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MASHANTUCKET PEQUOT MUSEUM & RESEARCH CENTER

VOL. 15, ISSUE 2  JUNE–AUGUST 2012

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

h s a e Unl r e n n i your ! d r e N This summer is filled with exciting action for the whole family! Starting with our Comic Art Indigène Exhibit and art related activities, to our Educational Powwow, to Native Games & Sports. This is one summer of programming you won’t want to miss.

Comic Art Indigène Exhibit — Where comics and the indigenous meet: see Page 2.

Pequot Museum Educational Powwow: see Page 5.


Special Exhibit

June 23-Sept. 15, 9 am–5 pm

Comic Art Indigène, an exhibit this summer in the Mashantucket Gallery, is an exciting look at how Native artists continue their storytelling traditions and life experiences through comics and comic-inspired art. Comic art is more related to Native American art traditions than one might expect. Historic examples of narrative art in this exhibit include photographs of rock art, ledger art, and ceramics, as well as contemporary artworks. As the first widely accessible mass media, comic strips and comic books were consumed by Indian people as a recognizable and legitimate form of storytelling. Stories of humor, adventure, and the fantastic depicted through pictures have always been an indigenous practice. The exhibit opens at 11 am on June 23. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members. This exhibition has been organized by the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe, NM.

watch me draw!

Curator of sheer Awesomeness! Saturday, June 23, 1–2 pm

Saturday, June 30, 1 pm

In this riveting visual presentation, Tony Chavarria offers an inside view of how American Indian artists today articulate identity, art, worldview, politics, and culture through comic art. This is a new world of American Indian art, full of brash excitement and unique expression never before seen in a museum setting. Learn about the ideas and inspiration behind this innovative exhibition and the art and artists who are featured in the exhibit. Chavarria is curator of Ethnology at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology in Santa Fe, NM. He has consulted on exhibition development, repatriation issues, sensitive materials, and programming. In the Auditorium. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Spend some time with Narragansett artist Ty’esha Reels as she tells a story with art on one wall in the Mashantucket Gallery in conjunction with the Comic Art Indigène exhibit. Her work is the first mural to be created in the Gallery during an exhibit — stop by and enjoy this rare opportunity to observe an artist at work. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Meet Tony Chavarria, Exhibit Curator

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Ty’esha Reels: Muralist

Jolene Nenibah Yazzie (Navajo) Protector of Innocence, 2007 Digital print Courtesy of the artist


Comic Art Indigène Events Saturday, July 21, 10 am-1 pm

Comic Art Fan Day

Andrea Grant (Coast Salish/Laplander Inuit)

East coast Native American cartoonists, animators, comic-styled artists, and illustrators meet and talk with kids and adults in the Gathering Space, while displaying their works alongside the Comic Art Indigène exhibit. Feeling inspired? Work at one of our drawing tables to create a comic book that can be displayed in the Gathering Space for the duration of the Comic Art Indigène exhibit. Come and have some fun — we supply the art materials. Among the artists, meet Andrea Grant (Coast Salish/Laplander Inuit), a professional writer, multimedia artist, and the founder of Copious Amounts Press (copiousamounts.com). Her latest project is a graphic novel series called MINX, merging Native American mythology with contemporary superhero fantasy. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Comic writer/Artist, Anthony Cooley (Sioux)

Animator, Ariel Merrill (Mashantucket)

Cartoonist, Chris M. Fry (Narragansett)

Illustrator, Robert Peters (Wampanoag)

Illustrator, Sedonia Champlain (Narragansett)

Inflate

25 psi

Digital Artist, Cassius Spears, Jr. (Narragansett)

Learn to Draw!

Saturday, June 23, 10 am

Saturday, Aug. 18, 10 am-noon

Members Only. Please join fellow Museum members and staff in the Mashantucket Gallery for a special preview of the Mashantucket Gallery’s newest exhibit, Comic Art Indigène. Our preview starts at 10 am followed by a brunch at 11 am of braised beef brisket, huevos rancheros, chili renellos, ranch potatoes, blue corn bread, pastries, bagels, and rice pudding. Meet Tony Chavarria, exhibit curator, and stay for his illustrated presentation in the Auditorium at 1 pm. $22 per person. Please RSVP by June 16 to Sarah Eleazer at (860) 396-6890 or seleazer@mptn-nsn.gov.

Interested in learning how to draw? Please join the Museum’s artist and Senior Graphic Designer Chris M. Fry (Narragansett) as he demonstrates the technique of cartooning. Create your own cartoon character in this fun-filled drawing class. Chris’ interest in drawing began when he was old enough to hold a pencil and illustrations have always been his first passion. Supplies included. Limited to 15 participants, ages 9–12. $10 fee. Call (800) 411-9671 or email seleazer@ mptn-nsn.gov by Aug. 17 to register.

Comic Art Indigène Preview and Brunch

Cartooning 101— Native Style!

NATIVE VISIONS  /  SUMMER 2012

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Special Edition

An insert to the Pequot Museum’s Native Visions Calendar of Events Magazine


Produced by the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center © MPMRC • All Rights Reserved


The Pequot Museum proudly presents

Saturday, July 21, 10 am-1 pm Andrea Grant (Coast Salish/Laplander Inuit)

Cartoonist, Chris M. Fry (Narragansett)

Digital Artist, Cassius Spears, Jr. (Narragansett)

Comic writer/ Artist, Anthony Cooley (Sioux)

3D Animator, Ariel Merrill (Mashantucket)

East coast Native American cartoonists, animators, comic-styled artists, and illustrators meet and talk with kids and adults in the Gathering Space, while displaying their works alongside the Comic Art Indigène exhibit. Feeling inspired? Work at one of our drawing tables to create a comic book that can be displayed in the Gathering Space for the duration of the Comic Art Indigène exhibit. Come and have some fun — we supply the art materials.

Illustrator/ Illustrator, Comic Artist, writer/poet, Sedonia Champlain Andrew Morceau Robert Peters (Narragansett) (Chappiquiddic (Wampanoag) Wampanoag)

Among the artists, meet Andrea Grant (Coast Salish/Laplander Inuit), a professional writer, multimedia artist, and the founder of Copious Amounts Press (copiousamounts.com). Her latest project is a graphic novel series called MINX, merging Native American mythology with contemporary superhero fantasy. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.


Andrea Grant, Multimedia Artist (Coast Salish/Laplander Inuit) Andrea Grant is a professional writer, editor, and multimedia artist. She’s the founder of Copious Amounts Press (copiousamounts. com), and has published essays, poetry, and photographs in numerous publications internationally. Her latest project is a graphic novel series called MINX, which merges Native American mythology with contemporary superhero fantasy.

They say, “If you die in your dreams, you die in real life...” For halfNative American Minx, this is not superstition - it is reality. Once a struggling young artist in New York City, Minx’s life is changed forever after suffering a vicious attack and slipping into a coma. But she doesn’t wake in the same world she left; rather, she finds herself in Dreamtime, the alternate reality that humans inhabit when they sleep. With this transition comes great revelation and profound responsibility as Minx evolves into a sophisticated warrior, charged with protecting people from a complex agenda that seeks to transform nightmares into realities and realities into nightmares. But Minx’s role as vigilante is not born from random coincidence: it is the result of elaborate conspiracy, ancient prophecy, and devastating betrayal...


Chris M. Fry, Cartoonist (Narragansett) Chris is a Narragansett Indian tribal member and is the senior graphic designer for the world’s largest Native American museum, the Mashantucket Pequot Museum, in Mashantucket, CT. Chris began his graphic design career at Foxwoods Resort Casino in 1995. Chris, his wife Charlene, and two wonderful children live together in the small town of Westerly, RI.


Cassius Spears, Jr., Digital Artist (Narragansett)

Cassius Spears, Jr. is a Native American artist and scholar from the Narragansett Tribe of Rhode Island. His grandfather and father taught him to appreciate the land and the water and their resources; his family immersed him in traditional plant uses, fishing, shell fishing, and hunting on his ancestral lands which made him sensitive to the natural world. This indigenous perspective compelled him to major in environmental science and policy at the University of Rhode Island. Cassius combines a Native American view in a scientific and political field and works to preserve, protect, and manage natural and cultural resources. In addition to his environmental work, Cassius is an artist with a wide breadth of skill; his craftsmanship extends to leather, bead, feather, and bone work. He is also a talented musical artist, composing and singing works in Narragansett language that are a reflection

of his musical passion, heritage, and life within modernity. In the same way, Cassius combines traditional indigenous themes into contemporary art forms when working within digital and graphic art. The combination of Northeastern Woodland aesthetics in pop-art inspired colors and motifs are an indicator of Cassius’s understanding of the fluid nature of “traditional” and “modern.” Cassius is active in the Narragansett tribal community in many different capacities. He currently is a tribal councilman and serves on the tribe’s Economic Development Commission, the youngest member to ever be elected to that position. An active traditional dancer, singer, drummer, artist, and educator, Cassius is a young man who continues his ancestors’ traditions and culture in multi-dimensional and concentric ways.


Anthony Cooley, Comic Writer/Artist (Sioux)

Anthony began collecting comics in 1978 when his parents bought him a copy of Ghost Rider #28 at a bus station on the way to Atlanta, GA, from his home town of Providence, RI. He was immediately hooked and could not get enough, so he started to draw his favorite characters. Eventually, Anthony started to really get into the stories being told and began trying to improve what was being done by the writers and artists of the time. Writing became a hobby and soon he was writing and drawing mini comics that filled in what he perceived as missing pieces from his favorite series. As he got older, he started to drift away from writing and drawing and started getting into technology and computer repair. However, he couldn’t help picking up a pencil and creating something new every so often. Recently, Anthony has experienced a resurgence of creative energy and has begun writing a sci-fi novel and scripting a children’s comic penciled by Todd Moniz. Both works are still in progress but Anthony has been doing freelance design and illustration work to help finance his projects.


Ariel D. Merrill, Animator (Mashantucket)

Ariel D. Merrill, Mashantucket Pequot tribal member, is a talented artist who grew up in New London County. Morning Glory (Ariel’s Indian name) is the daughter of Malcolm and Jean (Eleazer) Merrill. Ariel’s lifelong love of the visual and performing arts led her to pursue her passions. She has acted in student films, TV commercials, and in 2007 she produced and starred in William S. Yellow Robe Jr.’s play, Grandchildren of the Buffalo Soldiers, at the Mashantucket Museum & Research Center. Ariel studied classical and 3D animation at Vancouver Film School and went on to earn her Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in Visual Studies at the University of British Columbia. Currently Ariel is working on her Master of Fine Arts in film at Regent University.


Robert Peters, Illustrator (Wampanoag)

Robert Peters is a Mashpee Wampanoag artist, poet, and author. He published his first book, Da Goodie Monsta, in the fall of 2009 and is currently working on a series of acrylic paintings called 13 Moons. Da Goodie Monsta is based on a dream his son Robert Jr. had when he was 3 years old. The story depicts a monster that is part lion, part bird, and part dragon wearing roller skates. Da Goodie Monsta chases away nightmares. His work, 13 Moons, is intended for a 2015 calendar; several of the 13 acrylic panels are available as signed prints. Robert’s family moved to the Wampanoag home land of Mashpee when he was ten. Here his father Russell entered a life-long battle to regain land and sovereignty for the Mashpee Wampanoag people. 270 Mashpee Wampanoag people (including

his father) died during the more than 30 years it took for the United States Government to process their request for recognition. Robert retired from the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority after 24 years of service. During this period he observed the culture of Boston’s subway system working as a motorman, union steward, and at times, a civil rights activist on the MBTA’s Orange Line. He drew pictures, took notes, and made commentary — creating a not-yet-published collection of notes, pictures, cartoons, and essays that is an anthropological study of modern American culture from an indigenous perspective. Today Robert continues writing, painting, and working with youth. He is a fire keeper and a keeper of the oral traditions.


Sedonia Champlain, Illustrator (Narragansett)

Sedonia A. Champlain (Narragansett tribal member Dancing Waters) was born in Manhattan, NY, in 1943 and passed away in 2002. The second of Harold and Mazel Champlain’s eight children, Sedonia attended High School of Industrial Arts, School of Visual Arts, Arts Students League, and Fashion Institute of Technology, all in New York City. During her working career in publishing and printing, she was a freelance artist for many years. In 1988, she became the illustrator/art director for The Algonquin Indian Arts and Culture Association and assisted her father with the creation of the New England Native American Calendar. For 14 years she was at many powwows mostly in the New England area, promoting the calendar and her Native American coloring kits, T-shirts, tote bags, hats, etc., all featuring her exceptional artistic talent.


Andrew Morceau, Comic Artist (Chappiquiddic Wampanoag)

Andrew Morceau attended Boston Latin Academy across the street from Fenway Park before enlisting in the Army National Guard and taking college courses at UMass Boston. He is the War Chief of the Chappiquiddic Wampanoag tribe, and his mother, Yellow Feather, is Squaw Sachem Medicine Woman. He has been drawing since childhood and has always been a fan of great comic artists. He is married with 6 awesome kids who love their Native heritage and love comics even more.


pequotmuseum.org


Summer Thanksgiving Fri. & Sat., June 8 & 9, 11 am-3 pm

Strawberry Thanksgiving Celebration

Once again it is time to give thanks for Wuttatmineash, the first berry of the season. Native people continue to come together to honor the strawberry. See how the sweetness of the berry brings squabbling siblings together in our puppet show and sample that sweetness with a strawberry drink. Make a pendant to remember the celebration and enter the Hubbub tournament — the winner receives a Hubbub game. Teachers may pick up an informative, educational packet about Native seasonal thanksgivings. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Books & Workshops Wednesday, Aug. 8, 11 am–1 pm

Meet Earl Mills, Sr., Chief Flying Eagle

Do you love to read cookbooks? Meet Earl Mills, Sr. (Mashpee Wampanoag), author of Cape Cod Wampanoag Cookbook, and talk with him in the Research Library. Then join him for a delicious lunch in the Museum Restaurant. Feast on food from his cookbook, including Flume quahog chowder, chicken divan, “Three Sisters” vegetables, corn bread, and Grape Nut pudding. Mr. Mills blends thoughts and essays about Wampanoag life and stories in his books. Borrow a copy of Cape Cod Wampanoag Cookbook from the Research Library or purchase one in the Museum gift shop. Book discussion is free. Lunch is $30/20 Museum members. Call (800) 411-9671 or email seleazer@mptn-nsn.org by Aug. 3 to register.

Saturday, June 2, 1–4 pm

Saturday, July 28, 10 am–3 pm

Northeast Native artists have been using beads made from shells, seeds, wood, and bone for thousands of years. Later, glass trade beads were woven into belts, strung onto necklaces, and used to decorate clothing. Learn how to beadloom designs for center-seam moccasins. Candyce Testa (Pequot) and Curator Steve Cook show beaded moccasins from our collections for artistic inspiration and guide you in creating beaded designs. Relax and enjoy learning a skill practiced by many Native peoples over time. Bring your own leather moccasins to decorate. Fee includes loom and supplies. Limited to 15 participants, ages 10 and older. $35/25 Museum members. Call (800) 411-9671 or email seleazer@mptn-nsn.gov by May 25 to register.

Become an archaeologist for a day as you work beside museum scientists exploring a late 17th century (ca. 1675–1690) Mashantucket Pequot village. Participants learn archaeological survey and excavation techniques, and then analyze their finds in the archaeology labs. Be prepared to get dirty! It’s an educational adventure for the whole family. Limited to 15 people, ages 10 and older; participants 10–15 years old must be accompanied by an adult. Wear work clothes and heavy shoes or boots, pack a lunch and water. $40/$30 Museum members. Call (800) 411-9671 or email seleazer@mptn-nsn.gov by July 21 to register. Rain date is Saturday, Aug. 4.

Beading Moccasins

Family Archaeology Adventure

Friday, Aug. 3, 9 am-3 pm

Educators’ Workshop: Children’s Books about American Indians

Choosing books about Native people and cultures for your children or classrooms? There are many books available — how can you find the best ones? Spend the day in the Children’s Library and learn to look critically at books and discover what makes some better choices than others. In this hands-on workshop, participants gain skills and criteria that change how they think about materials written about other cultures. We have received lots of positive comments from teachers. “Thank you ... I’m able to view children’s literature more critically. I’ll have great resources to plan Native American studies.” Jonathan Perry (Aquinnah Wampanoag) joins us to talk about his story in Trickster: Native American Tales: A Graphic Collection. $35/$25 Museum members. Call (800) 411-9671 or email seleazer@mptn-nsn.gov by Aug. 1 to register. .5 CT CEUs available.

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Powwow

Photo by E. Davila

Bobby González

Wednesday & Thursday July 11 & 12, 11 am–3 pm

Wayne Reels (Mashantucket Pequot) guides visitors through the powwow experience as he explains different dances, powwow etiquette, regalia, and the significance of powwows to Native people. Intermission features Bobby González (Taino), nationally known motivational speaker, storyteller, and poet. He draws on his Taino and Puerto Rican roots to tell stories that celebrate his indigenous heritage. Visit with Native artists demonstrating and selling art including wampum and beaded jewelry, sweet grass baskets, and pottery. Enjoy some fry bread, Indian tacos, and other delicious Native foods. Experience the colorful celebration of a powwow! Grand Entry at 11 am and 1 pm. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Films Friday & Saturday, July 13 & 14, 2 pm

Saturday, July 21, 2 pm

We are pleased to present We Still Live Here, a multiple award-winning film by Anne Makepeace. The story begins in 1994, when Jessie Little Doe, an intrepid, 30-something Wampanoag social worker, began having recurring dreams about familiar-looking people from another time addressing her in an incomprehensible language. Jessie was perplexed and a little annoyed — why couldn’t they speak English? She realized they were speaking Wampanoag, a language no one had Wampanoag mother and son used for more than a century. These events sent Photo by Trisha Barry her and members of the Aquinnah and Mashpee Wampanoag communities on an odyssey that would uncover hundreds of documents written in their language, lead Jessie to a Masters in Linguistics at MIT, and result in something that had never been done before — bringing a language alive again in an American Indian community. 56 min. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Georgina Lightning makes her writing and directing debut with Older than America, the story of a woman beset by visions that lead her to an abandoned Indian boarding school. This powerful film turns a painful chapter of United States history into a compelling, piercing drama reflective of the many actual atrocities that darkened the doors of Indian boarding schools across the US and Canada. The awardwining cast also includes Bradley Cooper as a geologist tracking down the epicenter of an earthquake that leads him to cross paths with Georgina Lightening, Adam Beach, Chris Mulkey, and Wes Studi. 101 min. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

We Still Live Here

Older than America

NATIVE VISIONS  /  SUMMER 2012

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Daily Events on the Farmstead

© MPMRC • All Rights Reserved

There is a lot of activity on the Pequot Farmstead this summer. Be sure to drop by in the afternoons to help weave a fish net, identify trees, make corn husk creations, and search for letterboxes. On Thursday and Saturday afternoons, anthropologist Russ Handsman leads hands-on programs exploring the lives of Pequot families who lived on the reservation in the early 1800s. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Wednesdays, June, July, & Aug., 1–4 pm

Net-Making, Weirs, and More

For thousands of years, Native people in southern New England have been reaping bountiful gifts from the ocean. Many different types of fish and shellfish were eaten and used for various purposes, and certain techniques and technologies were used to catch them. Learn about and help us make cordage, fishnets, and even a weir — a large fish trap. Please note the museum is closed on Wednesday, July 4, 2012. Thursdays, June, July, & Aug., 1–4 pm

The Trees of Mashantucket

Be the envy of all your friends when you are able to accurately identify some local trees. Pick up our tree identification booklet to begin your learning adventure and follow the clearly marked path to look for the numbered trees. Once you’ve located a tree, write its number and identifying features in your booklet, and try to name that tree! Find all 10 trees and head back to the Farmstead where we check your answers.

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Thursdays, June, July, & Aug., 1:30–3 pm

Saturdays, June, July, & Aug., 1–4 pm

Museum archaeologists have excavated many Pequot home sites at Mashantucket. See the artifacts they found and learn how we use them as clues to understand what a Pequot house looked like, and how Native families interacted with the world beyond the reservation. In the Pequot Farmhouse. Fridays, June, July, & Aug., 1–4 pm

Everyone likes a treasure hunt. Learn about Native life as you explore the Farmstead looking for the letterboxes. Our childoriented boxes contain a pad and a rubber stamp. When you find one of the letterboxes, stamp your booklet with the ink stamp from the letterbox — as proof that you found it. See if you can you find all of them. Saturdays, June, July, & Aug., 1:30–3 pm

Digging for Clues

Corn Husk Creations

Join our museum educators to make corn husk dolls, cornhusk hats, or cornhusk flowers. Or create a colorful mosaic with corn kernels. You’ll never look at the green leaves you pull off your corn-onthe-cob in the same way again! $5 fee for materials.

Letterboxing

Counting Colors and Cultures

Census taking happened regularly on the reservation in the 1800s — although sometimes what was written did not accurately portray who lived here. Become a detective — using historic documents written by overseers and others to shed light on the realities and misrepresentations of counting Pequots in the 19th century. In the Pequot Farmhouse.


Summer Fun Days

Wednesday-Saturday, Aug. 8-11, 9 am-5 pm

Hide-Tanning Demonstration

Wednesday & Thursday, Aug. 8 & 9, 1-4 pm

Drop by the Farmstead to see an ongoing demonstration of traditional Native American brain tanning. At various times during the week, catch up with Curator Steve Cook as he works on cleaning, stretching, scraping, and tanning a deer hide using traditional tools and methods. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Atlatl Demonstrations

Indigenous people around the world made and used the atlatl for hunting everything from megafauna to birds. The atlatl has an ancient and long history as the preferred method for sending a projectile through the air at remarkable speeds with uncanny accuracy. Join our staff as they demonstrate some of the various designs and techniques in the construction and use of these tools. Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Friday & Saturday, Aug. 10 & 11, 11 am-3 pm

Native Games & Sports

We support the concept of Leave No Child Inside, so bring the family and join us on the Farmstead for a day filled with active traditional Native games and sports. Let us help you learn the skills and techniques of handling a lacrosse stick. Try “hunting” with a bow as well as with an atlatl. Young and old can try their hand at making a buzz toy or playing the ring-and-pin game to challenge hand-eye coordination. If you can ring the pin three times in a row, you could be a skilled hunter! Free with Museum admission, free to Museum members.

Member Events Saturday, June 23, 10 am

Comic Art Indigène Preview & Brunch See Page 3.

Saturday, July 21, 10 am–3 pm

Deerskin Bag

Deerskin bags have been used by Native Americans for years to carry any number of useful items for long journeys. With the help of Museum educators, you can create a deerskin bag using traditional and contemporary tools. Decorate it in a variety of methods. All materials are provided. Limited to 30 participants. $50 per person. Bring a bag lunch. Please RSVP by July 14 to Sarah Eleazer at (860) 3966890 or seleazer@mptn-nsn.gov. Interested in any of these events? Become a Member today! Call Sarah Eleazer at (860) 396-6890.

Saturday, Aug. 18, 10 am–2 pm

Corn Husk Dolls Join Museum educators Candyce Testa (Pequot) a n d A m b e r We i n b e r g (Mashantucket Pequot) to create and decorate your own personal corn husk doll. Learn the cultural significance of corn and corn husk dolls while you work. All materials are provided. Limited to 25 participants. $25 per person. Bring a bag lunch. Please RSVP by Aug. 11 to Sarah Eleazer at (860) 396-6890 or seleazer@mptn-nsn.gov.

NATIVE VISIONS  /  SUMMER 2012

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110 Pequot Trail, P.O. Box 3180 Mashantucket, CT 06338-3180

Download the Pequot Museum’s free app titled MPMRC from the iPhone App Store or itunes.com/appstore!

Text PEQUOT to 22828 to join the Pequot Museum mailing list. (Message and data rates apply.)

JUNE

1, 8, 15, 22, 29 2 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 2 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 6, 13, 20, 27 7, 14, 21, 28 7, 14, 21, 28 8, 9 9 23 30

Corn Husk Creations....................................... 6 Free Admission for Kids!................................ 8 Letterboxing...................................................... 6 Beading Moccasins.......................................... 4 Counting Colors and Cultures..................... 6 Net-Making, Weirs, and More...................... 6 The Trees at Mashantucket........................... 6 Digging for Clues............................................. 6 Strawberry Thanksgiving Celebration..... 4 Connecticut Open House Day.................... 8 Meet Tony Chavarria....................................... 2 Ty’esha Reels...................................................... 2

On Exhibit, June 23–Sept. 15 Comic Art Indigène Exhibit............................................................ 2

Saturdays, June 2, July 7, and Aug. 4, 9 am–5 pm

Free Admission for Kids

Visit the Museum with your children, grandchildren, and guests and we’ll make your visit even better because children ages 15 and younger are admitted free on the first Saturdays in June, July, and August. This offer cannot be combined with any other offer. Saturday, June 9, 9 am-5 pm

Connecticut Open House Day

This one-day statewide event is designed to showcase Connecticut’s diverse world of history, art, and tourism to Connecticut residents. We invite you to “see what’s in your backyard” with a 50% discount on Museum admission with proof of Connecticut residency. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center 110 Pequot Trail, Mashantucket, CT 06338-3180 Wed.–Sat. 9 am–5 pm, last admission at 4 pm.

JULY

5, 12, 19, 26 5, 12, 19, 26 6, 13, 20, 27 7 7, 14, 21, 28 7, 14, 21, 28 11, 18, 25 11, 12 13, 14 21 21 21 28

The Trees at Mashantucket........................... 6 Digging for Clues............................................. 6 Corn Husk Creations....................................... 6 Free Admission for Kids!................................ 8 Letterboxing...................................................... 6 Counting Colors and Cultures..................... 6 Net-Making, Weirs, and More...................... 6 Educational Powwow..................................... 5 Film: We Still Live Here..................................... 5 Comic Art Fan Day........................................... 3 Deerskin Bag...................................................... 7 Film: Older than America................................ 5 Family Archaeology........................................ 4

AUGUST

1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Net-Making, Weirs, and More...................... 6 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 The Trees at Mashantucket........................... 6 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Digging for Clues............................................. 6 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 Corn Husk Creations....................................... 6 3 Educators Workshops.................................... 4 4 Free Admission for Kids!................................ 8 4, 11, 18, 25 Letterboxing...................................................... 6 4, 11, 18, 25 Counting Colors and Cultures..................... 6 8, 11 Hide Tanning..................................................... 7 8 Meet Earl Mills, Sr., Chief Flying Eagle...... 4 8, 9 Atlatl Demonstration...................................... 7 10, 11 Native Games & Sports.................................. 7 18 Cartooning 101—Native Style!................... 3 18 Corn Husk Dolls................................................ 7

May 30-Sept. 1

Pequot Museum is a Blue Star Museum

The Pequot Museum is a Blue Star Museums participant, offering free admission to active duty military personnel and their immediate families from Wednesday, May 30, through Saturday, Sept. 1, during regular museum hours.

Scan this code for Museum information, videos, or to download our iPhone app. Download a free QR code reader at www.i-nigma.mobi

Calling All Extroverts! Help with Museum Enrichment ... and Stay Cool!

This summer we are creating a new kiosk in the Gathering Space to help visitors find their way and inform them of what is happening each day. We are looking for volunteers to work with museum staff at the kiosk daily, Wednesdays–Saturdays, between 11 am and 3 pm (2-hour shifts), starting June 1. If you love meeting new people and are looking for some respite from the summer heat, this is a good fit! Training provided. Please contact Sarah Eleazer at (860)396-6890 or seleazer@ mptn-nsn.gov for more information.

Visit our mobile website on your smartphone at pequotmuseum.org Please call 1-800-411-9671 or visit www.pequotmuseum.org for additional information.

Please note the Museum is closed on July 4, 2012.

Take Exit 92 off of I-95 or Exit 79A off I-395, and follow signs to the Mashantucket Pequot Reservation and the Pequot Museum.

Profile for Robin Cassacinamon

Native Visions: Special Edition  

This special edition Native Visions magazine features a Comic Art Fan Day exclusive insert. On Saturday, July 21, 10 am-1 pm, East coast Nat...

Native Visions: Special Edition  

This special edition Native Visions magazine features a Comic Art Fan Day exclusive insert. On Saturday, July 21, 10 am-1 pm, East coast Nat...

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