@bellnet.ca

St Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Metcalfe on 8th Line - only 17 mins from HWY 417 s WWW 3AINT#ATHERINE-ETCALFE CA

Arlington Woods Free Methodist Church

225 McClellan Road, Nepean ON 613-596-9390 www.awfmc.ca

Email: admin@mywestminister.ca

613-722-1144

429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

Our Saviour Lutheran Church Sunday Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

715 Roosevelt Ave. (at Carling at Cole) Pastor: Rev. Marek Sabol 6ISIT HTTP WWW OURSAVIOUROTTAWA COM s

The Canadian Forces Chaplain Services Military Chapel Sunday Services Protestant Worship with Sunday School 09:30 Roman Catholic Mass with Children’s Liturgy 11:15 Come Join Us: (Located corner of Breadner Blvd. and Deniverville Pvt.)

Les Services de l’aumônerie des Forces canadiennes Services du dimanche de la chapelle militaire Service protestant avec l’Êcole du dimanche 09:30 Messe Catholique romaine avec la liturgie pour enfants 11:15 Venez-vous joindre à nous (SituÊe au coin du boul. Breadner et Pvt. Deniverville)

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Riverside United Church 3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley)

Sunday Worship at 11:00am R0011588383

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Only south Ottawa Mass convenient for those who travel, work weekends and sleep in!

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NOT YOUR AVERAGE ANGLICANS St. Michael and All Angels Anglican Church 2112 Bel-Air Drive (613) 224 0526 Join us for regular services Beginning September 9 – Sundays at 8:00 & 10:00 a.m. Church school and youth group Rector: Rev. Dr. Linda Privitera – Everyone welcome – Come as you are – www.stmichaelandallangels.ca

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Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. Nursery and Sunday School October 21st: Agree? Again! A renewed covenant and a new name

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Sunday Services 9 am Teen Breakfast Club Adult Sunday School (Childcare provided) 10 am Worship Service Nursery and Children’s Sunday School

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10 Chesterton Drive, Ottawa (Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

The Church You’ve Always Longed For... Models Integrity Come join us!

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Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 Rev.10:30 Jamesa.m. Murray

faith@magma.ca www.magma.ca/~faith

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Sunday Services: 8am and 10am Thursday Eucharist: 10am Nearly New Shop/Book Nook Open Thursday, Fridays 1pm - 3:30pm and ďŹ rst Saturday of each month: 10am - Noon 8 Withrow Avenue 613-224-7178

470 Roosevelt Ave. Westboro www.mywestminster.ca

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Heb. 13:8 “Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am – 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm – 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

Parkdale United Church

The Redeemed Christian Church of God

Heaven’s Gate Chapel

St. Richard’s Anglican Church

Worship 10:30 Sundays

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Watch & Pray Ministry

613.247.8676

(Do not mail the school please)

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Pleasant Park Baptist Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11am 414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886 pleasantparkbaptist.org

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

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Rideau Park United Church

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EMC news - There ain’t no stopping Algonquin College now. The students and staff are on the move. During the fifth annual air bands competition to signify the start of their United Way Campaign, students and faculty alike hit the stage to perform hits like Sweet Child ’O Mine, He’s the Wizard and Ain’t No Stoppin’ Us Now by the duo McFadden and Whitehead. The bands collected donations prior to their performances. Their performances were evaluated by a panel of judges and awarded prizes.

The judges’ pick went to the band called “Iced Tea� for their rendition of the Guns N’ Roses classic. Emerald City Media Designers took home a prize for the most money raised. The fan favourite will be determined when the remaining performances are put on YouTube for a vote. The college has set a goal of $120,000. Staff and students will attempt to raise that amount in four weeks time. To help the college reach its goal, there is a new e-Pledge system that will allow staff to track their individual donations. Full-time staff can also use it to set up a payroll deduction option.

Refreshments / fellowship following service www.magma.ca/~ruc (613)733-7735

Place your Church Services Ad Here email srussell @thenewsemc.ca Call: 613-688-1483


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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Students get first-hand look at life of homeless Algonquin group braves cold conditions to raise money for Operation Come Home jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news – A group of 20 Algonquin College students braved the cold with little more than the clothes on their backs on Oct. 12 as part of a class project. The students complete “24 Hours of Homelessness” in their second year of the college’s community and justice services program. The group spent the night at Minto Park on Elgin Street to gain an insight into what their future clients have to deal with and to raise money for Operation Come Home. Cat Baron, an instructor in the program, said the students managed to raise $3,000 in pledges for the charity that aids homeless youth in the weeks leading up to the exercise. Students panhandled for more donations while they were out on the street, and Baron said she hoped to reach a total of $7,000. Students slept on cardboard boxes and layered their clothes, but other than sleeping bags, they were allowed very few supplies. “We did manage to find a couch,” Baron said and point-

ed to a student taking a rest and playing guitar while some of his classmates panhandled across the road. Tracy Frazer, who took a quick snooze on the Elgin Street sidewalk while collecting donations, said she wants to work with youth at risk. “I want to help them get off the street and get their lives back together,” she said. “It’s been a real eye opener.” Wrapped in a blanket and rubbing sleep from her eyes, Frazer didn’t look that much different than clients she hopes to help one day. She said she looked forward to a nutritious meal and some warmth. “People have brought us doughnuts and muffins and stuff, but it doesn’t really fill you up,” she said. “I wish I had brought more hand warmers.” Nick Venable, a resident of Orléans and another second-year student, echoed his classmate’s complaints. “It’s been a crazy experience. Some good things, some bad,” he said, adding it was tough to sleep out in the cold. Venable wants to work with youth who have ended up on the wrong side of the justice system. He said some homeless people had joined the

JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

Alyx Ford, left, Farah Shaban, Tracy Frazer and Sarah Brien, all second-year students in Algonquin College’s community and justice services program, panhandle for donations to benefit Operation Come Home during the class’s 24 hours of homelessness campaign at Minto Park on Oct. 12 and 13. group of students at different points in the night and it was valuable to hear about their experiences. “I mean, we thought it was tough doing it for one day in

PET OF THE WEEK

ID # A057266

JEWEL - This spayed female, gray and white Shih Tzu is about 7 years old. She has been at the shelter since August 27 when she was brought in as a stray. Jewel is on the shy side, but loves to cuddle once she gets to know you. She gets along well with other dogs who are similar in size and energy. She needs a calm home with teens

and adults. Jewel is a special needs dog because she suffers from arthritis pain. She is on pain medication, which she will need to continue after she is adopted, possibly for the rest of her life. Jewel’s new family should take her to their veterinarian to prescribe pain medication and to discuss treatment options that may slow the progression of her

arthritis. If you are looking for a senior dog, with lots of character and love to share, then come to the OHS Adoption Centre and meet Jewel! TOOQUE - This neutered male, brown and white tabby cat is approximately 6 years old. She was surrendered to the shelter by her owner on

August 14. Tooque loves to play with toys and people. He has a very friendly disposition and gets along well with other cats. He has also lived with a dog for a short while. He’s learned to come when you “click” your tongue and would be happy to come live with you, but always indoors please where it’s safe!

Care of the older pet

their tired bones. Some older pets may have difficulty climbing stairs. For cats, moving a litter box for easier access away from stairs is a helpful change. Cats should always be kept indoors for their own safety. Grooming Older dogs and cats tend to groom themselves less often and this can lead to tangled fur and skin problems. Be sure that you or a professional groomer tends to your pet, is sensitive to joints that may be stiff and looks out for lumps, bumps or changes in the skin. Keeping nails short allows your pet to walk more comfortably, especially if arthritis is a factor. Preventative Care Exercise in moderation is one aspect of preventative care for aging pets. Keep your dog or cat going as they

get older. If they are cooped up or kept lying down, their bodies will deteriorate more quickly. You may want to ease up a bit on the exercise with an arthritic cat or dog. Keep them active mentally and physically to keep them sharp. Take note of any behavioural changes such as appetite, thirst and elimination habits. Report any changes to your veterinarian. Chronic conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease are common in older pets and can affect the amount of water your pet drinks. Plenty of fresh water should be always be available. Monitor your pet’s intake. Schedule regular veterinary examinations – it’s one of the most important steps you can take to keep your senior pet in good health. These exams

can catch and delay the onset or progress of disease and can help in the early detection of problems such as arthritis. Healthy senior pets should visit the veterinarian every six months Senior pets are special friends who deserve to have their remaining time, quality time.

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

It Takes A long Time to Get This Sweet Adopting an older pet is making an important statement about compassion. Many older animals come into shelters because their owners have died, gone into seniors’ residences or moved to apartments that do not allow pets. Older pets have been around and if you provide them with a good home, they’ll recognize it and appreciate it!

Jessica Hi, my name is Jessica and I think my pet dog, Harley should get to be featured as your pet of the week. He’s a 5 year old pure bred black Lab. He loves to play Frisbee and swim at my parent’s cottage when he gets the chance to go up there, he loves the winter, loves to roll around in the snow, loves to play Frisbee then too and also he loves to lay in the sun during the summer. 9d ndj i]^c` ndjg eZi ^h XjiZ Zcdj\] id WZ ÆI=: E:I D; I=: L::@Ç4 HjWb^i V e^XijgZ VcY h]dgi W^d\gVe]n d[ ndjg eZi id ÒcY dji H^bean ZbV^a id/ X[dhiZg5i]ZcZlhZbX#XV ViiZci^dc ÆEZi d[ i]Z LZZ`Ç

Time to make a grooming appointment

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Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: lll#diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Email: 6Ydei^dch5diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Telephone: +&( ,'*"(&++ m'*34

(problems), addiction issues and homelessness,” she said. “Before this most (of the students) had never experienced anything other than their warm beds.”

TOOQUE

ID# A147860

As pets get older, there are many ways owners can ease the aging process for their cat or dog. Your senior pet will need special attention in these areas: Nutrition Obesity in pets is often the result of reduced exercise and overfeeding and puts your pet at risk for heart disease. Obesity also puts strain on the joints. As a result of their decreased activity, older pets have lower calorie requirements. Special foods with less protein and fewer calories can help keep your pet’s weight under control. Consult your veterinarian for a balanced diet that will meet the needs of your pet. Shelter Owners can provide a warm, quiet, soft place to help their pet sleep and cushion

to walk a mile in the shoes of the people they will serve. “They are going into the field soon and they are going to be dealing with clients who deal with mental health

EMC COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER G PET OF THE WEEK 3 X 109 R0011289256 SLS=4846

Pet Adoptions JEWEL

6 C weather, they do it everyday and sometimes in -40 C,” Venable said. Baron said one of the biggest benefits to the students is they get to learn what it’s like

12-5303 Canotek Rd.(613) 745-5808 WWW.TLC4DOGS.COM

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Jennifer McIntosh


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Getting Results for Your Family P Paul Dewar, MP | DĂŠputĂŠ Ottawa Centre TTel: 613.946.8682 p paul.dewar@parl.gc.ca w www.pauldewarMP.ca

R0011400805 R0011678674

Paul Pa aul u De Dewar, MP - Ottawa Centre

Time to Invest in Cooperatives This year marks the United Nation’s International Year of the Cooperative. Worldwide, cooperatives play an integral role in uniting people together voluntarily to meet their economic, social and cultural needs through jointly owned and democratically controlled enterprises.

FILE PHOTO

Historic Watson’s Mill in Manotick will host a suitably spooky affair on Oct. 27 when the Haunted Ottawa Paranormal Society leads two groups in a paranormal investigation of the 150-year-old grist mill.

Watson’s Mill bringing history back from dead emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news – Watson’s Mill usually tries to bring history alive, but this October staff are simply hoping to reveal the undead. On the evening of Friday, Oct. 27, the Haunted Ottawa Paranormal Society will lead two groups in a paranormal investigation of the 150-year-old grist mill in Manotick. Using professional equipment such as night vision cameras, electronic voice phenomenon (EVP) recorders and laser screens, the two groups will search the three-floor industrial building for the ghost of Anne Currier, who was killed on the first anniversary of the mill’s operation – and never left. Many have felt her presence before: education officer Cam Trueman said not a day goes by that visitors don’t report a creepy feeling or a brush with the other side. In 1861, the 20-year-old Ann Crosby had only been married to mill co-founder Joseph Currier for six weeks when her skirts were caught in the mill’s gears and she was dashed against a pillar, killing her instantly. Today, visitors and staff report a heaviness or weight on their chest as they ascend the stairs to the attic, and a similar feeling in the basement – a feeling that turns them back immediately. Trueman said the paranormal society has also found evidence of a ghost belonging to a young boy, who was possibly drowned in the basement. An angry man has also been detected in the attic. On Oct. 27, the first group will search the mill from 6 to 9 p.m. The second group will begin at 10 and end at 1 a.m. In previous years the mill has taken up to 70 visitors in one big group, but Trueman said they’re splitting that number into two smaller groups this year. “We’ll give people a better experience without feeling cramped. It’s a bit more intimate,� he said. The smaller group also increases the chances of actually finding a

ghost. “When you have that many people it’s difficult to find stuff. It’s better when it’s a smaller group.� Tickets are $25, and since its Halloween weekend visitors are encouraged to dress up in spooky costumes – but hold the superhero tights, please. “We hope for no Batmans or Spidermans, we want them to be spooky people,� Trueman said.

Rod Vanier specializes in: • Real Estate • Family Law • Wills & Estates • Business Law R0011412075

Rod A. Vanier, B.A., LL.B. BARRISTER, SOLICITOR & NOTARY PUBLIC

90 Centrepointe Drive 613.226.3336 Email: vanier@vanierlaw.on.ca R0011654769/1004

Emma Jackson

Using a lawyer for buying or selling a house could be one of the best investments you ever make.

The important role that cooperatives play in poverty reduction, employment generation and empowerment of individuals is widely acknowledged. Co-op members collectively make decisions and beneďŹ ts accrue back to the members. Their resiliency has been proven by a study commissioned by the Quebec government showing that co-operatives have a long term survival rate twice that of investor owned businesses. There are nearly 9000 co-operatives in Canada, with membership totaling nearly 18 million and assets hovering around $330 billion. They are active in many sectors such as ďŹ nance, housing, health care and agriculture. Here is our community many people recognize cooperatives through their role in providing safe and affordable housing, as well as the ďŹ nancial services offered by credit unions. Despite the popularity of the co-operative movement and its considerable contribution to the Canadian economy and communities, the current federal government has shown a complete disregard for this vital sector. They cancelled the Cooperative Development Initiative, and scaled back the Rural and Co-operative Secretariat. These cuts will impede innovation and economic development in rural communities. Furthermore, the Conservative government continues to allow the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation to impose harsh penalties on co-ops that are re-negotiating their loans. The penalties are equivalent to the total interest payable from now until the end of the mortgage term.

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In keeping with the UN’s commitment of encouraging member states to implement policies and legislation that foster the growth and stability of the cooperative sector, my colleagues and I continue to call on the government to stop its cuts to co-ops. We would like to see a closer working relationship established between co-ops and the federal government to reduce bureaucratic red tape. The cooperative movement continues to be a beacon of innovation, empowerment and community building in Canada. It demonstrates what can be achieved when people work together towards a common goal. In an era where many lament the drive for extreme proďŹ t making at the expense of shared interests, the cooperative movement represents a different way of doing things. New Democrats will continue to call on the government to increase investment to this vital sector. During this celebratory year, I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate all the co-ops in Ottawa Centre on their continued hard work!

Š 2011 International Comfort Products, LLC

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

35


Your Community Newspaper

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SPORTS

Your Community Newspaper

Female hockey players aim for next level Brier Dodge

River Ward City Councillor Conseillère, quartier Rivière

brier.dodge@metroland.com

Ottawa Water Quality Is Among the Best In The World As Chair of the City’s Environment Committee, I am pleased to let you know that our drinking water quality exceeds all expectations for meeting provincial standards and federal guidelines. In the 2011 Drinking Water Quality Management System Annual Report, the City achieved 100% ratings from the Ministry of the Environment for all of its seven drinking water production systems for the third consecutive year. I am proud of our staff who are committed to excellence and provide our residents with the best drinking water in the world. The City performs over 100,000 tests annually on our drinking water and we are always working on improving and protecting our water infrastructure.

BRIER DODGE/METROLAND

Meghan Brennan of Nepean practices at the Nepean Sportsplex on Oct. 9 with the Nepean Wildcats hockey team. The team is one of two Ottawa teams to play in the Provincial Women’s Hockey League. this year’s team is new to the Wildcats. “This will be a big year for us,” he said. He thinks they have it in them, with a group that he said is very close, and committed to one another. “They get along extremely well,” he said. “Basically,

they’re a great group of girls to coach and very talented.” But what it comes down to at the end of the day is hard work on the rink, balanced with hard work off it. “That’s what we have to stress as a coaching staff – the education has to be number one,” said MacDonald.

The Britannia and Lemieux Island Water Purification Plants together produce approximately 290 million litres of drinking water each day. The treatment process makes use of multiple barrier filtration to remove impurities, such as colour, suspended particles, algae, and bacteria, from the water. Please visit Ottawa.ca for more information on the quality of Ottawa’s Drinking Water. Planning 101: Heading Back to School...Planning Really Can Be Cool City planning staff will be professors of planning for the evening. Planning 101 will allow you to learn more about the land-use planning process. Report to class for an evening of learning: Date: Thursday, October 25, 2012 Time: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Place: Hunt Club-Riverside Park Community Centre 3320 Paul Anka Drive Bus Routes 87 and 146 SPACE IS LIMITED. If you would like to participate, please call my office at 613-580-2486 to register. Point and Click Your Mouse for Current Info Delivered to Your House Please check out my website at MariaMcRae.ca. It features a number of tools to help me connect with you and to keep you up-to-date about matters important to you. Your Strong Voice at City Hall I appreciate hearing from you and encourage you to keep in touch with me as it allows me to serve you better. It remains an honour and a privilege to be your strong voice at City Hall. R0061655951

teams, hitting the road almost every other Thursday night to travel for games or tournaments. MacDonald hopes the team will make at least the semifinal round and finish in the top four teams in the league. Despite a 16th-place finish last year, about three-quarters of

R0011679293

EMC sports - For top female hockey players, it’s as much about the academics as it is the athletics. University and college level play is the main goal for most junior competitive players. “For the girls, the highest level they can basically play other than Team Canada is college,” said Nepean Junior Wildcats head coach Dave MacDonald. “It’s what I would call their NHL.” MacDonald has put a heavy emphasis on performance off the ice, in the classroom, for his players. His players are in the right league to get recruited to a university program, playing in the 20-team Provincial Women’s Hockey League. “It’s great to be a good hockey player but first of all you have to be a good student,” MacDonald said. “The academics are the most important thing for these kids.” American schools need to see strong standardized testing results and high school grades before offering players scholarships. While players on the team range in age, the majority on this year’s team are Grade 12 students. Though it’s a Nepean team, training at the Nepean Sportsplex and doing dryland training at Scotiabank Place in Kanata, players come from all over the region to play for the Wildcats, one of two Ottawa teams in the PWHL. The Ottawa Senators Women’s Hockey Club also has a team in the league who the Wildcats face. MacDonald said there are a growing number of opportunities for women to play university level hockey in Canada. Nipissing University and Laurentian University have just started new women’s teams this year. MacDonald played hockey for Laurentian University; hockey carried his own daughter through a successful career with the Carleton University Ravens team. As a new coach for the Wildcats, he wants to bring his experience with the university system to the players to make sure they have the option to play hockey in future years. “I know what it takes to get there,” he said. “I know what a student athlete has to do to be successful, and that experience is very valuable.” Two players from this year’s team are also playing for the provincial team, with Lauren Miller from Brockville on the first team, Team Red, and Kanata’s Taylor Thurston on the second team, Team Blue. Three more players made it to the selection camp. It will hopefully help the team when the provincial championship comes to their own backyard. This year’s championship tournament is being help in Ottawa in conjunction with the women’s world championship. It will be a nice break from the frequent travel the team makes to play Toronto-area

Tel./Tél.: 613-580-2486 Maria.McRae@ottawa.ca MariaMcRae.ca @CouncillorMcRae Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

37


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: ottawawest@metroland.com

Oct. 20

Harvest Gold Dinner and Dance fundraiser for the extension of St.Helen’s Anglican Church, Orléans. Buffet dinner, museum tours, silent auction, live auction, and dancing at the Canada Aviation Museum, 11 Aviation Pkwy. Tickets are available by calling St. Helen’s at 613824-2010 or email: harvestgoldtickets@gmail.com. Dispose of your personal records securely – bring your old tax files and other personal records for this oneday Kiwanis Club of Ottawa fundraising event. Watch as Shred-it technicians destroy your documents at their mobile unit on Saturday, Oct. 20 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Hampton Park Plaza, at the intersection of Carling and Kirkwood. Shredding costs $7 per box with a maximum of five boxes per person. All proceeds will benefit the Kiwanis Christmas Food Basket Program. For more information, contact the Kiwanis office 613-233-1900. Why is creation waiting for the Christians? Welcome to a public lecture by Peter Harris, founder of A Rocha at 7 p.m, at St. Paul University, 223 Main St. This lecture is a great opportunity to engage with the work of creation care in Canada and around the World. Come learn about A Rocha’s hands-on approach to biblical environmental stewardship.

Oct. 21

First Annual Walk for Sjogren’s Syndrome to take place at the Carlingwood Shopping Centre on Sunday, Oct. 21. The group will meet near the customer service booth at the north east corner of the mall. Registration begins at 1 p.m. and the walk will end at 2 p.m. Wheelchairs and strollers are available with seating provided

along the 1.5 kilometre walk. All are welcome to join us for the people, the networking and the fun. For more information please contact the organization by email at OttawaSjogrensWalk@bell. net or by calling 613-2988574. The Bayshore Mosaic Multicultural Fair, coordinated by a committed group of local volunteer residents participating in the Bayshore Mosaic Program, is a fun filled event aimed at sharing cultures and traditions and build community spirit and participation. It will be hosted by CBC News co-anchor Adrian Harewood, and will feature stage performances, music, dance, a bike rodeo organized by the city of Ottawa, art activities and a cake cutting ceremony. Join us on Sunday, Oct. 21 from 1 to 4 p.m. at St. Rose of Lima (formerly Bayshore Catholic School) at 50 Bayshore Dr. For more information, contact Janice Canning at j.canning@pqchc.com or 613-820-4922 ext. 3590. The OK Clean Water Project annual fundraising brunch will be held at the Centurion Conference and Event Centre, 170 Colonnade Rd. South at 11 a.m. This event is to support a water project in Kumbo, Cameroon. Advance tickets at $35 from horanc@ sympatico.ca or 613-7373681.

Oct. 22

The Carlingwood branch library wants to help Ottawa residents learn how to buy a digital camera. When buying a digital camera, you are faced with a bewildering array of choices. Chris Taylor, president of the Ottawa PC Users Group, will help focus your search for the ideal digital camera. The event takes place from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. and registration is required. For more information, call

613-725-2449, ext. 22.

Oct. 25

Ottawa Independent Writers group monthly meeting will take place on Thursday, Oct. 25 at the Library and Archives Canada, 395 Wellington St., Room 156 starting at 7 p.m. The meeting will welcome experienced authors Terrence West, Patricia McCarthy and George Laidlaw who will explain how to launch a book, set up a signing and take a book on tour. Tickets for guests are $10. More information is available by calling 613-731-3873 or visiting the website at www. oiw.ca.

Oct. 27

The Friends of the Farm are holding a used book drop-off for our used book sale to be held in June. The drop-off will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Building 72 at the Central Experimental Farm arboretum, located east off the Prince of Wales Drive roundabout. No magazines, encyclopaedias, or text books, please. For more information, contact the Friends at 613-230-3276 or via email at info@friendsofthefarm.ca.

Oct. 29

The kids are gone. The house is too big and it’s time to downsize. Condo apartment? Townhouse? Don’t make a move before attending this informative discussion on the transition to a new “right sized” home. This presentation by Bob Fraser and Travis Gordon from RE/MAX takes place from 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. at the Carlingwood branch of the Ottawa Public Library, 281 Woodroffe Ave. Registration required – please call 613-725-2449 ext.22.

Nov. 3

Scotland Tonight - An eve-

ning of Celtic excellence featuring the Sons of Scotland Pipe Band and many guests including the Katharine Robinson School of Dance and the Ar n-Oran Gaelic Choir join the Sons for this wonderful show. The show also welcomes back comedian Johnny ‘Bagpipes’ Johnston from British Columbia. Tickets are available at the door for $20. The doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. at the Bronson Centre at 211 Bronson Ave. Free refreshments are available during intermission. Ticket holders have the chance to win the door prize, an overnight stay for two at the Lord Elgin Hotel. More information is available on the Sons of Scotland Pipe Band at www. sospb.com.

Nov. 3-4

Ottawa artist Margaret Chwialkowska is participating in the sixth annual Art Studio Tour/Fundraiser, showcasing a great selection of award-winning oil paintings inspired by the Ottawa River and Gatineau Hills forests. A portion of the proceeds from on site sales and silent auction will be donated to the Ottawa Riverkeepers. The event will take place on Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., at 195 Woodroffe Ave. For more information, call 613-729-9351 or visit www.artristsincanada. com/margaret.

Nov. 7

Discuss estate planning and power of attorney with Lawyers Alaina Spec (Low Murchison Radnoff LLP) and Paul Taylor (Borden Ladner Gervais LLP), and learn the process involved in creating a will. This session takes place from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Carlingwood branch of the Ottawa Public Library, 281 Woodroffe Ave. Registration required – please call 613725-2449 ext.22.

Nov. 14

We don’t stop playing because we get old; we get old because we stop playing. Peter Ryan presents activities using play balls as a catalyst for re-experiencing the game of life. Offered in partnership with MASC. For adults 50-plus. The session takes place from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Carlingwood branch of the Ottawa Public Library, 281 Woodroffe Ave. Registration required – please call 613725-2449 ext.22.

Nov. 17

Visit the popular Holly and Lace Bazaar at First Unitarian Congregation of Ottawa, located at 30 Cleary Ave. The event will feature a silent auction including valuable art, clothes, collectables, a flea market and homemade lunch. Great deals on gently-used clothes, books, and timeless treasures. For more information, visit www. firstunitarianottawa.com.

Nov. 18

Singing from Our Heart: For Our Heart, a Heart and Stroke Foundation fundraiser on Sunday Nov. 18, from 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Dominion Chalmers United Church 355 Cooper St. The afternoon will showcase Ottawa talents with performances include Julie Nesrallah, Dr. Fraser Rubens, Julian Armour and Singers, Suzart Productions, Polaris, Orpheus Choral Group and Canterbury High School. For More Information, please contact Micheline Turnau at the Heart and Stroke Foundation by calling 613-265-9335 or emailing, mturnau@hsf.on.ca.

Nov. 17-18

The Friends of the Farm are hosting a craft and bake sale, with an incredible selection of items to choose from, Don’t forget to pick up some delicious baked goods. The sale takes place at at Building

72 at the Central Experimental Farm arboretum, located east off the Prince of Wales Drive roundabout from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Nov. 22

The Salvation Army is getting ready for its annual Hope In The City Breakfast on Nov. 22. Taking place from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. at the Ottawa Convention Centre’s Trillium Ballroom, Hope In The City celebrates the incredible impact that our volunteers and staff make in our community every day. The Hope In The City Breakfast also marks the start of The Salvation Army’s Christmas fundraising campaign. This year’s keynote speaker is social commentator and editorialist Rex Murphy. Tickets for the event are $65 each, or a table of 10 can be reserved for $500. To order tickets, call 613-233-8428 ext. 221 or email nadia_ferrante@can. salvationarmy.org.

Mondays

Looking to learn conversational Spanish? Improve your Spanish speaking skills with Los Amigos Toastmasters. We meet at Tunney’s Pasture Mondays from 4:55 to 6:30 p.m. For more information, contact Carole at 613-7616537 or visit our website at www.amigos-tm.ca.

Tuesdays

Our painters circle is a friendly, encouraging group with a wide range of painting experience. Sharing ideas, showing off work, seeking suggestions, it has proven to be a really pleasant experience for painters. All media except oils are welcome. No tuition, so experience is necessary. Tuesday mornings from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Call 613-695-0505 or email clderwent@gmail.com for information.

Ottawa Valley Weavers’ and Spinners’ Guild’s Annual Exhibition and Sale

38

Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

and will feature home furnishings with a difference! Hours are: Friday 4-8, Saturday 10-5, and Sunday 10-4. There will be vendors, fibre and weaving demonstrations, and exhibits of handwoven, spun and felted creations.

There is no admission charge and plenty of free parking!

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OVWSG’s annual Exhibition and Sale will be held at the Glebe Community Centre - 175 Third Avenue, Ottawa on November 2, 3 and 4. This year’s Exhibition theme is - Simply Unique: Home,


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Libra, whether feedback from work is positive or negative, rest assured that hard work will ultimately garner some recognition. Keep working hard and all will work out.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22

Taurus, there’s so much to get done this week that you may not know where to begin. Making a list of your responsibilities may help you get organized.

No one is going to know how you feel unless you speak up, Scorpio. Don’t slink into the shadows; get out in the open and have your voice heard.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

Gemini, you may be on the fence about making a large purchase, but the stars indicate that now could be a good time to buy and things will work in your favor financially.

Projects around the house seem to grow with every passing day, Sagittarius. If you do not think you can get them all done on your own, it may be time to hire a professional.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

Cancer, instead of rushing along through the daily grind, take some time to slow down and enjoy the scenery along the way. This will help you clear your head and relax.

Experiencing car troubles, Capricorn? This may be the ideal time to go shopping for a new vehicle. A new ride can lift your spirits and put to rest those fears about your current vehicle.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

Leo, the weekend will not be fun unless you finish up all of your work at the office. Don’t procrastinate and leave all the difficult tasks until next week.

Don’t work yourself silly, Aquarius. It’s good to be productive and company-minded, but not if it comes at the price of your health. Recharge before you tackle anything else.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

Virgo, there are serious things to consider with respect to your family life, and not all of the conversations will go your way. Be patient and work through everything a little at a time.

Pisces, while it can be challenging to sit idle, lazy days are very often great ways to catch up on some rest and personal time.

This weeks puzzle answers in next weeks issue

Last week’s answers

Fun By The Numbers Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test!

CLUES DOWN 1. Electronic data processing 2. Man or boy (Br.) 31. MN 55731 3. W. African nation 32. Sun in spanish 4. Fault’s incline from vertical 33. Helps little firms 5. Method of birth control 34. Cease living 6. City founded by Xenophanes 39. Flames up 7. Legumes 40. Egyptian sacred bull 8. Beckham’s spice girl 41. To wit 9. Explosive 42. Mire 11. 1936 Nobel winner Otto 43. Bring two objects together 12. Greenbay teammate 47. Filths 13. Brass that looks like gold 50. Israeli dance 14. School graduates 51. Oil cartel 19. Lively, merry play 52. A particular instance of selling 21. Make indistinct 53. Microelectromechanical sys24. Egyptian mythological figure tem associated with floods 54. Var. of 45 across 25. Washing sponge 55. Goat & camel hair fabrics 27. Old name for nitrogen 56. Soda 28. Impounds for lack of payment 58. A firm’s operational head 29. Radiotelegraphic signal 60. Seaport (abbr.)

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36. An easy return in a high arc 37. Italian commune 38. L. Comfort’s illuminator 44. Foot digit 45. Minute tunicate genus 46. Green regions of desert 48. Direct a weapon 49. ___ de Janeiro 50. Equestrian animals 53. Acress Tomei 56. Head of the RCC 57. Twines 59. Scientific workplace 61. Minerals 62. Hypothetical original substances 63. Hit with the open hand 64. Political action committee 65. Winged goddess of the dawn 66. W. states time zone

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

Aries, you may need some creative strategies to clear up some conflicts in your schedule this week. You must be quite popular since you have so much going on.

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CLUES ACROSS 1. European Common Market 4. Poetic go quickly 7. Parts per thousand (abbr.) 10. Pigeon pea 12. Sao __, city in Brazil 14. Longest division of geological time 15. __ Alto, California city 16. Small terrestrial viper 17. Coming after all others 18. Penetrate with a sharp fork 20. Still-hunt 22. Chinese frying pan 23. Cave-dwelling salamander 24. Any thick messy substance 26. About the moon 29. AKA Tao 30. Jet cabin requirement 35. Prince Hirobumi, 1841-1909

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

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39


Your Community Newspaper

Mayor Jim Watson

Mid Term Progress Report to Taxpayers Budgets: Keeping rates below 2.5%

Lansdowne Park Revitalization

Property Tax Rate Difference 4

4.9

4.9 3.9 2.45

2

0

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2009

2010

Previous Council

2011

2.39 2012

Current Council

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Ottawa West EMC - Thursday, October 18, 2012

jim.watson@ottawa.ca

jimwatsonottawa.ca

2012076028

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