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Keywords: Real Estate Owner Search, Property Ownership Search Title: Real Estate Owner Search: Uncover the Assets of Cops and Robbers Summary: The dragnet caused Cassidy and Sundance to flee to South America, where their luck finally ran out. Trapped in a little mountain village by Bolivian troops, Sundance was killed and Cassidy committed suicide rather than be taken alive. Sleuth Alan Pinkerton foiled an assassination plot aimed at President-elect Abraham Lincoln while he was en route to his 1 861 inauguration in Washington, D.C. Pinkerton was made the head of Union Army intelligence, founding what later became the Secret Service. When he left government service, he founded the private detective agency which bears his name. In the first quarter of the twentieth century, the Pinkerton Agency was primarily used for ant labor activities and strikebreaking. The dragnet caused Cassidy and Sundance to flee to South America, where their luck finally ran out. Trapped in a little mountain village by Bolivian troops, Sundance was killed and Cassidy committed suicide rather than be taken alive. Even with primitive technology, a real estate owner search revealed assets that the crooks believe would remain hidden. As the twentieth century' continued to unfold, there would be other outbreaks of Wild Westtype banditry7, most notably that of the Depression-era bank robbers such as John Dillinger and Charles “Pretty Boy� Floyd. But the main trend of modern crime would be urban in nature, with organized crime mobs controlling lucrative vice rackets such as bootlegging, gambling, prostitution, and narcotics, ultimately creating a nationwide crime syndicate dominating a significant sector of the national economy. Changing times demand new- solutions. Just when the era of the Wild Bunch came to an end, the Bureau of Investigation, the embryonic organization that would eventually become the FBI, came into being. Chapter 2: Origins of the Bureau Teddy Roosevelt's Bigger Stick Starting in about 1880, the United States began experiencing a massive influx of European immigration, with most of the newcomers settling in the cities. Increased urbanization, industrialization, and new technologies such as the automobile, telephone, and electric light dramatically transformed the U.S. landscape, culture, and balance of power. Federal law enforcement needed to keep up with the changing times.


As New York City police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt had once told his men, “There’s more law in the end of your nightsticks than in all the law books in the world.” He also once famously observed, “Speak softly and carry' a big stick.” As president of the United States, he carried over this same vigorous, hard-driving approach to law enforcement. An activist trustbuster and conservationist, he demanded additional policing powers to protect the public. Roosevelt’s vehicle was the Department of Justice, which had been created in 1870 during the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. Heading the department was a presidentially- appointed attorney general. (The attorney general was one of the four original Cabinet posts established in 1789.) Department of Justice duties included detecting and prosecuting violations of federal law', representing the federal government in civil suits, and assisting the president and other federal officials in fulfilling their lawful duties. Initially, the department had no staff of permanent investigators, borrowing them as needed from the Secret Service Division of the Treasury Department, or from private detective agencies, such as Pinkerton (a practice forbidden by Congress in 1892). The Justice Department belongs to the government’s executive branch, and Congress, jealous of its powers and prerogatives, was unwillingBy 1 899, the number of immigrants arriving yearly at these shores numbered 300,000, rising to a peak in 1907 of one million immigrants per year. From 1908 to 1917, immigration rates remained at 650,000 per year. Official and Confidential In our constitutional system of checks and balances, the president proposes and Congress disposes. The legislative body has the power to authorize the funding of government agencies. Congressional Appropriations Committees control the amount of the federal budget allocated yearly to the FBI, giving them some measure of oversight regarding the Bureau. This tug-of-war between presidential and congressional interests would prove to be a major factor not merely during the start-up of the Bureau, but throughout its history. In 1908, Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte (grandnephew of French emperor Napoleon I) requested congressional approval for the department to form its own investigative division. Not only was he turned down, but as payback for an earlier land fraud probe which had targeted legislators, he was forbidden by Congress to use Secret Sendee agents to carry out investigations. Scheduled to go into effect on July 1, 1908, the prohibition was circumvented by Bonaparte, who used the discretionary' funds at his disposal to hire a small staff of nine investigators and


fourteen examiners and accountants. He put them on the Justice Department payroll before the expiration of the June 30 deadline. The unnamed agency’s first chief was Inspector Stanley W. Finch, who served from 1908 to 1912. On July 26, President Roosevelt officially authorized the new investigative division. William Howard Taft won the 1908 presidential election. Appearing before the House Appropriations Committee in February' 1909, outgoing Attorney General Bonaparte assured the members that he’d installed institutional safeguards on the new detective force. Congress agreed to fund the new division, while reserving the right to keep close tabs on it. On March 16, 1909, new Attorney General George Y. Vickersham named the agency the Bureau of Investigation. (In abbreviated form, BI.) Wickersham’s 1910 report to Congress outlined the Bureau’s area of operations: “enforce national banking laws, antitrust laws, peonage laws, the bucketshop law, laws relating to fraudulent bankruptcies, impersonation of government officials with intent to defraud, thefts and murders committed on government reservations, offenses committed against government property, and those committed by federal court officials and employees, Chinese smuggling, customs frauds, internal revenue frauds, post office frauds, violations of the neutrality act... land frauds and immigration and naturalization cases.” From its inception, the Bureau and politics would prove to be inseparable. Responding to national outrage over massive organized prostitution rackets, Congress passed the Mann Act, a.k.a. the White Slave Traffic Act, in 1910. Named for its sponsor, Illinois Republican Representative James Mann, the act made it a federal crime to transport a female across state lines for “immoral purposes.” Congress voted to give the BI the responsibility of enforcing the Mann Act, thus extending its bailiwick to madams, prostitutes, and pimps. Hence, the FBI has retained superior investigative powers and abilities that include extremely advanced algorithms to conduct a real estate owner search to find suspected criminals.


The dragnet caused Cassidy and Sundance to flee to South America, where their luck finally ran out. Trapped in a little mountain village by Bolivian troops, Sundance was killed and Cassidy committed suicide rather than be taken alive.

Sleuth Alan Pinkerton foiled an assassination plot aimed at President-elect Abraham Lincoln while he was en route to his 1 861 inauguration in Washington, D.C. Pinkerton was made the head of Union Army intelligence, founding what later became the Secret Service. When he left government service, he founded the private detective agency which bears his name. In the first quarter of the twentieth century, the Pinkerton Agency was primarily used for ant labor activities and strikebreaking.

The dragnet caused Cassidy and Sundance to flee to South America, where their luck finally ran out. Trapped in a little mountain village by Bolivian troops, Sundance was killed and Cassidy committed suicide rather than be taken alive. Even with primitive technology, a real estate owner search revealed assets that the crooks believe would remain hidden.

As the twentieth century' continued to unfold, there would be other outbreaks of Wild West-type banditry7, most notably that of the Depression-era bank robbers such as John Dillinger and Charles “Pretty Boy� Floyd. But the main trend of modern crime would be urban in nature, with organized crime mobs controlling lucrative vice rackets such as bootlegging, gambling, prostitution, and narcotics, ultimately creating a nationwide crime syndicate dominating a significant sector of the national economy. Changing times demand new- solutions. Just when the era of the Wild Bunch came to an end, the Bureau of Investigation, the embryonic organization that would eventually become the FBI, came into being.

Chapter 2: Origins of the Bureau Teddy Roosevelt's Bigger Stick Starting in about 1880, the United States began experiencing a massive influx of European immigration, with most of the newcomers settling in the cities. Increased urbanization, industrialization, and new technologies such as the automobile, telephone, and electric light dramatically transformed the U.S. landscape, culture, and balance of power. Federal law enforcement needed to keep up with the changing times.


As New York City police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt had once told his men, “There’s more law in the end of your nightsticks than in all the law books in the world.” He also once famously observed, “Speak softly and carry' a big stick.” As president of the United States, he carried over this same vigorous, hard-driving approach to law enforcement. An activist trust-buster and conservationist, he demanded additional policing powers to protect the public. Roosevelt’s vehicle was the Department of Justice, which had been created in 1870 during the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. Heading the department was a presidentially- appointed attorney general. (The attorney general was one of the four original Cabinet posts established in 1789.)

Department of Justice duties included detecting and prosecuting violations of federal law', representing the federal government in civil suits, and assisting the president and other federal officials in fulfilling their lawful duties. Initially, the department had no staff of permanent investigators, borrowing them as needed from the Secret Service Division of the Treasury Department, or from private detective agencies, such as Pinkerton (a practice forbidden by Congress in 1892).

The Justice Department belongs to the government’s executive branch, and Congress, jealous of its powers and prerogatives, was unwilling By 1 899, the number of immigrants arriving yearly at these shores numbered 300,000, rising to a peak in 1907 of one million immigrants per year. From 1908 to 1917, immigration rates remained at 650,000 per year. Official and Confidential In our constitutional system of checks and balances, the president proposes and Congress dis-poses. The legislative body has the power to authorize the funding of government agencies. Congressional Appropriations Committees control the amount of the federal budget allocated yearly to the FBI, giving them some measure of oversight regarding the Bureau.

This tug-of-war between presidential and congressional interests would prove to be a major factor not merely during the start-up of the Bureau, but throughout its history.

In 1908, Attorney General Charles J. Bonaparte (grandnephew of French emperor Napoleon I) requested congressional approval for the department to form its own investigative division. Not only was he turned down, but as payback for an earlier land fraud probe which had targeted legislators, he was forbidden by Congress to use Secret Sendee agents to carry out investigations.


Scheduled to go into effect on July 1, 1908, the prohibition was circumvented by Bonaparte, who used the discretionary' funds at his disposal to hire a small staff of nine investigators and fourteen examiners and accountants. He put them on the Justice Department payroll before the expiration of the June 30 deadline. The unnamed agency’s first chief was Inspector Stanley W. Finch, who served from 1908 to 1912. On July 26, President Roosevelt officially authorized the new investigative division.

William Howard Taft won the 1908 presidential election. Appearing before the House Appropriations Committee in February' 1909, outgoing Attorney General Bonaparte assured the members that he’d installed institutional safeguards on the new detective force. Congress agreed to fund the new division, while reserving the right to keep close tabs on it.

On March 16, 1909, new Attorney General George Y. Vickersham named the agency the Bureau of Investigation. (In abbreviated form, BI.) Wickersham’s 1910 report to Congress outlined the Bureau’s area of operations: “enforce national banking laws, antitrust laws, peonage laws, the bucketshop law, laws relating to fraudulent bankruptcies, impersonation of government officials with intent to defraud, thefts and murders committed on government reservations, offenses committed against government property, and those committed by federal court officials and employees, Chinese smuggling, customs frauds, internal revenue frauds, post office frauds, violations of the neutrality act... land frauds and immigration and naturalization cases.” From its inception, the Bureau and politics would prove to be inseparable. Responding to national outrage over massive organized prostitution rackets, Congress passed the Mann Act, a.k.a. the White Slave Traffic Act, in 1910. Named for its sponsor, Illinois Republican Representative James Mann, the act made it a federal crime to transport a female across state lines for “immoral purposes.” Congress voted to give the BI the responsibility of enforcing the Mann Act, thus extending its bailiwick to madams, prostitutes, and pimps. Hence, the FBI has retained superior investigative powers and abilities that include extremely advanced algorithms to conduct a real estate owner search to find suspected criminals.


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