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The Terry Fox Run gets support from long-time participants. – Page 4

news

School trustees consider options for sports teams and other clubs. – Page 6

sports

Maple Ridge students get a taste of the Olympics and Paralympics. – Page 20

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Councillors say bridge not a priority Existing infrastructure more important in wake of sinkhole Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Two east-end councillors are backing a motion to de-prioritize a new interprovincial bridge in the wake of the sinkhole traffic mess. The motion was set to come forward at the Sept. 26 council meeting at city hall. Couns. Rainer Bloess and Bob Monette propose the city oppose an east-end bridge. Proposed for one of three corridors, the bridge would connect Gatineau to Ottawa and be an alternate route to heavily-used King Edward Avenue. If the bridge is unavoidable, they still support the city’s position that the preferred crossing is corridor five, known as the Kettle Island corridor. The two other corridors, six and seven, are both further east, connecting with highway 174. They are currently being studied alongside corridor five by the National Capital Commission for a new crossing. Monette said the failure of the old pipe that caused the sinkhole demonstrates the lack of funding in infrastructure. “We saw two weeks of the community being faced with drastic traffic conditions because of the failing infrastructure,” he said. “So obviously more money needs to be put in the road infrastructure before we even look at building a bridge.” Monette said the bridge can’t be made a priority, and light rail transit – as well as community priorities in Orléans like employment – need to come first. See ROADS, page 2

Brier Dodge/Metroland

Firefighters from the Charlemagne Boulevard station create an instant convertible from a Toyota donated by Sonshine Auto Parts. On Sept. 17, firefighters demonstrated how they safely open up vehicles in order to remove passengers trapped as a result of an accident.

Fire department chops up donations Cumberland business thanked for help with training program Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Cumberland’s Sonshine Auto Parts has been recognized for donating a total of about 12,000 cars to the Ottawa fire department. The cars – as well as space at the large property in Cumberland – have been donated to firefighters so they can practise their extrication skills. Extrication involves safely removing the parts of a car following an accident or

crash, to treat and remove any passengers. Because there are so many models of vehicles on the road with different compositions, body types and internal systems, firefighters need to fine tune their skills on a variety of cars. Sonshine, owned by Denis Desjardins since 1993, takes any valuable parts out of vehicles and removes all fluids that could be a danger to firefighters. They then place the vehicles in whatever position the firefighters need – upright, sideways, or upside down – on the grass. After the firefighters are done, Sonshine crushes the vehicles on site. Desjardins used to own Cumberland Towing, and got to know many of the local firefighters while responding

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to car accidents. “This all started back in the ’80s and they made their way down (to Sonshine),” he said. “They’re more like family now.” Desjardins’ home is on the same Dunning Road site as Sonshine Auto Parts, and he’s recieved weekly visits from the firefighters – both employed by the city and volunteer members – for as long as he’s been there. Ottawa fire communications director Marc Messier said it’s the main training spot for the east end of the city. There is some training that can be done on site at the stations, but Sonshine has lots of space and doesn’t charge the firefighters to place or remove the cars. “I can tell you firsthand how critical it is to be able to provide realistic training,”

Messier said. During a Sept. 17 visit, Mayor Jim Watson said the city gets a call for a car crash or accident requiring extrication about every three days. He thanked Desjardins and his staff, and presented him with a plaque from the city. Ottawa fire Chief John deHooge presented him with a special firefighter’s helmet. He said training is a powerful tool that helps firefighters be more prepared when responding to calls. Ottawa firefighters compete in extrication competitions and thanks to the training, have won provincial and national titles. “These situations are always stressful for those who are trapped, and the firefighters,” deHooge said. “The best way to prepare our firefighters is practise.”

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Cenotaph undergoing repairs Arteast hits St. Laurent Complex Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - The statue vandalized at the Orléans Legion in August is getting a lift thanks to the community. So far, $1,200 towards the $2,100 cost of repairs has been raised, including a fundraiser at Coalition Martial Arts on Sept. 15 that brought in about $775. The statue, called Remembrance of Comrades is by

sculptor Bruce Garner. “There’s still a little to go, but I’m working with (Veteran Affairs) to try and get some more funds,” said Legion president Jim Ferguson. If more funds can be raised, Ferguson hopes that more security measures can be added, such as the installation of surveillance cameras. The statue, which includes two figures, was vandalized overnight in August. Someone bent one of the two figures.

Ferguson hopes it’s an isolated incident. “It’s been 12 years since the statue has been up, and this has been our first episode ever of vandalism,” he said. The Taylor Creek Drive location of the Orléans Legion opened in 1991 and the statue was installed in 2000. Anyone wishing to donate towards the repairs or security can drop off donations at the branch, located at 800 Taylor Creek Dr.

! % 0 9 o T p U e v a S

Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - The annual juried exhibition showcase for Arteast members will take place at the St. Laurent Complex at 525 Côté St. starting Sept. 30. The show, which will highlight the best works of about 50 members, will run until Nov. 29. The location is ideal because of the high number of parents taking children to activities and recreational users that pass through the complex, said show coordinator Cheryl Mattice. Arteast holds a permanent spot at the Shenkman Arts Centre, but the larger space and more foot traffic makes St. Laurent the right spot for this show. “We always have something running at Shenkman, so we need a different spot in order to have the juried awards,” Mattice said. “And I know from talking to the managers (at St. Laurent) that they really enjoy having it there because it gives people something to look at.” The opening reception for the show, where the prizes are awarded, will be Oct. 11 from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Winter Room. Arteast is an east-end based arts group, but does

include members from as far away as Kanata, Nepean and Cornwall, Ont. They display work at St. Laurent, Shenkman, and the Orléans, Cumberland and North Gloucester branches of the Ottawa Public Library. It has a mix of amateur and professional artists and will show work in nine different categories, including photography, oil painting, mixed media and sculpture. First, second, third and honourable mention awards will be given for each category, with an overall Best in Show Award given as well. All artists who register for the show are accepted, but this year the show only allowed each artist to submit one work. Last year, for the 30th anniversary, artists were allowed to submit multiple works, and the space was jam-packed. “This year is more manageable,” Mattice said. “There’s quite a variety, and some really interesting things that I haven’t seen done before.” The show doesn’t have a theme for the artists to work around, giving them the choice of which piece they enter. For more information on Arteast, visit www. arteastottawa.com.

Roads come before bridge Continued from page 1

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Coun. Stephen Blais has publicly urged the prioritization of light rail over the bridge in the past, saying that highway 174 can’t support more traffic until more public transit options are in place. Bloess said that flooding the rest of the city with the traffic from the highway 174 road closure was a real-time example of what could be in store if traffic from a bridge uses highway 174. “This came out of the whole sinkhole escapade where it became so obvious what the traf-

fic impacts will be if you start throwing another 30 per cent traffic on there,” Bloess said. “We can do all the modeling in the world, but there’s nothing more realistic than seeing the last week and a half to two weeks of traffic backups.” study coming

The NCC will finish the study, set to identify the best corridor, in December. The councillors supported the completion of the study, but not an immediate build. The priorities need to be identified, and building a

bridge is not something the city should be putting money towards, Monette said. “Let’s focus on what’s really important,” he said. Bloess said a new bridge isn’t a project the city wants to fund right now. “The one thing that needs to be clear is it’s a long ways from actually building a bridge,” Bloess said. “None of the provincial or federal governments have any money, and the city isn’t looking to put any money in… Most of us probably won’t be around when they finally get around to building a bridge.”

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012


news

Your Community Newspaper

Resource recovery centre documents Clarification available for public comment Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Taggart Miller, the company proposing the Capital Region Resource Recovery Centre, submitted their terms of reference on Sept. 14. One of the two proposed sites is near Carlsbad Springs. Residents of both areas have formed opposition groups, Dump This Dump and Dump This Dump 2, to oppose the site. The public can currently review the documents, and the opposition groups are urging residents to submit comments to Jeffrey Dea, project manager at the Ministry of the Envi-

ronment at jeffrey.dea@ontario.ca and to the Minister of the Environment, Jim Bradley at minister.moe@ontario.ca. online

The documents can be viewed online by visiting the website that Taggart Miller has set up at www.crrrc.ca. Documents can be viewed at the Carlsbad Springs Community Centre at 6020 Eighth Line Rd., Ministry of the Environment Ottawa office at 2430 Don Reid Dr. and the Blackburn Hamlet branch of the Ottawa Public Library at 199 Glen Park Dr.

A Sept. 13 article “St. Joseph Boulevard to be closed for 75 days,” stated “construction to St. Joseph Boulevard will cause a 75-day closure to the road from the eastbound highway 174 onramp to Taylor Creek Drive.” The eastbound highway 174 on-ramp is east of Old Tenth Line Road, and is not the Montreal Road exit, as some readers may have inferred.

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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news

Your Community Newspaper

OrlĂŠans Terry Fox participants have no plans to slow down Brier Dodge

Ottawa when she died. She had formed a team in 2010 to support research and she had many similarities to Fox.  They were both athletic, young, and suffered from bone cancer, said Goneau. She was diagnosed with cancer on the anniversary of his death.  She passed away after the first year of her team, but team members – 140 of them – returned for their third year at the run as a team.  The first year they participated, they raised $25,000. More than $30,000 more has been raised since for the Terry Fox Foundation, with her foundation donating over $50,000 separately to the Ottawa Hospital.  Goneau has had cancer

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Some Terry Fox Run participants did a short walk, others five kilometres, and some finished with 10 kilometres under their belt during the Sept. 16 run in OrlÊans.  But for several participants, like Nelson Waddell and Chris Goneau, there is no finish line in the near future when it comes to their involvement. For Goneau, who is the chairperson of the OrlÊans run, it’s a special day to remember his daughter, ValÊrie, who passed away from bone cancer two years ago. A Beatrice Desloges graduate, she was in her second year of school at the University of

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himself; he wore the special red survivor’s shirt the day of the run and has been in remission for almost 15 years. But it was watching his own daughter fight a battle, undergoing treatments that doctors told him hadn’t advanced in 20 years for her specific type of the disease, that made the most impact.  “It’s a terrible disease, but leave the kids alone,â€? he said. “Why are kids having to fight this disease? We have lots of work still to do.â€?  Runner Nelson Waddell watched his nine-yearold daughter go through 18 months of chemotherapy years ago.  So when the very first Terry Fox Run happened and one of the locations was at Convent Glen North near Cairine Wilson Secondary School, he signed up. “It was a good fit, because our family already had cancer,â€? he said. He ran the 10-km race that day, and has never stopped - whether at a downtown run in Ottawa, a tiny foggy Nova Scotia run of about 25 people, or the local OrlĂŠans run at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Secondary School, he has made every Terry Fox Run.  “May as well do it again,â€? he told himself at the time. “And then again. Be careful with what you start.â€?  The Fallingbrook resident

has brought his wife Irene along with him for the ride, and he’s raised $93,000 in his 32 years.  He’s turned into a runner, from challenging himself with the first Terry Fox Run 10-km, to winning the age category for 60-to 64-year-olds at the Toronto Marathon in 2003.  Since the journey started, his daughter and his wife have both had to fight breast cancer. Today, they are both happy to keep supporting the run, and healthily participate.  “It’s been something that’s been very close to our hearts,â€? Waddell said.  His wife said there is nothing that would stop him from doing the race now, even if he had to crawl through.  He hopes to eventually break through the $100,000 fundraising mark; a major accomplishment for someone that does it all through pledges and no community sponsors.  “It feels great,â€? he said, as he finished the race with his granddaughter, Krista Bonner. “I feel like a kid just starting.â€?  There was no overall fundraising goal for the OrlĂŠans run, Goneau said, but 500 to 600 people were expected on the course over the day.  “Today’s the day we thank people like Terry and ValĂŠrie,â€? Goneau said. “Today’s the day you put a smile on your face and say, ‘We did good.’â€?

Brier Dodge/Metroland

Nelson Waddell finishes the 10-kilometre course at the Terry Fox Run in OrlĂŠans on Sept. 16. Waddell has been taking part in the run for 32 years, ever since the very first Terry Fox Run took place.

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OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012


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Board seeks to save school clubs

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Heights Secondary School will be able to run their field hockey and basketball programs thanks to the help of volunteers in the community. But Theresa Kavanagh, who represents the zone that corresponds with the city’s Bay ward, said the school board needs to work on solutions that will help students in areas of the city where income and cultural backgrounds may impede the parents’ ability to volunteer their time. “I think all the kids should have the same opportunities,” she said. Barrhaven trustee Donna Blackburn introduced a motion at the meeting directing staff to do everything possible to maintain extracurricular activities at public board schools. “I have been inundated with calls from parents and students from three of the four of my high schools have staged protests,” she said. Director of Education Jennifer Adams said staff will be working with a group of principals and vice-principals on the language in the board’s volunteer policy to make sure there is room for community volunteers to run sports programs and other clubs. She said she thinks the language should allow for qualified volunteers. “Obviously we prefer if teachers and staff were able to run the programs, but we won’t be holding out for that,” Adams said. The deadline to register for winter sports is the end of October so that gives staff five weeks to work out a plan to offer volunteer-run programs. John Shea, who represents parts of Or-

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EMC news - Volunteers could salvage sports and other after-school clubs. That was the message delivered during an Ottawa Carleton District School Board meeting on Sept. 18. Sister of former CFL-er Ken Evraire and volunteer, Debborah Evraire said the board needs to talk about solutions to offer sports programs before the deadline for winter registration passes. “It’s unacceptable that 11 of our schools don’t have sports teams playing right now,” she said. “I don’t think the call to the community (for volunteers) has been loud enough.” The fall sports programs were lost as the board couldn’t meet the deadline to register teams set by the Ontario Federation of School Athletic Association (OFSAA). Sports teams and other clubs are in jeopardy this year because the two teacher unions that represent elementary and secondary schools have asked teachers to reconsider doing extra work in protest of the Putting Students First Act. The legislation freezes teacher wages, ends the banking of sick days and bans strikes for the next two years. Only two Ottawa schools – Glebe Collegiate Institute and Colonel By Secondary School – registered a team for every sport. Eleven of the board’s 25 high schools didn’t register any sports teams for the fall season and nine others registered some teams. Longfields-Davidson

léans and Cumberland, said making sure that happens is the number one priority. Both Shea and Mark Fisher, who represents much of the city’s south end, said the practice of using teachers who volunteer leaves the board vulnerable. “Through crisis we are seeing some of the cracks in the system,” Shea said. ANOTHER PLAN

Pam Fitzgerald, trustee for the zone that corresponds with the city’s College ward, asked the board to go a step further. She said extracurricular activities are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the Putting Students First Act and urged her fellow trustees to take a stand on the legislation. In her notice of motion Fitzgerald suggested staff look at the possible financial implications because of the legislation. “The act promises to save $2 billion over the next two years,” she said, adding the board may want to ask for a repeal of the act and come up with alternatives to save money, such as an amalgamation of the public and Catholic boards. Adams said superintendent of facilities Mike Carson will study the impacts of the reduction of grants and some of the other aspects of the legislation. Peter Guilani, president of the OttawaCarleton Elementary Teacher Federation, said trustees don’t need a study to tell them the legislation is bad. “We don’t think you need a financial analysis to stake a position,” he said. “If it’s wrong, it’s wrong.”

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Opinion

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EDITORIAL

Meeting Ottawa’s infrastructure challenge

F

ollowing the presentation of a report on the state of the city’s infrastructure last week to the city’s finance committee, it has become clear Ottawa has an infrastructure problem. The potential consequences of this problem were brought sharply into focus recently when a portion of highway 174 was closed by a sinkhole. While the extent of Ottawa’s problem is not so acute as the east-end sinkhole, the

report indicates that without a significant infusion of cash to increase maintenance activity, the city runs the risk, in the long run, of seeing things like sinkholes, broken water mains and collapsed roofs popping up like dandelions from Carp to Carlington to Cumberland. We cannot afford to let this happen. Just ask anyone who had to sit in traffic on Montreal Road or Barrhaven residents who saw watering restrictions imposed in 2011 following the

Woodroffe Avenue water main break how much fun it is to have critical infrastructure fail. Yet despite a two-per-cent infrastructure levy that was imposed from 2008 to 2010, more than $400 million in federal and provincial stimulus cash and the $340million Ottawa on the Move program, the city is only able to scrape by when it comes to maintaining things like roads, recreation facilities, libraries and other civic buildings. This means the city needs

to find $165 million per year, up from the $80 million it’s currently spending, to maintain what it already has and even more once new infrastructure is added by 2022. As Mayor Jim Watson said following the presentation of the report to council, there are several ways this maintenance can be paid for: adding debt, increasing taxes or seeking funding from other levels of government. Looking to other levels of government, at least in the

short term, appears to be a non-starter – the province is looking to spend less money, not more, and the federal government is poised to slash thousands of civil service jobs in Ottawa to get its own fiscal house in order. Borrowing money to pay for what are permanent, ongoing needs is a dubious course of action. The need to maintain infrastructure isn’t going to stop anytime soon, so why mortgage the future to pay for it?

That leaves us with finding additional money to pay for this vital, necessary work. This can be done in two ways. The city can raise taxes or money can be cut from other areas of the city budget. Things like upcoming capital projects can be put on hold or cancelled, city staff can be cut or services can be reduced or eliminated to shift money to pay for these needs. Either tax hikes or spending cuts will bite taxpayers in the end, but such decisions are the burden of leadership. How council handles these choices will have far-reaching implications for this city – let’s hope it chooses wisely.

COLUMN

Oh no, not more about 1972! CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

I

f it weren’t for the hockey lockout the anniversary of the 1972 Canada-Russia series would not have received so much attention. Whatever the reason, the attention goes on and on and on and it may be that anyone who wasn’t around in 1972 - a good chunk of the population - might have seen more than enough of it. The good news for them is that it should all be over soon. September 28 marks the 40-year anniversary of Henderson’s goal in the final game. Mind you, there is still the 40-year anniversary of the plane ride home, the 40-year anniversary of the team’s welcome in Toronto, and there could be many others. Still, for all intents and purposes it’s over. Not that it hasn’t been interesting, especially to look at the lessons we think we’ve learned from those moments in time 40 years ago. There was a lot of jingoism in Canadians’ attitude toward the series. Along with our love for our team went a certain amount of hatred for the Russians. That seems, if not embarrassing, at least quaint when looked at today. We were willing to tolerate some thuggish behaviour by our team, not to mention the officials, if it was necessary to win the series. There were also judgments made about the way the then-Soviets played hockey. They were emotionless robots, uncreative, unable to play with passion, it was said, despite the incredibly high level at which they played. We wince at that today, with so many Russian players playing so well on “our” teams in the National Hockey League. Perhaps you can argue that Russian play-

ers can now play with passion and creativity because they have been freed from the yoke of Communist oppression. But more likely the difference is in the way we perceive things. Heaven help us that we should be drawing deep philosophical conclusions from hockey anniversaries, but if there is a conclusion to be drawn it is that the world and Canada have changed a lot in 40 years. That may be difficult to fathom for those who feel like it only happened yesterday, but it’s true. To begin with, 40 years ago there were no Russians in the NHL, in fact hardly anyone who wasn’t Canadian. Forty years ago, we feared the Russians in a way we do not now. The Cold War was at its height. The Soviet Union was a closed society. The hotel rooms were lousy and could have been bugged. The Russians didn’t trust us all that much either, although our hotel rooms were better. Everything isn’t wonderful now, but the Cold War is over, the Russian hotel rooms are better and probably not bugged. There is no Soviet Union and there is dissent in Russia - to what avail no one is quite sure. Players from all over what used to be the Soviet bloc are performing, creatively and with passion, in the NHL, or will be, when the NHL begins. Is any of that because we “won” the 1972 series? Maybe. Or maybe it’s because we almost lost it and realized there was something to be learned from the way the Russians played. And they learned that there was something to be learned from the way we played. As for Canadian fans, did we learn anything? Did we learn that it was a little excessive to be as excessive as we were in cheering our boys on? Probably not. Think of the waves of patriotism that swept over Sidney Crosby when he scored the game-winning goal against the United States at Vancouver 38 years later. We are still going to get worked up over hockey. Whether we get too worked up is another question. We’ll get another chance to think about it when the 50th anniversary of all this rolls around in 10 years. You can hardly wait, right?

Editorial Policy The Orléans EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to The Orléans EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa ON, K2E 7L2.

orlÉans

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57 Auriga Drive, Suite 103 Ottawa, ON, K2E 8B2 613-723-5970 Vice President & Regional Publisher: Mike Mount Group Publisher: Duncan Weir Regional General Manager: Peter O’Leary Regional Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne Publisher: Mike Tracy / mtracy@perfprint.ca

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ADMINISTRATION: Crystal Foster 613-723-5970 ADvERTISINg SALES: Sales Manager: Carly McGhie 613-688-1479 cmcghie@perfprint.ca DISpLAy ADvERTISINg: Gisele Godin - Kanata - 221-6214

Web Poll This Week’s poll question

Previous poll summary

How should the city go about addressing the cost of maintaining its infrastructure?

Do you think the Main Library branch needs a new site or $6.3 million in upgrades as suggested by a city report?

A) Borrow the money. Interest rates are low right now, lets take advantage.

A) Build a new one. The existing building is old and is not fitting as the city’s central library.

42%

B) Invest $6.3 million in upgrades as suggested by city staff. There’s no need to move the facility.

8%

C) Do nothing. The main branch doesn’t need upgrades or a new site.

33%

D) I don’t use the library.

17%

B) Bring back the infrastructure levy. This is exactly what it was meant to do. C) Cut back on projects and services. Those are just frills if we can’t afford to maintain our infrastructure. D) If we let things fall apart, maybe the feds and province will pony up!

To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

Dave Pennett - Ottawa West - 221-6209 Dave Badham - Orleans - 688-1652 Cindy Manor - Ottawa South - 688-1478 Geoff Hamilton - Ottawa East - 688-1488 Valerie Rochon - Barrhaven - 688-1669 Jill Martin - Nepean - 688-1665 Mike Stoodley - Stittsville - 688-1675 Stephanie Jamieson - Renfrew - 432-3655 Dave Gallagher - Renfrew - 432-3655 Leslie Osborne - Arnprior / WC - 623-6571 Emily Warren - Ottawa West - 688-1659 cLASSIfIED ADvERTISINg SALES: Sharon Russell - 613-688-1483 Kevin Cameron - 613-221-6224 Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571

EDITORIAL: Managing Editor: Patricia Lonergan 613-221-6261 patricia.lonergan@metroland.com NEWS EDITOR Nevil Hunt nevil.hunt@metroland.com 613-221-6235 REpORTER/phOTOgRAphER: Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com 613-221-6235 pOLITIcAL REpORTER: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com 613-221-6162

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Anglophones need not apply

I

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse the Parti Quebecois does. Its raison d’etre is to prevent the infiltration of English and other languages into Quebec’s language and culture – which it views as distinct – and of course, to separate from the rest of Canada. Many of the people I know who voted for the PQ deny the underlying prejudice of their government. “Quebec is distinct,” they say. “Quebec is a socialist province, not like the others.” “The PQ is the only party that will protect our collective belief that governments should pay for cradle-to-grave services.” To which I respond – What does any of that have to do with language? A few days ago, my own children proudly donned the Franco-Ontarian flag, on which the trillium and the fleur-de-lys stand side-by-side against a green and white background. The same day, we spent time researching publicly-funded Mandarinlanguage classes, looking to foster another element of

our family’s diverse cultural background. This hasn’t always been possible here, granted. Minorities in the province have had to fight hard to preserve their languages and cultures. But as the world shrinks and

our communities become increasingly heterogeneous, it looks as though Ontario will continue to grow, protect and foster diversity. Simultaneously, the xenophobic policies of the Parti Quebecois will also continue to have wide reach. With no room for minorities, the Parti Quebecois and its supporters may finally chase out the nonFrench-speakers and get what they want – an exclusive, homogenous society. But in a world and a country that is ever-inclusive and diverse, frankly, it will be their loss. R0011636731

magine for a moment a new player in Ontario politics. Let’s call it the Ontario Party. This fictional party has emerged with the goal of separating from the rest of the country. Fundamental to its party platform is a clause stating that true Ontarians are those whose mother tongue is English. As such, its party leader and candidates refuse interviews with media outlets that don’t publish or broadcast in English. When “The Ontario Party” is elected, its first point of order is to rip the Canadian flag from its once-prominent place in the legislature. It then enacts legislation forcing all business owners in the province to erect signage in English or face hefty fines. Under “The Ontario Party’s” new immigration rules, people from Englishspeaking countries will be given priority over all others, even those who have learned English as a second language. Laws are created to prevent non-English people from running for public office. Funds to French-language and other language schools are degraded. ”The Ontario Party’s” overwhelming message: “If you don’t speak English, you don’t belong here.” Thankfully, this party doesn’t exist. But across the Ottawa River, in Quebec,

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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news

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Sports Day in Canada is back for its third year on September 29, 2012. Sports Day in Canada is a national celebration of sport, from grass roots to high-performance, in communities across the country. In the week leading up to, and including, September 29, local sports organizations, communities and schools across Ottawa are encouraged to open their doors to celebrate sport and physical activity at the local level by hosting try-it days, competitions, meet-and-greets, tournaments or spectator events. Brier Dodge/Metroland

Westboro kayaker Michael Tayler was the only Ottawa Olympian at CHEO, and signed autographs for some of the patients, such as Avdi Hassan, a student at Gisèle Lalonde public high school in Orléans, at CHEO on Sept. 19.

As a primer for Sports Day in Ottawa all Ottawa residents are encouraged to wear a jersey, team or club uniform to school, work or play on Jersey Day - Friday, September 28.

CHEO patients get Olympic visit Brier Dodge

Free sporting events offered by City of Ottawa Parks, Recreation and Cultural Services on Saturday, September 29:

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brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - It was a special visit for patients at CHEO as the Olympic Heroes Tour arrived at the hospital on Sept. 19.

The Olympic Heroes Tour was held in Ottawa and Toronto, and brought Canadian Olympians and Paralympians to schools and CHEO to meet with children. Several medalists, including open water swimmer Richard

Weinberger and Paralympic swimmer Summer Mortimer, brought their medals for the youths to try on. There was a lot of energy when athletes entered a room, See OLYMPIANS, page 13

• Interested in getting your child into hockey and find it difficult to afford all the equipment? We can help! A Hockey Equipment for Kids Give Away session will take place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the J.A. Dulude Arena, 941 Clyde Avenue. Also, if you have any gently used equipment that your child has outgrown, please feel free to drop it off. All donations are welcome.

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012


news

Ice Skating

Your Community Newspaper

Olympians inspire CHEO patients Continued from page 11

and Olympians and officials packed around patients who were eager to meet the athletes they cheered during the summer. The tour was set to conclude in Toronto with a parade through the downtown core on Sept. 21, with the athletes taking the train from Ottawa after Sept. 19 visits. Selena Close, 11, from Stittsville, watched many of the athletes in the room all summer. “It was fun to get to learn things about them and all the things they had to go through,” she said. Selena recently had surgery on her foot because of a condition she was born with, tarsal coalition, meaning two of the bones rub against each other. Meeting the Olympians was a good consolation for missing the first day of tryouts for her competitive basketball team in Goulbourn, but she hopes to be back playing in December to finish the season. The Grade 6 student at Holy Spirit Elementary School also plays soccer and runs track, and said she would love to be an Olympian herself one day. It was one of the first public visits back in Ottawa for

Westboro’s Michael Tayler, a kayaker who attended Nepean High School and now Carleton University. “It’s such a cool experience, and it’s something I was really looking forward to,” Tayler said of being able to meet with the children. “It’s great to be able to share my story and hopefully improve some lives.”

He also spoke to an excited crowd at St. Peter Catholic High School in Orléans earlier in the day as a part of the tour. For Jake Periard, a student at Farley Mowat Public School in Nepean, in CHEO for an eye infection, the experience was “awesome.” He was enthralled by Paralympic boccia player Marco Dispaltro’s equipment as they plotted where to find a quiet hallway to share a quick demonstration. “Marco was very cool,” he said. “I had to stay in bed all day yesterday. Today was the funnest day of my life.”

a workout for all ages Ice skating is a low-impact activity that provides exceptional cardiovascular health benefits. Just like walking, running or swimming, ice skating can offer a great workout while being easy on the joints! Look no further than the City of Ottawa Recreational Skating School to get an introduction to skating. Or you can learn specialties such as figure skating, speed skating or power skating. Courses are offered at various times, every day of the week, for ages two years and up. If private lessons are more your style, these can be arranged too! Lesson plans are specially designed to accommodate the participant’s skill level. Call 613-580-2596 for information or register to learn, improve or master the ability to skate. All participants must wear CSA approved hockey helmets.

Want to practice your skating? Brier Dodge/Metroland

Nepean’s Jake Periard, a student at Farley Mowat Public School, was excited to meet Paralympic boccia player Marco Dispaltro at CHEO on Sept. 19.

Use our convenient Public Skating search tool found on ottawa.ca to find the many public skating locations and times in your area!

Skater safety is a top priority at the City of Ottawa and safety starts with a properly fitted helmet. Children aged 10 and under, as well as skaters of all ages at a beginner skill level, are required to wear a Canadian Standards Association (CSA) approved helmet while attending City of Ottawa indoor public skate sessions. Some tips for choosing a helmet: • Buy a helmet that fits now, not one to grow into. • Never buy a used helmet. • Make sure your helmet has been tested for safety (Helmet will have a CSA sticker inside) To learn more about our helmet safety requirements, visit ottawa.ca or call the Public Skating Information line at 613-580-2666. Remember to skate smart – all skaters, regardless of age, and skill levels are encouraged to wear a CSA approved helmet while skating. Skating is a great way to be active and enjoy our Ottawa winters!

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ottawa.ca/skating Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

13


seniors

Your Community Newspaper

Fall means burning leaves

T

MARY COOK Mary Cook’s Memories asking him to come up with even one barn or house that had been burned to the ground because of leaf burning out at Northcote. “Well, I sure hope we aren’t the first,� he retorted every year as long as I can remember. I wasn’t big enough or strong enough to manage a rake. So my job was to circle the mounds and with my feet, try to make each pile round, and push any wayward leaves into place. It took most of the day to round up all the leaves and when we were finished we would have about four big piles of leaves in the centre of the yard. Of course, Mother, who made an occasion out of the simplest events, wouldn’t let us light the leaves until after the sun had gone down and the yard was in complete darkness. Supper would be early that night; another excuse for Father to complain. He liked everything on time and that included his meals. So by the time we had eaten, cleaned up the kitchen and hauled out

chairs to circle the mounds of leaves, nightfall had settled in. We would start out with heavy jackets on to ward off the chill of the fall evening. My oldest brother, Everett, was always in charge of the matches. He had the lighting of the leaves down pat. He rolled sheets of the Renfrew Mercury into tight cones, and he lit the paper, setting it ablaze. That way he could poke the paper deep into the mounds of leaves, making sure it burned from the inside out. Very clever, was my brother Everett. We sat on the kitchen chairs, circling the burning piles, but well back from the fire, we five children and Mother. Father chose to stay in the house reading the Ottawa Farm Journal. If marshmallows were in existence back then, we certainly didn’t know about them. And it is doubtful we could have afforded them anyway. See FLAMES, page 16

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his time of year, we all smelled the same at Northcote School. The heavy scent of burning leaves penetrated everything we wore and no amount of airing out could eliminate the odour of our smoke-infested clothes. But none of us minded. Burning leaves was something we all looked forward to at our farm and as far as I knew everyone in Northcote did the same thing. None of us minded the smell of smoke on our clothes- well, that is, we five kids and Mother. Father said making the event into a grand affair was something he had little time for: too many other more important things to do on the farm instead of making a party out of burning leaves. Our front and side yards were full of big maple trees and by the time the last days of summer rolled around the leaves were in some places knee deep. We waited until the limbs were completely bare and then on a Saturday it was time to rake the leaves and pile them into big mounds well away from the house and barns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asking for trouble,â&#x20AC;? Father would say. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just one little spark and the whole place would go up in smoke.â&#x20AC;? Mother paid him no heed,

Bronze Sponsor

STEP BY STEP, WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LL FIND A CURE!

Every 29 minutes someone new is diagnosed with a blood cancer in Canada. On Saturday, October 13th 2012 WALK with us at Marion Dewar Plaza (City Hall) as we Light The Night in support of finding a cure.

W W W. L I G H T T H E N I G H T . CA / O N 14

OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

R0011638142

R0011610335


news

Your Community Newspaper

Fall the time to bake with apples Local air

N

ow that fall is officially here, the cool, sunny days are just right for a family outing to visit one of the many apple orchards in Eastern Ontario. While youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there, ask the orchard staff to recommend which apples are best for eating and which types are better for baking. For this apple cinnamon braid, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need two or three baking apples. The recipe starts with the dough cycle in your bread-making machine and finishes in the oven. Shaping the dough into a braid is very easy. Give the recipe a try now, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to make it again for your guests on Thanksgiving weekend. This bread is nice with breakfast, with coffee or for dessert. Apple Cinnamon Braid

Dough â&#x20AC;˘ 2/3 cup water â&#x20AC;˘ 3 tbsp. margarine or butter, softened â&#x20AC;˘ 3 tbsp. white sugar â&#x20AC;˘ 1 tsp. salt â&#x20AC;˘ 2 cups flour â&#x20AC;˘ 1 1/2 tsp. bread machine yeast Filling â&#x20AC;˘ 2 cups apples, peeled and sliced â&#x20AC;˘ 1 tbsp. white sugar â&#x20AC;˘ 1 tbsp. flour â&#x20AC;˘ 1/4 tsp. cinnamon

PAT TREW Food â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Stuff â&#x20AC;˘ 1/2 tsp. margarine or butter Place the ingredients for the dough into your bread machine in the order given. Select the dough cycle. While the machine is working, prepare the apples. Mix all the ingredients for the filling in a microwave-safe bowl and let sit for 15 minutes. Microwave the apple mixture on high for four to five minutes, stirring at one-minute intervals. When the apples are soft and syrupy, the filling is done. Set it aside to cool. When the dough is ready, remove it from the bread machine. Place it on a lightly floured surface, cover with a damp cloth and let it rest for 10 minutes so it will be easier to work with. On the floured surface, roll the dough into a 33-by-20centimetre pan. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about three hand widths long and two hand widths wide. Trim the edges of the dough, if necessary, to get the shape. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil, grease the foil and then place the dough on it.

Spoon the filling down the middle of the rectangle, so that the centre third of the dough is covered. To shape the braid, first make cuts in the long side of the dough. Each cut should be 2.5 centimetres apart, and extend from the outer edge of the dough in to the edge of the filling. Next, starting at one end of the rectangle, fold a strip of dough diagonally over the filling. Now, fold a strip of dough from the other side so it overlaps the first strip in the centre. Continue, alternating sides, so that the filling is completely covered. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and let it rise in a warm place for about 30 minutes or until double. Use a ruler to measure the height of the braid before and during the rising to tell when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready. Bake at 375 F (190 C) for 30 minutes, or until golden brown. When the bread is done, use the aluminum foil to transfer it to a rack. Slide the foil out from under the braid and let it cool. Slice to serve.

cadets shine at summer camps

EMC news - Royal Canadian Air Cadets offers young people the opportunity to experience summer camp like never before. Cadets from all over Canada are selected from their local squadrons to attend. The summer of 2012, the 632 Phoenix Squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Cadets shone as they represented their squadron and their community at various camps throughout Canada. awards

This year they finished their summer training with seven cadets being awarded various awards and medals for their hard work, strong leadership skills and top marks during their weeks at camp. Flight sergeant Rebecca Gendron, as a staff member for the basic training course in Bagotville, Que., received the Commanding Officerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Commendation Pin for her hard work as a staff member.

At Kumon Kumon, we give your kids the power of knowing knowing. Whether your child needs extra help with math and reading or wants new academic challenges, our specialized learning program provides children of any age or ability with the confidence to achieve more all on their own. Kumon Math & Reading Centre of Orleans - North tKHJMMFBO!JLVNPODPN XXXLVNPODBPSMFBOTOPSUI ,VNPO.BUI3FBEJOH$FOUSFPG'BMMJOHCSPPL t%FCCJF'JOMBZ1BSFOU!PDETCDB XXXLVNPODBPSMFBOTGBMMJOHCSPPL Kumon Math & Reading Centre of Chapel Hill tUBLXJOHMBN!JLVNPODPN XXXLVNPODBPSMFBOTDIBQFMIJMM

Academic Enrichment Pre-K â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 12th Grade 800.ABC.MATH www.kumon.ca R0011635544

ORLĂ&#x2030;ANS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

BUSINESS SHOWCASE Presented by

crantastic

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Saturday October 20th, 2012 10:00am - 4:00pm Shenkman Arts Centre 245 Centrum Blvd. Feature Presenter:

David Chilton Author of The Wealthy Barber and the newest Dragon on CBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dragonsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Den Tickets Public: $40 Exhibitors/Members: $20 *$10 extra at door

Contact: Tel: 613-824-9137 orleanschamber.ca

Connecting your business with the community

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for something truly refreshing, reach for a glass of crimson tangy goodness. Farm Boyâ&#x201E;˘ Cranberry Cocktail contains 25% premium (not from concentrate) juice, squeezed from 100% Nova Scotian grown cranberries. We add no preservatives or colors; just true tart cranberry flavour.

To promote your business, please contact the OrlĂŠans Chamber of Commerce

Farm Boyâ&#x201E;˘ Cranberry Cocktail $3.49 each, 1.89 litres

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OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

15


news

Your Community Newspaper

Garbage collection every two weeks starting Oct. 29

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EMC news - Garbage collection will change to every two weeks starting Oct. 29, and the city is offering some high-tech tools to make the transition easier for residents. With the new web-based collection calendar tool, peeking out the front door to see if your neighbours put out their trash will be a thing of the past, IT subcommittee chairman Coun. Tim Tierney said. The tool offers a searchable online calendar, as well as weekly collection reminders by phone, email or Twitter. You can also choose whether you want the alerts to arrive the evening before or the morning of your collection day. Information can be found at ottawa.ca/en/garbage_recycle/. Starting Oct. 29, green-bin materials will be collected each week and the frequency of cardboard and container recycling won’t change, but garbage pick up will be reduced to every two weeks. As a result of the transition, 158,000 households in Ottawa will get a new garbage collection day. Waste will be picked up by new “dual-collection” trucks that can collect organic and recyclable materials at the same time, reducing the number of trucks on the road. The changes are expected to save the city $10 million each year and were approved by city council in an 18-4 vote in April. Some councillors (Rainer Bloess, Diane Deans, Jan Harder, Bob Monette and Tim Tierney) would have preferred to see seasonal biweekly pickup, which they said would have quelled fears

of stinking garbage piling up in the summer months. Switching to biweekly pickup is expected to divert an additional 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes of organic waste from the landfill, Weir said. That will boost the diversion rate from the current 44 per cent to around 54 per cent. But that still leaves Ottawa 15,000 tonnes short of its 60 per cent diversion target, said Bloess, the councillor for Innes ward. The city will never be able to achieve that diversion target until it tackles the “ICI sector” – industrial, commercial and institutional organizations, Bloess said. The city is currently only focusing on residential waste collection. Weir said city staff expect to hit the goal of a 60 per cent diversion rate by the end of this new waste contract, which will be in 2016. Household waste

• Garbage: The amount of trash sent to the landfill increased to 159,579 tonnes in 2011, up from 158,698 tonnes in 2010 • Blue bin: With the addition of new types of plastics to the collection in 2011, the city collected slightly more in the blue bin – 15, 955 tonnes, up from 15,321 tonnes in 2010. • Black bin: Paper and cardboard recycling dropped to 43,604 tonnes in 2011, down from 44,602 tonnes in 2010. • Green bin: In 2010, 53,349 tonnes of organic waste were collected from Ottawa homes; in 2011, that number rose only slightly to 55,063. - Leaf and yard waste: Organics recycling for leaf and yard waste decreased slightly, from 9,677 tonnes in 2010 to 9,428 tonnes in 2011.

Flames reach the sky Continued from page 14

October 14, 2012 Southam Hall National Arts Centre 53 Elgin Street,Ottawa ON

Tickets call 1.888.991.2787(ARTS) or 613.226.1830 www.cccda.ca

Net proceeds go to Easter Seals and the Disabled Troupe Sponsors

Supporting Sponsors R0011596973

16

Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

So the only enjoyment we got was sitting on the chairs and watching the raked leaves go up in smoke. Mother always took her mouth organ out on those nights and she expected us to sing along to whatever she was playing. Emerson refused. Audrey with her clear, sweet voice was the only one who could carry a tune and so she and Mother provided what entertainment there was. I would sit on the chair and listen, watching the flames rise towards the sky and wonder why Father couldn’t see the sheer joy of the evening. The old iron pump was right in the middle of the yard and although Mother said there was absolutely no need for it, Father made sure there

were several pails on the pump platform just in case the blaze got out of hand. By the time the fire was raging, we took off our jackets as the heat came at us in waves. It didn’t take long for the piles of leaves to be burnt right to the ground and I often wondered if it was worth the effort. When it was all over and we had hauled the kitchen chairs back into the house, Father would let out a big sigh, as if he carried the cares of the world on his shoulders. He would go out to the yard for the first time since supper was over, and he would pump many pails of water, and pour it over the remnants of the burning leaves. He was taking no chances that the barns and the log house that had been there for three generations would go up in smoke.


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BAKER HUGHES A leader in oilfield services, we currently have outstanding opportunities available for: 1) Equipment Operators for coiled tubing and cementing #1212681 2) Coiled tubing service supervisor - Red Deer #1214944 3) Coiled tubing service supervisor - Clairmont #121936 4) Cementing service supervisors #1215317 5) Operations manager #1214616 To apply, search for jobs at barkerhughes.com/careers EARN UP TO $28.00/HOUR. Undercover Shoppers Needed To Judge Retail And Dining Establishments. Experience Not Required. If You Can Shop - You Are Qualified!! www.MyShopperJobs.com Help Wanted!!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.TheMailingHub.com HOMEWORKERS NEEDED IMMEDIATELY!!! Full & Part Time Positions Are Available - On-Line Data Entry, Typing Work, Home Assemblers, Mystery Shoppers, Online Surveys, Others. No Experience Needed! www.ontariojobsathome.com

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Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858.

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MARINE Winter boat storage- Winterizing, shrink wrapping, indoor and outdoor, $335-$425. Mobile shrink wrapping available. 613-267-3470. relax@christie lakecottages.com

FINANCIAL / INCOME TAX Consolidate your Debts. 1 monthly pmt, including credit cards, taxes, collection agencies, garnishments, etc. GMC Consulting 24 hrs, Toll Free 1-877-977-0304. Services Bilingues. gmyre@debtzero.ca

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VEHICLES Need a car or truck and canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get financed? Whatever your credit issues we can help. Guaranteed financing is available to everyone regardless of credit history. Call today, drive tomorrow. Call Joseph 613-200-0100.

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1968 Thunderbird 4 door, 70,000 miles or 120,000 km, 11 to 1 compression, high output 429 CID Thunderjet engine. Engine and C6 transmission are excellent. Black leather interior in good condition. Car needs restoration. $2,800 o.b.o. 613-282-1836, Kemptville. Call anytime!

Weddings, Baptisms & Funerals, location of your choice. Also available small weddings, my home, weekdays. The Rev. Alan Gallichan. 613-726-0400.

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OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

17


! n I w ! n I w ! n I w Simply e-mail or mail in your favourite summer recipe (with a picture if possible) by November 5, 2012. Be sure to send it with your name, address, and phone number. If chosen, we will publish your recipe in our

Recipe

Holiday Favourites 2012

Holiday Recipe Favourites Supplement Book on December 6, 2012

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Your communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favourite holiday recipes for 2012.

many fabulous PRIZEs to bE won!

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Watch your upcoming EMC papers for prizing to be WOn

Contest Rules: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Employees of participating sponsors and their immediate families and Performance Printing / EMC employees are not eligible to compete in this contest. Contestants must abide these general contests rules and all specific rules applied to contests to be eligible to win available prizes. Prize winner selection is by random draw. Winners must correctly answer a skill-testing question to win. Prize winners will be contacted by telephone. Winners must bear some form of identification in order to claim their prize. There is no cash surrender value to prizes and they must be accepted as awarded. The EMC and participating companies assume no responsibility

whatsoever damages, be they physical or monetary, injury or death, as a result of this contest or any part of it. The EMC and participating retailers reserve the right to limit the numbers of entries received from any particular contestant(s). 8. The EMC and the participating companies reserve the right to change, rearrange, and/or alter any of there contests policies at any time whatsoever without prior notice. Also these contest rules are subject if necessary to comply with the rules, regulations, and the laws of the federal, Provincial, and local government bodies. 9. Ads will be published September 20, 27, October 4, 11,18, 25, 2012. 10. One entry per household. 7.

E-mail us at:

contest@thenewsemc.ca

0927.R0011636510

NOTE: All recipes must be typed or neatly handwritten. All others will not be accepted. Photocopies from books and magazines will not be accepted.

Or mail to 57 Auriga Dr., Suite 103, Ottawa, Ont. K2E 8B2 R0011641689

18

OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012


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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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news

Your Community Newspaper

Maple Ridge students hear Olympic success story Athletes share experiences, chance to wear medal with children Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - Maple Ridge Elementary School got a special visit as the Hometown Olympians Tour stopped in on Sept. 19. Nova Scotian Geoff Harris, an 800-metre runner, and British Columbia’s Richard Peter, gold-medal winning wheelchair basketball player, visited the school as a part of the tour. Harris told the students how he played just about every sport he could while growing up in Halifax, and decided to take running seriously as a Grade 12 student. He’s trained for eight years – full time for six – and overcame what he said was a weak 2011 season to make

the 2012 team. “It’s been a really long time for me to get to this point now,” he told the students. “I found running in Grade 12 and it took eight years to get there.” good result

Going into the Olympics ranked 34th in the world, his 17th place finish was an accomplishment for the 25year-old, who doesn’t have plans to retire anytime soon. In contrast, Peter said the London Games, his fifth, were also his last. He’s won four Olympic medals, three of them gold. His London medal came along to Maple Ridge with him, and got a big cheer from the students when he brought

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Brier Dodge/Metroland

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bus, so he chased after it. The driver, not knowing he had run up behind the vehicle, put the bus in reverse and backed up over Peter’s chest, breaking his spine. play safe

“I want you guys to go out there and have fun, but also play it safe,” he said. It was a shorter talk for Peter, who regularly does public speaking engagements and often brings along wheelchairs for students or teachers to try out. Grade 6 student Alycia Ayettey said she hopes she can

be in Harris and Peter’s position one day, returning from an Olympic Games. “I thought it was really cool that they tried a lot of sports,” said the runner and dancer. “Lately I’ve really liked running. I’m starting to try longer distances.” Harris and Peter both signed a poster and left a package for the students at Maple Ridge, before heading to their next stop on the tour. The tour included stops at St. Peter Catholic High School in Orléans and Henry Munro Middle School in Gloucester.

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it out. Peter has had a long career, proud to represent both Canada and our First Nations population as one of the few aboriginal Canadian athletes at the Games. His hometown community on Vancouver Island has celebrations planned for his retirement. He took time to remind the students about staying safe. Peter was born able-bodied, but became paralyzed from under his rib cage down when he was four years old. He got off the school bus but still wanted to play with friends who were still on the

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From left, Grade 6 student Alycia Ayettey, Olympic runner Geoff Harris, wheelchair basketball player Richard Peter, and Grade 6 student Bryce Guitor pose with the Canadian flag and Peter’s gold medal at Maple Ridge Elementary School on Sept. 19.

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Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

Read us online at www.emconline.ca


news

Your Community Newspaper

Laura Mueller

laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - The city’s first-ever in-depth report on its infrastructure reveals that Ottawa needs to boost repair spending from $80 million to $165 million a year by 2022. Just days after spending $4.9 million to repair a sinkhole on highway 174 caused by a collapsed culvert, the report revealed the city isn’t spending enough to stay on top of repairing its roads, underground pipes and bridges. The report was particularly important in the context of a recent significant failure of a key piece of city infrastructure: the highway 174 sinkhole. “The cost in terms of both dollars and quality of life was very real,” Watson said. The money will be needed to repair and upgrade Ottawa’s $30 billion in roads, water, transit, recreation and cultural infrastructure. None of the infrastructure is unsafe right now, but transportation infrastructure, such as roads, has the highest percentage in really poor shape, with 25 per cent of the city’s $11.2 billion in transportation infrastructure rated in poor to very poor condition. Transit

infrastructure is in the best shape, with $1.4 billion of assets rated 79 per cent in good to very good condition. The report didn’t include detail on how the city will pay for the increases, but the options are limited: raise it from taxes, or take on more debt. Funding could theoretically come from the federal and/or provincial levels of government, although no new infrastructure programs are forthcoming. The infrastructure report was only tabled on Sept. 19; debate and discussion will take place on Oct. 2. During that meeting, city treasurer Nancy Schepers will also present a proposed plan for finding the needed funds, which are all expressed in 2012 dollars and don’t account for inflation. There are spikes in the city’s infrastructure spending in 2012 and 2014 from the city’s Ottawa on the Move road rebuilding project, which shows that city council has already made infrastructure repair a priority, said Alain Gonthier, the city’s asset management boss. “With Ottawa on the Move you’ve allowed yourself a bit of breathing room,” Schepers added. The city currently carries around $1.4 billion in debt,

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which is less than the limits set by city council and the province. Schepers wouldn’t say whether taxes would have to go up, but Watson was firm on maintaining a maximum tax increase of 2.5 per cent annually. Last year alone, the city added $1 billion in new infrastructure assets it will have to pay to maintain over the years. When asked if the report was a wake-up call that the city should cut back on building new infrastructure and focus instead on maintaining the assets it already has on the books, Watson said city council’s focus on reining in the urban boundary was an attempt to do just that. “Obviously we’re always going to be growing, but we have to have smart growth,” Watson said. “(It’s) one of the reasons why I was fighting to preserve the urban boundary. The farther out we go, the more expensive it is. We know that growth does not pay for itself.” River Coun. Maria McRae, who heads the city’s environment committee, said the city needs to include future maintenance costs in the “financial implications” sections of reports before council approves projects. “It’s short sighted and myopic of council sometimes,” said McRae, adding that councillors are sometimes just focused on “snipping the ribbon,” not on what it will cost to maintain infrastructure over its lifetime.

“ N e i g h b o u r s H e l p i n g N e i g h b o u r s”

Pet Adoptions BeeBee

OReO

ID#A143073 Beebee is a spayed female, brown tabby Domestic Shorthair cat who is about seven years old. She was brought to the shelter as a stray on May 5 and is now available for adoption. Beebee loves to curl up in the sunshine and watch the world go by. She has a quiet personality and gets along well with pretty much anyone. She is past her feisty kitten years and would rather not live in a busy and bustling home. Beebee needs a quiet loving home where she can enjoy her adult and retirement years receiving love and attention curled up on your lap.

ID#A142675 This unaltered female, black and white Syrian Hamster is about 10 months old. She was surrendered to the shelter by her owner on August 21. She is one of many hamsters and other small animals currently available for adoption. She would love a wheel in her cage for exercise, and an extra-special treat would be a hamster ball to explore your home outside the cage,under supervision,of course! For more information about these or other animals available for adoption, please call the Adoption Centre at 613-725-3166 ext. 258 or visit www. ottawahumane.ca.

Is your cat’s scratchIng habIt leavIng you scratchIng your head?

Scratching is normal cat behaviour, not a comment on your upholstery. Cats scratch in order to: remove the dead outer layer of their claws; rub their scent onto things to mark their territory; stretch; work off energy; and even to seek your attention when they want something. There are lots of ways to keep your feline friend from ruining the furniture.

Dimitri Do you think your pet is cute enough to be “THE PET OF THE WEEK”? Submit a picture and short biography of your pet to find out! Simply email to: cfoster@thenewsemc.ca attention “Pet of the Week”

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You can’t eliminate scratching behaviours: it’s a normal behaviour for your cat; it becomes a problem only when the object being scratched is an item of value to you. The goal is to redirect the scratching to an acceptable object, such as a scratching post. Provide objects for scratching that are appealing and convenient from your cat’s point of view. Observe the physical features of the objects your cat is scratching. Note their location, texture, shape and height. Substitute a similar object(s) for your cat to scratch (for example, rope-wrapped posts, corrugated cardboard, or even a log). Place an acceptable object (for example, scratching post) near

make her less likely to use the post. Special products for training your cat are available at pet supply stores. If you are considering declawing your cat, consider this: declawing a cat doesn’t remove just the claws — it amputates the end digit from the paw, similar in scope to cutting off a person’s finger at the last joint. This procedure can cause substantial discomfort and complications after the operation. Declawed cats may become reclusive, irritable, aggressive and unpredictable, and may have a tendency to bite as they cannot scratch to give warning. While other, newer methods exist for declawing (for example, laser surgery), the end result is still undesirable for your cat as it prevents her from engaging in normal cat behaviour. The OHS does not support declawing. It should be considered as a final option after you have exhausted other alternatives to eliminate destructive behaviour. However, if you feel that you must either declaw your cat or give her up, the OHS would rather see your cat stay in her

home. If you decide that it is absolutely necessary to have your cat declawed, only have the front paws done, so that the cat can still scratch an itch, climb and defend herself. If this is your decision, consult your veterinarian first and discuss having the surgery done at the same time your cat is spayed or neutered. Other tips If you catch your cat in the act, try making a loud noise (for example, use a whistle, shake a soda can filled with pebbles or pennies, or slap a wall or a table) or use a water-filled squirt bottle. Conversely, when your cat claws the scratching post instead of your couch, make sure you give your cat extra praise and affection. One reason cats scratch is to remove the dead outer layer of their claws. Regularly trimming your cat’s nails can help reduce scratching. You should clip off the sharp tips of your cat’s claws on his front feet every two weeks or so. More companion animal information is available at www.ottawahumane.ca.

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: www.ottawahumane.ca Email: Adoptions@ottawahumane.ca Telephone: (613) 725-3166 x258 Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

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Dimitri is a British Shorthair who likes to hang around the front stoop of his home. Some of his favourite things are catching house flies, stalking sparrows and putting up with cuddles from his 4 year old owner. Always welcome for attention, make sure you say a big hello if you see this big boy lazying around on the side walk.

an inappropriate object (for example, upholstered chair). Make sure the objects are stable and won’t fall over when she uses them. You can make these objects more attractive to your cat by spraying them with catnip periodically and hanging a toy from the post. If you cat is refusing to use a scratching post and prefers your rug, try covering a piece of plywood with carpet and spraying it with some catnip. Cover the inappropriate object(s) with something your cat won’t like, such as double-sided sticky tape, aluminium foil, sheets of sandpaper, or a plastic carpet runner with the pointy side up. Only remove the “unappealing” coverings (for example, double-sided sticky tape, aluminium foil, sheets of sandpaper) from the inappropriate object(s) when your cat is consistently using the appropriate objects. This will entice your cat to investigate the more appealing scratching post. Don’t take your cat over to the scratching post and position her paws on the post to show her what she’s supposed to do. This will likely have the opposite effect and

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Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: orleans@metroland.com Discovery Café presents Let’s Do Business! given by Jerry Tomberlin, dean of the Sprott School of Business, Carleton University. Discovery Café is a series of public lectures on the last Friday of the month at Blackburn Hamlet Community Church, 2598 Innes Rd (between the TD Bank and the Blackburn Arms). Coffee/tea/desserts are provided. Visit www. blackburnhamletcommunitychurch.ca for more.

Sept. 29

The Cumberland Farmers’ Market celebrates agriCULTURE in the context of the Canada’s Culture Days, which is a volunteer movement to raise the awareness, accessibility, participation and engagement of Canadians in the arts and cultural life of their communities. The market is at 1115 Dunning Rd. in Cumberland. The Gloucester North Lions Club’s White Cane Day fundraiser from 10 a.m. to

3 p.m. at Canadian Tire, 3910 Innes Rd. All proceeds support the vision screening program offered by the Lions Club to all primary schools in our area. Please give generously and help promote healthy vision for our children. Opening concert in MacKay United Church’s 2012-2013 chamber music series at 7:30 p.m. at 39 Dufferin Rd. Performing will be soprano Isabelle Lacroix, tenor JeanPhilippe Fortier-Lazure, baritone Denis Lawlor, and pianist Jean Desmarais. Tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for seniors and students, available at Books on Beechwood or through MacKay United Church, 613-749-8727, and at the door. For information call 613-749-8727 or visit www. mackayunitedchurch.com.

Through Oct. 1

Youth and adult futsal fall/ winter individual and team registration. Space is limited and registration deadline is

Oct. 1. This is a great winter fun sport which will definitely improve your summer soccer skills. Registration online at cumberlandsoccer. powerupsports.com/registration. For more info call 613-837-9282.

Oct. 3

Ladies Fall Fashion Show at Orleans United Church , 1111 Orleans Blvd., at 6 pm. There will be a display from small businesses at 6 p.m., followed by the fashion show at 7 p.m. Tickets $10 or reserve by calling Jean at 613-837-4321.

October 5, 12, 19 and 26

Euchre partieS held by the Leonard Women’s Institute at the Bearbrook Community Centre, 8720 Russell Rd. near Bearbrook, at 8 p.m. Friends and good company are always welcome to play cards and visit. Sandwiches, dessert, coffee and tea will be available afterwards. Prizes and door prizes. Fee to play is $5 per person.

Oct. 6

The parenting children course will run from10 a.m. to noon, and runs for five weeks at Blackburn Hamlet Community Church, 2598 Innes Rd. For information and registration, call Karen Bergenstein at 613-8372422 or email bhcchurch@ gmail.com. Some child care is available. Learn about the course at relationshipcentral. ca.

Oct. 13

The Cumberland Curling Club hosts a free curling clinic and open house for first-time curlers at 10 a.m. Learn the basics of the game, including rules, etiquette and strategy, then head out onto the ice to throw some rocks and take part in a match. Space is limited so email to cccurling.membership@gmail. com or call George Mota at 613-834-2740. Season opens Oct. 15. For more information about the club or to register, visit www.cumberland. ovca.com.

Oct. 20

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Harvest Gold Dinner and Dance fundraiser for the extension of St.Helen’s Anglican Church, Orléans. Buffet dinner, museum tours, silent auction, live auction, and dancing at the Canada Aviation Museum, 11 Aviation Pkwy. Tickets are available by calling St.Helen’s at 613-824-2010 or email: harvestgoldtickets@gmail.com.

Oct. 27

2012 Giving Thanks Roast Beef Dinner at the Orleans United Church at 1111 Orleans Blvd. Entertainment from 5 to 6 p.m. and dinner at 6:15 p.m.The cost is $15 per adult or $30 for a family. Tickets at 613-837-4321 or 613-276-0183 or email

JUNIOR A HOCKEY We are gearing up for a great season and could use your support. Come and enjoy Friday Night Hockey at the Earl Armstrong Arena!

future home games

Friday, Sept. 28 • 7:30pm - NEPEAN RAIDERS Friday, Oct. 5 – 7:30pm - CORNWALL COLTS www.gloucesterrangersjra.com 22

Orléans EMC - Thursday, September 27, 2012

roger@7seas.net.

Through Nov. 15

The Teen Zone of the Cumberland branch of the Ottawa Public Library, is continuing its teen art exhibits. For the fall, we will be displaying the works of local teen artist, Chelsea Lambert.

Mondays

The Ottawa Pub Dart League plays from October to April at various venues in the city. If you are interested in joining or venue sponsorship, please visit www. theopdl.ca.

Fridays

Fivepin bowling league is to encouraging senior citizens over the age of 50 to participate in an activity that provides regular moderate exercise. There is no registration fee. The league is a fun, non-competitive league, experience not required. Bowling takes place each Friday afternoon between 1 and 3 p.m. at Walkley Bowling Centre, 2092 Walkley Rd. Participants are placed on mixed four-person teams. To register, please call Roy or Jean Hoban at 613-7316526.

Saturdays

The Cumberland Farmers’ Market 2012 season is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., rain or shine, until Oct. 13 at the RJ Kennedy Community Centre, 1115 Dunning Rd. For information visit cumberlandfarmersmarket. ca or call 613-833-2635.

Ongoing

Ottawa Newcomers’ Club invites women new to Ottawa to join activities and meet some new friends. Please check the our website at:

www.ottawanewcomersclub. ca For more information call 613-860-0548 or ottawanewcomers@hotmail.ca. The Gloucester South Seniors’ Chess Club, 4550 Bank St. meets every Monday and Thursday at 7 p.m. Immediate openings. Please contact Robert MacDougal, 613-821-1930 for more information. There is a Mom and Me Playgroup meeting at East Gate Alliance Church. It takes place the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. More information can be found at www.eastgatealliance.ca or by contacting debbie@eastgatealliance.ca or 613-744-0682. Women’s competitive volleyball league looking for individual players. League runs end of September to end of April. Cost is $170. Located in Blackburn Hamlet on Wednesday evenings from 8 to 10 p.m. Contact Marg Walters at mewalters@ rogers.com. Girl Guides of Canada offers programs locally for girls from five to 17 years of age. Meetings, camps, leadership and skills are all part of the opportunities provided. Go to www.girlguides.ca to find the unit closest to you and complete the online registration. The Active Living Club invites active seniors and adults 50-plus to join us in the outdoor activities of hiking, cycling, canoeing, cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. All outings start at 10 a.m., from different locations in OttawaGatineau, and range from one-and-a-half to three hours. Call City Wide Sports at 613-580-2854 and press 1 for administration or email cws-psm@ottawa.ca.

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#

Oops! Correction. We got the name wrong last week.

Alexandre Boivin Date of Birth: January 11, 1994 Height: 5’ 10” Weight: 150 Home Town: Ottawa, On

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