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Sleigh day

EMC Events – Much of Frontenac County woke up to a blizzard last Thursday, but for Jordyn Payne and Grace Meier the weather was just perfect to dig out the sleighs they each got last Christmas and hit the hill at McMullen Park in Verona.

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The storms we have weathered will give way to sunshine before long By Janet Gutowski

Central Frontenac Mayor Frontenac County Warden

EMC News - If I were to describe the year 2012 at Frontenac County using weather terms I would characterize it as “stormy with brief periods of sunshine.” From my observations it seems that the ice storm which delayed the January meeting set the tone for the entire year. Budget discussions were a cloudy and unsettled time with some members still struggling to understand provincially mandated budget items such as the accessibility committee. Then when it looked like spring would thaw relations between the County and North Frontenac, the proposed joint ambulance/fire

hall project fell apart leaving both councils with challenges which are still unresolved. In late spring, when we were more than ready for some sunshine, the MTO proposed converting the Howe Island Ferry from diesel to rechargeable electric batteries. This proposal, which looked like an environmental win at first blush, also fell apart under closer scrutiny. So when did the sun shine? It was shining full force when Wolfe Island celebrated the completion of the renovations to the ambulance base which is vital to ensuring emergency care for the islanders. We also had sunshine at the K&P Trail opening in Harrowsmith. There was a good turnout and representation from a variety of user groups who were on hand to join in the long await-

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ed event. The sun was also on hand at Canada Day and numerous other local events that took place this past summer. In fact there was so much sun that it kept fire departments busy across much of Eastern Ontario and it has left many farmers in despair. Lets everyone keep those farmers and other stewards of our land in mind and in our prayers as we make plans for the new year. As for 2013...I do not expect it to be an easy year. There is no doubt that some of my colleagues are upset that I dared to challenge to status quo and others are concerned that council will refuse to work with me because of it. For those of you who know me however, you know that I am not known for taking the path of least resistance. I firmly believe that our citi-

zens expect more than the status quo and it was the citizens who put me in office, not the politicians. I believe we cannot continue to do business the same way year after year and expect different results. I believe we can and are making a difference to those who live in our communities by making strategic investments like the Community Improvement plans. I believe we can and must find more ways to work together for the benefit of all our citizens. That is the path which I have chosen to follow. When it comes right down to it I suspect my colleagues and I have more in common than some would have you believe. I believe I am working with people who want to

make a difference. In a very short time we will have to get down to business. For your sake and mine, I am hopeful the storms we have weathered will give way to some sunshine before long.

Janet Gutowski Central Frontenac Mayor Frontenac County Warden


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news

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Busy year in 2012, review City finalizes 2013 of services slated for 2013 budget with 2.5% property tax increase South Frontenac Mayor

EMC News - The last meeting of South Frontenac Council for 2012 is over… what a year it has been. Together, the nine members of Council with advice and support from a dedicated staff, have been busy working on your behalf. Council met 40 times over the course of the year; sometimes with only a reporter in the audience and others with a room full of concerned citizens. Regardless of the audience, our primary focus has been on making things better for the residents of South Frontenac. I encourage you to make it your New Year’s resolution to become aware of how your local government is making a difference. There were many high- Gary Davison lights and accomplishments South Frontenac Mayor in 2012. The Township has once again experienced growth with subdivision out of concerned residents approvals, new commercial and generated lots of ideas. space under construction, These sessions have resultnew businesses and the cre- ed in changes to the initial ation of more residential plans and we will be golots. The Community Im- ing back to the community provement Plan (CIP) for to present the plan early in Verona has seen 20 proj- 2013. The Portland waste been a9:58:09 focus FRONTS_EMC_JANUARYFLEX_Final.pdf 1 12/28/2012 AMand the ects underway and grant site has money is still available. In Ministry has responded fa-

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EMC News – This may come as little consolation to some homeowners, but property taxes in Kingston are going up the equivalent price of a cup of coffee each week. At their final meeting of the year on December 18, councillors finalized the necessary bylaws to implement a $309 million muBirthday Cash nicipal operating budget for The city will spend up 2013, along with a 2.5 percent property tax increase. to $20,000 to help celebrate That works out to an extra the birthday of Sir John A. $85 a year for the average- Macdonald this month. A series of public events sized house. “It’s the lowest tax rate are planned at Sir John A’s increase since amalgama- statue in City Park and the tion,” said mayor Mark Ger- Grand Theatre between Janretsen, who noted that one- uary 9 and 13 to coincide percent of the increase is with the 198 th anniversary dedicated to infrastructure of the birth of Canada’s first prime minister. improvements. Arthur Milnes, honoura“So really, the tax increase to run the city ry commissioner of the Sir amounts to just 1.5 per- John A. Bicentennial Commission, promises a “big cent,” he added. While councillors and announcement” will also be staff praised each other for made on January 11. “It’s not my announcesetting and achieving a “reaso I can’t tell you what FRONTS_EMC_GAME18_Final.pdf 1 12/27/2012 4:10:35 PM sonable” tax increase, coun- ment cillors were also warned the it is,” he informed council.

The city is gearing up for a much bigger celebration, the 2015 bicentennial of the Old Chieftan’s birth, by working with the Sir John A. Commission. “This is so darn important for the community, we are going to do it right,” Milnes added. Coincidentally, at the same meeting, councillors moved ahead with plans to designate the entire Cataraqui Cemetery as a property of heritage value under the Ontario Heritage Act. The cemetery, established in 1850, has 43,000 interments and is the final resting place of several prominent Canadians including Sir John A. Macdonald. The provincial heritage designation was five years in the making, and it comes one year after the federal government declared the cemetery a National Historic Site. The dual designations not only cement the cemetery’s importance as a heritage asset, but will likely limit the visual impact on the sprawling property from high-rise development that is proposed along its eastern border.

january

Reporter

2.5 percent increase may not be sustainable in future budgets without service cuts or new revenue sources. The mayor also cautioned against plunging taxes too low, like what happened in the 1990s. “And look what happened? Future councils put up taxes nearly 11 percent one year to make up lost revenues. We don’t want to see those fluctuations.”

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By Bill Hutchins

vourably to the Townships plans. Council has given serious consideration to the operation of cemeteries and is making changes to provide better service and reduce the burden on the property tax bill. In an effort to be consistent, a process of routine tax sales has begun to collect long past due property taxes. A new financial system will provide the tools for greater accountability and reporting. The 2013 budget process has been completed even in the face of significant cuts in funding from the Provincial government and tackled the serious challenges the municipality faces between service delivery and fair taxation. I could go on, but will pause here…suffice it to say, everyone has been busy. What does 2013 hold? Council has committed to reviewing the services that are delivered and in establishing priorities for the years to come. This process will assist us in facing the future and the financial challenges that come with it. One thing is certain and can be summed up perfectly with the newly adopted Township motto… “Our Strength is Our Community.”

Sydenham, the lights went up and the high school has begun its expansion. 2013 promises more with seniors housing being explored and additional demands from future subdivisions. Solid waste has been a hot item and it has received a lot of attention. Public meetings saw a large turn-

By Gary Davison

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

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news

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Kingston’s movie-going experience just got bigger with IMAX By Bill Hutchins Reporter

EMC News – The moviegoing mantra – bigger is better – has led to the demise of downtown Kingston’s Capitol 7 theatre and the opening of a new 1,762-seat, megascreen theatre in the city’s north end. Nova Scotia-based Empire Theatres opened its 10screen cinema on Dalton Avenue, near Division Street, featuring the region’s only IMAX screen, exactly one week before Christmas. “Yes, with the help of the construction team we were able to open a few days earlier than planned. We wanted to take advantage of The Hobbit’s popularity,” explained Dean Leland, Empire Theatres’ vice president of studio relations & media. The giant IMAX screen has played The Hobbit to near sold-out shows daily since it opened December 18. “The geometry in the theatre is specific to IMAX. The film is different than you would see in a regular theatre. You feel you’re part of the movie,” said Bob Raposo, vice president of theatre development and sales for IMAX. The Mississauga-based IMAX has partnered with Empire to install its custommade big screen, big sound

technology in seven of the chain’s 52 theatres, including Kingston. The wall-to-wall IMAX screen is about 40 percent larger than most regular silver screens, along with a thundering digital sound system and crystal clear images, while audience seating is much closer to the screen to fill your peripheral view, which has the option to play 3D films; all aiming to give viewers the feeling like they are in the movie, Raposo explained during a pre-opening media tour of the new facility. The projection room for the IMAX and nine other screens is virtually automated. Gone are the days when giant spools of film flickered 35 mm print images that required constant monitoring. Instead, the digital technology for each movie can fit into the palm of your hand, wrapped in a small metal container, and is plugged into a projection machine that resembles the size of a household furnace. Leland would not disclose the price of each projection unit, nor the overall cost to construct the theatre in the King’s Crossing mall. “We are opening about two of these theatres every year,” he said of Empire’s expansion to compete with the long-established Cineplex

chain. He says Kingston was an obvious choice for the IMAX screen because nothing like it exists in southeastern Ontario. The nearest IMAX is in Whitby. The theatre will screen different films in the IMAX format depending on what film is playing and the popularity of it. Tickets to an IMAX film will cost about $5 more than average admission prices. Raposo, who oversees IMAX screens throughout The Americas, says the Canadian-developed technology that once focused on screening documentaries and educational-style productions decided to branch into showing Hollywood movies a decade ago. Empire may have the region’s only IMAX screen but it still has some catching up to do. Even though each of the theatre seats is numbered, movie goers can’t yet pre-book the exact seat of their choice. “That’s not a feature we have right now, but we are moving in that direction,” Leland explained. But the seating, sound and visual experience appears to be on par with the competition. Each screening room ranges from 150 to 300 seats. It’s something Empire’s downtown theatre couldn’t

provide audiences. “Through research, audiences were telling us that the Capitol theatre that we operate is not the way of the future, and they prefer a much more state of the art facility.” The Capitol 7, a film-going fixture of Princess Street for decades, closed its doors December 20 following the day’s last showing of the Bond film, Skyfall. “We are actively looking for a buyer,” Leland said of plans to sell the Capitol building. Empire’s new theatre has about 60 full and part-time employees, more than double that of the Capitol cinema. Leland says downtown employees were offered the option of moving into the new movie house.

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013


news

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Here comes the bridal festival Twenty-Three Years on Wolfe Island and Counting By Kristyn Wallace EMC Correspondent

By Margaret Knott Correspondent

EMC News - Another year is drawing quickly to a close and, as it does my thoughts turn not just to incidents of the last year but to my childhood, growing up years, marriage, children, grandchildren…. And of course I recall the many places where we, (Walter and I), have lived until we finally settled on Wolfe Island. And it is here we have lived the longest, moving here on a wet November day in 1989. Walter had not yet retired and lived in Ottawa during the week for a number of years, coming home weekends. So I was on my own, learning about sump pumps and wells and roofs and mice, cutting grass and what the previous owner and builder of our home new had done before us. Much of that first winter was an experience for me, meeting neighbours, driving into Marysville, picking up the mail, going to church, getting used to the ferry, searching out a doctor in the city, trying to meet people and find something I could be involved in. The wonder of a small community I was soon to discover is that if you are willing to step out the community will welcome you. Caring neighbours, church suppers, school council, church choir, CWL, island events, coffee at Ernie’s and a chat at Fargo’s, kept one up on the news. If you had a question, you had only to ask. And as for the history and stories of the island…

they were there for the taking.. Every one is a neighbour on the island. Everyone is there to help when needed. (e.g.. Ice storm. ) And because the community is small every accident, illness or death is felt with sadness and every wedding, birth, occasion and event is noted with joy. But perhaps it was at the Town Hall and at council meetings I began to understand what island living really is all about,as one study after another happened with regard to ferry service. There was the long haul over amalgamation, the download of Roads #95 & 96, and the winter dock road with not enough money to maintain them, the big issues around wind towers, Big Sandy Bay, the Land Fill site, the bridge debate, the casino debate, the fares on the ferry debate, a larger ferry, two ferries, official plans, sustainability, etc. etc. And of course there is the ongoing challenge of the new skating rink and how to roof it…. The water has been too high, too low,. Its has been too dry, too wet, not enough snow. Tourism, cyclists, new businesses become more and more important to island. All the while more houses are being built on the island, which means traffic on the ferry is heavier and heavier… What I have learned over the time, and it has been my privilege to write about it, is that maintaining roads and community services and issues around the MTO ferry service (the same one and no bigger) and water levels, are among the island’s greatest is-

sues. Coming up not necessarily in 3rd or 4th place, is how to provide medical services and senior facilities for people so that they remain on the island, maybe not necessarily alone in their homes but within Marysville, where they can walk, be near friends and the services that are there. A lot to think about in 2013. Happy New Year and Good Health, to Family, Friends and Neighbours…… Thanks to you All… Walter & Margaret Knott Around Town: The Bath Road Rangers association of the Church Athletic League will be hosting the Bath Road Rangers Winter Classic at 1pm on Jan. 6, 2013 at Wolfe Island’s NHL size outdoor rink. Four Ranger teams will compete against invited house league hockey opponents. Opponents include: Kamha Worriors (novice); Loyalist Twp (Atom); KAMHA Public Health (PeeWee); North Frontenac Bantam (Bantam). The games are planned to begin at 1PM sharp with the last game to conclude at 5PM on that date. Bleachers (baseballtype) will be set up alongside the rink. However there is no cover around the bleachers, so dress warmly. It is important to remember that the ferry lands at the winter dock on Wolfe Island when coming from Kingston. *CONTACT PERSON:* Jim Sutherland bathroadrangers@ gmail.com 613-634-3348 (hm) 613-545-5309 (cell) For Further information: www.wolfeisland.com

EMC News – For any soonto-be-bride, it’s the event of the year. The 32nd annual FLY FM Bridal Festival takes place Jan. 13, and this year’s edition will be the largest one yet. “It just keeps growing and growing,” says Deborah Mitchell, one of the organizers of the event. In fact, the event has grown so much that it will be held at the K-Rock Centre this year for the first time. The venue will provide ample room for the approximately 80 exhibitors to show off their goods and services. “There’s a lot of buzz, there’s a lot of excitement, and you get to meet people who want to try to make your day the way you envision it to be,” says Mitchell. For those planning a wed-

ding in or around the Kingston area, the event will feature everything from jewelers and florists to DJs and photographers. There’s also information about local venues, gift registries and honeymoon locations. Longtime exhibitors at the festival include Bridal Creations, A Party Centre, Pam’s Flower Garden, The Harbour Restaurant and Luce Hair Studio. Exhibitors include not only local merchants, but also those from the surrounding area, including Belleville and Ottawa. And the event isn’t just for people who are getting married in the near future. “Generally, it’s people who have an engagement ring on their finger or think they will soon,” says Mitchell. “And the girls come out and they bring their moms and their bridesmaids...and there are things to entice the guys to come out

with them.” One of the highlights of the event is the fashion show, which will include designs for not only brides and grooms, but also the wedding party and even the parents of the happy couple. The fashion show is set to music and features professional lighting, staging and choreography. Interested viewers can follow along with the show’s program and jot down designs they like. The event also features door prizes and food samples from local caterers. “You get caught up in the excitement,” says Mitchell. “It makes the planning of it real.” Tickets for the FLY FM Bridal Festival are $10 in advance or $12 at the door and can be purchased at the K-Rock Centre box office. For more information or to view a directory of vendors appearing at the event visit www.flyfmbridal.com.

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Editorial

EMC - Your Community Newspaper In Our Opinion

Back to life, back to (a new) reality Hollie's Happenings By Hollie Pratt-Campbell

hpratt-campbell@theheritageemc.ca

EMC Editorial - I’ve always been awed by how working parents manage it all so effectively. Since having my own child eight-and-a-half months ago, that awe has increased significantly, and is gradually transforming into an overwhelming sense of “holy moly that’ll be me� as my return-to-work date fast approaches. “Oh you must be just dreading it,� most people say when the subject comes up. “I have a lot of mixed emotions,� I answer, and that’s the truth. What I usually leave out is

that the foremost emotion in the mix is guilt. Namely, guilt at how much I’m genuinely looking forward to going back to work. Lacking the words to articulate why it is, exactly, that a large part of me prefers reporting to baby care and not sound like a horrible, selfish mother, I’ve tended to shy away from the topic. Then a couple of weeks ago, I read an essay called “Joy� by the brilliant Zadie Smith, and came face-to-face with a perfectly-worded explanation of why I’m feeling this way. After breaking down the difference between pleasure and joy, and how the former relates to things more immediately and sensually enjoyable and the latter to things that are beautiful and awe-inspiring but also hard and overwhelming, Smith says of her daughter: “Occasionally the child, too, is a pleasure, though mostly she is a joy, which means in fact she gives us not much pleasure at all, but rather that strange ad-

mixture of terror, pain, and delight that I have come to recognize as joy, and now must find some way to live with daily.� I couldn’t agree more. Put bluntly, I’m looking forward to returning to work because I’m lucky enough to enjoy my job; thus I know I will experience more daily pleasure than I do on maternity leave. For me, writing is the exact opposite of how Smith describes a child: occasionally a joy, mostly a pleasure. Meeting and interviewing the lovely people of Kingston and area is always a pleasure, and now that I no longer feel shy about taking pictures of (mostly somewhat reluctant) people multiple times a day, so is photography. That says nothing of the smaller pleasures my return will bring, such as being alone in my car when an amazing song comes on the radio, and being able to sit down and take 10 minutes to mindfully enjoy a sandwich. Still, as I write this column,

In Our Opinion

with one eye on Summer playing with the TV remote control on the floor in front of me, I am also aware that something will be lost on Feb. 11, when I am no longer able to be with her 24/7: a sense of certainly that she is well and safe, perhaps, mingled with anxiety that I might be missing a milestone, or even a particularly cute giggle. Indeed, the extent to which Summer currently needs me around at all times is terrifying in the most joyful of ways, and the knowledge that she will need my immediate presence less and less in another way entirely. But the question remains: how will I manage it all? How can I possibly be both a mom and a reporter – each a fulltime job in its own right? How will I find time to read and run and dry my hair? How will I cope with all the joy, and all the pleasure, in my life simultaneously? Truth be told, I have no idea. But I’ll figure it out.

New Year’s is just much ado about nothing really Craig Comment By Craig Bakay editorial@theheritageemc.ca

EMC Editorial — “Another year over, and a new one just begun.� When all else fails, quote John Lennon, eh? But essentially, that’s really all that New Year’s Eve/Day is — one year over and a new one begun. And the Ukrainian side of me keeps reminding me that New Year’s Day won’t be until Jan. 14 this year (or Jan. 7 to some, but in our family, that was Christmas). In China, it won’t be the New Year until Feb. 10 (2013 is the Year of the Snake, specifi-

cally Water Snake, for those so inclined). Similarly, around the world, the beginning of a new year varies — from country to country, and even within most countries. In short, there’s no real consensus as to when a new year should begin. Officially here in Canada, New Year’s Day is Jan. 1, 2013. That’s dictated by the use of the Gregorian calendar, with the date being chosen as that of the circumcision of Jesus (on the eighth day from His birth). Other than that, there’s no real justification for the date. It’s not like it’s an equinox, or a solstice. And while, yes, we do base our year on how long it takes the Earth to make one orbit of the Sun, it’s not like there’s any great celestial reason for saying the trip begins Jan. 1. It could just have easily been April 26 when the Earth formed and started revolving around the Sun for all we know.

But, by the same token, there isn’t any real good reason for changing it either. While it might be nice to begin a new year the day after the longest day of the year (or the shortest, which we’re at least close to with Jan. 1) or something like that, changing the date would cause more problems that it solved. For one thing, all those calendar-making templates on computer systems everywhere would have to be changed. For another thing, government bureaucracies live for calendar years and changing the way government bureaucracies do things has historically proven to be a Herculean task. But, it’s often interesting to speculate. For instance, moving the New Year holiday might make the end of the year less stressful for some, as Christmas followed by New Year’s can be incredibly hectic as we rush around to get everything done “in time.�

Granted, it’s not an overwhelmingly compelling reason to change the date, but humans have done more for lesser reasons. If we were to change the date, I’d like to nominate some time near the beginning of March. The biggest reason for this is that there are no long-weekend holidays in March (St. Patrick’s Day notwithstanding in some circles), and after a long winter we could probably use one then. April is probably more the end of winter and the beginning of spring-like weather but Good Friday/Easter Sunday happen in April and if we got too close to them, we’d hardly solve the ChristmasNew Year’s stress period we were seeking to avoid. All in all, New Year’s will probably just stay where it is and continue to be nothing more than an excuse to party and finish up the Christmas turkey.

Start the New Year with realistic goals EMC Editorial – It’s that time of year again: gyms are packed, savings plans are made, and people are committing themselves to new goals, or recommitting themselves to old ones. New Year’s resolutions are a great reason to try to better ourselves in some way. The New Year is a time of renewal, and what better way to do that than to make changes we’ve been wanting to make for some time. According to Huffington Post Canada, “more than 51 per cent of Canadians make New Year’s resolutions,� but more than half of those who do can’t stick to them for more than a month, according to a survey conducted late in 2011. That survey, administered by Virgin Mobile Canada, found that the top resolutions for Canadians included: “stay in touch with friends and family, fall in love, quit smoking, get better grades or a promotion at work, and drink less alcohol.� So why do we have so much trouble sticking to our resolutions? In large part, it’s because we set unrealistic goals. Take falling in love, for instance. That’s hardly the kind of thing that one can do on a prescribed timeline. We could be more open to love, put ourselves out there, or commit to finding ways to meet new people, but resolving to fall in love is like resolving to win the lottery. When we set unrealistic goals, we also set ourselves up for disappointment. Rather than feeling good because we’ve made positive changes, we feel guilty because we didn’t do what we set out to do. That’s why it’s important to set attainable goals. Say, for example, you want to lose 100 pounds. A good resolution might be to lose 25 in one year. If you exceed your target that’s a bonus, and you’re far less likely to disappoint yourself by failing to lose all 100 pounds in just 12 months. Many of the resolutions we make are things that take time, commitment and energy. Few people can quit smoking cold turkey; even fewer can lose weight without hitting the gym. The passing of a day doesn’t suddenly enable us to be able to do these things. Rather, it can be the motivation that we need to be successful.

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What’s Happening Regional Events and Happenings Over the Coming Weeks Kingston Kingston Horticultural Society meets at the Ongwanada Resource Centre, 191 Portsmouth Ave. on Jan. 10 at 7:30 p.m. Speaker: Simon Smith on the topic of Dry Summer Garden and drought proof plants that look great all summer. Non-member admission fee. Contact Brenda at 613-389-8895. Open Shuffleboard Tournament & Meat Spin Saturday, Jan. 5 at the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 623 on County Rd. 4 in Millhaven. Meat spin: 1- 4 p.m. Open Shuffleboard tournament: Registration starts at 12 Noon. Play Starts at 1 p.m. Bring your own partner. Everyone welcome. Win cash & prizes. The Adult Rendezvous Club (ARC), based at St. Paul the Apostle R.C. Church Hall, 1111 Taylor Kidd Blvd., in Kingston, meet for Contract Bridge, Progressive Euchre and board games Thursdays, 1-3:30 p.m. from September to June. Yearly membership. For more info call 613-548-7936 or 613-389-0968. GriefShare support group meets Thursday afternoons at 1 p.m. at Bayridge Alliance Church (825 Gardiners Rd.), in the fireside room. Starting on Thursday, Oct. 11. Meets for 13 weeks. For anyone who has lost a loved one. For more information check out www.griefshare.org or contact Julia at jmkooy@gmail.com or 613-386-5210. Love to Sing? Join Shout Sister! Choir for a relaxed atmosphere and repertoire of popular music. No auditions and no need to read music. Join us for a practice, everyone is welcome. Tuesdays, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Mulberry School on John St. between Patrick St. and Montreal St. Choir Director is Georgette Fry. www. shoutsisterchoir.ca. Overcomer’sAssembly Prayer Room, 1187 Princess St. Kingston will have their church open for personal prayer times Tuesday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Everyone welcome. Frontenac County Childcare Centre.L.C.V.I. Preschool Program, 153 Van Order Dr. Kingston, Ont., K1M 1B9. Full-time and part-time spaces available. Spaces available for this school year, 2013. Spaces available for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. For Further Information Contact Edie at 613-545-1759. Shout Sister Choir welcomes new members. Practices are Tuesday evenings from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Kingston Seniors Centre, 56 Francis St. www.shoutsisterchoir.ca.

Kingston Hearing Care Clinic at the Kingston CHS office in the Frontenac Mall Jan. 7 from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. People can come to our office, talk to one of our counsellors about cleaning hearing aids, buying batteries, hearing screens, hearing health care, and general counselling. Questions about hearing health are welcomed and encouraged. We are currently accepting registration for our Winter American Sign Language courses, offered to students 16 years of age and over from January to March 2013. American Sign Language is a beautiful, expressive language with unique grammar and a rich cultural history. Students learn to use facial expression and spatial cues to communicate with one another in a fun and inclusive environment. If you’re interested in taking a course or want to find out more, please call 544-1927 or email us at smaracle@chs.ca. You can also visit The Canadian Hearing Society in the Frontenac Mall, 1300 Bath Rd. Registration deadline is Jan. 11. Seats are limited so sign up soon! Darts are starting up again at the R.C.L. Branch 623 on County Rd 4 in Millhaven Thursday, Jan. 3 & every Thursday after. Starting @ 7 p.m. For Information: call the branch @ 613-352-7772. Everyone Welcome. The Baha’i Community of Kingston welcomes everyone to a devotional gathering on the theme of New Beginnings. Saturday, Jan. 12 at 2:30 p.m. at 99 York St. Further info: bahais@kingston.net 613-634-0767. 39 Club of Kingston Dance Friday. Jan. 4. Music by Red Rose Express. 8-11:30 p.m. at Collins Bay Royal Canadian Legion 631, 4034 Bath Rd. Singles and Couples welcome. Dress Code in effect. Kingston Business & Professional Women’s Club Monthly Dinner/ Speaker Meeting Wednesday, Jan. 9 at Smitty’s Restaurant, 2376 Princess St., Kingston (Chapters Plaza). 5:30 p.m. - Networking. 6 p.m. - Order from the menu. 7:20 p.m. - Speaker: Chris Jones, a sales Representative from Kingston Homes Realty Inc. & founder of the group called ‘BuyingSolo’. BuyingSolo is comprised of different professionals with a variety of backgrounds, who have come together to help guide independent women towards homeownership and financial security. Ladies, please join us. All welcome. Contact Mary (613) 384-0076, mebeach@ cogeco.ca.

Kingston

Kingston

Kingston

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The Napanee Chapter of the Business Men’s Fellowship in Canada will host a banquet on Jan. 11, at Selby Community Hall at 6:30 p.m. Guest speaker and musician is Mr. Glen Kelsy. Reservations must be in by Jan. 8. Men, ladies and youth are welcome. For tickets call Andre @ 613-377-6710, Rev. John Hilliard @ 613-352-5691 or Garfield @ 613-354-9235.

Friday night karaoke Jan. 4 hosted by Showman’s Karaoke from 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. in the lounge of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 560, 734 Montreal St. All welcome. Small cover charge for non-members.

waterfront trail downtown through Lake Ontario Park for some 14 km. at a relaxing pace and in good company with a refreshment stop to savour the experience or catch up with friends. Departure time is 10 a.m. Details: (613) 767-6990. Hike Little Cataraqui Conservation Area Wednesday, Jan. 9. Come join us for some fun at this popular, yearround location. Ski, snowshoe or hike easy trails at a slow to moderate pace for some 5-10 km. Lots of choices for healthy, fun-filled winter activity with friends. Departure time is 9:30 a.m. Details: (613) 634-1877 or peterbur@kingston.net. All hikes depart from Canadian Tire Parking Lot at the Kingston Centre along Bath Rd. Car-pooling available. Details: (613)385-2356.

Southern Frontenac Community Services Foot Care Clinics. Clinics are offered throughout the area. Glenburnie Clinic: Country Pines Apartments every month on the second Monday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Verona Clinic runs at the Verona Medical Centre every month on the second Tuesday from 9 a.m. 12 p.m. They Sydenham Clinic runs every month on the second Tuesday sfrom 1 p.m. to about 4 p.m. To book a home visit, please contact Danielle Penner Tel: 613376-6477 email: danielle.penner@ sfcsc.ca.

Aquafit: Water Warriors. Men, want to try aquafit? This full body workout including strength training, balance, flexibility and cardio is designed specifically for men. Join this three class session for a small fee and try it before the full session begins. Mondays, 11:15 a.m. to 12 noon starting Jan. 7. Location: The Royale, 2485 Princess St. Must be a member of the Seniors Association 613.548.7810, seniorskingston.ca. Bereaved Families of Ontario Kingston Region Mothers’ Night: An evening for mothers to share the loss of a child of any age, due to any circumstances, with other mothers in a warm and confidential environment. Held Tuesday, Jan. 8 at 6:30 p.m. at Tompkins Funeral Home, 435 Davis Dr. (Downstairs in the Lounge – Please Park in the Left-Side Lot and Use the Right-Side Main Entrance). Spousal/Partner Night: A support evening for those who have suffered the loss of their spouse or partner to death. Held Wednesday, Jan. 9 at 6:30 p.m, Same location. Kings Town Trekkers Walk Sunday, Jan. 13 from the Holiday Inn. Registration in Fitness Centre at 1:30 p.m. Walk starts at 2 p.m. Quill Lecture Series at Jan. 13 at 2 p.m. on Sunday in Goodes Hall, 143 Union St. Adversity, Resilience and Masculinity: Why Men Die Young and What We Can Do About It. Dr. Susan Phillips, Professor, Department of Family Medicine, Queen’s University. For more info call 613-549-1910. Taoist Tai Chi™ Open House: Saturday, Jan. 12, 10 a.m. - noon, 302 Montreal St.. See demonstrations and find out about the introductory and health recovery courses beginning the following week. This aerobic, meditative stretching exercise promotes health and well-being for those of all age and fitness levels, while relaxing and strengthening body and mind. It can be done standing, or sitting in a chair/wheelchair. Special classes for those with serious health issues. For more info: www.taoist.org/kingston, 613544-4733.

Seniors Walk to the Beat Plus Stretch & Strength classes are on Tuesday and Thursday mornings in the Kingston’s west. Introducing beginers Line Dancing. Also offering seniors, affordable gentle pain free treatments for Arthritis and all related conditions. For location and additional info: call Dee [Deanna] 613-389-6540. Introduction to Line Dancing and Zumba moves for seniors Tuesday and Thursday mornings in Kingston’s west end. For location and additional info please call Dee at 613-389-6540 VON SMART (Seniors Maintaining Active Roles Together) exercise classes. Come and join our fun and friendly low impact fitness classes designed for Seniors. Classes include cardio, strength training and stretching with no mat work. Five convenient locations in Kingston. First trial class is free! For location and information call Joanne 613634-0130 ext. 414 or email joanne. irvine@von.ca. Movement for Life. Attention Wolfe Islanders: join this fitness program open to all ability levels and focused to meet your individual needs. Focus on wellness through movement for greater vitality. Registration required. Mondays & Thursdays, 1:10-2:45 p.m. starting Jan. 14. $75. Location: Wolfe Island Medical Clinic, 102 Highway 95. Must be a member of the Seniors Association, 613.548.7810, seniorskingston.ca. Are you troubled by someone’s drinking? Call Al-Anon/Alateen Family Groups, 613-384-2134. Lunch Bunch Tuesday, Jan. 8, 1 p.m. Meet new friends aged 50 and up or catch up with old ones over lunch at Red Lobster, 410 Bath Rd. To reserve your seat, call The Seniors Centre (613.548.7810) by Jan. 4. Rideau Trail Kingston Club K&P Trail at Sydenham Road hike Saturday, Jan. 5. Start the New Year healthy with an easy winter walk on this popular trail at a moderate pace for some 14 km., depending on weather conditions. Enjoy the many vistas of winter and watch the landscape transform itself. Departure time is 9 a.m. Details: (613)3824778. Downtown Kingston Winter Walk Sunday, Jan. 6. Enjoy the

Seniors Community Club #523 Centre 70, corner of Days and Front Road. Shuffleboard and Bridge Tuesday and Thursday afternoon, 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. New members welcome. Senior’s Boomer Modified Yoga-Fit with all standing poses and activities. Introduction to Line Dancing and Golf clinics designed to improve distance/accuracy of the ball, as well as addressing injuries specific to golf. Join us at 50+ Fitness. For location and additional info please call Dee at 613-389-6540. Bluegrass weekly jam every Thursdays at 7 p m at Ben’s Pub, 105 Clergy St., Kingston. No cover charge. Everyone welcome, whether you play or come to listen. For info Sandra 613-546-1509. Join the drum circle at Ben’s Pub (105 Clergy Street) every Sunday from 8-10 p.m. No experience is necessary. This is a casual, comewhen-you-can circle open to all. Bring drums, shakers, flutes, and other instruments. If you don’t have any, we have extras on hand. Come to play or just sit back and watch. Free. Wheelchair accessible. The ‘Silver Wings’ welcomes exservice members from all branches. Join us at the Wing 416, Kingston, for a fun lunch and social every third Sunday at 1 p.m. For more details and info please contact Molly at 613-389-6120.

Frontenac Open Mic Night every Friday at the Storrington Centre Fire Hall in Sunbury, 7-10 p.m. Old and new country, gospel, bluegrass and more. No cover charge.

Rural Women’s Group last Wednesday of every month from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Southern Frontenac Community Serivces Corporation offices, 4419 George St., Sydenham. Rural Women’s Group provides a safe and welcoming place for rural women to get together, addressing common interests and needs within Frontenac County. This group is open to all women wishing to make connections within their community and will provide valuable life skill-building opportunities through discussions groups and workshops. Transportation available: call in advance to arrange. For more information, please contact: Elizabeth Peterson, Family Services Intake Assistant to inquire: Tel: 613-376-6477 or 1-800-763-9610. Sunbury TOPS Chapter meet every Monday evening, weigh-in 5:30 p.m. meeting begins at 6 p.m. Everyone welcome. Come and join a supportive weight loss group to take off pounds sensibly. For info chrisintops@hotmail.com. SMART (Seniors Maintaining Active Roles Together) exercise class every Thursday from 10-11 a.m. at the Grace Centre, 4295 Stagecoach Rd. in Sydenham. Fun, Low Impact fitness class, no mat work. Call Joanne at 613634-0130 ext. 414 or email joanne. irvine@von.ca. Bedford’s Bi-Weekly Open Mike and Jam Session, 1-5 p.m. Jan. 13 and 27 at Bedford Community Hall, 1381 Westport Rd. Featuring Bluegrass,Country, Gospel and more. Info, at 613-374-2614. The Frontenac Cattlemen’s Association will be holding their Annual General Meeting at 7:30 p.m. on Jan. 15 in the Community Room at the Sydenham Public Library in Sydenham. For more information contact Mike Voith at tel:613-3536380.

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

9


LIFESTYLE

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Gathering ice blocks always sent chills down Mary’s spine By Mary Cook

EMC Lifestyle – For reasons which escape me today, I was always home from school on the day Father went to the Bonnechere to bring ice in from the ice house. I think now, it was because Mother knew how very anxious I was when Father went to the river, and in my childish mind, I was sure I could save him from any disaster if I too was on the Bonnechere. Father had been watching the river for weeks. And then one day he went down with the auger and burrowed a hole to see how thick the ice was in the very centre of the river where the water was the deepest. It was ready. It was time to bring in the blocks of ice for the ice house. Through necessity, the ice house was always built on the north side of

clothes. His big cowhide mitts covered two pairs of wool mitts, a fur hat with the ear lugs down was tied securely under his chin, his pipe, as always hung loosely from his mouth, and we were ready for the trip across the back field, down the other side of the West Hill to the Bonnechere. The ice on the river cracked and snapped under the sleigh. I fervently prayed the horses, sleigh and Father and I wouldn’t end up on the bottom of the river. We came to the very centre of the Bonnechere. And then the long process began. Father, using the auger, burrowed four holes, forming a square into the ice. Then, with the needle-nosed saw, he cut a swath from one hole to the other three. This was when I was filled with dread, because I knew what was coming. Once the square was freed from the water, the block instantly flew from the water, sometimes rising above the very ice we stood on, splashing great gushes of water all around. Most of it landed right on Father.

Now the block was ready to be hauled out and put on the sleigh. This step was repeated until the sleigh was covered with blocks and they were piled three deep. Here, I took on a new fear. What if the sleigh was so weighted down, the horses, the sleigh, the cut blocks of ice, and I went to the bottom of the Bonnechere? By the time the last block was heaved onto the top row of ice, Father’s overalls were slick with frozen water. It was all he could do to climb onto the front of the sleigh and head the horses back to the ice house. As soon as we were on firm ground, I said my silent prayer of thanks that we had been saved from a freezing death in the bottom of the Bonnechere. But Father’s work was far from over. Once back at the ice house, he had to unload the blocks, one at a time, each probably weighing in at 100 pounds, and place them in rows inside. Father could hardly walk upright with the weight of his frozen overalls. But he was not ready to change

into dryer clothes yet. The horses had to be put in the barn, fed and bedded. Only then did he head for the house and the warmth of the kitchen. Mother had to strip him of the frozen outer layer, and the overalls were draped over the wood-box to melt and dry. The brothers would be pressed into service on Saturday, as they headed to the sawmill, to bring back load after load of sawdust and cover the blocks in the ice house. The sawdust was free, the owner of the mill glad to be rid of it. And so, for another winter, and hopefully well over the summer, we would have ice for the ice box in the kitchen of that old log house. We considered ourselves very privileged indeed to have the big oak Barnett bought by grandfather who couldn’t understand how anyone could survive without an ice box. After that day on the Bonnechere, and after his supper, Father, completely spent of every ounce of energy, would go to his usual spot in the kitchen. He would settle into the

rocking chair in front of the Findlay Oval, lift his stockinged feet onto a cushion on the oven door, and promptly fall asleep. The Ottawa Farm Journal, or the Family Herald and Weekly Star would have gradually slipped from his gnarled hands. I would watch his gentle breathing and I would be filled with such caring. And again I would say my prayers of grateful thanks that Father had survived another day of bringing in the ice from the Bonnechere.

      

 

     

 

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

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Mary Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Memories

the barn. This protected it from the sun. It was a small, black building, not much bigger than the smoke house, with no windows, only a narrow door just wide enough to allow one body inside with the big iron ice-tongs. Now the day had arrived when Father would go to the river with the flat bottom sleigh and the team of horses, and the tools he needed for cutting out the ice. I was filled with both dread and admiration. I lived in fear that Father would slip into one of the holes from which he had taken a block of ice, and be lost forever. And at the same time, I marveled at how this single day would provide us with ice for the rest of the winter, and if we were lucky, until this same exercise was repeated the next year. If I was with him, I figured I could look after him and make sure he was safe. What I could do, I had no idea. But just being with him, I knew would keep him safe. I was bundled up like a mummy, and Father wore a second pair of bib overalls over his winter

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DAYTRIPPER

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Stirling is sterling Mark Bergin

columnist editorial@theheritageemc.ca

EMC Lifestyle - The village of Stirling, north of Belleville, has all the essentials. The United Empire Loyalist descendants who settled and developed the village may have envisioned a covered bridge. But they probably never foresaw a main street with a chocolate shop, a performing arts theatre and a trendy book store. The village shares its name with a town in Scotland. The first thing you’ll see when you arrive is the lovely covered bridge. It looks like it’s been there for a century or two. The bridge was completed and dedicated to the town by the Rotary Club in 1980. The bridge sets the tone for a pleasant visit. You can park right beside it and have fun walking through the wooden structure. The town’s got something for all ages. Shops along West Front Street and Mill Street offer everything from chocolate to antiques. The

town’s shopkeepers are pleasant and have time to chat. They’ll recommend locations to find what you’re looking for around town. Joan Wilkinson owns The Village Chocolatier at 30 West Front St. She opened the store in 2004 after becoming bored with retirement. She loves the setting of Stirling and explained that chocolate is a feel good food. “Every day is a fun day,” she said. “If people come in sad, they go out happy. It’s a really happy business to be in.” Everything in the shop is handmade and has no additives. The chocolate is made from Belgian Callebaut. The fudge, jams and herbs are all regional products. “Stirling is a beautiful place to come to and spend a day,” said Wilkinson. “There’s lots to do and see. You can poke around and find all kinds of wonderful things.” A few doors away at 14 West Front St. you’ll find West Wings Espresso Bar, Books and Clothing. Tracy West, Scheona West and Analese Meek (nee West) converted a former hardware store into an eclectic book shop, café and general meeting place in downtown Stirling. Unlike Anton Chekhov’s Three Sisters, the West sisters of Stirling lead anything but a drab life. West Wing’s has a kind spirit. The West sisters are family and environmentally conscientious. Their coffee and tea prod-

ucts are all fair trade and organic. The clothing they sell comes from Canadian and international independent designers. The sisters combined their past work skills from an international coffee specialty franchise, a national book chain and their ethical framework for life and work and ended up with their shop. West Wings is well-stocked and the book selection is broad and will appeal to adults and children of many tastes. The children’s section actually looks like it’s for children rather than being a perfunctory corporate cutout design. There are many well-known titles as well as some lesser known gems. The light is bright enough to make reading easy, yet didn’t have the blaze of fluorescents that one finds in corporate chains. I sometimes wonder if we should put sun screen on our children before entering those establishments. Several customers came in during my visit. Many of them approached the café counter with cheery banter. When customers treat the staff like sisters, the staff must be doing something right. “We are all parents,” said Tracy. “We know how hard it can be to afford things with kids. Our goal is to keep prices fair for everyone. I hope everyone enjoys West Wings as much as we do.

Photo/Mark Bergin In 1980, the Rotary Club dedicated this covered bridge in Stirling. Life’s too short to do things that make you feel bad.” A fascinating fixture along Stirling’s main drag is the Stirling Festival Theatre at 51 West Front St. It was built in 1927 for community service purposes. It was a central spot where locals could come together for many social activities, including the Women’s Institute and ballet lessons. From the 1930s to the late 1950s the building’s auditorium housed the village movie theatre. The building later housed public works, a police station and a jail. In the early 1980s there were plans to demolish the building. Locals had the wisdom to understand that a modern and shiny building would not replace the old structure at the heart of this community. They reacted quickly. The Stirling Performing Arts Commit-

tee formed and garnered support and gathered petition signatures to stop the destruction of this important landmark. They raised funds to refurbish the building. They cleaned and maintained the 436-seat theatre themselves. They made changes and additions: air conditioning, new washrooms, excavation of the orchestra pit, sound baffling, and re-wiring. The community raised funds to buy a beautiful Bosendorfer grand piano. It’s now the only such instrument between Toronto and Ottawa. While larger city councils fight political battles for years regarding building new entertainment and performing arts locations at exorbitant costs and decades of debt, this small village pulled it off quickly and efficiently. They soon started to offer professional entertainment, fea-

turing such Canadians as Dave Broadfoot and Don Harron. By 1996, the theatre offered its first summer festival of professional entertainment. Today, more than 45,000 people attend the Stirling Festival every year. There’s something about small-town sensibility that makes the air easier to breathe. Directions: From 401, take exit 62 north at Belleville. From there, it’s 30 km to Stirling. Turn left at Hwy 49, Stirling Road. That will take you directly to the main street of Stirling. For a more leisurely day, you could travel home via Hwy 62 through Belleville to Hwy 33 onto the Isle of Quinte. You can take Hwy 33 all the way back into Kingston, with a ferry ride at Glenora on the way. For more information: www. stirling-rawdon.com

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Photo/Mark Bergin The Stirling Theatre is housed in a building that has a varied history with many past uses, including a community services centre, public works headquarters, police station, jail and movie theatre. When the town council planned to demolish it in 1980s, locals reacted quickly and turned it into a performing arts centre and home to the successful Stirling Festival, which attracts 45,000 visitors each year.

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

11


ENTERTAINMENT

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Blue Canoe Productions opens 2013 season with The Drowsy Chaperone By Kristen Coughlar

kcoughlar@perfprint.ca

EMC Entertainment – This Jan. 10-26, Kingston residents are invited to attend the apartment of a musical theatre fan for an evening they won’t soon forget. For 16 days, Blue Canoe Productions will stage its 2013 season opener The Drowsy Chaperone. “We’re doing it in the Baby Grand Theatre and I’m excited to use the space because we’re going to try and create the entire space as his apartment. From the second you walk in it will be like you’re in someone’s apartment building,” said Director Kelsey Jacobson. The apartment belongs to Man in Chair, a lonely musical theatre fan. As he listens to the record of his favourite 1928 production, The Drowsy Chaperone, the musical literally comes to life in his living room, telling the tale of oil tycoon Robert Martin and Broadway star Janet Van De Graaff and the craziness that takes place on the day of their wedding. “It’s this 1920s Golden

Age sort of musical with all of its lame gimmicks and awkward lines and stuff that comes alive in his apartment,” Jacobson said. As the story unfolds the Man in Chair provides running commentary. Jacobson explained that she first saw the musical in 2006. She said it’s a piece that allows its cast to show off its comedic talents. The Blue Canoe Production will feature a varied cast, with representation from area high schools, university and colleges and the Kingston community. “It’s a nice mix of people and it’s a really strong cast,” she said. Among the cast is Sebastien Darcel-Sinclair who plays the role of Aldolpho, a Latin Lover who is enlisted to seduce Janet in the hopes of ruining her relationship with Robert and keeping her in show business. “Of course he sleeps with the wrong person and craziness ensues,” DarcelSinclair revealed. He said it has been a fun character to play, with his ridiculous accent, redlined cape and cane.

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“What was hardest for me was getting the accent down because again it’s a random accent…I’m literally from everywhere,” Darcel-Sinclair laughed. A week before breaking for winter vacation however, he said he was settling into his role. “I haven’t actually played many very comedic roles so it’s something that is so new for me, but I love it. My character is just so over the top and ridiculous that it’s so much fun to be able to do it.” Also among the cast is Adrienne Miller, who plays the character of Mrs. Tottendale. Mrs. Tottendale is the aging hostess of Robert and Janet’s wedding. “She’s this very sweet older lady who is very forgetful and doesn’t really have a sense of what is happening, so it provides a lot of comic relief in the show,” Miller explained. “The whole play is about a wedding but she never remembers that a wedding is going on, but it’s taking place at her house.” Miller noted that she first saw The Drowsy Chaperone on Broadway

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Blue Canoe Productions presents The Drowsy Chaperone Jan. 10-26 at the Baby Grand Theatre. for her 13th birthday. To have the musical reemerge in her life years later in university has been a fun experience. “ I’ve never played anyone like Mrs. Tottendale before…It’s definitely taken some work because she’s old and she’s also just very eccentric, but it has been a lot of fun because I’ve played a lot with my voice and with my physicality of her.” After a month-long winter break, the cast and crew are now hoping pick up where they left off, with very little time to tweak things before open-

ing night next Thursday. “It’s always a bit of a challenge with the January time slot because we do take a month off…The biggest thing is to just get all our rehearsals in and get the show to a really good point before we leave because we come back and we jump right back into tech week,” Jacobson said. Some long days and nights are no doubt in store, but Jacobson is excited for the opportunity to bring The Drowsy Chaperone to Kingston audiences. “It’s hilarious; it’s the

funniest show I’ve ever seen. There are tons of jokes for people who love theatre and for people who don’t love theatre quite so much.” Tickets for The Drowsy Chaperone can be purchased at Tricolour Outlet in the JDUC at Queen’s University, or at the Grant Theatre Box Office. Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for seniors and students, and $10 for children. The curtain rises at 7:30 p.m. for all performances. For additional information, visit bluecanoeproductions.yolasite.com, or kingstongrand.ca/event/ drowsy-chaperone. R0021803025

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ENTERTAINMENT

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

The Year in Review: the good, the bad and the ugly in film for 2012 Pat Trew

My Take BY MARK HASKINS

EMC Entertainment As I look back on the year in film there have been a lot of superheroes, quite a few spies, some vampires, some zombies, and even an alien or two. There’s been spectacle, there have been explosions and even been a bit of history. And BY JOHN TUCKER as always there have been good films and some not so good. Ted was not my favourite film. I know it has its fans, but just because it’s a talking teddy bear telling them, it still doesn’t make used ‘Family Guy’ jokes funny. Dark Shadows, 21 Jump Street and Battleship were all colossal wastes of time. Yet as bad as they were they weren’t as bad as Red Dawn. It was by far the worst film of the year that went beyond just being bad, and right into insulting the audience. Then there were the films that were bad but still

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fun to watch. These are those unique films that despite being awful are still entertaining. They’re our guilty pleasures and there were a few. Films like Lock Out, Goon, Dredd, and Underworld 3 all fit the bill. However the best of the worst had to be Ghost Rider Spirit of Vengeance. Whether it was intentional or not this sequel was hysterical. This brings us to the best of the year. In narrowing down my list I found it difficult to say one film was better than another. You just can’t compare some films to each other because they

are completely different animals. With that said what follows are the five

mustsee films of the year. Pitch Perfect was without question or hesitation

the funniest film I saw this year. It had a quick witted and talented cast, great songs,

and wicked one liners and jokes. It was clever, it was

smart, and above all it was hysterical. For a film that is essentially about waiting for something to happen Argo was thrilling. It was exciting to watch, and I knew how it was going to end before I even sat down in my seat. It’s a brilliant piece of storytelling. It was the first film of the year, but it still stands out as one of the best. I called The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo a work of genius then, and I stand by it now. It was one of the most interesting and compelling films of the year. On spectacle alone,

I’d have to include The Avengers on this list. It was one of the biggest blockbusters of the year but The Avengers wasn’t just spectacle. It was one of those rare films where story, cast, effects, and direction all come together in perfect harmony. In terms of sheer dramatic power Lincoln was a masterpiece of filmmaking. Its cast was remarkable, and the story unfolded with passion and intensity while bearing the immense weight of history. It was insightful, it was powerful, it was an extraordinarily moving film. So ends another year. Here’s to another one filled with spectacle, drama, and hopefully substance. Happy New Year. Mark Haskins’ column is a regular feature of the EMC.

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AUTOMOTIVE

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

1937 Buick 4-door convertible from Nova Scotia Falls, Ontario: “Hi Bill, I am 82 years old and a long-time sub-

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This 1937 Buick Century 4-door convertible emerges from 40 years of storage near Milton, Ontario, in 2008. This could be the same car seen by Smiths Falls resident Ray Ferguson in Toronto around 1960.

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1937 Buick 4-door convertible from Nova Scotia to Toronto over 50 years ago, probably hoping to get a better price. We might also hear from the person who bought that car from the gas station in Toronto. And it might turn out to be the same car you see pictured here. Stay tuned!

“We used to gas up when we got to Toronto. I remember one morning we pulled into this small service station, possibly on the north side of Danforth, and there was a 1937 Buick 4-door convertible sitting out front with a for sale sign on it. I have thought about that car many times since. It was a dull grey or sand colour. The top was up and the car was in rather rough shape. “At that time, I already owned two Buick four-door sedans, a 1937 and a 1939 and I didn’t really care for the slant back on the one in Toronto, although I realized later that perhaps I should have bought it. “I believe the asking price was $650, which I thought was steep enough considering the condition it was in. It looked like it had been driven hard and neglected. I distinctly recall the car had Nova Scotia licence plates on it. It had obviously been driven up from Nova Scotia a short time before. “Wouldn’t it be great to know if that was the same car as the one featured in your article! It would be interesting to know if anyone had seen a pair of Nova Scotia licence plates in the building where the car had been stored.” Maybe we will hear from the person who brought that

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A look back at the stories that made the headlines of 2012 January The New Year brought some new priorities at Kingston City Hall, including a $4.5 million project by Parks and Recreation to revitalize Lake Ontario Park, a $12-million expansion and modernization of Artillery Park Aquatic Centre, an $11-million re-vamp of the J.K. Tett Centre, and the widening of John Counter Boulevard for $17.4-million. Sustainable Kingston invited citizens to check out the latest in “green” at the first annual community forum. Representatives from local businesses and organizations that have partnered with Sustainable Kingston shared their projects and programs on Jan. 28 at the Four Points by Sheraton. Former mayor of Toronto, David Miller, was the keynote speaker. Kingston Soccer fans will now have a new place to get their kicks – and it will be sheltered. The city announced it is moving ahead with their plans to install a $900,000 artificial turf field at John Machin Park, off Highway 15 in the east end. The Royal Military College is also planning to construct an inflatable dome at the bottom of Barriefield hill, but it would be used almost exclusively by military students. Kingston had a slow start to winter which saved Kingston Public Works a few hundred thousand dollars from their 2011 road clearing budget. “This is probably the mildest of the past three winter seasons,” said public works director Damon Wells. While the relatively tame winter season was bad news for private contractors that get paid for each snowfall event, it added up to savings for the city in materials, fuel and overtime. By the end of January Kingston did have some snowfall, but it didn’t last before the mild temperatures and rain washed it all away once again. The City of Kingston hosted a meeting on Jan. 18 to gather public input on the best way to salute our hometown rockers, The Tragically Hip. The debate: should one block of Barrack Street be renamed in honour of The Tragically Hip. Ken Noakes, general manager of K-Rock Centre said, “I can see hundreds or thousands of people standing in front of the street sign getting their picture taken.” Support for renaming also came in from businessman John Wright and actor Dan Aykroyd.

February Kingston’s own Cataraqui Cemetery was recognized as a National Historic Site of Canada. The cemetery was 18

recognized as one of the best examples of a medium-sized rural or garden cemetery featuring a number of noteworthy monuments and sculptures as well as being the resting place of many prominent Canadians such as the most famous resident Sir John A. MacDonald. After two years stuck in neutral, Kingston is restarting discussions to expand patient parking around Hotel Dieu Hospital. The city and the hospital will begin new talks to look for ways to increase the parking supply and to enhance pedestrian safety around the busy hospital. Hotel Dieu is in the midst of a multi-million dollar expansion to take almost all out-patient clinical care duties from Kingston General Hospital. The clinical expansion will be completed this fall and will result in an extra 50,000 new patient visits annually. Council has agreed to spend up to $50,000 on parking-related studies, though the actual solutions could cost millions. Results of the city-hospital parking talks should be known in four to six months. A total of 38 roads will have lower posted speed limits starting this spring. Among the roads facing speed reductions to 70 kph: Brewer’s Mills Road, McAdoo’s Lane, Orser Road, Woodburn Road and Highway 15 (Innovation Drive to 401). Speed limits dropping to 60 kph include: Westbrook Road, Middle Road, Latimer Road, Aragon Road and Highway 15 (Gore Road to Innovation Drive). Among the roads facing a new 50 kph speed limit; Station Road, Shannon Road, Spooner Road West and Pine Grove Road. The biggest drop in speed, from 80 to 40 kph, will occur on roads such as Brewer’s Mills Road, Country Side Crescent, Leo Lake Road, Loughborough Drive, Perradice Road and Washburn Road. Easter Seals of Southeastern Ontario kicked off its 29th annual telethon campaign. Rotarian Doug Radford announced that the goal for 2012 would be $312,000. This year’s telethon takes place April 1. The Frontenac Secondary School swimming team, the Falcons, was named the overall champion at the EOSSAA for the fourth consecutive year. Empire Theatres on Princess Street was showered with love Valentine’s Day afternoon, as community members of all ages came out to decorate its doors with pink and red hearts containing messages of affection such as “we need you”, “we love you”, “please don’t break up with us” and “u rock”. The event was held in response to the recent announcement that

The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

Empire Theatres will close the downtown establishment later this year, and replace it with a 10-screen megaplex at the King’s Crossing mall at Division Street and Dalton Avenue.

ship arena’s manager, SMG Canada, to determine whether its current contract for the K-Rock Centre should be renewed. SMG’s current fiveyear contract is set to expire in February, 2013. The 5,000 seat arena was initially supposed to generate $1.1 million in annual profits to help pay down its $47 million construction debt. Instead, profits have generated about half the target. Later in the month it was revealed that despite industry accolades, Kingston’s flagship sports and entertainment venue failed to meet its profit targets for the fourth year in a row. The 5,000-seat facility was supposed to earn $700,000 in net income in 2011. Instead, unaudited figures show a profit of $318,000. The $382,000 difference will have to be

March The City of Kingston will study a request by the area’s chief medical officer to limit smoking in outdoor public spaces. Dr. Ian Gemmill outlined specific recommendations to council March 6 to ban smoking in municipal parks, playgrounds, sports and playing fields, seating areas of stadiums, beaches, splash pads and outdoor community meeting areas. In addition, the KFL&A board of YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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He believes there are many economic climate, nobody is signs, movie tickets, building a 2013 budget. “It’s something opportunities to find the savings getting increases over inflation. solar panel farm at Belle Park to really work hard and get at, in city hall’s $300 million oper- Our feeling is that the city needs golf course and leaving staff po- rather than just say 3.5 percent to respond to that,” said Pater- sitions unfilled are just some of is good.” EMC News – Kingston’s ating budget. Coun. Rick Downes signaled the money-making and money The tax issue was front and son. drive to become Canada’s most Coun. Dorothy Hector says saving measures that councillors caution in the drive to reduce sustainable city must include centre during last week’s strataxes. “As soon as you get kneemany homeowners in her west have publicly discussed. is Bill lowering the property tax rate as tegic priority session, which By Hutchi ns mayor suggested the jerk reactions to huge increases becoming an annual event Reporte to end well, say councillors. r district are seniors living They’ve“The had 20 numbe or huge cuts, you see it impact a (Belle “Is a 3.5 percent tax increase allow councillors to discuss and on fixed incomes and their Old r onePark) “Enha hits, city Look for the wonis14funding Junos, in arather very negative way.” golf club that has only 30ed mem- the citynce AgeNews Security and pensions don’t receiv really sustainable? I think the refine civic priorities as their EMC the Order than eradicate,” echoed of – One Canad block EMC Real Estate a andexample Gerretsen admitscatalyst to draw more That’s a good 3.5 percent to Barracincrease answer is no,” said Coun. Bryan term evolves. ofmatch hon- ofologis Mayor retired ourarybers. k Streetbyshould archae degree visitors astic t SueisBazley growing a services, and we raised could over change,” there annual tax rate.beShe a millio During a similar priority namedthe Paterson. re-saysone . pressure toto the downtown. letters of in honou Guide in This r ofaround n dollars The Traglowerpointe the civic rate, but he “I can see hundre explained Patersonthroug of theh solar They rate increase 3 percent actor Dan Aykrosupport from ically Hip, Faced with mounting com- workshop in 2011, most cound outtax local benefi that Baraccording to rack points yd, who said t concerts. Street out got it’s as high as itthousands of people ds or “the openin farm idea. more palatable, 3.5 may most notingHow plaints from homeowners, cillors were content to set apeople Weeks EMC! its not name who be g from the British spoke can the citycivic leaders will a public used toinbe. “This council has ap-in front of the street standing concert alonenight dedication However, city atmust continuesuch to and gthat councillors have asked staff to percent tax target for 2011meetin on the subjec achievement recognize route soldie the 1800s as the ting sign get- the will be worth thewould lowest take tax rates since their picture a staff briefing in the provedrs raisethe money fort.road and sewer wait for s? come up with options to reduce 2012 – a figure that factored in REAL ESTATE The City effort,” and Most of the taken,”said tweenamalgamation.” of Kings Guide from Peter the Royal Horse be- Ken Noakes, tonhave few weekscomm on what repairs. “So we the annual tax increase from 3.5 a 2 percent inflation rate, 1edperhost-to figure Soumalias, the Januar entsrevenue centrednext genera Artil-plunglery and Fort on spending y 18we whether to of K-Rock Centre l manager da’s Walk president of Canameetin He also warns against reduction options out where are going find and percent to 2.5 percent. The one cent for infrastructure repairs, Fronte g to to the gather public renam nac. They of Fame in Toron input block They also emadesaid on the or cost sav- lower ing tax rates like what They are realistic. it Barrac revenue plus another 0.5 percent toway coverto alternate percent difference equals aboutLook k is to, onetoo of low, for the the few Tragic said celebrating The who noted “celebrity salute the homet best Street in front the of Barrack remainhappened ing two decades ago clear that any move to a lower sells.” ings.” to cultural $1.5 million in lost revenues for service improvements street names city’s flagally Hip own ship arena, rockers. Mayor Mark that apmark EMC services betwe Gerretsen, street would with their own who chaire when successive Real Esta must come ex- the fi- tax rate and public transit. “Let’s While councillors won’t city’s city hall. ennot King militarycouncils Ontari andat theand boost Kings te d the public create past, rates it should ton’s ing, international provednot zero-percent pense of, as current priorities, such nalize the some 2013 tax rate until No- o Streets some councillors “Absolutely, it all comes meet‘The Tragimodern history be altered tax was joined GuideHowever, cally profile and any way, here and in build in by several help counc and the for city’s infrastructure be- a new improvements roads, parks, theyget want staff to pro- HipasWay.’ say This the 3.5 percent target is vember, down to numbers. Either it’s now even The ideatowas tourism movin one enterta fi illors rst block. put inmen g who forwar t dislistened to transit and affordable housing. “Thisgan to crumble. videagain, an advance trict in the North for many homeowners ” said list services we forego, decrease Weetookshigh Billof municiSwan, a local cil late last year.d to city coun- Barrac is part of our culture. EMC Block with more than 35 speakers, tourism operaGerretsen: “We can’t Coun. Brian Reitzel says k is Added services or jobs future plans spending or find new user fees,” to afford year!after year. The not from Queen tor. rate pal programs, generi to ’s c,” said start a Kings Citizens University do ithistori in the same way aston theWalk focusing the tax issuearchite now ctural that could be affected if the rate who on said mayor Mark Gerretsen,REAadds nearly $100 to the average - sors and profescomm of “It’s an easy ented the renam L ESTATEtax bill. tour boat au- in other 1990s. It hasantoand be done a re- artists Fame honouring to will ing givepropos senior managersthor timeJennif 2.5 percent.on Added andtohonou who supports the drive to lower residential er McKe Guide able way tois reduced r- dorsed a young boy, operators al en, politicians ndry. honou Otherssponsible sustainable way.” to alook for ymore savings in the feesr for “Right now in theagreed current user taxes. prominent and a diverse roughl theportable billboard it by pointedandout two-to- are local reside Hip,” one margin. But there the K-Roc Kingstonians near background list worthy many nt Peter was not of a Hip song itself. Kingston. k Centre. on the same everyone Kingstonian other prominent “If we Special Sale Pricing side of the s– About 30 others About 80 people street. Others ent - who deservpast and pres- we can can do this one block urged showe attended not up for the get something the meeting e simila to tamper with the city ognition, FS 38 Gas Trimmer meeting, but d to provide ideas started,” disapp such as Peter r rec- said Nick Water part left Canada’s Finest AA, AAA to celebrate of militar ointed its 27.2 cc / 4.1 kg fi Millik eld. y en, . the band’s artistic history. Robertson Businessman Hip fans expec The ardent and philan $ 95 “It’s nibblin John Macdonalds Davies, the two one of thropic achiev g away those spearh Wright, tographs and ted to get au(Flora and ments over eeading Sir street the past three heritage,” said heritag at our John A.) and Dan renaming effort, the members of pictures with decades. Gord e activ- & Wing Steaks)Aykroyd. (Porterhouse, T-Bone the band, none The debate over Downie, Rob ist Helen Finley, who said the downt of Baker, Paul whom attend own’s vibran joined with others to Bar- enhan Avglower 18-20lbs Langlo cy was ing. ed the meetsupport a statue rack Street appear Fay edWrapped and Gord Sinclais, Johnny or plaque MS 170 Gas Chain Saw BG 55 Leaf Blower to draw For ced with the arena’ battle lines Cut in s over & City officials heritage ver- construction and the 30.1 cc / 1.3kW 27.2 cc The / 4.1 kg Tragically Hip ir formed honour the the vicinity to lb /sus 13.20kg Grand tourism Your Freezer! Theatr will Hip’s achiev in 1983. ments $ 95 $ 95 e- of tourism . A large number can’t e’s restoration. “You lect public comments col. l.d.powersports@xplornet.com operators from 730 FRONT RD. @ DAYS RD. t 613-634-1BOB(1262) t OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!stop it. You’v the spoke in favour of the e got to makemeeting and online and build on it.” renaming as a recom a Wright also the street renammendation on HURR read enthus ing proposal Y IN! i- to city counc il in February. By Bill Hutchins

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health wants to keep smokers at least nine metres away from any entrance or exit of municipally-owned or operated buildings, and three metres away from any doorway at workplaces and publicly accessible places. Kingston city council voted 7-6 in favour of renaming one block of Barrack Street, between King and Ontario streets, “The Tragically Hip Way”. The proposal generated controversy, especially among military historians who argued the 200-year-old Barrack Street name should not be removed, even for only one block. The original name refers to the street that British soldiers once marched on between Royal Artillery Park and For Frontenac. However, 67 per cent of citizens at a public meeting were in favour of the renaming. Ernestown Secondary School came out on top in the KASSAA senior boys’ basketball championship against Holy Cross Catholic Secondary School. The Eagles defeated the Crusaders 58-56 to take the championship title. The City opens contract renewal talks with its flag-

April The Federal Government announces the closure of Kingston Penitentiary by 2015. The closure is expected to save millions of dollars. Correctional Services Canada is the third largest employer in the Kingston area with over 4,000 employees. Deputy Commissioner Lori MacDonald was told CSC was confident the effect on employees will be minimized as a result of a number of expansions happening at other institutions with the Kingston area.

Harman

Photo/John Harman

EVENTS

ing John Counter Boulevard on the river’s western shore to Gore Road on the eastern side is at least $120 million. A Sunday-only farmer’s market at the Kingston Memorial Centre is set to open this spring. Council voted 11-2 to seek out a private operator for the Memorial Centre market. It will cost an estimated $60,000 to upgrade the floors, electrical systems and signage of the Bennett barn to open a Sunday market from April to November.

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covered by a tax-replenished reserve fund. This year, the city’s flagship sports and entertainment venue is once again projecting $700,000 in net operating income. A fact finding study on the 3rd bridge crossing nears completion. According to the results of a detailed environmental assessment (EA) by J.L. Richards the City of Kingston can manage the risks of building a bridge over the Cataraqui River, despite the cultural, environmental and engineering challenges. The second and final phase of EA is still open for public comments before the report is formally presented to city council for a final decision on whether to proceed with the bridge. Supporters say a new eastwest bridge is badly needed to ease traffic congestion on the La Salle Causeway which handles about 22,000 vehicles a day. Opponents say the two existing crossings – causeway and Highway 401 – are enough to handle future growth and the bridge cost is too high. The proposed cost of a two-lane bridge connect-

The City of Kingston is pursuing the reinstatement of photo radar, despite a lukewarm reception from its own police services board. Rural councillor Jeff Scott says photo radar could be a useful tool to control speeding vehicles in his rural district, north of Highway 401, where there are few sidewalks and not enough traffic enforcement along country roads. Council agreed to endorse a resolution that was initially drafted by the police board in Nottawasaga, a community near Barrie, asking the province to reinstitute photo radar for provincially-regulated police boards to “manage and use at their discretion.” Kingston’s own police board was asked to weigh-in on the debate before councillors voted on the motion. The civilian board said it prefers traditional traffic enforcement measures where officers with radar guns can stop speeding motorists on the spot, issue fines and demerit points. Hugh Johnston, a music teacher at Regiopolis-Notre Dame Catholic High School, is this year’s recipient of the Canadian Music Teacher of the Year Award, presented by the Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (CARAS) at the recent Juno Awards in Ottawa. Six years of patience and hard work was celebrated last week, as students, staff, city officials and members of the broader community celebrated the opening of the Kingston Community Outdoor Athletic Park at the Invista Centre. The new track and field facility, the result of a partnership between the Limestone and

Algonquin and Lakeshore District school boards, features an eight-lane, 400-metre rubberized track, artificial multi-use sports field, sports lights, accessible washrooms and bleachers. Businesses in the old Sentry Plaza on Princess Street completed their relocation into a new and larger building about 30 feet away, The Queensbury. The sprawling four storey building features apartments on the upper floors and ground level commercial space. Peter Splinter Family Holdings is the west end plaza’s owner. Kingston’s hockey museum will have to come up with a new game plan in order to finance the move into downtown digs. City councillors agreed to provide a $200,000 conditional grant to the Original Hockey Hall of Fame to help it relocate into the refurbished Smith and Robinson building at Ontario and Princess Streets this fall. However, the move may still be in jeopardy because museum keepers were counting on $400,000 in municipal tax support – one-third of the $1.2 million relocation costs. The museum must now find one million dollars from other government sources and a public fundraising campaign.

May The $1.1 million restoration of Kingston’s iconic locomotive is right on track for a fall completion. ‘The Spirit of Sir John A’ locomotive, cab and tender box were split up last summer for badly needed repairs to the century-old machine. The rusty 10-wheel locomotive remains at Confederation Park for on-site refurbishment work that will be “substantially completed” in September, while the cab, tender box and cow catcher were moved indoors for a painstaking restoration. The locomotive’s targeted unveiling is October 14-20 to coincide with Local Government Week in Kingston. A mild winter, increased transit ridership, more blue box recycling sales and several unfilled staff positions added up to big savings for Kingston city hall last year. The city reported a $3.8 million surplus from its 2011 budget. But don’t expect a tax rebate cheque in your mailbox. Instead, council is expected to funnel the savings into a variety of reserve accounts to help cover future expenses. Finance officials say the surplus is a sign of good fiscal management, and not a case of gouging taxpayers for money the city doesn’t need. See Kingston page 20


A look back at the stories that made the headlines of 2012 January A mild winter has meant fewer accidents and less mileage on snow-removal equipment; however, Central Frontenac Public Works Manager Mike Richardson told council not to expect any financial windfalls. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are some potential savings, but not much,â&#x20AC;? he said. Habitat for Humanity Kingston is looking to expand its builds into Frontenac County. Habitat CEO John Alkenbrack approached Central Frontenac Council about the possibility of the township helping to foster a build in its community through a donation of land and some development fee rebate considerations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be anyone not supportive of at least looking at this,â&#x20AC;? said Mayor Janet Gutowski. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s back to the drawing board for South Frontenacâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policy makers when it comes to regulating outdoor furnaces following a discussion at a Committee of the Whole meeting in Sydenham. The amending bylaw proposed the following regulations: outdoor furnaces only be permitted in an Agricultural or Rural Zone; a 50-metre (164 foot) setback from any abutting lot whose permitted use is residential; a 30-metre (98.4 foot) setback from any other lot line; a building permit be required for such building/ structure; and operation of outdoor furnaces be prohibited between May 1 and Oct. 1.

February Central Frontenac started out looking at a 19 per cent increase in taxes; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve since got it down to just under seven per cent. When all is said and done, it looks as though the 2012 budget will come in with a three per cent increase. In a year where revenue has decreased by $200,00 (mainly due to a cut in transfer payments from the McGuinty Government), policing costs have risen by $60,000 and operational expenses have increased 1.9%, the only places left to cut seemed to be transfers to reserves and cuts to the capital budget. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are we cutting our own throats?â&#x20AC;? said Mayor Janet Gutowski. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We cut ours or cut our taxpayerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throats,â&#x20AC;? responded Coun. Francis Smith. As South Frontenac Township tweaks its Official Plan, one area Planner/Deputy Clerk Lindsay Mills would like to see

strengthened concerns setbacks for waterfront properties. Millsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; proposals for the OP include 90 metre setbacks in Environmentally Sensitive Areas such as significant wildlife habitat, fish habitat, significant areas of natural and scientific interest, significant woodlands and valleylands. For waterfront not in Environmentally Sensitive Areas, the setback will remain at 30 metres. South Frontenac Township voted to join the City of Kingston by lowering speed limits on sections of four roads that they share jurisdiction for at its regular meeting last week in Sydenham. The roads affected are Spooner Road East (to Perth Road Easterly), 60 kph; Spooner Road (Dover Road) (to Latimer Road Easterly), 50 kph; Horning Road (to Sydenham Road Westerly), 60 kph; and Orser Road (Sydenham Road to 3.8 kilometres west of Sydenham Road), 70 kph. As per the Municipal Act, if a highway is under the joint jurisdiction of two or more municipalities, then a bylaw in respect of the highway must be passed by all of the municipalities having jurisdiction over the highway.

March The Sydenham senior girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; volleyball team finally managed to break the winning streak of their venerable opponents, the RegiopolisNotre Dame Panthers, in the KASSAA championship game, held Feb. 20 at the Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ARC. The Golden Eagles, who were themselves undefeated during regular season play but for a single loss against the Panthers, took the game in four sets with a score of 25-21, 14-25, 25-19, 25-23. A proposed multi-use facility for Sharbot Lake enters the preliminary design phase after the Multi-Use Cultural Centre Steering Committee receives grants of $15,000 each from Frontenac County and the Frontenac Community Futures Development Corporation. The committee has chosen Basterfield and Associates of Peterborough to produce conceptual drawings and supporting materials for construction of a trails-oriented centre which will provide yearround public washrooms, a public multi-use area for displays and gatherings and a commercial area that will cater to year-round trail users and community visitors.

only had its 2012 budget passed, it actually reduced the tax levy by 1.40 per cent. Last year taxes were raised and it was not spent. Some of that money, $200,000, was moved into revenues.

Central Frontenac Council passes its new municipal waste bylaw, and the most controversial aspect of it seemed to be what to do about all the old garbage bag tags still in circulation. As of April 1, tags and non-Townshipissued bags will no longer be accepted at the two landfill sites. Only clear bags purchased from the Township will be acceptable and dump attendants will ask residents and businesses to remove any recyclables before accepting the bags. Many residents still have bag tags, so council decided on a plan to exchange tags for bags. Reidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Frontenac County may consider implementing new roles for its paramedics after a presentation on community paramedicine from Michael Nolan, chief of the Renfrew Paramedic Service and president of the Emergency Medical Services Chiefs of Canada. Nolan explained that â&#x20AC;&#x153;community Paramedicineâ&#x20AC;? is a model of care whereby paramedics apply their training and skills Generations in â&#x20AC;&#x153;non-traditionalâ&#x20AC;? Frontenac community-based enviOPEN ronments, often outside the usual emergency Frontenac .com Eastern Cowboy once again opens its response and transdoors for animal welfare fundraiser portation model. He Inside said that by expanding W in ter weather LOCAL NEWS enables win the role of paramedter activities ics, and working collaboratively with other New Mural community agencies, Pg. 3 LOCAL NEWS paramedics can manage patients who do not require transportation 90 Years! to an emergency dePg. 18 partment. LOCAL NEWS YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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Bill Young is introduced to Central Frontenac Council as the Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Fire Chief last. Young is a veteran of the force, most recently serving as Deputy Chief/Operations. Art Cowdy continues as Deputy Chief. Former Chief Mark MacDonald resigned the position last month to become a Deputy Chief on the Belleville Fire Department.

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Photo/Craig Bakay Katana Barry, Nicole Geary, Kendra Sweet and Catherine Pokrywa with Pappy at the Eastern Cowboy fundrasier for Shebaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Haven SatEMC Lifestyle urday. - Sean Taylo r (right) mad e the trek from Oshawa Satu Look for the rdaypile to join up . .budd .â&#x20AC;? cued dogs and I collect and two donkeys a mother maybe they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do much the vet bills By Craig Bakay y Photo/Craig Pokrywa said that she Woody Wood for som horses, so we make a deal,â&#x20AC;? and daughter named Lilly but the mother was schedEMC Real Estate Reporter Bakay e ice fishing saidrapy Lynn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is her and Ginny, were added to uled to be sold for meat can always use volunteers The on Big Clea Dog r Lake. Guide in This and when our daughter Jes- to give the dogs attention, the fold. EMC News â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Once day.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;When youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re married se heard that, she brought brush them and take them â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know why I do again, Lynn and Leslie Weeks EMC! Cronk invited the public it, it just gives me joy,â&#x20AC;? to Lynn Cronk, everything them here and what could for walks. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event deto their Eastern Cowboy said Leslie. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I even have has to have a purpose,â&#x20AC;? Dad say?â&#x20AC;? REAL ESTATE For Catherine Pokrywa, parted somewhat from the said, laughing. ranch just off Wagarville one dog from Romania Leslie Guide that was (barely) living in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hitched up the oxen who operates Shebaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ha- â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;trail rideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; format of preRoad for a worthy cause.Loo k for the and has them pulling logs ven, the Eastern Cowboy vious fundraisers in that And once again, the recipi- a park. Craigand EMC Rea there was no formal trail heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll â&#x20AC;&#x153;I guess the way IBy look ent of the day was Shebaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Baka y be showing them fundraiser is a Godsend. l Estatea difference Repor ter at fairs.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so busy with 13 ride, only pony rides for serve notic Haven Rescue, a place for at it is, I made e she asaid. Guidineone 9.8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re re- kids, and there was a more dogs,â&#x20AC;?that The donkeys arecenta incre life.â&#x20AC;? dogs that require palliative in dogâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s This ase woul dnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t per final 2011 numb inally only set up for and kids-oriented EMC slightly different story.this year. while there are sevor special needs care. ersprogram, fly 10 Feb. New s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; until tral WeeksAnddogs The anshe said. Fron tenac nual budg â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donkeys EMCrunning cluding kite making and I keep saying I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take 13,â&#x20AC;? around This was the third time eral â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ! comi ng up et danc e are excellent A no way detai ls to put begu n inguards hasand can cookie decorating. any more dogs we but howe what few for sheep otherincre the Cronks have opened greeting people (an moochare know n, abou t $1,03 1,000 or Cent ral ase 19.12 reser away $100 ,000 in ver. per cent taxes Fron First Local, there rockers Botyou do. by 10 incre but we tedonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tper reala bit of hot dog), nac itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not their ranch to raise fundsREAing Townanimals ves for L EST cent,can is Rock ship with no belie ves short of what staff â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ATE ase in the Smit hdogs Guid staff forwe said.keep hall in Parh a new fire donated their time, anything them only dogs. a pair for animal causes. is need e Recently,sugg educ ation estin gly ahave â&#x20AC;&#x153;If having did, porti tom am and in9.8 pershe woul of the an Last year, ed. cent creas e the extended more anddnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t more issues andon playing to guard,â&#x20AC;? said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But we Leroy, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My wife collects res- of oxen, Duke and incre have muni ase to cipal set. the tax bills for capit al budg the Town ship any peop le livin g ship spen t $5.39 Town - by $450 ,000. Resi denti al 2012 here to sessm et pay it. rate for 2012 milli on. ent (the valueand as- This year it . On the capit How ever, want â&#x20AC;&#x153;I place s think by to spen d d $6.43 milli MPA al budg et muni cipal staff need s wish list are staff â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alwa on. to in the C on all prop ertie s ys ask for more sharp en their penc $300 ,000 for Town ship) Som a than they ils.â&#x20AC;? e of the bridg e on is up by Smit h 10.1 per cent. incre ase woul d be Road , $178 Crow Lake get and thenthink theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ll tion to also took exce pdue to ,000 the facto rs ing And altho it beco mes prop Coun cilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ugh Fron te- the Town ship has Arde n Road for pavnaliz e a 2012 osal to fi- nac job to whit very litCoun , tle $118 budg contr ty ,000 for that down has tle et beol over, impr ovem ents fore the 2011 yet to fito a figur e said. For exam Trep anier stron actua ls are naliz e its budg et for they know think the g and Cros to Arm ple, 2012 n. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s look ing ratep ayers s Road s, can live with . like there will, cial trans fer paym prov in- $18,0 00 for        â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know be a mode st ents for imag two therm how incre ase com- infra struc ture are al Coun   . Fran ing units ing fromIncl. proje ctces Smit h can come up with a we (for ed to be down OAC/Taxes the Coun ty was the first budget by the by $128 ,000 rescu e), $420 ,000 fire/  

    por- and tion. on Coun cil polic ing costs two for to when we end of Janu ary are ex- snow tande m truck s with Even so, wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know pecte d to      the l.d.powersports@xplornet.com be the nary plow preli miup by abou numb ers have $60,0 00. t phon e systes, $11,0 00 for a Cenm upgr ade Staff woul d also like $25,0 00 for a docu and ment mana geme nt syste m.

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A lot more people showed up for the inaugural Community Improvement Program in Sharbot Lake than organizers had expected. Suggestions ranged from more signage, both along Highway 7 and within the hamlet; seniors housing projects, both to create living spaces and provide employment opportunities for young health care professionals; funding business start-ups should be given lower priority than â&#x20AC;&#x153;fixing up what we haveâ&#x20AC;?; washroom facilities and trash receptacles; a hamlet website; expanding the boundaries of the hamlet to the south; helping businesses comply with accessibility requirements; fish stocking programs for Sharbot and adjacent lakes; and more parking, benches and flowers.

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A review of Central Frontenacâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cemeteries suggests plots will be gone in five to seven years. Of the 11 cemeteries that the Township is responsible for, only four have plots available for purchase, said a report presented by Clerk/CAO Shawn Trepanier. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are about 500 plots available for purchase and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re selling from five to 10 plots a month,â&#x20AC;? Trepanier said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unless something is done, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be sold out within five to seven years.â&#x20AC;? Council directed staff to prepare more plots at the Oconto Cemetery. The price of plots also came in for considerable scrutiny. The Township only charges about $200 a plot, while in Kingston the price ranges around $3,000. Trepanier said staff is working on a master plot list and cost analysis. South Frontenac Councillor Larry York announces that the township is now in a position to accept bale wrap and shrink wrap (from boats) for recycling

May Council got an earful from delegations on garbage. In April South Frontenac decided to go with clear plastic garbage bags and waste site attendants were instructed to reject bags containing recyclable material. This had delegates question the township on the practice of inspecting garbage bags, suggesting it contravenes Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s search and seizure laws outlined in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Mayor Janet Gutowski said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early days yet and we will continue to make changesâ&#x20AC;?. Central Frontenac Council decides to form a Central Recreation Committee to look at potential uses for Hinchinbrooke Public School and perhaps Sharbot Lake Public School. The two schools are scheduled for closure in the fall of 2013. A work plan submitted by the steering committee includes looking at purchasing the school(s) when they become available, providing project management for renovations and ongoing operational management. By forming the Central Recreation Committee, the Township can apply for a grant from the Frontenac Community Futures Development Corporation to complete a feasibility study and business plan.

Road work season got underway in Central Frontenac, with work started on Arden Road and Crow Lake Road. The good news was the cost to pave the Arden Road came in a little cheaper than anticipated so paving was extended to three kilometers instead of the original plan of 2.5 km. At a regular Central Frontenac Council meeting in Mountain Grove, CAO/ Clerk Shawn Trepanier presented his cemeteries report, and the verdict is that $150 per plot plus $150 for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;perpetual careâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (a total of $300 per plot) isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough to finance the Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment. He said the plan is to raise prices by $25 per year until the price per plot reaches $500. He said there are two reasons for the change: according to the new Cemeteries Act, electronic records and surveys are required for each plot, which will cost about $40,000; and maintenance costs, including headstone replacement.

June Councillor Ron Vandewal makes his 125th blood donation at the Kingston headquarters of Canadian Blood Services. Vandewal has been six times a year for the past 20 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is just my quiet personal thing,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I come every 56 days.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s official. E-waste in South Frontenac Township will be collected at the Keeley Road site only, following passage of a bylaw at a regular Council meeting in Sydenham. The Township estimates it will save about $30,000 a year having just the one site. South Frontenac honours its 2012 Volunteers of the year. They include Margery Smith, Bob Harding, Norm Roberts and Les Moore. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The little things the volunteers do are so important to the fiber of this community, said Mayor Gary Davison. Central Frontenac honoured its Seniors of the Year. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recipients were Marg DesRoche (District 3), Verna Cowdy (District 2) Herbert Clow (District 4) and Leigh Scott (District 1) Twenty seven teams participated in the annual Relay for Life, by walking around the track in Parham for an entire night. Proceeds from the night went to Canadian Cancer Society. Online pledges alone were $8,400. See next weeks issue for July - December

The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

19


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Did you attend a UHKF event in 2012?

June

KINGSTON From page 18

Councillors say they’ve gone too far down the third bridge road to back out now. They voted 10-3 to adopt the final stage of a $1.9 million environmental assessment (EA) that lays out a blueprint to construct a bridge over the Cataraqui River, linking John Counter Boulevard and Gore Road. Approval of the EA triggers a 30-day public review period where further objections or concerns can be raised with the city. If no major objections are filed, the study will be deemed completed by the Ontario environment ministry. Consultants say the last stage is the project’s implementation is to finalize the bridge cost, design and construction timetable. It’s estimated a bridge would cost $120 million for two lanes, or up to $196 million for four lanes based on 2011 dollars. The final stage work will likely remain on hold while Kingston seeks out government grants. K-Rock Centre’s operator, SMG Canada, has to re-apply for its job. Council voted 7-6 not to extend its contract with SMG Canada by another five years, but instead to seek competitive bids on a future arena management contract. Council members say they owe it to taxpayers to launch a transparent process to see if another operator can do a better job of running the 5,200-seat arena. The city owns the $47 million sports and entertainment venue, but it has been managed by SMG since it opened in 2008. The current contract with SMG will expire November 30th, 2012. C The city announced its plans for an $11 million facelift at The Artillery Park Aquatic and Fitness Centre. The centre is expected to be closed for 18 months starting this summer. Users of the downtown recreation centre’s pool, gymnasium and cardio equipment will be relocated to an alternative facility by the city. The RND senior girls’ soccer team captured its fourth consecutive KASSAA title at St. Lawrence College, defeating the Frontenac Falcons 5-2.

Kingston’s drive to become Canada’s most sustainable city must include lowering the property tax rate as well, say councillors. Faced with mounting complaints from homeowners, councillors have asked staff to come up with options to reduce the annual tax increase from 3.5 percent to 2.5 percent. The one percent difference equals about $1.5 million in lost revenues for city hall. While councillors won’t finalize the 2013 tax rate until November, they want staff to provide an advance list of municipal programs, services or jobs that could be affected if the rate is reduced to 2.5 percent. The Kingston Humane Society and City of Kingston have been locked in a war of words since earlier in the year over how much tax money should be provided to care for injured, stray or unwanted cats and dogs. The Society currently receives $109,000 a year, but is looking for a 400 per cent increase from the city, or $578,000. The military’s new $4 million sports dome was inflated at the bottom of Barriefield Hill earlier this month. The dome has been a source of controversy among some residents who say it detracts from the gateway heritage view of downtown Kingston. “I suspect once we get our landscaping plans in place, once they (residents) realize this means extra physical fitness facilities for 7,000 military people in the bad winter days, plus the special activities like Special Olympics and Paralympics that we support, I think they will realize this dome is going to be a huge benefit,” Col. Steve Cadden told reporters. It was known as “the great debate” around backyard chicken coops. It took several weeks for city council to finally agree, 10-3, in May 2011 to amend its animal-control bylaw allowing residents to have up to six hens in their backyard. After all the hoopla, the city has, as of June 7, issued 11 licenses. That’s less than one a month. See next weeks issue for July - December

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HOROSCOPES ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, there are some things that need to be accomplished this week despite the your reservations. Find a way to make the best of the situation. TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, enjoy an active week ahead that includes a very busy social schedule. Instead of trying to swim against the tide, let it take you along. GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Take care of things on your own this week, Gemini. Others around you will be just as busy, so put your head down and get started on the many tasks at hand. CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22 Sarcasm is not the right approach this week, Cancer. Focus on being amiable to all of the people you interact with the next few days and reap the rewards. LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23 Secrets have a funny way of catching up with you, Leo. Although it can be hard to be honest, upcoming situations will work out much more easily if you are. VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22 You have no reason to question your confidence this week, Virgo. Give yourself a pep talk to make it through a sticky situation, and things will turn out alright. LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23 You are coasting on a high of good fortune, Libra. Don’t worry, it isn’t going to slow down anytime soon. Enjoy all of the opportunities that come your way. SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22 It takes more than just good ideas to find success, Scorpio. There is also a lot of follow-through and legwork that goes into every scenario. Start working through the particulars. SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21 You won’t be able to rest until you solve a problem that has been bugging you, Sagittarius. But the solution won’t immediately present itself. CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20 Sometimes it takes more time and money than it’s worth to follow through with something that originally seemed like a good idea. Don’t think of it as giving up but redirecting. AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 It may take a little more time to work through the long to-do list, but that will make the satisfaction of getting the job done that much more worth it, Aquarius. PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20 Words can be interpreted in many different ways, Pisces. Choose what you say wisely so you don’t give anyone the wrong impression.

The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

21


LIFESTYLE

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Safety first for winter sportsmen EMC Lifestyle â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Winter is a special time of year for sportsmen. The great outdoors beckons men and women in the wintertime, when skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, and sledding are just a few of the many cold weather activities to entice athletes out of their homes. Though winter sports can help fend off cabin fever, those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t exercise certain safety precautions might find themselves dealing with another kind of fever. Cold weather can leave men, women and children susceptible to illness or injury if they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t careful. The following are a few safety tips for winter sportsmen who want to make the most of the coming winter sports season. Clothing Inadequate clothing is one of the easiest ways a winter sportsmen can fall victim to illness or injury . But the right clothing can go a long way toward ensuring this winter sports season is fun and illnessand injury-free. * Wear protective head gear. Protective headgear can help sportsmen avoid colds and head injuries. When venturing outdoors in the winter, always wear a protective wool ski cap. Most body heat is lost through the head, but wool caps help your body retain warmth on cold days and nights. In addition, sportsmen should always wear protective headgear when

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skiing, sledding, snowboarding or playing ice hockey. Even the most experienced sportsmen can suffer a head injury when playing a winter sport, but the appropriate headgear can prevent head injuries to veteran and novice athletes alike. * Dress in layers. Dressing in layers is another way to stay warm and prevent illness in the winter months. Kids are especially susceptible to cold weather, so parents should dress them in one more layer than they dress themselves. When wearing scarves, sportsmen should tuck their scarves in so they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get tangled with sporting equipment. * Remove drawstrings from kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; clothing. Drawstrings on winter hats, overcoats and pants can prove harmful to children. These drawstrings can easily get tangled and lead to strangulation. Parents should remove all drawstrings from kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; winter clothing before kids participate in winter sports.

waters, including rivers and creeks, is never safe enough to skate on. Such waters should always be avoided no matter how thick the ice may appear. When going ice skating or playing hockey outdoors, only do so on waters that are supervised and have been tested and approved for skating. * Skate with the crowd and never skate alone. Skating alone might give you all the room in the world to perform a figure eight, but skating alone leaves you with no backup should the ice break and you fall in or if you injure yourself in a fall. When skating, never skate against the crowd. Skiing and snowboarding Skiing and snowboard-

ing are immensely popular in the winter, but that popularity should not overshadow how dangerous these activities can be. * Get instruction. Ski resorts typically require guests with no previous skiing or snowboarding experience to get lessons before they can take to the slopes. These lessons are a must for novice skiers and snowboarders and even those athletes with no recent experience on the slopes. * Be especially cautious when entering or exiting the ski lift. Ski lifts pose a significant injury risk, so skiers and snowboarders should always be attentive when entering or exiting the lift. * Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow young children to snowboard. Many of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s young-

sters prefer snowboarding to skiing. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children seven years of age and younger should not snowboard. * Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be in a hurry. Skiing or snowboarding too fast increases the chance you will lose control and cause injury to yourself or others. Go at a slower, more relaxed pace and take in all of the beautiful scenery along the way. Sledding Sledding is a great way to have some fun in the winter snow. But even though sledding is often seen as a carefree activity, it can be risky as well. * Never sled near traffic. Sledding near traffic is a definite no-no, as it risks

the lives of sledders and motorists alike. Always make sure you sled in an insulated area far away from roadways. * Sled feet-first or sitting up. Sledding feet-first or sitting up greatly reduces a sledderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s risk of suffering a head or neck injury. Never sled while lying down head first. * Never sled on ice. Sledding on ice can cause injuries and make it difficult to control a sled. When sledding, only do so on packed snow. * Do not allow a sled to be pulled by a vehicle. Being pulled by a vehicle while on a sled might seem like fun, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nearly impossible for oncoming traffic to see a sledder behind a vehicle, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very easy for the sled to fishtail into oncoming traffic.

Ice skating & hockey Winter is a great time to go ice skating or play some hockey. However, ice sports like skating and hockey can be especially dangerous, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wise for adults and children to be as cautious as possible when getting in some ice time. * Beware of thin ice. Ice that forms on moving

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AUTOMOTIVE

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AWD vs. 4WD vs. Mother Nature Car Counsellor Brian turner

EMC Lifestyle - Happy New Year to all and hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to a year without motoring mishaps! With the first major winter storm of the season behind us, more than a few drivers may have been disappointed at the snowdefeating performance of their AWD or 4WD vehicles, and many of these sport-ute and crossover fans were surprised by various warning lights appearing on their instrument panels during the worst of the challenges they faced getting out of their driveways and down unplowed roads and streets.  But first things firstâ&#x20AC;Ś All Wheel Drive (AWD) is the term usually reserved for the drive systems on vehicles that use their front wheels as the

main method of propulsion and automatically activate the rear wheels when traction is poor due to road and weather conditions.  Depending on the make and model, there may be manual override switches to permanently engage the rear wheels, but often no driver interaction is required.  Four Wheel Drive (4WD) is most often used to describe truckbased SUV drivelines where a separate transfer case is used to provide power to the front wheels when needed and the rear wheels do the driving the rest of the time.  Most of these systems have control switches or levers and many have a dual range transfer case which can be helpful during off-road adventures when controlled traction, not speed is required. No matter which system your vehicle uses and no matter what type of tires it has, Mother Nature can mix up a recipe of snow, freezing rain, winds, and temperatures that can defeat the best designed,

engineered, and built systems leaving us literally spinning our wheels. AWD and 4WD systems both have their benefits and downfalls, but when navigating through thick wet heavy snow, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the AWD that can frustrate more drivers.  The key to most AWD systems is a unit called a viscous coupler.  This device is located on the driveshaft going to the rear axle, or built onto the transmission, or on the rear axle itself on a primarily frontwheel drive vehicle and as its name suggests it connects or couples the front and rear axles so that in very poor traction conditions they both power the wheels.  On dry roads with good traction the coupler is disengaged providing no traction to the rear wheels, but when the going gets slippery, the shaft leading into the coupler from the vehicleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transmission will spin relatively faster than the wheels.  This will heat up a special liquid inside the coupler causing it to expand and lock the unitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

internal clutches together transferring power to the rear wheels.  With late model vehicles that use this system, an on-board computer will constantly monitor the AWD system and if any preset threshold relating to the risk of overheating or otherwise damaging the system is exceeded, the AWD will be shut down and a warning light will appear on the instrument panel.  For vehicles without AWD but with any type of traction control, a similar failsafe system exists that has a similar effect to temporarily shut down the system to give it a chance to cool off so to speak. The key to avoid AWD system shut-downs and possibly a trip to your local service provider to check out your dash warning light(s) is speed (or rather the lack of it).  When faced with a foot or two of thick white stuff covering your driveway or residential street, take it easy.  Plowing through that slop at breakneck speed may seem like fun,

but the constant wheel spins it creates can stress even the best AWD system or leave you in the ditch or both. The other common result of a sudden onslaught of heavy wet snow is windshield wiper failure.  Sometimes caused by drivers who flip on the wipers without first clearing the windshield with a brush (or checking to ensure the wiper blades arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t frozen to the glass) but more often caused by those who neglect to clear the snow off the roof of their vehicle and then at the first stop sign of the day 50 lbs or more of slushy snow and ice come sliding off down the windshield to twist and bend the wiper arms beyond recognition and damage their drive linkage if the wipers happen to be turned on at the time.  Replacement wiperarms can range in price from $50-$150 each and the linkage system can often exceed $400 (not to mention labour or taxes).  A few minutes with a

snow-brush can save a lot of grief. If you have any questions, opinions, or stories on anything automotive please drop me a line, [By email to emc@perfprint. ca or directly to bjoeturner@hotmail.com   listing â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Question for the Car Counselorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on the subject line or by post to Record News Communications, 5 Lorne St., P.O. Box 158, Smiths Falls, Ont. K7A 4T1].  When using regular mail, please supply a phone number if you seek direct contact (due to volume I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always promise replies).  Yours in service Brian Turner

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CL416028

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REAL ESTATE SERVICES

We Buy Houses, Fast-Cash

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Mortgage Solutions Purchases, Consolidations, Construction. Lower that bank posted rates (OAC) On-Site Private Funds for credit issues, discharged bankrupts and BFS without proven income. Chase Financial 1-613-384-1301 Chase Financial o/b 835289 Ontario Inc. Brokerage License #10876

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E270827

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5,990

$

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CL395347

ROOM/BOARD

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CL376435

CENTRAL BOILER OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACES

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CL414950

Firearms Safety CourseJanuary 18th & 19th. Hunter Education Course. January 25 & 26th. Harrowsmith ON. Call Bill, 613-335-2786.

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CL414951

FOR SALE CL419629?1108

COMING EVENTS

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Caught The Moment Now You Can Keep The Memory

Nadeau Realty Inc., Brokerage, 919 Sydenham Rd. Kingston, Ontario K7M 3L8. Direct: 613.507.4444

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The successful applicant will have significant construction industry estimating experience OR will be a graduate that possesses excellent numeracy and MS Excel skills that can be trained as a construction industry estimator. Permanent position at Perth location. Apply via email to Peter Ghinn peter@awdcontractors.ca

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EMPLOYMENT OPPS.

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

OCNA

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HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

“We Need You!”

POSITION TITLE: LOCATION: SALARY RANGE: HOURS OF WORK: POSITION STATUS:

Carrier Routes Available

CLOSING DATE:

LOCATION

7010614

87

Auden Pk. Dr./Brimley Ct./Renda

7010615

219

Glen Cairn Terr./Lakeview Ave./McEwen Dr. Kingston

7010715

52

Peachwood St

Kingston

7010718

79

Cedarwood Dr./Sprucewood Cr.

Kingston

7010720

106

Pinewood Pl./White Oak St.

Kingston

7010818

65

Arbour Cr.

Kingston

7011004

131

Yonge St. (King to Johnson)

Kingston

70-10202

60

Lancaster Dr. (Limestone to Liston)

Bayridge

7010220

66

Dunham/Plainview

Bayridge

7010221

79

Megan’s St./Wise St.

Bayridge

7010308

74

Brookside/Butternut/Carmil

Bayridge

7010305

75

Clark Cr./Edwin St/Louis Ct/Louis St

Bayridge

7010314

86

Downing St/Hudson (Mona to Sussex)

Bayridge

7010402

87

Gainsborough/Purcell

Bayridge

This position requires experience as a Human Resources Manager in a unionized environment. For additional details, please visit our website at www.kerrysplace.org. Send Resumes To: Hema Tuitt, Director of Human Resources Email: htuitt@kerrysplace.org This position is open to both internal and external candidates. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

Kingston

CL417301

MAIN STREET

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

to be held at Lombardy Agricultural Hall just south of Smiths Falls on Hwy. #15 at Kelly’s Road (just past the Lombard Glen Golf Course) on Wed., Jan. 16/13 @ 9 am - Preview 8:00 am

CL401502

Call today to get the route you want!

Downsizing a collection, settling an estate, disbursing of overstock or end-of-the-line merchandize, please call our office to reserve your space for this auction sale. Welcoming QUALITY items only on Tues. Jan. 15th between 9 am & 3 pm only. Terms: Cash, Cheque, Debit, Visa, M/C - Catering Please note that we are now booking for spring & summer auctions. Whether it be to auction your Real Estate, Settle an Estate or Liquidate, we would be most happy to conduct a free, no obligation consultation at your property site to answer any questions you may have. As 3rd generation auctioneers we are committed to providing only the best customized service to you and your family.

Auctioneers & Qualified Appraisers JIM & TREVOR HANDS: THE VOICES OF EXPERIENCE Phone: (613) 267-6027 or (613) 267-1335 Fax: (613) 267-6931 www.jimhandsauction.com

Charles 613-384-2729 or cmcrae@theemc.ca Will 613-376-6545 • Angie 613-531-9382 Kingston EMC Office 613-546-8885

LIQUIDATION AUCTION SALE

Currently, there is a career opportunity in Brockville for a:

PART TIME WAREHOUSE SUPPORT – BRANCH Reporting to the Branch Manager, you will be responsible for performing tasks according to documented quality system procedures and loading/unloading delivery vehicles, verifying merchandise with documents. You will also be required to fill, package and verify customer orders from stock and deliver to the shipping area. You will be responsible for counting all packaged pieces and pallets and ensuring vehicle is loaded, in a safe manner, with the correct shipment. You will observe safety policies and procedures of the Occupational Health & Safety Act, Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and any other pertinent legislation. You will be responsible for maintaining the cleanliness and orderliness of the warehouse and performing other branch support duties including delivery driving and/or customer service as required. Completion of a high school diploma, or the equivalent work experience, and the ability to lift up to 25 lbs. on a regular basis are essential. You are able to prioritize tasks and complete them in an accurate and timely manner. You have basic math proficiency along with the ability to read and write English. Your proven customer service skills and good telephone manners are coupled with the ability to work cooperatively in a fast-paced, computerized, team environment. Previous warehousing experience would be an asset as would knowledge of the handling of dangerous goods and WHMIS regulations. The position is for 30 hours per week.

CL404431_0103

Applicants are to forward their resumé by January 18th, 2013 to:

Acklands - Grainger Inc. ensures equality in the recruitment and selection process by making employment decisions based on qualifications, relevant experience, knowledge and capability, demonstrated skills and accomplishments. We thank you in advance for considering Acklands - Grainger Inc., but only those candidates being considered will be contacted. No agency solicitation or phone calls please. Come visit us at www.acklandsgrainger.com

AUCTIONS

CONSIGNMENT AUCTION SALE

Many More Routes Still Available!

Acklands-Grainger Inc., Attn: Michelle Evans at Acklands Grainger Email Address: evansm@agi.ca Fax Number: 613.345.1605 Mailing Address: 789 Chelsea Street Brockville, Ontario K6V 6N4

Human Resources Manager KPAS South East Region $49,483.20 - $61,838.40 Annually 40 hours per week Temporary Full-Time (12 month contract; Two weeks written notice prior to contract ending) 4:30 pm, January 7th, 2013

CL420322/1227

# PAPERS

HELP WANTED

Kerry’s Place Autism Services EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY #12-212

Kingston

ROUTE

HELP WANTED

for Dollarrific at 6179 Perth St. (shopping plaza) Richmond, ON K0A 2Z0 on Fri., Jan. 4, 2013 at 10 am - Preview 9 am

Lease is up & EVERYTHING must be sold. Household supplies, sewing & crafts, plastic cutlery & tableware, gift-wrap, greeting cards, candles & scents, confectionaries such as beverages & candy, cosmetics & hair care, seasonal items, school & office, eye glasses, books, toys, stickers, magnets, pet items, kitchenware, hardware, paper & plastics, party supplies, balloons, seasonal items, frames, baby items, jewellery & key chains, spray paints, Royal 583CX electronic cash register. Pepsi 2 sliding glass door cooler. Large qty of panel & freestanding shelving. Large outdoor auction sale. Dress warmly. Bring a lawn chair. Terms: Cash, Cheque, Debit, Visa, M/C

Auctioneers & Qualified Appraisers JIM & TREVOR HANDS: THE VOICES OF EXPERIENCE Phone: (613) 267-6027 or (613) 267-1335 Fax: (613) 267-6931 www.jimhandsauction.com VEHICLES

VEHICLES

23 WHELAN STREET, WESTPORT 2012 CHEV 3500 EXPRESS 12 passenger van, white $28,000 2011 CHEV MALIBU 4DR LT loaded, blue $12,995 2009 HYUNDAI SONATA 4 dr. loaded, BLUE $9,995 2008 DODGE AVENGER 4 dr. loaded, black $9,995 2008 MAZDA 5 WAGON, 7 psgr., auto, loaded, white $8,995 2008 CHEV IMPALA LT, loaded, black $8,995 2008 PONTIAC G5 2dr auto, air, black $9,995 2007 GMC SIERRA EXT. CAB 4x4, loaded, brown $17,995 2007 NISAN VERSA S, hatch, auto, grey $9,995 2007 DODGE CALIBER RT AWD, loaded, red $9,995 2007 CHEV SILVERADO LT

There’s CL420354_1227

HELP WANTED

VEHICLES

613-273-9200

CL339300_1220

HELP WANTED

EXT. CAB 4X4 Z71, loaded, grey $17,995 2007 PONTIAC WAVE, 4 dr., auto, air, 28,000 km, red $7,995 2005 HONDA CIVIC, 4dr, 5spd, air, Only 66,000km grey $7,995 2005 BUICK ALURE CX 4dr., loaded, red $7,995 2004 GMC SIERRA NEVADA EDITION, loaded, white $10,995 2003 MERCURY MARQUIS, loaded, grey $5,995 2003 BUICK LESABRE LTD loaded, leather, maroon $6,995 2003 CHEV SILVERADO Reg Cab, Short Box 4x4, blue/pewter $12,500 2002 VW BEETLE Auto, loaded. 101,000 km, grey z2002 GMC SIERRA $7,995 1995 GMC SIERA Reg Cab 350, V8, 4x4, only 136,000 kms. AS IS

ALL PRICES ARE PLUS TAXES & LICENSE

Financing & Extended Warranties Available! Vehicles can be viewed at

www.autowizard.ca/westportmotors

To Be Made in the Classifieds 613-546-8885 1-888-WORD ADS Kingston/Frontenac

EMC

The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

25


news

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Masquerade targets next generation of United Way supporters By Kristyn Wallace EMC Correspondent

EMC News – A new generation of philanthropists is raising awareness and funds for the United Way. Next Gen provides young professionals with opportunities to become engaged in the community. The group was created for individuals between the ages of 25 and 40. The Kingston Next Gen cabinet was formed just over a year ago, and since then the group has organized or participated in several successful events benefitting the United Way. Shawn Whalen is the chair of the six-person Next Gen cabinet. “The idea is really very simple,” says Whalen, “It’s to get the next generation of community stakeholders involved and engaged in the United Way and what it does.” Next Gen will host its first event of 2013 on Saturday, Feb. 9. Masquerade: A Black and White Affair is a semiformal event that will feature black and white dress, optional masks, music, dancing, cocktails and appetizers. “It started as an excuse to

get dressed up,” says Whalen. “The idea is that you come out for a fantastic night of dancing and cocktails, and it’s happening in the middle of February, which is otherwise kind of a cold and dreary month, and we plan on injecting some fun into it.” Masquerade takes place at the Renaissance Event Venue in downtown Kingston, and will also feature a live jazz band and a DJ. Prizes totaling $1,000 will also be up for grabs. “We really want the purpose of people coming out to be to have a great time, and the fact that it also happens to help out people who are in need of assistance through the United Way is a fantastic bonus,” says Whalen. Previous Next Gen events have been very successful, including Hopscotch, a beer and whiskey festival, and Score 4 United Way, a Kingston Frontenacs game event that raised $4,620. “Part of the goal is to raise cash for the United Way in fundraising dollars, but a big part of it is to use those events to market Next Gen and spread our brand,” says Whalen. And the enthusiastic group is already thinking of new

Photo/Kristyn Wallace Pictured are United Way Next Gen Cabinet members Shawn Whalen and Erin Nolan. Photo courtesy Jason McAdoo ideas for the new year. “Looking ahead to 2013, we’re hoping to put together a workplace program through Next Gen so that we have Next Gen ambassadors in

workplaces that are already engaged in the United Way’s annual campaign,” he says. “As time moves forward, those young people become older people that are still in-

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2010 Ford Ranger EXT Sport Auto, White, 4.0l, 2WD, Balance of factory warranty 27,900kms

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are $30 and are available online, by phone or through the Grand Theatre box office. For more information about Next Gen visit www. unitedwaykfla.ca/nextgen.

volved in the United Way, and it’s this constant cycle of movers and shakers in Kingston that are engaged in the United Way and making an impact.” Tickets for Masquerade

The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

*0 Down + HST. **All payments are bi-weekly. 2007 & 2008: 60 months. 2009: 72 months. 2010, 2011 & 2012: 84 months. P.P.S.A. license and taxes are extra. Financing example: $10,000 plus taxes of $1300 = $11,300 financed at 6.99% - $103.25 bi-weekly. Cost of borrowing $2122.50 on approved credit.


ENCHANTé

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Mark Bergin

columnist editorial@theheritageemc.ca

on a journey, and they came back feeling better.” To her, this is the artistic ideal. “Art should be redemptive and uplifting.” She explained that flamenco training is difficult. “There’s an intricate rhythm to learn,” she said. “It’s like jazz, a structured improv. Not everyone wants to spend that much time learning the rules.” The specific form known as flamenco is the music, song and dance of Andalusia in southern Spain, rooted in gypsy music. “Flamenco is like Canada. It’s a culture of many cultures,” she said. “It has its origins in India, then travelled across the Middle East to Europe.” The region of Andalusia in southern Spain provided creative ground for flamenco music and dance to develop. Catholic, Judaic and Islamic Moorish cultures came together to influence gypsy dance form, which is rich in embellishment and improvisation. “They’ve found peace there. It’s created something beautiful,” said Morgan. “Flamenco doesn’t have a vast repertoire of steps, so the beauty, and challenge, is to invent new ways of using a few basic steps. They are steps that come easily to us, so it is organic and accessible. At the Alhambra (in Andalusia), one sees that a few simple materials, an infinite amount of creativity and hard work create something timeless. My goal as I get closer to 50 is to make my flamenco like the Alhambra: a few steps to create something beautiful.” She’s been teaching dance in many forms − ballet, flamenco, Spanish, folk dance, and others—since retiring from the National Ballet. She’s willing to visit schools to talk about healthy ballerina and dance culture with young children. She inspires them to dance. She says Kingston is fortunate to have people like Ebon Gage at the Kingston School of Dance, who inspires boys to become involved. She understands that art, design, costuming, lighting, music and theatre are intertwined. She hopes to see diverse arts come together in Kingston.

“The arts need to intersect,” she said. ”We need to get back to dancing in the open market squares. We need more collaboration in the arts. Cantabile, Kingston School of Dance, 1000 Islands Flamenco, dance and theatre all need to work together when there is limited audience capacity and performing opportunity. Dance and theatre need to be more visible in places where the tourists are, outdoors, like one sees in Europe. The culture in the markets in Spain was high quality, entertaining and respectful of the many needs of the market area.” Her attitude toward dance has evolved. She’s inspired to pass on the skills of dance. Her own mentor and teacher, Irine Fokine, died in December 2010. “I feel a greater responsibility to carry on the tradition,” said Morgan “Irine was the last of the Fokine’s. Her mother trained Robert Joffery. Her uncle choreographed ballets that are still danced by the world’s great ballet companies. Her godparent was the legendary Anna Pavlova. One feels a greater responsibility to pass on that lineage as one gets older and as my teacher’s Photo/Mark Bergin generation passes away. We thank our teachers by sharing Former National Ballet of Canada dancer Anthea their legacy and we hope to Morgan demonstrates flamenco.  She also  teaches inspire future artists and audi- at FRONTS_EMC_GAME19_Final.pdf 1 12/27/2012 4:31:43 PM School of Dance and 1000 Islands the Kingston ences.” Flamenco Spanish Dance Company and School.

Storrington Lions Club Hall Rental Available • Banquets • Birthdays • Anniversary

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EMC Lifestyle - There’s a rhythmic pounding in the room, like a tribal drumming. It marks the beat for young dancers performing flamenco on stage at the Domino Theatre. It’s part of the Kingston School of Dance Let It Snow performance. The flowing arms and fingers and the gentle swooshing of the dresses contrast the staccato beat. The dancers twirl, then gracefully but forcefully open fans. It’s exotic and earthy in the same moment. Their teacher, Anthea Morgan, appreciates their hard work and understands that to become a dancer a lifestyle of discipline is required. “It takes years and years of work when everyone else is watching TV,” she said. “It never lets go of you. My parents gave up so much for me.” Morgan grew up dancing in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. “I grew up on Botafogo Bay in Rio, during the military dictatorship,” she said. “My mom and I danced on the beach along the water. I used to go for sleepovers in the favelas and we danced, samba.” She explained that the movie, City of God, took place in the same time period in different favelas (shanty towns). “Similar worries,” she said. “The ocean, the sun, and dance − I think kept us all whole during that time, reminded us of the goodness in life and of being together.” Now living in Kingston, she said she loves the limestone and the lake. “One can always look to nature to inspire.” But what is flamenco? Anthea explains it with a story. “In Cordoba, Spain, just outside the Mezquita at one of the archways at night, a man started to sing, flamenco, as he got to one of the archways. When he finished, he turned to those around and said, ‘This gate always makes the song come out of me.’ He then walked off with his partner and disappeared into the night. Flamenco....the song comes out of one….not one sings. That is flamenco. One learns the language, then when one is deeply touched by something eternal there is a way of sharing that moment with others. “Flamenco encompasses so much,” she said. “The controlled passion, mystery and honesty are unique to flamenco. It’s about sharing, expressing feelings. It’s not showing off. When you dance flamenco, it’s OK to be sad, to dance like you’re sad. Moments of comedy and joy come together. It’s about sharing feelings we’re not always

comfortable with.” She said she loves flamenco and Spanish culture because of the respect for the human body. “With flamenco, you get to dance as you. Flamenco allows you to love your body as it is.” In 2010, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) recognized flamenco as a World Heritage Treasure. Morgan said that will help flamenco survive and grow. “There are more elements of ballet in flamenco now,” she said. “It is changing. Years ago, you would never see a man do a triple attitude turn and come out into flamenco. It is evolving.” Anthea Morgan has lived the life of a dancer since childhood. The former National Ballet of Canada and Royal Ballet dancer teaches ballet and repertoire at the Kingston School of Dance. At her own studio, 1000 Islands Flamenco Spanish Dance Company & School, she teaches flamenco, Spanish classical, Sevillanas and Spanish folkloric dance. Sevillanas are social dances that don’t require a partner. They can be danced solo, in pairs or in groups. Prior to retiring from her dancing career, along the way she shared the stage with Rudolph Nureyev, Mikhail Baryshnikov and Karen Kain. At the age of 16, Morgan left Brazil after landing a role with the Royal Ballet in London, England. When she was 18, her family moved to Canada. Morgan wanted to be closer to them. “My teachers said, ‘If you really don’t want to stay in Europe, audition for the National Ballet [of Canada].” Morgan spent a week auditioning with the Canadian company. She landed a contract and danced with them for seven years. “It was a great time to be in the company,” Morgan said. “Karen [Kain] was in her prime. We travelled and toured a lot.” With the National Ballet, Morgan danced in front of thousands of people, night after night. “It’s a wonderful feeling to dance for 3,000 people and uplift them, to give them something,” Morgan explained. “For three hours you’ve taken them away from somewhere,

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New Members Welcome! The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

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LIFESTYLE

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Pictures are worth a thousand words into an 18th century print room. Pedigree isn’t important—mood is. What not to do is pick artwork based on you décor, such as choosing a green painting for a green room. Whether you have one painting or a collection, let the room grow around it. Though buying art can be an investment, it should be bought for pleasure. A great place to buy wonderful paintings is estate auctions. My husband and I enjoy going to auction houses and buying antique oil paintings. They are usually sold for a great price. Just remember to study the paintings before the auction starts to look for any damage or repair to the painting itself, or the frame. Buy the painting because you love it; it doesn’t have to be a well know artist. Even if the painting is wonderful but you are not crazy about the frame, you can always change out the frame. If a picture is worth a thousand words, it is worth showing off to its best advantage. This not only means choosing the best place to hang it, but selecting an appropriate frame. Medium and large frames help expand spaces by lending a sense of proportion and depth. Small frames focus the eye on detail. It is important to match the style of the frame to what it displays. It’s worth spending the money to have something you enjoy.

to another revitalizes a room, celebrates the quality of a piece and invites you to see it with a fresh eye. As a contrast, lean favourite items against the wall or bookshelves. Side-by-side, artwork and books speak volumes about your range of inBy Merola Tahamtan terests. merolatahamtandesigns@live.ca If you are hesitant about drilling holes in your wall, EMC Lifestyle - We all you can run picture rails know how hard it can be to above a mantel or along a hang our pictures. Pictures blank wall, add a ledge, or use and drawings can fundamen- a traditional picture molding tally affect the way in which and hang your drawings from we perceive a room. picture hooks. Knowing how to hang In a bland space it pays pictures can make your room to be decisive and organize complete. A large painting on focal point. You can design a wall will attract attention, your own by mixing differa group of misaligned prints ent shapes, sizes and styles will irritate and distract. of artwork. The conventional Like any other element in approach arranges pictures the decorative vocabulary, with symmetry as a guide; the pictures can be used as fore- unconventional alternative ground or background ele- forgoes linear logic and aims ments. Hanging your pictures for whimsy. Settle on what arat eye level encourages you to rangement pleases your eye. study them, and is more com- Plan out your arrangement on fortable for viewing. If pic- the floor first so you are not tures are placed too high, or committed to holes drilled in low, you can’t capture the true the wall. beauty of the pictures. Things you love should be Anchoring a room with a hung—they are expressions handsomely framed mirror or of your taste. Things you love an outstanding painting will usually complement each othaugment the room’s classical er as well, so they will look proportions. great together. People tend to get complaThemed groupings arrest cent about their displays. Any the eye as well. For example, picture that hangs for too long a collection of botanical prints will get taken for granted. Ro- of the vegetable FRONTS_EMC_JANUARYFLEX_Final.pdf 1 same 12/28/2012 9:58:09 AMor flowtating artwork from one room er will transform any room

anee is soon showcasing the work of these local artists in their common areas. It will be on a rotating basis where new artists will proudly show their work, and offer some for sale. If you are interested in showing your work there, you can reach me at merolatahamtandeisgns@live ca. Pictures are a great way

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House & Home

There is such a wide variety of frames out there. Make sure your frame suits your picture. A frame can dramatically change your image. Be sure to check out the work of local artists. There are so many wonderful painters, photographers, and sculptors in this area. The Lenadco Community Center in Nap-

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

to express yourself as well as add the finishing touches to your unique room. Merola Tahamtan is an Interior Stylist in Home & Business Design, Home Staging, Painting and Window Draperies. You can reach her at 613-561-0244 merolatahamtandesigns@ live.ca


FOOD

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

What to do with all those Duck is a lean and flavourful meat choice holiday leftovers EMC Lifestyle - Duck isn’t just for special occasions, nor is it difficult to prepare, so look for Ontario raised duck in you grocery store and give this great recipe a try. Duck is readily available at butchers and some grocery stores; it is a lean and flavourful meat choice. Quick and easy to cook, it makes weeknight meals or special dinners simple to get on the table. Preparation Time: 10 minutes plus one hour marinating time  
 Cooking Time: 20 minutes 
 Servings: two

Ingredients ·     1/2 cup (125 mL) sodium reduced chicken broth ·      3 tbsp (45 mL) rice wine, mirin or white wine ·     3 tbsp (45 mL) sodium reduced soy sauce ·      2 tbsp (25 mL) seasoned rice vinegar ·     1 tbsp (25 mL) minced ginger ·      2 fresh cloves garlic,

minced ·      1 fresh Ontario duck breast ·     2 tbsp (25 mL) canola oil ·      3 cups (750 mL) chopped bok choy, rapini or swiss chard ·      2 cups (500 mL) chopped Nappa cabbage ·      1 pkg (4 oz/114 g) shitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced ·     1 fresh sweet red pepper, thinly sliced Preparation In shallow dish, whisk together broth, mirin, two tbsp (25 mL) of the soy sauce, vinegar and half each of the ginger and garlic. Pour one third of a cup (75 mL) of the marinade into shallow bowl and reserve remaining marinade. Score duck breast skin crosswise, then lengthwise to form a cross-hatch. Place duck breast in shallow bowl and turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour

or up to four hours. In ovenproof skillet, heat half of the oil over high heat and sear duck breast skin side down until golden brown and crisp. Turn duck breast over and place skillet in 425°F (220°C) oven for about five minutes or until thermometer reaches 155°F (68°C). Set aside. Meanwhile, in large nonstick skillet, heat remaining oil over medium high heat and sauté bok choy, cabbage, mushrooms, pepper and remaining ginger and garlic for two minutes. Add reserved marinade and cook, stirring occasionally for about five minutes or until tender crisp. Whisk together cornstarch and onetbsp (25 mL) soy sauce and stir into vegetables. Cook, stirring for one minute or until sauce is thickened. Divide among two plates. Thinly slice duck breast and place over top vegetable mixture to serve.

EMC Lifestyle – The food cooked during the holidays is often enough to feed an army. Too often, hosts and hostesses prepare and serve much too much food, only to find themselves left with a refrigerator full of leftovers when guests don’t eat as much as hosts had suspected. In order to avoid wasting food, many people attempt to create new meals from their excess holiday ingredients. Putting leftovers to good use can take a little ingenuity to disguise the reality that you’re eating turkey or ham for the third consecutive night. All it may take is a little inspiration to create delicious meals with repurposed holiday foods. The first thing to keep in mind when using leftovers is food safety. Any food remaining after the holiday meal should be packed into storage containers and refrigerated or frozen no more than 2 hours after the meal has ended. This ensures that bacteria are not able to proliferate in the food and cause foodborne illnesses.

Choose shallow containers, which will enable the food to chill more uniformly and not create warmer spots that take longer to reach a safe storage temperature. Do not save any foods that have remained at room temperature for too long or seem questionable, especially dairy products. It is adviseable to discard leftovers (even if refrigerated) after 4 days. Use it or lose it! Now that leftovers are properly stored, you can think up some creative menu ideas for using them in the next few days. * Turn stuffing into croquettes or burgers by mixing chopped turkey with stuffing or adding a new meat to the equation, like sausage. * Dice ham and potatoes and add to the morning helping of eggs for a country-style omelette. * Promptly boil the turkey carcass to make homemade stock for soups and stews. * Turn leftover mashed potatoes into a creamy potato soup, with the addition of cream, ba-

con and scallions. * Use cranberry sauce in place of butter on bagels or toast. * Mash up leftover sweet potatoes and bake into a moist and delicious sweet potato loaf bread. * Create open-faced sandwiches for lunch by layering ham or turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and gravy on top of a thick slice of bread. * Diced meats, vegetables and onion can be added to a batter of pancake mix and turned into an easy quiche. * Host Mexican night and use leftover turkey meat to make spicy fajitas, complete with sour cream and salsa. * Use stale bread to make homemade croutons for salad or use in a bread pudding recipe. * Add cranberry sauce to boxed muffin mixes for a tart treat. * Turn leftover holiday meats into an Asian stir-fry with the addition of water chestnuts, bean sprouts, soy sauce, and mixed vegetables. * Grind meats to make a hearty meat loaf. * Make leftover potatoes into hash browns. * Cube leftover cake and serve on skewers and fruit for dipping into chocolate fondue. * Use pie crust and small ramekins to turn turkey or ham into savory pot pies. There are so many ideas for using leftover holiday foods this season. Experiment with flavors your family will enjoy.

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

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LIFESTYLE

EMC - Your Community Newspaper

Healthy resolutions for the year ahead EMC Lifestyle – As the calendar turns to a new year, the focus of men and women often shifts as well. After the hectic holiday season has come and gone, many people re-dedicate themselves to their personal health and wellbeing. That renewed dedication might be thanks to all those big holiday meals or it might just be a result of the new calendar year being symbolic of a fresh start. Regardless of the reasons behind this renewed vigor, the opportunities to make the next 12 months a healthier 12 months abound. While losing weight might the most popular resolution, there are a host of other health-related resolutions individuals can make to improve their lives over the next 365 days.

Resolve to eat better Losing weight and adopting a healthier diet are not necessarily the same thing. While a healthier diet might help you lose weight, the goal of adopting a healthier diet is to improve overall health. A healthy diet can strengthen the body’s immune system, making it easier to fight cold, flu and other ailments. A healthy diet can also help in the battle against any preexisting conditions. For example, replacing salt with healthier and flavorful herbs can help reduce high blood pressure, and many people cannot even taste the difference once they start eating.

When incorporating exercise into a daily routine, start slowly and gradually work your way up to more vigorous exercise regimens. Going full speed from the outset is a great way to increase risk of injury, which could actually restrict your ability to exercise for some time. Resolve to quit smoking To nonsmokers, keep up the good work. For smokers, perhaps

some statistics are enough to get you on the path toward quitting smoking: * More than 150,000 Americans were projected to succumb to lung cancer in 2011, according to the National Cancer Institute. * The Canadian Cancer Society estimated that 20,000 Canadians would lose their lives to lung cancer in 2011. * More than 6 percent of all

deaths in the United Kingdom in 2011 were related to lung cancer, according to Cancer Research UK. If those statistics aren’t enough to get men and women serious about quitting smoking, consider the negative effect secondhand smoke has on your loved ones. The American Cancer Society notes that roughly 3,000 nonsmoking adults experience lung cancer caused by sec-

ondhand smoke in the U.S. each year. When making a resolution this year, smokers’ top priority should be to quit smoking. When making resolutions at the start of a new year, men and women often focus on healthy resolutions. But healthy resolutions go beyond losing a few extra pounds, and many involve dedication throughout the year to improve overall health this year and for years to come.

Resolve to exercise more Much like changing a diet, exercising more is often seen as a means to weight loss. While that’s a positive side effect of daily exercise, the goal should not be to lose weight. Instead, the goal of daily exercise is to get healthier. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, exercise helps lower the risk of heart disease and hypertension by 40 percent while lowering the risk of depression by 30 percent. In addition, men and women with a family history of diabetes should know that regular exercise lowers their risk of type 2 diabetes by nearly 60 percent. So while exercise is a great means to losing weight, it’s even better at helping reduce the risk for serious disease.

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Resolve to reduce stress Stress is a major part of most adults’ lives, and that’s especially so after the hectic holiday season when men and women are pulled in so many different directions. Work is a common cause of stress, but family and personal finances, especially nowadays, are big sources of stress as well. This year, resolve to reduce stress in all aspects of life. At the office, analyze ways in which you can manage time more effectively, including how to best prioritize work projects so you don’t always feel as if you’re up against a wall. Outside the office, recognize the importance of maintaining a personal life and its relation to reducing stress. Spending time with friends and family can relax

you and provide a welcome respite from the stress of the office.

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The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013


By Bill Hutchins Reporter

EMC News – The cost to get married or buried is going up in Kingston. In one of their final decisions of 2012, councillors approved a raft of user rate increases that reach into dozens of services provided by the municipality. Many of fee hikes are tied to the national inflation rate, though some are higher than the projected 2013 inflation rate of two percent. “These fee adjustments were considered part of the funding for various programs when preparing the 2013 recommended operating budget,” said a report to council by treasurer Desiree Kennedy. The cost of getting a marriage licence at city hall jumps nearly $4 from last year to $132.10, while a burial permit increases from $31.50 to $32.45. Residents will be spared increases in several core services; rates for public transit, on-street parking meters and parking ticket fines will remain unchanged in the New Year. The single adult cash fare for Kingston Transit remains at $2.50 while the monthly adult pass is $68.25, the same as last year. However, other commuters will feel the pinch of higher rates. The first-hour-free parking in the Hanson and Chown municipal garages has come to an end, while parking permit fees have gone up by an average of two to three dollars a month as of January

1. Monthly permits now range from $52.75 in the Anglin and Doug Fluhrer parking lots to as high as $112.10 in the Sheraton Hotel’s municipal parking stalls. Kingston’s 2013 ‘fees and charges’ bylaw also includes modest rate hikes for a host of recreational programs. The increase will affect; seasonal passes to the Outdoor Aquatic Centre, swimming lessons, farmers market leases, conference and meeting rooms, Belle Park golf course, rink rentals, marina mooring, baseball diamonds and soccer fields, development applications and permits, and airport parking, terminal and landing fees. Annual business licences are also on the rise for private operations ranging from restaurants, pet stores and gas stations to pool halls and adult dancers. City officials say user fees are one way to keep property taxes down, and they note many of the recreational and service fees are already subsidized from the municipal tax base. “If fees are not adjusted appropriately, the result will be increased pressure on tax increases to subsidize costs of providing the service,” Kennedy noted. Some new recreation fees are also being implemented for the first time, such as Market Square ice skate rentals and, if you want a spring in your step, there’s a new charge to rent the pole vault and high jump facilities at Caraco track & field of $28.97 an hour.

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Whether you make it at home or onpremise, Freeman’s is the place to get all things wine related. Make it onsite at one of our state-of-the-art, fully equipped locations or simply find all the supplies you need to make it yourself. Winemaking has never been this accessible and friendly. In addition to winemaking and brewing supplies, ingredients, and equipment rentals, Freeman’s offers a unique selection of delicious gourmet foods, charming wine-themed giftware, and quality kitchenware, including Riedel Stemware, Le Creuset cookware and

Fruits & Passion products. Freeman’s is an excellent place to pick up a gift for a kitchen-savvy friend or for the person who has everything. We look forward to your visit at either of our locations (Kingston and Belleville). As a bonus, the Kingston store is also home to Cork & Beans Caffé which serves coffee and espresso-based drinks along with tasty baked goods daily. Come and enjoy! Happy New Year!

The Kingston/Frontenac EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

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