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sports

news

entertainment

FINISHING TOUCHES

DERBY TO ROCK

SCREEN ON FIRE

Work on the Penticton Community Centre and pool nearing completion

Rockin N’ Roller derby hits Penticton ready to promote growing sport

Kitchen Stove Film Festival explores personal experience of war in Middle East

See page 3

See page 9

See page 17

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

VOL.45

ISSUE 18

F R I DAY, M A R C H 4 , 2 0 1 1

Meetings shed light on proposed prison Potential sites for correctional facility will be unveiled at open houses next week KRISTI PATTON Western News Staff

Mark Brett/Western News

HITTING A HIGH NOTE — Conductor Paula Baker of McNicoll Park Middle School directs members of her Grade 8 band during a performance Wednesday at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre. It was the final day of the Okanagan Band Festival.

Public open houses with the Ministry of Corrections Services next week in Penticton, Summerland and the Penticton Indian Reserve will unveil potential prison sites. While none of the potential sites for the 360-cell correctional facility have been officially announced by communities in the South Okanagan, Summerland Mayor Janice Perrino confirmed they have submitted the site of the failed golf course development known as Summerland Hills for the province to look at. “Yes, it’s just a possible location,” said Perrino. “What we have done is sent five sites in total to the province to say are these possible? Whether they even will be considered, because the land might be too rough or whatever, is what we are waiting to hear back on. All five pieces will be unveiled at the open house on Monday night.” The Summerland mayor also said at least one piece of property is from a private landowner. Officials with the ministry are expected to be in Summerland on Monday, although Perrino said she was unsure if they would be physically going to those potential locations to evaluate them. The Monday meeting is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. at Centre Stage Theatre, where the public will be allowed to ask questions of the government officials, and the municipality will be handing out a survey asking the public how they feel about the potential sites that the government has

deemed acceptable for consideration of a prison. A ministry spokesperson said it’s an important prerequisite that the jail is a project the public welcomes in its community. A recent poll conducted by the municipality showed 56 per cent support for a proposed provincial prison in Summerland. Applications from communities that show interest in a correctional facility are being accepted by the province until April 1. “Council’s next step will be to have a meeting about it and they may choose to submit a proposal. If they do that it will be with the City of Penticton and the Penticton Indian Band, who also may submit any land pieces that are found acceptable at that time,” said Perrino. “Then we will wait and see if the province is interested in any of those pieces of land, considering that Lumby and Spallumcheen are still in the running. If the government does show they are interested, then at that point we will go to the citizens with a plebiscite possibly in the spring or early summer.” The meeting in Penticton will be held on Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre. The ministry then will meet with the Penticton Indian Band community members on Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the community hall. “We are glad to have this opportunity and invite people out as the ministry staff will be available to answer questions. They will be able to answer a lot of those questions that people have had,” said Penticton Mayor Dan Ashton. “It will be a good meeting and we are looking for public input, so we are encouraging everyone to come with their questions and concerns.”


2

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

News Fire victims provided housing KRISTI PATTON

“The needs are all going to be different and we don’t know what they all will be just yet.”

Western News Staff

Residents of a boarding house gutted by fire on Saturday have all found temporary homes. Pastor Pete Harris said thanks to three women from government outreach organizations, local businesses and private citizens, those affected by the fire will at least have a roof over their heads for the next month. The pastor, who runs the charity organization Another Chance Ministries, has been acting as a spokesperson of sort for the residents — many of which fled from the Pine Lodge home early Saturday morning with no shoes and little clothing. The residents were offered 72-hour emergency social services that found them a place to stay at the Sandman Inn and food at the neighbouring Denny’s restaurant, but that ran out Tuesday morning. “I was really worried. I was going to have 18 people with no place to go,” said Pastor Pete. “By 6 p.m. on Tuesday the last group was being dropped off to their temporary housing. The emotions of the residents are as mixed as the number of people there are because now it’s going to all start sinking in about what happened.”

— Pastor Pete Harris The Penticton Fire Department arrived to douse a shed in the backyard of a house on Ellis Street around 7:22 a.m. on Saturday. It is believed someone was living in the shed, and the flames from that fire extended to the house and destroyed it. Pastor Pete said he picked up essential items for the residents at Wal-Mart, who chipped in to pay a quarter of the cost of the items that ranged from underwear to shoes. The Salvation Army put together food hampers for the residents and ABK Restorations, which is working on disaster cleanup of Pine Lodge, said they would put aside anything they find such as pictures or personal items for the residents. “The needs are all going to be different and we don’t know what they all will be just yet. I put a query out to half a dozen churches to collect specific items

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and it will take about a week-anda-half to gather those. I’m praying to be able to get enough of what I asked for to wardrobe the people, but there is no guarantee that is all going to come in or happen.” Pastor Pete said the landlord of Pine Lodge has started to try and reimburse some of the rent money which has helped some residents find housing. The landlord has also been offering transportation and taken in a few of the residents into another house. “Some of the stories we may get out of this is that they may have better life situations out of it. But in saying that, we don’t want everyone to back off of considering donating because there may be a plea coming out in a few weeks or the next month for a lot of furniture, household items and that kind of stuff,” said Pastor Pete. For those wanting to donate immediately, Pastor Pete suggests doing so by either sending money or gift cards in $20 denominations from places such as WalMart so the displaced residents can get the essential items they need. The mailing address for Another Chance Ministries Society is 198 Hatfield Place, Penticton, V2A 6M1, or contact Pastor Pete at 250-493-1631.

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PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

3

News

Centre renovations head into final stretch BRUCE WALKINSHAW Western News Staff

Pentictonites young and old fascinated with big machines will be treated to one of the biggest in the province this Monday and Tuesday as work continues on the almost completed $23.3 million worth of upgrades and expansion to the Penticton Community Centre and its aquatic facilities. Weather permitting, PCC construction mangers are expecting the arrival of a 270-tonne crane at the site early next week. According to the city’s recreation manager Dave Lieskovsky, the apparatus is required to install rooftop units that will accommodate the community centre’s new green heating ventilation and air conditioning system. “Everything we have done to the facility is an upgrade to what we had before. So basically all of the mechanical systems in the entire building had to be upgraded,” Lieskovsky explained. “Once the rooftop unit has been installed then they can hook up to all the HVAC system and then it will be completed and ready to go. “We will be running the community centre at a much more energy- efficient and cost-efficient level.” Lieskovsky said the project continues to be on budget and on time for its March 31 deadline. “We are running to the finish line and so we have got just under a month left, and all indications are that it is on track,” said Lieskovsky. “As people can probably see from the

Mark Brett/Western News

WILLIE JOUBERT of Stuart Olson Construction surveys the work on the inside of the Penticton aquatic centre which is currently undergoing renovation and expansion.

street, the facility is starting to look a little more refined.” With a lot of the framing and insulation already complete, Lieskovsky said the construction team has begun working on a lot of the finishing touches of the building. “Everything is coming together nicely,” he said. “The tiling in the pools is pretty much done and they

are currently working on the tiling in the corridors right now. The lighting is close to being installed and then there will be the railings and fixtures to do. “We will be dealing with inspections from Interior Health this month and then we will be putting water in the pools in the last couple of weeks of March.”

The only work that might be delayed is the paving of the asphalt surrounding the building, said Lieskovsky. However, the federal government has approved an extension of the deadline for that work, so that the city remains eligible to receive the full $15.5 million worth of provincial and federal government infrastructure stimulus grants.

“They will give us until the end of April to pave the perimeter of the outside area of the building,” he said. “That was an extension only due to the fact that we are unsure of when the asphalt plants will open. The plants usually target April 1, but some years they are earlier and some years they are later depending on weather conditions. “We can’t pave when the weather is like this (snowy) so hopefully it will improve between now and the end of March ... It is likely going to be early April by the time we pave it.” Lieskovsky said one of the most impressive aspects of the PCC’s new design is the amount of natural lighting and visual openness created by the large panes of glass, providing users a full view of the pool and of the building’s surrounding landscape. “It really gives you a spectacular feeling,” said Lieskovsky. “People will be very impressed with the amount of visibility you have in the building because you are looking through glass into the natatorium (main pool area) and then you are looking out into the mountains surrounding Penticton, especially on the second floor where you can see a lot more. “This will also be a better accommodation for families viewing the rest of their family members in the pool and it will also help for swim meets as well ... It really is a dramatic improvement from what we had before.”

Summerland science teacher exploring new frontiers STEVE KIDD Western News Staff

Not only does Summerland science teacher Raja Gupta have the district science fair competition to help oversee on Monday and Tuesday at KVR Middle School, he’s also hoping to earn some bragging rights for himself at the national finals of the Iron Science Teacher competition. In February, Gupta won the regionals of the Discovery Channel-sponsored competition. Now, as soon as the local science fair is finished he is heading to Calgary for the finals on March 9, 10 in Calgary. “I didn’t know such a competition existed. A colleague of mine nominated me and then, after the fact, informed me,” said Gupta, explaining that the nationals will have the same format as the regionals, consisting of both a six-minute prepared lesson and another created on the spot from a supplied prop. The first portion was straightforward. Along with two assistants — teachers Ryan McCarty from Summerland Secondary and Shona Becker from Summerland Middle School — Gupta delivered a lesson on the history of chemistry. “I told the story, the narrative, while they did the demonstrations at the appropriate time,” said Gupta. But the second part of the competition was even more challenging. “They gave me a dust mop, more like a handheld duster — and the topic I was given was characteristics of insects,” said Gupta, adding that he had just one minute to confer with

Photo submitted

SUMMERLAND SCIENCE TEACHER Raja Gupta beat out two competitors to win the Iron Science Teacher regional competition last month, earning the right to compete at the nationals in Calgary next week.

his colleagues and get ideas. “I turned the handheld duster into a flower and talked about the importance of insects being able to pollinate … the birds and the bees, as it were,” said Gupta. “It worked out quite well.” Gupta’s performance was strong enough to beat out the other regional finalists, two instructors from the Lower Mainland with some previous experience.

“Both individuals that I competed against — wonderful people — had experience as demo scientists at Science World,” said Gupta. “They were blowing up stuff and showing concepts in this kind of format at Science World prior to them becoming teachers … I’ve never done that, till now.” Gupta, who has taught science for 15 years, is being modest about his own accomplishments; along with Trevor Knowlton — the

colleague who nominated Gupta — he runs LiveTeacher.ca, a website that provides online group classes and streaming video recorded lessons designed to enhance and expand on the curriculum the students are learning in their classes. On the final study day before exams, the site had 1,500 students online, a total of more than 5,200 in the week before exams. Gupta also started another innovative program, evening science seminars to help parents understand the work their children are doing in class. “That has brought a lot of attention to me. I had parents this semester asking me when I was gong to be holding the classes, prior to me holding the classes,” said Gupta. “The word is getting out there that such things happen. Perhaps it is turning into an expectation but it’s not a bad thing.” Along with teaching and his other activities, Gupta oversees the district science fair, which sees up to 150 students from around the Okanagan Skaha School District displaying their science projects and competing for a chance to go on to regional and national competitions. The science fair takes place Monday night at KVR Middle School, with the awards presentation at 7 p.m. The public will be invited to have a look at the projects from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the school. “We’ve been very fortunate here with our history of having some very successful projects at the national level,” he said. “A lot of that goes to not only the kids but the support structures behind them — the parents as well as the teachers that are involved.”


4

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

News Farnworth says NDP must broaden its base of support BRUCE WALKINSHAW Western News Staff

BC NDP leadership candidate Mike Farnworth was in the Okanagan this week, speaking Thursday evening in Penticton at an event organized for him by local constituency president Julia Pope. Farnworth said Thursday morning that he believes of all the candidates, he has the most potential to improve and develop the NDP’s policy platform, expand its base of public support and lead it to victory in the next provincial election. “We are very good in the NDP with talking to people about health care and education,” said Farnworth. “People know that we are good at that and they trust us on those issues. But I think in order to win an election we’ve got to broaden our base of support. “That is why we have to talk about not just health and education, but a whole range of issues such as the economy, public safety and the environment. We have to talk about those things in the terms that people view these things because that is what matters to them and their families. I think if we do that and have a positive alternative in the next election with a platform that speaks to people about the things they care about, we can win.” Farnworth said it is paramount to the NDP that its new leader repair the internal damage inflicted leading up to former leader Carole James’ resignation.

Mark Brett/Western News

PROVINCIAL NDP leadership hopeful Mike Farnworth answers a question during an interview with the Western News Thursday in Penticton.

“I think what the NDP members have to do is look at who can unite the party, because that is key, and who can speak to British Columbians about a positive alternative that will broaden our base of support,” said Farnworth. “I believe those are two of the reasons why I am the best choice.”

According to Farnworth, currently there is too much power centralized in the premier’s office in Victoria, a structure he said negatively impacts the South Okanagan. “We are one province, but we are many regions and many communities with a diverse population, and government needs to pay attention to all regions,” he said. “There are a lot of issues here, whether it is the environment, health care or seniors or economic activity that we have got to encourage. This is a tremendous province with huge potential and I think that if we have a government that wants to work with people and work with communities we can achieve a lot.” Farnworth said if he were to serve as premier for a decade, he would hope to leave the province with a thriving resource sector, emerging industries and a citizenry that is optimistic about the future. “My desire would be for people to look at my governments and say, ‘You know what, they have done a good job. They did what they said they were going to do and did it in the best interest of the public of British Columbia in large measure by sitting down and working with them as opposed to trying to pit one group against another,’” he said. Farnworth is competing against Adrian Dix, John Horgan, Nicholas Simons and Dana Larson for the NDP leadership, which will be decided on April 17. For a full transcript of the 45-minute interview with Farnworth, visit www.pentictonwesternnews.com.

Tips lead to wanted man Western News Staff

Marcus Sheena, one of the RCMP’s 10 most wanted in B.C., was located on the Osoyoos Indian Band reserve thanks to tips from the public.

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Sheena was one of two South Okanagan men reported to the media last week on the RCMP’s most wanted list. He was listed as a chronic offender in the Oliver and Penticton area. RCMP credited the heightened awareness and media reports about B.C.’s most wanted for the number of anonymous tips from the public which resulted in the apprehension of two of the people on the top-10 list so far. “Information is a powerful tool for police,” said Cpl. Scott VanEvery of the South Okanagan and Similkameen Regional Investigation Section. “We received a number of tips, and that information led us to the right place. And in the end, Marcus Sheena was arrested.” Sheena was taken into custody around 1 p.m. on Tuesday at a residence where, with the co-operation of the Osoyoos Indian Band, he was arrested without incident. He was wanted for breaching probation conditions related to a charge of assault with a weapon. On that file Sheena attempted to obtain money from the victim, and when they refused he choked out the victim. Still outstanding on B.C.’s most wanted list is Thomas Lawrence Grant, who has two outstanding warrants. RCMP list the man as a chronic offender around Penticton, the South Okanagan

Marcus Sheena

and Boundary regional detachment area. Grant’s first warrant is from Nov. 16, 2010 on a Penticton file for possession of stolen property, dangerous operation of a motor vehicle and mischief. The second warrant is for theft under $5,000 and possession of stolen property in Summerland. This warrant has been in effect since Nov. 26, 2010. Police said all attempts to locate Grant at his residence as well as through his known associates have been unsuccessful. In addition to his warrants, Grant is also accused and before the courts on charges of assault causing bodily harm in the Boundary regional detachment area and possession of counterfeit money in Penticton. Anyone with information about the remaining eight people on the list, or their current whereabouts, is asked to call their local police or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). To view the full list of B.C.’s most wanted visit www.bc.rcmp.ca and go to the new most wanted section.


PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

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REACH FOR THE STARS — Penticton’s Patricia Tribe explains the work her partner Col. Alvin Drew (on screen) is doing to Grade 6 students Stuart Carlson and Morgan McDonald (right) at KVR Middle School Wednesday. Drew is a mission specialist aboard the space shuttle Discovery and was taking part in his second extra vehicular activity in three days.

City adding teeth to dog bylaw BRUCE WALKINSHAW Western News Staff

The City of Penticton has taken steps to tighten up rules regulating the licensing and control of dogs in the municipality, particularly in regards to aggressive or dangerous dogs. City council voted unanimously last week to rewrite the municipality’s dog bylaws while adding new fines for infractions or increasing old fines. The changes come after Coun. Dan Albas brought forward a story of a postal worker who was apparently bitten by an inadequately restrained aggressive dog, which had attacked him on several other occasions. The worker tried to use the city’s dog bylaws in a lawsuit but it

was thrown out of court, said Albas, because the bylaws were poorly written and unclear, “not properly defining what an attack is.” Council directed staff to amend the bylaws to make them similar in effect to the Regional District of Central Okanagan dog regulations. However, city clerk Cathy Ingram found it would be easier to create new rules, instead of making several changes to the old one. Ingram said the city has also taken steps to inform postal workers what information they need to provide when reporting an attack. “We have spelled out specifically what we need: location of the incident; a description of the dog; the time of the incident; any bystanders; and a general description of injuries and the severity,” said Ingram.

The city’s dog bylaw phone number will also be posted on the city’s website. “I am glad to see that we have tightened up the bylaws,” said Albas. “I think that will allow a good civil process to happen.” The city will now have fines for various infractions such as $100 for not failing to control one’s dog on one’s own property or $200 on someone else’s property. Failing to leash a dog while not on your property or in a dog park will now bring a $100 fine. Most of the old fines for offences, such as not having a valid dog licence, will be going up by $25. A ticket for not picking up after a dog will now cost $100, while failing to control a dangerous dog will cost $250. The biggest jump will be for attacks, going from a $200 fine to a $500 one.

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Residents of West Bench are looking for support from the regional district to help solve their water problems. In a December referendum residents voted down a project that would have resulted in the City of Penticton providing filtered water to the West Bench Irrigation District. Since then the group has been searching for other options on treating water. A letter from the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development sent to the Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen explains that they are interested in assisting the WBID in finding a solution, but any water quality improvement project will likely be beyond the financial resources of the landowners because improvement districts are not eligible for water infrastructure grant funding. At Thursday’s regional district meeting the board supported the recommendation to authorize administration to work with the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development to assist the WBID in resolving their water quality problems and that administration be instructed to report back to the

board with the preferred alternative. The ministry has suggested the RDOS is eligible for the infrastructure grant funding and wants to explore the prospect of having the RDOS undertake a water treatment project for the WBID. “The scope of the project will depend upon direction from the Interior Health Authority. If the water must be filtered, the option for obtaining water from the city could be revisited. However, it is unlikely that this option would be supported by the electors so soon after the vote in December,” said Mike Furey, assistant deputy minister, in the letter to the RDOS. Furey added once a workable treatment option is identified, funding could be obtained through existing grants. The regional district board would need to pass a service area establishment bylaw and a loan authorization bylaw to finance a portion of the project that is not financed by grants. In addition, the ministry will need to request a cabinet order that dissolves the WBID and transfers its assets and liabilities to the RDOS. Furey said there is a very limited timeframe until March 31, 2012 that the water treatment project must be undertaken and completed in order for the RDOS to receive grant funding under the British Columbia Community Water Improvement Program.

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Opinion

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Published Wednesdays and Fridays in Penticton at: 2250 Camrose St., Penticton B.C. V2A 8R1 Phone: (250) 492-3636 • Fax: (250) 492-9843 • E-mail: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

EDITORIAL

Clark must strike a delicate balance

C

hristy Clark won the BC Liberal leadership and the province’s premiership with the public support of only one sitting Liberal MLA — a littleknown backbencher at that. That fact is telling, for a couple of reasons. Kevin Falcon and George Abbott split the support of the remaining government MLAs between them, a point that speaks to the current regime favouring some version of the status quo. On the other hand, roughly 52 per cent of those who cast ballots in Saturday’s leadership poll — more than half of eligible voters weren’t card-carrying Liberals when Gordon Campbell resigned — felt confident this “outsider” was the best person for the job. Since she’s been out of the political spotlight for six years, Clark may give the Liberals their best chance to defeat the NDP. Unless, that is, she makes a major gaffe on policy — read: the HST — or gives voters any sniff that this is still Gordon Campbell’s Liberal Party. Many voters will remember Clark as Campbell’s deputy premier and minister of education from the time the Liberals took office in 2001 to 2004, a time of heavy across-the-board cuts to ministry budgets. Nonetheless, British Columbia’s second female premier (Rita Johnston led for 200 days in 1991) — a woman who backed away from the messy political fray to focus on raising her son — deserves a chance to lead the province out of a difficult time. How she manages, under a tight fiscal framework, to initiate her “Families First Agenda for Change” focus — a campaign slogan seemingly lifted from an NDP brochure — will go a long way toward determining the public’s view of Clark and her government leading up to the next election. She could wind up a historical footnote as B.C.’s second short-term woman premier, or be the breath of fresh air that allows the Liberals to recapture the public’s favour.

2250 Camrose Street, Penticton, B.C. V2A 8R1 Tel: (250) 492-3636 Fax: (250) 492-9843 Publisher: Mark Walker Editor: Dan Ebenal Sales Manager: Larry Mercier

The Penticton Western News is a member in good standing of the Canadian Community Newspapers Association and the British Columbia & Yukon Community Newspapers Association. The Penticton Western News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888687-2213 or go to www. bcpresscouncil.org. This publication reserves the right to refuse any material — advertising or editorial — submitted for publication and maintains the sole right to exercise discretion in these matters. Submissions by columnists and guest writers do not necessarily reflect the opinion of this newspaper. All material contained herein is copyright.

Clark opens door for conservative shift

C

hristy Clark won the Liberal leadership on Saturday and is poised to become our next premier. Her margin of victory was slim (four percentage points) by any measure, and the indifference to her win by many in the Liberal Party is palpable. Clark now leads a party that is, if not divided, disillusioned. The BC Liberals have chosen the status quo, and it is clear not all BC Liberals are pleased. The public’s appetite for more fiscally conservative and small government legislatures is growing. Across North America voters are tired of funding increasing wages and benefits for public-sector unions. Taxpayers are weary of increasing taxes and fees, and are demanding changes in government policy. U.S. voters repudiated the liberal, big government policies of President Barrack Obama last November. The majority of U.S. states are moving to small government, low-tax regimes under Republican leadership. Historically liberal Toronto has elected a decidedly conservative mayor, much to the chagrin of the Toronto-centred media, which campaigned fiercely for anyone but Rob Ford. Despite the concerted efforts of virtually every media outlet in Canada, the Harper Conservatives continue to hold a significant lead in public opinion polls and would almost

MARK WALKER AT RANDOM

certainly form a majority, or strong minority, government if an election were to be held today. Cities and towns across B.C. are facing up to reality that the effects of past “mission creep” — where municipalities forgot their role of providing roads, sewer and garbage collection, and instead squandered precious property tax dollars on social welfare programs — are no longer sustainable. Voters are demanding a return to the provision of basic municipal services. Across Europe notoriously socialist countries have embraced conservative policies. These countries are backtracking on virtually all their lynchpin social polices. Faced with the dismal results of decades of spending on failed social engineering programs and multicultural policies that have destroyed the fabric of traditional western European soci-

ety, voters there are demanding a return to increased personal freedom and accountability, and less intrusion by government in day-to-day life. In B.C., Clark’s Liberals will continue to represent the urban progressive voters of the Lower Mainland and cling to power by providing voters a slightly more credible alternative to the NDP. Clark’s internal challenge will be how to court the right wing of her party going forward. At the same time, Clark’s election presents a real opportunity for the BC Conservatives to present a responsible alternative to the Liberal policies. There is scant evidence Christy Clark has the leadership qualities to unite the BC Liberals in the long term. To keep her party together, she will need to allow the right wing of her party to influence the provincial agenda. If not, she will face a redux of a Reform Party-like break-up that put the NDP in power in 1991, or face the ascension of the BC Conservatives as a real election threat in the coming years. Or both. The BC Conservative Party at a provincial level has long been viewed as fringe group. It has lacked credible leadership, and has been portrayed as espousing extreme religious and social views. Spokespeople for the party in the past have done little to dispel this view. Nevertheless, paid membership

in the BC Conservative Party is at an all-time high. Clark’s election presents an opportunity to the BC Conservatives. They need to engineer a few key defections of Liberal MLAs who have been disaffected by the Clark election. They will also have to revamp their executive and leadership and begin to articulate a less extreme stance on social issues. This will allow them to continue to build membership and fundraising efforts. Their strategy must be to capture the conservative voter in the interior of the province and create a minority Liberal government, with Conservatives driving important fiscal legislation. The door is now wide open for the BC Conservatives to get their act together and capitalize on the Liberals’ apparent lack of courage to address the issues facing the province. Clark faces the prospect of adopting conservative values much more substantial than her vacuous “families first” policies if she is to keep her party together and remain in power. Either way, the election of Christy Clark on Saturday evening may well herald the rise of the right in B.C., and that may be the best thing we can take away from last weekend’s leadership election. Mark Walker is the publisher of the Penticton Western News.


PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

7

Letters

New Liberal leader faces tough questions The BC Liberal Party’s resurrection is over, or has it just begun with the selection of Christy Clark as our next premier? Several questions come to the fore. Will there be party unity and internal support as stated by the unsuccessful candidates? How many will stay with the ship? What will their marching orders be? How much will things change, or will they remain the same? Questions, questions and more questions will be raised. The pot has not yet begun to boil and little stirring, if any, has taken place. Ms. Clark has spoken out and stated her first priority is to improve the lives of B.C. families, echoing the theme upon which her campaign was based. She stated that: “My commitment to putting families first starts with job creation and fighting poverty. These issues are going to be the top priorities for our government.” In theory, it sounds good. There are several issues that need to be addressed over and above these. Many of these are of equal importance. This is her opportunity to put her money where her mouth is. She stated that she wants to hear from “all British Columbians” and “institute real change.” Were I to talk with the new premier, some of my

Councillor’s response out of line

In light of recent updates in the media regarding a possible postponement of opening our community centre, I emailed my thoughts on this to each of the council members. I received one very prompt, courteous and unbiased reply from a council member, which I was pleasantly surprised at. I also received a shockingly rude one from another council member. This is a direct quote from the email I received: “maam you are getting worked up over nothing. There have been no orders to slow down. Review council meeting of a couple of weeks ago for public verification of same.” Despite the abrupt and grammatically incorrect nature of the email, I gave this council member the benefit of the doubt and replied with this: “Thank you for your prompt reply. I am glad to hear construction is on schedule. As this is the case, I would simply re-iterate that there is no need to delay opening once the facility is ready.” I was surprised to hear back almost immediately from this council member again: “please bone up on this, preferably before you comment further. The construction isn’t everything, there is recertification and a new provincial act involved, which we are told on a new facility will be used. Staff are trying to determine the timing.” Well, Mr. Councillor, I decided to “bone up” on the issue. After reading the new act in which the regulations are updated for recertification and new facilities (www.lifesaving.bc.ca/node/1935), I am curious to know exactly which part of it is presenting a problem for council. Many of the potential problems should have been taken care of by this point, as much of it pertains to construction and permits regarding spray and wading pools. The rest of the roadblocks that I could see hinged directly on the principal operator of the facility once it is open (ie pool safety plan). This decision has not been made. Decide who will run it now, and the necessary planning could begin that much sooner. There are obviously many issues at hand here, and I appreciate that council must do its due diligence in the area of fiscal responsibility. But I ask the council and the public: What does “due diligence” look like when it comes to responding to the public, who voted for them in the first place? All other issues aside, I would hope that an apparently educated professional working in our community and on our behalf would have the sense to know how to respond appropriately. It seems in this case, however, I am wrong. S. Otke Penticton

immediate questions would be as follows: Would she entertain the idea of reconvening the Legislature and allow a free vote on the HST, as this would save about $30 million in the proposed useless June referendum? Coastal oil tanker issues should be on her agenda. Will she let the feds run an Alberta oil pipeline across B.C. to Prince Rupert based on the proviso that the feds supply matching funding to build a refinery at the Port of Prince Rupert and that the only export shipped from this refinery will be gasoline? BC Ferry fuel fiasco: Firstly, she would have to realize and admit that her predecessor, Gordon Campbell, messed up more on the BC Ferries development than the previous NDP debacle. Campbell built ships abroad that not only cost more, but are somewhat moth-balled at present as they consume 32 per cent more fuel than do the 40-plus-year-old ferries that are in service. Health care: It’s time to follow other provinces and get rid of ever-increasing “regressive” MSP premiums. To this end, adopt a “progressive” fee for service model that is capped at one per cent of income, has exemptions for poor and low-income patients, and regulations ensuring all patients receive treatment regardless

Columnist needs history lesson

Gwynne Dyer, a man whom media has built up, writes articles and books that are a very powerful weapon in that they could easily be accepted as the truth with this venerable acknowledgement. During the First World War, the British (Tavistock) learned that by manipulating information you could get 87 per cent of the population to accept it as truthful. This has become a well-perfected art that is used to determine people’s thinking, and form their opinions. What Gwynne said about Israel, the Arabs and Islam clearly shows that he either is indifferent about history; doesn’t like true history; or is intentionally trying to form people’s opinions with his misinterpretation of facts. History and facts of the Middle East paint a different picture than what the views of journalists form in our minds. In the 1700s Britain supplied weapons from their India colony to certain Wahhabis Muslim tribes near the Mecca area to destabilize the ruling Ottomans. After the Turks lost their empire because of poor choices of bedfellows during the First World War, the British and the French raced to get the Middle East. The French got the north while the British the south and Egypt. Britain then, for the first time since one Roman ruler 2,000 years previous called the area of Israel, Gaza, the West Bank and Jordan ‘Palestine’. Before that the people living there were thought of as Arabs (because they spoke Arabic) or Jews. They got along. Britain, with the usurping French, formed countries because of their nefarious allies. Saudi Arabia was formed and given to one Wahhabis Muslim ally, the Ibn Sauds. Not to leave the Hashemite Husseins empty handed, Britain formed Trans Jordan and installed one of their sons as king. The French formed a country in the north and called it Mesopotamia; another Roman name, and put another of the Hussein sons in charge of it. Name later changed to Iraq. My hope in writing this is to encourage you to be earnest to know the truth, and look into history yourselves. Don’t believe what you hear, read, see or even believe me without studying first what really happened. I’ve been privileged to live in Israel, the West Bank and Turkey, making good friends with Jews, Bedouins, Arabs, Druze and Turks. I learned a lot living with them, and that’s why I get so angry when I read misinformation. Terry Magnus Penticton

Youth wins UN visit

The United Nations Pilgrimage for Youth Competition was again held in the Summerland IOOF Hall on Feb. 19. Judges Bob Chalmers and Anne Kemp from

of ability to pay. Education: (Remembering that as education minister, she saw about 100 schools close) introduce “per student” funding for primary and secondary education. It should be scaled to each region. This would give parents and students more educational choice, and allow communities to choose which schools to support when there are closures. Educational outcomes could be improved for rural and lower-income students. The bonus here is that students, parents and teachers would be brought together to co-operate in the educational process, which currently puts teachers in the front lines of having to defend a system that is unaccountable to anyone. Whoa, wait a minute. Silly me, I shouldn’t even be thinking such thoughts. Our political system is somewhat unorthodox. Ms. Clark is leader in name only. She is not yet an MLA. Strange how someone can get behind the wheel of a bus without taking a test and getting a proper licence, isn’t it? Only in Canada and B.C. you say?

Summerland again provided their service and we were delighted that Sharon Cartmel from Penticton was available to assist us to make our third judge. Four students competed; three from Pen High (Jolene Hayter, Jelayna Ruthford and Dillon Brown) and one from Summerland Secondary (Ellen Ruthford). There were no students competing from Princess Margaret, which was disappointing. The winner of the competition was Jolene Hayter from Pen High and runner up was Jelayna Murdoch, also from Pen High. The winner will go on a trip in July to the United Nations in New York with other winners from the rest of Canada, U.S. and several from Europe. This will be the 63rd year that The Odd Fellows and Rebekah Lodges have sponsored this all-expense paid trip for a student in Grade 11 (must still have one year of high school to go). The Rebekah Lodge Faith #32 in Summerland with several members from Penticton has initiated this competition for the Okanagan. Last year, one student from Kelowna participated and won. There is a lot of work that goes into preparing for these ‘speak offs’ in hopes we will have an Okanagan student able to go on this trip. Each Lodge in B.C. works to have teas and flea markets, and we assist with the Light Up with our chili night and assist with the Summerland Fair in order to have our share of the funds by the end of each February to send an Okanagan student. We are also committed to providing bursaries each June for our secondary schools in Summerland and Penticton. We are a fraternal order committed to serve our communities, our young people and our elderly in need. We support visual research, arthritis, and we provide bursaries at an international, provincial and community level. We are very proud of our Okanagan students who have participated — this is the fifth winner in our area. We wish we had the funds to send them all because they are all dedicated and excellent students, Penticton, Summerland and Kelowna can be very proud of them. It was hard work, and required a lot of initiative and research. We wish we could send them all, they really deserve it, but we Rebekahs are in a recession just now too, so one student is all we have funds for. Maybe soon when finances pick up. But for now, thanks kids, you are great. We are proud of you all. This was our fourth year participating in the Okanagan, so until next year, thank you all. Burga Black Faith Rebekah Lodge #32 Summerland

Ron Barillaro Penticton

Farmers should provide for workers

It is extremely nice of Mr. Sardinha to rally for financial support from the farmers when every earlier attempt made has fallen on deaf ears. After all, it should be entirely the responsibility of the orchards to provide shelter and humane living conditions for the seasonal workers. Please, in these times of economic restraint with the HST already having shifted the main tax load onto the consumer, it is not fair to expect the taxpayer to finance this campground project. Are the people of Osoyoos aware of all the hidden costs involved? Now we are talking about a campground manager? Who is providing security and liability insurance? And what about next year? Our essential social programs are being cut on a daily basis, parking meters in the publicly financed hospital yard and the list goes on. To all the bleeding hearts that have made it their priority to help the orchards in avoiding their financial responsibility, please get your priorities straight. The free handouts are over and the government’s purse is closed. If you are looking to help I will suggest for you good Samaritans to take the initiative and start your own fundraisers to finance the costs and quit running to the taxpayer. Only once you have shown that you are truly dedicated to your cause and have raised the finances yourself, then it will be the right time for you to proceed. I have suggested an “adopt a potty” or “adopt a picker” program for everyone working on this project, but when it comes down to reality, nobody is willing to do anything. Fruit growers need to start taking responsibility for their workers, not us. They are the ones that need to provide for their workers with decent housing for humane living conditions, not us. Robert Fisher Penticton

We want to hear from you The Penticton Western News welcomes letters to the editor for publication. We suggest a maximum length of 400 words and reserve the right to edit letters for length, brevity, clarity, legality, abusive language, accuracy and good taste. All published letters remain the property of the Penticton Western News, which is the sole judge of suitability for publication. Letters must include the writer’s address and daytime phone number, which will not be published. Letters should be signed with the writer’s full name and be sent by e-mail to letters@pentictonwesternnews. com; mailed to the Penticton Western News, 2250 Camrose St., Penticton, B.C., V2A 8R1; or faxed to 492-9843.


8

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY BILL BARISOFF, MLA

MARCH 8, 2011

PENTICTON OKANAGAN VALLEY

HON. STOCKWELL DAY, MP Proud to serve as your Member of Parliament for Okanagan-Coquihalla

It has been my pleasure to represent the people of Penticton-Okanagan Valley in the British Columbia Legislature since 1996. CONSTITUENCY: 210 – 300 RIVERSIDE DR., PENTICTON, BC V2A 9C9 PH: 250-487-4400 bill.barisoff.mla@leg.bc.ca www.billbarisoffmla.bc.ca

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www.bodiesonpower.com 250-770-8303 102-500 Railway St., Penticton The Okanagan Teacher’s Union’s Social Justice Commitee is proud to celebrate women’s achievements - social, cultural, legal, economic, and beyond. OSTU Office: 250-492-4915 Social Justice Chair: - Lindsey Mennell 250-770-7600

“Nobody can make you feel inferior without your permission” ~ Eleanor Rooselvelt

Celebrating Women

We provide information, support, referral and advocacy for women and men in the South Okanagan-Similkameen. #209-304 Martin St., Penticton, BC V2A 5K4 Ph: 250-493-6822 Fax: 250-493-6827

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2250 Camrose Street Penticton, BC 250-492-3636 Fax: 250-492-9843

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International Women’s Day History Nears Centennial Anniversary PENTICTON – Every year on March 8, thousands of events are held around the world to inspire women and celebrate their achievements. The history of International Women’s Day spans nearly 100 years. During the early 1900s the oppression and inequality spurred women to be more vocal and active in campaigning for change. A number of protests were held in Europe and North America demanding voting rights, and shorter hours and better pay for working women.

Celebrate the collective power of women Past, Present & Future 8312 - 74th Avenue PO Box 1110 Osoyoos, BC V0H 1V0 Email: john.slater.mla@leg.bc.ca

In 1910, over 100 women from 17 countries attended an International Conference of Working Women in Copenhagen, Denmark. Clara Zetkin, leader of the Women’s Office of the German Social Democratic Party, suggests the idea of a day for women to celebrate and press for change around the world. The participants approved the proposal unanimously. The next year, the first International Women’s Day is honoured in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland on March 19. Over a million women and men take part in rallies for women’s right to work, vote, hold public office, and receive an education. A week later, in New York City the “Triangle Fire” kills over 40 immigrant factory women. This tragic event attracted attention to U.S. working conditions and labour laws.The current date for International Women’s Day is fixed to March 8, when Russian women campaigned for peace on the eve of World War I. Their protest takes place on the last Sunday in February. This date on Julian calendar in use in Russia at the time coincides with March 8 on the Gregorian calendar used elsewhere. Okanagan College will be hosting a number of events Tuesday to celebrate International Women’s Day. March 8 is internationally celebrated as Women’s Day and hundreds of events occur not only on this day but throughout the month to mark the economic, political and social achievements of women. The day also celebrates the empowerment of women through important roles such as community leaders, educators and policy-makers who work to bring positive and fundamental social, economic and political equality for women in Penticton. This year the Penticton and Area Women’s Centre is partnering with the Okanagan College Students Union and the South Okanagan Boundary Labour Council to host the event. Activities will be taking place in the Sunoka Foyer at Okanagan College from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year’s theme is United Nations and equal access to education. At 6 p.m. the evening events will start to celebrate the gains and achievements in gender equality in Canada and around the world while considering the work that remains. This will include an art show, live music, a local feminist poet, sharing stories, yoga, bellydancing, food and fair-trade coffee and hot chocolate.

John Slater , MLA Boundary Similkameen

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9

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

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INCENDIES March 10th

Shatford shows its spirit

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Set against the dark pages of the Lebanese civil war, this film follows the journey of twin siblings whose deceased mother left two astonishing envelopes in her Will: one addressed to a father they thought was long dead and the other to a brother they never knew existed. They travel to their mother’s homeland in search of the truth and eventually piece together a heartbreaking story of exceptional courage. This is a visually poetic, thematically complex, masterful film experience. (14A - subtitled)

ished off their Spirit week festival with a party, opening the doors of the heritage building to the community and offering creative activities for all ages, like fiveyear-old Lorna Dagg (left), trying her hand at painting, Nywyn Jefferson (above) leading imagination play for the kids or vegan chef Aja Jackson trying her hand at drumming.

Tickets: $12 each available at the Penticton Art Gallery, 199 Marina Way (250-493-2928) and the Book Shop, 242 Main Street (250-492-6661). Limited tickets at the door.

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oscar-nominated film from director Denis Villeneuve. dead and the other to a brother they never knew existed. They travel to their mother’s homeland in search of the truth and eventually piece together a heartbreaking story of exceptional courage. Simon is unmoved by the posthumous mind

games of a mother who was always distant and cold. However, the love he has for his sister is strong, and he soon joins her in combing their ancestral homeland in search of a woman who is very different from the mother they knew.

Tickets for the film, which screens at 4 and 7 p.m. on March 10 in the Pen-Mar are $12 each and available at the Penticton Art Gallery and the Book Shop on Main Street. Limited tickets at the door may be available at the door.

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For the second feature of the Spring season, the Kitchen Stove Film Festival is bringing the Oscar-nominated Incendies to the screen at the Pen Mar theatre. While the film didn’t win the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, it’s not short on awards or nominations. It’s up for 10 awards at the Genies, including Best Motion Picture and it’s already won top honours at both the Toronto and Vancouver International Film Festivals. An adaptation of Wajdi Mouawad’s prizewinning play, Incendies, is a moving comingof-age story that brings the horror of war to a personal level, examin-

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Kitchen Stove starts blaze in theatre ing the scars left by the cycle of violence and the power of the will to survive. The play premiered in France in 2003 and has since been staged all over the world, including Canada. Incendies is the fourth feature-length film from director and screenwriter Denis Villeneuve and is a Canada-France co-production that was shot in Quebec and Jordan. Set against the dark pages of the Lebanese civil war, this film follows the journey of twin siblings, Jeanne and Simon Marwan (Mélissa Désormeaux-Poulin, Maxim Gaudette), whose deceased mother left two astonishing envelopes in her will: one addressed to a father they thought was long

Academy Award Nomination ~ Best Foreign Language Film

Director: Denis Villeneuve Cast: Lubna Azabal, Mélissa Désormeaux-Poulin, Maxim Gaudette

Steve Kidd/Western News

Western News Staff

at 4 p.m. & 7 p.m. at the Pen-Mar Cinema

Greetings, On International Women’s Day CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION, MARCH 8, 2011 United Nations declared International Women’s Day, 2011 as “Access to Education”

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Phone: 778-476-5771

Email: soblc@shaw.ca


10

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Arts & Entertainment Diamond coming to Peachfest T. G . I . F. Western News Staff

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Penticton Peach Festival has announced that B.C.’s own award-winning children’s entertainer Charlotte Diamond will be the headline act for children’s day at the annual festival. This year’s festival runs from Aug. 3-7, with Kiddies Day on the final Sunday. The day begins with the Kiddies Day Parade, a smaller version of the festival’s grande parade. Children up to age 12 are encouraged to create colourful costumes for themselves, their tricycles, bicycles and wagons and parade from the city centre parking lot to Okanagan Lake Park, where prizes will be given out for best costumes in the different age groups. Following that parade, Diamond takes to the main stage in Okanagan Lake Park, with new songs and dances for her fans, as well as favourites like I am a Pizza and Four Hugs a Day. More information and regular updates are available on the Peachfest website at www.peachfest.com

Entertainment BARLEY MILL PUB — Karaoke 2.0 every Wednesday and Friday at 8:30 p.m. Thursday: Big Slick Poker at 7 p.m. Watch sports on 23 TVs and one 11-foot screen. COPPER MUG PUB — Big Slick Poker on Sundays at 7 p.m. GREY SAGE PUB — Free pool every Sunday, poker and prizes every Tuesday, music bingo every Wednesday and karaoke every Thursday in the OK Falls Hotel. Sports on the big screen. VOODOO’S — Thursday Night Blues Jam hosts an incredible lineup of musicians from the South Okanagan, both pro and amateur, including horns, harmonica players and a number of the best guitarists, drummers and singers in the area. Submitted photo

POPULAR CHILDREN’S entertainer Charlotte Diamond will be headlining Kiddies Day at the 2011 Peachfest.

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Zia’s Stonehouse in Summerland is offering a helping hand to the Summerland Asset Development Initiative, aiding them in raising some much-needed cash by hosting a fundraising dinner for the youth opportunity program.

For the evening of March 8, Zia’s owners Shannon and Claude Ferlizza have donated their restaurant, staff and food to help the local organization out. “I have children and I see what SADI does for the community,” said Shannon. “Having a safe place for youth in a small

town is an important thing.” SADI is a youthdriven movement that provides opportunities, activities and support for Summerland youth and families. Funds raised during the evening will help support the operations of the Unity Youth Club, a safe place where

Final Notice: Hired Equipment Registration Okanagan Shuswap District The Okanagan Shuswap District of the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure is creating its list of registered Equipment for Hire for the fiscal year of 2011/2012, which begins April 1, 2011. This area geographically covers the area from the United States border, east to Osoyoos, west of Princeton and north of Salmon Arm. All individuals or companies registered in 2010 will have received invitations by mail to re-register hired equipment for 2011. If you have new equipment to be added to your profile, you can register online at www.bcbid.ca or contact the District Office in Kelowna to obtain the appropriate forms. Any individuals who were not registered in 2009/2010, but wish to have equipment listed are hereby invited to contact the District Office, either in person or by phone, to obtain the appropriate registration forms. Note that while you do not need to have Commercial (Comprehensive) General Liability Insurance, or up-to-date WorkSafe BC coverage to register, you will have to meet these requirements prior to working on any ministry projects. Only owned or lease-to-own equipment is eligible for registration. Equipment may only be registered in one area in any given year. Seniority is not transferable from area to area. The deadline for new registrations for the 2011/2012 fiscal year is midnight on Friday, March 18, 2011. Late registrations will be accepted, but may appear at the bottom of the open list. Note that there is no charge for registering new equipment, or for changing or deleting equipment information already listed. Register through the Okanagan Shuswap District Office at: 1358 St. Paul Street, Suite 300, Kelowna You can also phone 250 712-3660 or send a fax to 250 712-3669 to have the forms mailed or faxed to you.

youth can gather in a supportive environment. The youth club currently accommodates over 650 drop-in monthly visits, with structured activities that operate at full capacity, often with waiting lists. The evening will feature a three-course dinner, live music featuring Summerland youth and a live and silent auction, all hosted by the evening’s emcee, Summerland Mayor Janice Perrino. Organizers say they have received tremendous support from the business community in Summerland and Penticton, who have donated a wide variety of auction items. Live auction items include a dozen bottles of wine from Bottleneck Drive and Summergate wineries, a romance package including two nights at the Waterfront Hotel and couples’ aromatherapy massages from Beyond Wrapture. The silent auction includes Apex ski passes, scrapbooking and cooking baskets, a Thornhaven Winery basket and gift certificates for Zumba, Primo Pizza, Lakeshore Fitness, Penmar, Dream Café, bellydancing and suntanning. Tickets can be purchased at the SADI Unity Youth Club and Willowbrook Lane. For more information, check online at www.sadi.ca or contact Michelle Stefan at 250494-9722.

Concerts March 4 — Blackberry Wood is back in Penticton for a visit to VooDoo’s, bringing a high-energy cabaret spin on old and modern music adding spicy flavours like exotic world beats, jumpin’ ska, folk, punk and many others mixed into their magic combination of altcountry-gypsy-circus music. March 11 — The Foothills Brass Quintet, sponsored by South Okanagan Concert Society, performs at 8 p.m. in the Venables Auditorium in Oliver. Serious fun, quality musicianship, entertainment, variety and high energy. Tickets available at the door or Beyond Bliss in Oliver. March 12 — Neil Young Tribute band Forever Young will be covering four decades of Young’s music at 8 p.m. in Summerland’s Centre Stage Theatre. Tickets available at Classic Guitars in Penticton or The Beanery in Summerland. March 16 — A taste of Canadian country music is coming to the Barking Parrot at the Penticton Lakeside Resort with a visit by Shane Yellowbird, fresh off his first appearance on stage at Nashville’s Grand Ole Opry. March 19 — Accomplished Canadian guitarist and multi-instrumentalist Steve Dawson specializes in slide and fingerstyle guitar, pedal steel, lap steel, banjo and other stringed instruments and he is headed to Penticton for a gig at the Dream Café. March 5 — The Get Bent Active Arts Society is offering a sneak peek of their 2011 Bollywood Bellydance Tour at 2 p.m. on the Cannery Stage in Penticton. Tickets for the fundraising event are available at Get Bent Yoga and Bellydancing (inside the Cannery) for $15 or at the door.

Events March 5 — Dinner and dance to ABBA tribute band ABRA Cadabra at the Penticton Lakeside Resort for the annual Women Front and Centre awards gala, marking SOWINS’ 30th anniversary. More info at 250-488-0825 or e-mail donna@ sowins.com. March 19 — Ballet Kelowna brings their spring 2011 tour, Actions Consequences, featuring Auguste Bournonville’s The Flower Festival Pas de Deux and Dvorak Dances, an evocation of Czech composer Antonin Dvorak’s music at 7:30 p.m. in Summerland’s Centre Stage Theatre. March 26 — Ken Smedley and the George Ryga Centre present An Evening In Ol’ Mexico with music from Vancouver’s Mariachi Los Dorados, fresh from an appearance at the International Festival of Mariachis, in Guadalajara, Mexico. Tickets for the 8 p.m. concert at Centre Stage Theatre are available at Martin’s Flowers in Summerland and The Dragon’s Den in Penticton. More info at www.ryga.org.


Arts & Entertainment

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Flick swings from action to blandness

t could’ve been worse. He could’ve been a vampire. And really, I Am Number Four sort of looks like your runof-the-mill sci-fi ride, infiltrated by the spirit of this generation’s sensitive bloodsuckers. Thanks Twilight. Thanks a bunch. Based on the novel by Jobie Hughes and James Frey, I Am Number Four is a collision between an angstridden teen movie and an adrenaline-jammed action flick. Brit Alex Pettyfer (who took an earlier swing at a franchise with Alex Rider: Stormbreaker, only to strike out) plays the lead as John, one of nine ‘gifted’ children rescued from his home planet when it was overrun by Mogadorians, the gruesome baddies still hunting him on our turf. Paradise, Ohio, is the exact battleground. That’s where John (real name Daniel, by the way) is hiding out, attending high school, flirting with an attractive girl (Diana Agron, Glee), dodging her bully-jock ex-boyfriend

11

DDDDDD

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Gift

Certificates

Downtown Downtow Down wnto tow wn PPenticton wn entititict en ict cto ton - 376 Main Ma St. (next to TD Bank) 250-493-8823

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JOHN (ALEX PETTYFER) and Number Six (Teresa Palmer) are aliens hiding out on earth, battling teen-

407 Main St. * Penticton, B.C. * 250-493-1513

age angst and enemies sent to destroy them in I Am Number Four, a new thriller from Dreamworks.

(Jake Abel) and trying to live a normal life. Or as normal as you can get when you’ve got glowing palms and you’re the target of ray guns, alien torture balls and some kind of lizard tracking dogs. Director D.J. Caruso (Disturbia) knows how to slap together a relatively suspenseful film, and I Am Number Four is no exception — when it has to cook, it cooks. But it’s also, given the potential for some real edge, surprisingly bland. Perhaps it’s

JASON ARMSTRONG AISLE SEAT

because the presentation borrows so many elements from so many movies. I Am Number Four often resembles a highlight reel from

everything from The Fantastic Four to Percy Jackson. It just doesn’t have its own identity. It is loud and energetic enough to escape dullsville, though. It ain’t great … but it ain’t exactly a number two either. Out of a possible five stars, I’ll give I Am Number Four a two and a half. The feature is currently playing at the Pen-Mar Cinema Centre in Penticton.

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Jason Armstrong is a movie reviewer living in the Okanagan.

Around the Okanagan with a book

T

omorrow is World Book Night. More than 20,000 book lovers are gathering in London’s Trafalgar Square to meet big name authors such as Alan Bennett and Margaret Atwood. Throngs of people will cheer on authors in a frenzy to get their hands on thousands of free books. I can’t make it across the pond for the big party, but to show solidarity I’m having my own low-key armchair soiree. With a glass of bubbly, I’ll curl up with a new favourite: a book that reflects my home focus and at the same time, is truly worth celebrating. This choice is Grandma Wears Hiking Boots by Kelowna author Laurie Carter. There’s no doubt that the world is full of more dramatic or historically important places than the Okanagan. But still, our valley is special in its own right. In Grandma Wears Hiking Boots, Carter pens a

collection of personal journeys around the valley, exploring everything from the best place to hike with kids to best lunch spots and places to brush up on Okanagan history. Carter’s often humorous experiences go beyond peaches and beaches: She skydives, picks mushrooms, snowshoes, sips tea and visits the Okanagan’s best pumpkin patch. The book is accompanied by beautiful photos, directions and maps, but it’s the personal touch in each of these short entries that sets the book apart from other travelogues. In the Let’s Eat section, Carter recounts a time she and her husband grumbled aloud while rattling the locked door of their favourite Indian restaurant in Oliver. About to give up, a voice called from above. “Perched high on a ladder a bearded man in a green turban smiled down at us,” writes Carter. He climbed

HEATHER ALLEN 100 MILE BOOK CLUB

down, opened the restaurant and prepared them a home-cooked meal. “Talk about service and beyond!” My daughter once left her favourite toy at this restaurant. When we went to pick it up, the owner had it set aside with a box of homemade sweets. In Grandma Wears Hiking Boots I enjoyed reading about many familiar places. But even for us locals, there’s much in these pages that’s new. Carter originally thought the book would appeal only to baby boomers like herself. She has been pleas-

antly surprised. “It’s beyond what I expected or hoped for,” she said. “The book is appealing to the generation beyond the boomers, who are using it more for armchair travel. Young parents with kids love the short entries and people new to the valley are reading the stories as a way to get in and learn about their new home.” Carter is obviously someone who enjoys conversing with and learning from all sorts of people. I imagine her flitting like a songbird from one branch of interests to the next. “The book was really a chance to bring together an awful lot of information I’ve gathered over the years and put it in one place,” she said. Whether you’re a local or a tourist in town for the weekend, you’ll find something here to cheer about.

Heather Allen is a writer and reader who lives in Penticton. allenh@telus.net

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12

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Life

School reducing its waste STEVE KIDD Western News Staff

March 15th Vernon Wesbild Centre produced by: Autopoetic Ideas

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A Penticton elementary school has made changes to its hot lunch program that is not only reducing the amount of styrofoam and plastic waste they are creating, but saving them money over the long term. Local filmmaker Jan Vozenilek calls it a fantastic success story. Last year, he said, the daily hot lunch program at Queen’s Park Elementary consisted of almost 200 kids using all disposable styrofoam plates and utensils for their lunches. “This was every day, three full garbage bins of waste,” said Vozenilek, who showed a video of the 200 kids dumping their plates into the garbage to the Okanagan Skaha board of education, shot when he did a presentation there. “I guess they got the point and they funded Queen’s Park over $1,000 to buy stainless steel plates and cutlery. They called it a pilot project,” he said. “Today, all of this is washed in the dishwasher and there is no waste.” According to Rob Zoppi, principal of the

2111 Main Street 250.492.6708

www.CherryLane.ca

Steve Kidd/Western News

JAN VOZENILEK shows a group of Kaleden Elementary students some of the bits and pieces of plastic trash he collected during his journey to Midway Island to document the albatrosses that are dying there after ingesting the floating trash, thinking it was food.

school, they were spending almost $800 a year on the styrofoam plates. “I didn’t know anything happened at the school until I talked to the principal,” said Vozenilek. “It’s just a small little step, but what if every school in the district did that? What if every school in the province did that? It doesn’t take much.” Queen’s Park was one of the schools that Vozenilek has brought his presentation to, using his work documenting the plight of albatrosses nesting on Midway Island in the Pacific. Ocean currents drive masses of floating plastic garbage

to the area and, mistaking it for food, the birds scoop it up to both feed on it and feed to their young. With bellies filled with plastic, the birds are dying by the hundreds. Using his films along with images of the birds, their rotting carcasses exposing the plastic inside as a starting point, Vozenilek traces the path of the plastic back to its starting point. “That’s really the full circle that I now try to paint in these little talks that I do. I work it back with the river system and bring it right back here,” he said. “We talk about walking along the shores of our own lake here on

Oliver getting in the game Some of the world’s best Crokinole players will soon be making tracks to Oliver. The third annual B.C. Open Crokinole Championship Tournament will be held March 19 at the Oliver Community Centre. “This year we will

once again welcome players from Washington, Ontario and the western provinces to our community to compete in this event that has caught the attention of some of the best Crokinole players in the world,” said Carol Sheridan, Oliver recreation program manager.

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the beaches of Penticton, or the channel, and you find the same kind of garbage on the shores of our lake as you find out on Midway.” Vozenilek shows the students what they experienced on Midway, then focuses on solutions locally and what various school groups have already done, attempting to inspire them that they could do the same. “We’re just as responsible here to have an impact on the environment globally,” he said. “The kids just get it. It’s a really simple thing for them. They look at the problem and they instantly jump to the solution.”

to the Sales Team. Andrew would like to invite his friends and past customers to visit him for all their vehicle needs.

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Crokinole is an action board game similar to both shuffleboard and curling, reduced to table-top size. Players take turns shooting discs across the circular playing surface, trying to have their discs land in the higher-scoring regions of the board, while also attempting to knock away opposing discs. Players of all experience levels are invited, from those who come to compete to those who just play for fun. Over $1,700 will be awarded in cash prizes as well as trophies, numerous door prizes and great raffle draws. Tournament registration packages are available online at www.oliverrecreation.ca, or call 250-498-4985 to register by phone. Register before March 4 to get the early bird rate.


13

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

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14

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

15

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

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ON NOW AT YOUR BC BUICK GMC DEALERS. 1-800-GM-DRIVE. GMC is a brand of General Motors of Canada. */x/†/††/∞ Offers apply to the purchase of a Canyon Crew SLE 4WD (R7A), 2011 Terrain SLE FWD (R7A), 2011 Acadia SLE1 FWD (R7A), 2011 equipped as described. Freight included ($1,450). License, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees and taxes not included. Dealers are free to set individual prices. Offers valid to May 2, 2011. Limited time offers which may not be combined with other offers, and are subject to change without notice. Offers apply to qualified retail customers in the BC GMC Dealer Marketing Association area only. Dealer order (2011MY only) or trade may be required. X$7,000/$2,200 manufacturer to dealer delivery credit available on 2011 MY GMC Canyon Crew SLE 4WD/2011 Acadia SLE1 FWD (tax exclusive) for retail customers only. Other cash credits available on most models. See your GM dealer for details. †5.19% purchase financing offered by TD Financing Services, OAC. Down payment or trade may be required.Monthly payment will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $10,000 at 5.19% APR, monthly payment is $162 for 84 months. Cost of borrowing is $1,659.11, total obligation is $11,659.11. Interest applies for entire financing term. ††Variable rate financing for 84 months on 2011 Terrain and Acadia on approved credit. Bi-Weekly paymentand variable rate shown based on current TD Finance prime rate and is subject to fluctuation; actual payment amounts will vary with rate fluctuations. Example: $10,000 at 3% for 84 months, the monthly payment is $132. Cost of borrowing is $1,099, total obligation is $11,099. Down payment and/or trade may be required. Monthly payments and cost of borrowing will also vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Biweekly payments based on a purchase prices of $27,998/$34,998 with $2,099/$2,499 down on Terrain/Acadia, equipped as described. ∞Offer applies to most new or demonstrator 2011 GM vehicles, excluding PDJ Trucks and Camaro Convertible, delivered between February 1 and May 2, 2011 at participating dealers in Canada. Dealer order or trade may be required. Retail customers will receive up to $1,000 (tax exclusive) (Cruze LS-1SB is eligible for $1,000 all other Cruze models and Aveo will receive $500), to be used towards the purchase of genuine GM Accessories and Options. Installation not included. Alternatively, the $1,000 manufacturer-to-dealer Customize Your Ride Event credit (tax exclusive) ($500 for Chevrolet Cruze and Aveo) may be applied to the vehicle purchase price. This offer may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without notice. Conditions and limitations apply. See your GM dealer for details. ◊U.S. Government star ratings are part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) New Car Assessment Program (NCAP). For more information on safety ratings, go to www.safercar.gov. WBased on Natural Resources Canada’s 2010 Fuel Consumption Guide ratings. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. ~2011 GMC Terrain FWD equipped with standard 2.4L ECOTEC I-4 engine. Fuel consumption ratings based on GM testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Competitive fuel ratings based on Natural Resources Canada’s 2010 Fuel Consumption Guide. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. **Based on 2010 Energuide submissions/competitive websites. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. Excludes other GM vehicles. 2011 data unavailable at time of print. *†2010 GMC Canyon 4WD with 2.9L with either a 5 speed manual or 4 speed automatic transmission based on GM testing in accordance with approved Transport Canada test methods. Competitive information based on 2010 Natural resources Canada Fuel Consumption Ratings. Your actual consumption may vary. +To qualify for GMCL’s Cash For Clunkers incentive, you must: (1) receive Government confirmation of vehicle eligibility under the Retire Your Ride (“RYR”) Program, supported by The Government of Canada, and turn 1995 or older MY vehicle that is in running condition and has been registered and properly insured in your name for the last 6 months; (2) turn in a 1995 or older MY vehicle that is in running condition and has been registered and properly insured under a small business name for the last 6 months; or (3) turn in a 1996 through 2003 MY vehicle that is in running condition and has been registered and properly insured in your name for the last 6 months.GMCL will provide eligible consumers with a manufacturer to consumer incentive (tax inclusive) to be used towards the purchase/finance/lease of a new eligible 2010 or 2011 MY Buick/Chevrolet/GMC/Cadillac vehicle delivered between January 4 and March 31, 2011. Ineligible Chevrolet vehicles: Aveo, 2010 Cobalt, Cruze, 2011 Buick Regal and Medium Duty trucks. Incentive ranges from $750 to $2,000, depending on model purchased. Incentive may not be combined with certain other offers. By participating in the Cash For Clunkers program you will not be eligible for any trade-in value for your vehicle. See your participating GM dealer for additional program conditions and details. GMCL may modify, extend or terminate program in whole or in part at any time without notice. If you successfully complete the RYR Program, you will be eligible for a $300 cash incentive from the Canadian Government. Residents of Northwest Territories, Yukon or Nunavut are excluded from the RYR Program and are therefore ineligible for GMCL’s Cash For Clunkers incentive. Visit www.retireyourride.ca for more information

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16 PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

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Sports

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PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Sports Editor: Emanuel Sequeira • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 224 • E-mail: sports@pentictonwesternnews.com

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JUMPING FOR GOLD —Penticton’s Caitlyn Nyhus (8), who was named Player of the Match for the UBC-O Heat, celebrates as the Heat won provincial gold in ďŹ ve sets against the Vancouver Island University Mariners on Feb. 25. The Heat’s men’s volleyball team won gold in four sets with the help of Penticton’s Nate Speijer, who was named Men’s volleyball Athlete of the Week as he was a big reason the Heat won. Speijer led all players with 14 points (12 kills, two blocks) with a .380 attack efďŹ ciency on Feb. 25 and 18 points (14 kills, 2 aces, 2 blocks) with a .250 attack efďŹ ciency and on Feb. 26. Speijer helped close the door on the Columbia Bible College Bearcats tallying six of the last seven points of the match from the service line.

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Roller derby arrives in Penticton What’s your excuse now? EMANUEL SEQUEIRA Western News Staff

If you love hockey, there’s a good chance you will feel the same about roller derby. At least that’s what Ainsley Mosienko believes. Mosienko, also known as Robin Banks on the competitive track, is the chief executive officer of the Rock N’ Roller Derby featuring the Reign Valley Vixens (Abbotsford) and the Kootenay Cannibelles (Nelson) that will take place at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre on March 12. With 900 tickets available, Mosienko believes the event will be an easy sell in the Peach City. “It’s fast paced with contact,� said Mosienko, who is an all-star with the Peach Tarts in Kelowna and the granddaughter of Bill Mosienko, who scored three goals for the Chicago Black Hawks in 21 seconds. “Girls really get into it.� Presented by the S.S. Rodeo, the objective is to promote the sport in the community and attract more players. The S.S. Rodeo, which is based in Penticton, has a bank track, which will be put in the South Okanagan Events Centre and is the first one in Canada. Mosienko said what is interesting about the track

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is it can be taken apart and placed in different locations. There will be another game in Penticton on April 23. Justy Bee, who becomes Maude LoBrowski on the track, is excited about the event. “It’s the first time my family will get to see me play,� said Bee, who came up with her derby name as she loves the movie the Big Lebowski. “I hope it will be a hit. Games sell out all the time.� Because the sport has been able to attract audiences in other cities, Bee sees no reason the same results won’t happen in Penticton. “We just want to spread the sport,� said Bee, who will play with the Vixens

and will be joined by local Adrienne Hartviksen. “It will be amazing games. The blockers are going to have to work hard to stop the jammers.� Mosienko said that good games are decided by five to 10 points. How it works is there are two jammers and it’s their responsibility to score points by busting through the blockers. Jammers are quick and agile. Once they pass through the group a second time they can start scoring points. There are two 30-minute periods. Jammers wear helmets with a star and that responsibility can be passed on to another player. Bee, who has been playing the sport for over a year, likes being part of

the atmosphere and that it’s an aggressive sport. She also enjoys the camaraderie that comes with it. She is intrigued by the physical aspect as she has been involved with martial arts and has a black belt in taekwondo. “I fell in love with it,� said Bee, adding that hockey players make good roller derby players. Bee added that for spectators unfamiliar with the sport, brochures will be given at the game. Tickets are $15 and kids five and under are free. They are available at the SOEC box office, the Wine Country and Visitor Centre, by phone at 1-877-SOEC-TIX (763-2849) or at www. valleyfirsttix.com.

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PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

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VEES GOALIE Joel Rumpel will have to deal with talented Salmon Arm SilverBacks such as Brett Knowles when their second round in the BCHL playoffs begins on Tuesday.

SilverBacks coach excited for tilt with Vees

on 17 chances. Pierce commented on the offensive depth Salmon Arm possesses. “Mike Hammond is a leading scorer in our league, Tim Kehler is sure fans will be in for a treat when is a very dangerous player,” said Pierce, of the Brett the Penticton Vees and Salmon Arm SilverBacks do Hull trophy winner. “You can’t spend time focusing on battle in the second round. one or two guys. They have depth through their lineup The SilverBacks coach has already begun his game up front that can score and their defenceman are very plan when his team meets the Vees for Game 1 as active. They play a very up-tempo game.” the BCHL playoffs continue. Kehler feels two of the Pierce thinks it’s going to be a good matchup. He league’s best teams will be on display. said it’s power against power with this matchup and “This is what the BCHL is all about,” said Kehler, noted goaltending is going to be a huge factor. In the who won the Joe Tenant Memorial trophy as coach of post-season, Brett Knowles leads with SilverBacks the year for the Interior Conference of his excitement for with three goals and 10 points. The Vees will also face the series. “It’s two teams that can play the game with a a familiar face in Brad Reid, who played for the club lot of pace. They have the skill set to move puck. Both in 2008-09. Laleggia leads the Vees in offence with six teams have defenceman that can join in the scoring. points in four games, while four others collected five Nobody has done it better than (Joey) Laleggia this year. against the Quesnel Millionaires. Should make for great, exciting, skillful hockey.” “It could turn out to one of those series where last Like the Vees, the SilverBacks swept their first shot wins,” said Pierce, who will take time off work round opponents, the Merritt Centennials, but were during the offseason to get married in May. “Turnovers given a tougher test. Kehler said the series was how the are critical. They (SilverBacks) take pucks that you scores indicated, close. Aside from a Game 1 blowout turn over and they turn them into offensive chances. (7-2), all the games were decided by a goal and one You can dominate the game for five to 10 minutes went into overtime. and you give them one opportunity and then they can “Merritt played really well,” he said. “They gave score.” us a good, competitive first round series, which I was Kehler sees similarities between his club and the happy that we were able to persevere. Playoff hockey is Vees in that both have depth and scoring through four about winning close games.” lines. Kehler knows attention must be paid to all the Centennials coach-general manager Luke Pierce felt Vees’ forwards. He is also interested to see how matchhis club made strides. ups unfold and is putting his plan together. In looking “Game 1 wasn’t good,” said Pierce. “Game 2, I at the regular season series stats, the SilverBacks had thought we outplayed them for a portion of that. Likely the edge in record at 3-2-1-0, while the goals for were deserved a better fate. We wanted to gain the experience equal at 21. of trying to win a round, at least win a game and learn “I think we’re both going to count on exceptional what it was going to take for our group. I think it was a goaltending and just execute at key times,” said Kehler. good season for us.” “We expect it to be a great series. We really respect the What the Centennials discovered is the SilverBacks skill level and the depth of the Vees roster. It will be a have a dangerous power play, which scored four times great matchup.” scored his third goal of the playIronman alumni offs on the power play, which David Snyder, a retired was the winner. Coyotes goalie Penticton High School English Kyle Laslo made 19 saves for teacher, has undertaken a project the shutout. The Coyotes also to write a book in celebration defeated the Chiefs 5-2 in Game of Pen High’s 100th anniversary gmail.com. Those emailing are 1, 5-0 in Game 2 and Game 3 3-2 coming up this year. Within the book, Snyder will mention Pen asked to include their graduation in overtime. After eight games, High graduates that have suc- year and the year or years of Martine leads with 15 points cessfully completed the Ironman Ironman Canada they completed. while Laslo has a sparkling 0.96 goals against average with .953 Canada triathlon race. If you have save percentage. The Coyotes KIJHL playoffs or know someone that has comOn Tuesday, the Osoyoos now face the Revelstoke Grizzlies pleted Ironman Canada, email Martina Zamecnik, who is help- Coyotes dumped the Kelowna who pounded the Kamloops ing Snyder with this part of the Chiefs 5-0 to sweep their best- Storm 10-4 on Wednesday to project, at ironmancanadapenhi@ of-seven series. Ross Mancuso clinch the series 4-1. EMANUEL SEQUEIRA Western News Staff

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19

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Sports

Wanted

Athlete of the Week Do you know someone who should be the Western News Athlete of the Week? If so email sports editor Emanuel Sequeira a brief discription and a photo to sports@ pentictonwesternnews.com.

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GREAT WINGS — Penticton Dairy Queen Pee Wee Wings defeated Dynamic Refrigeration 4-3 to win the City Cup. The Wings are as follows left to right: Back row — Coach Kevin Stevenson, Skyler Lamontagne, Brayden Jones, Tyler Koppe, Emma Roos, Sierra Voeller, coach Leslie Roos and coach Albert Warkentin. Middle Row — Carson Stocker, Manny Bahniwal. Front Row — Alec Simmons, Katelynn Roos, Austin Milanovic, Todd Corrie, Connor Graham, Ryan Stubban, DJ Warkentin, Nate Lamontagne, Finn Kennedy and Colton Stevenson.

Real playoff test for Vees begins S

eparation has begun in the BCHL playoffs as the pretenders are left behind from the contenders. The Penticton Vees swept aside the Quesnel Millionaires, as did the Salmon Arm SilverBacks with the Merritt Centennials (my apologies to Centennials coach Luke Pierce if you’re reading this, my sucking up comes later). In the Coastal Conference, the Surrey Eagles got rid of the Coquitlam Express, outscoring them by a 18-5 margin, while the Langley Chiefs sent the Alberni Valley Bulldogs home in four, outscoring them 19-11, with two games decided in extra time. The Vees series went as I expected, though the Millionaires put pressure on in Game 3 only to blow it. The Vees found a way to win and kudos to them. However, in round two, they will get a true test with the SilverBacks. Hopefully James Polk, who scored nine times in the regular season, already has three in the playoffs, doesn’t have similar results as Stefan Nicholishen. The former Vee had a strong series against the Centennials last year scoring twice, then didn’t find the back of the net again. To Polk’s credit, he is a better player. It’s important for strong teams to rid themselves of weaker opponents quickly because it helps eliminate the question if they are serious Fred Page Cup contenders

EMANUEL SEQUEIRA SEQUEIRA’S STANCE

or not. It’s also important to avoid injuries if possible, which wasn’t the case for the Vees. Brendan O’Donnell only saw action in Game 1 of the series, while Mark MacMillan played seven periods and didn’t dress for Game 4 for precautionary reasons. Any time a team struggles against a weaker opponent, you have to wonder how they will perform against the top dogs. It has been known for weak teams to play harder as to prove their worth against elite foes. A good example of that was the series between the SilverBacks and Centennials. Aside from the SilverBacks’ 7-2 blowout win in Game 1, the remaining three games were decided by a goal, with one decided in overtime. It was a test that SilverBacks coach Tim Kehler was glad his team faced. Merritt improved this season and has earned the respect of strong clubs. I have doubt in the Vees after watching them tie Prince George 2-2 in their second-last game of

the season. Vees coachgeneral manager Fred Harbinson felt differently as he liked how his team played and credited Spruce Kings goalie Kirk Thompson’s play against them. There is no doubt that goalies can steal a game, and even a series for teams — just ask the Washington Capitals and Pittsburgh Penguins, who lost to the Montreal Canadiens last year in the playoffs. However, their performance could have been better. The talent is there for the Vees to be successful in the playoffs. They have the right captain in Derik Johnson, who needs to be more careful of not taking unnessary penalties. They have offensive weapons in Joey Benik, MacMillan, O’Donnell, Garrett Milan, Laleggia and the list goes on. They also have physical players in Logan Johnston, who is having a strong playoff thus far, Joey Holka, Milan who always plays bigger than his five-foot-eight, 155-pound frame. There is also Mark Hall, who thrives on taking the body, Johnson, Paul Bezzo and Kyle Beaulieu. There isn’t too much of a shortage of being able to play physical, it’s doing it consistently. The Vees are proud of the fact they are the biggest team in the league and they added to it with local product Carter Rigby (six-feet, 210 pounds), who enjoys throwing the body, and has passed Michael Betz (six-foot-two, 205 pounds) on the depth chart. If the Vees show the hunger to

win the BCHL title they have talked about all season, yes, call them true contenders. Emanuel Sequeira is the sports editor of the Penticton Western News.

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PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Business New store to pamper your pooches KRISTI PATTON Western News Staff

Zeina Elgazzar jumps, literally, when people ask about her dogs. As she quickly strides across the room to show off pictures of her “two boys” the passion to provide services to other Penticton dog-lovers is evident. It is why she came up with the business idea Okanagan K9, a dog boutique that opened this week. “Having my own two dogs I felt there was a lack of services available to them in terms of daycare and various therapies,” said Elgazzar, who has lived in Penticton for 13 years. “There is a large dog population here, over 3,000 tags were sold through the city, and I just strongly feel the service is needed here.” Working with the Community Futures entrepreneurship program Elgazzar put the ideas she had been dreaming up for years onto paper. With Community Futures support and the assistance of the mentorship program Elgazzar developed her business idea and found a location, taking the first steps for Okanagan K9 opening as a boutique. Right now the store has a number of Canadian-made dog accessories from leashes, beds, eco-friendly toys and locally-made treats. Okanagan K9 is also an exclusive dealer in the Valley of a product called blanketID, a dog tag system where pet owners register their tag online with photos, contact numbers and any special care guidance so that if your pet is lost it will automatically send out a email to local SPCA’s, animal hospitals, shelters and other blanketID members. BlanketID owners can log onto their unique ID number whenever they want to update their pets information. Elgazzar and general man-

Annual chamber meeting upcoming

Mark Brett/Western News

OWNER ZEINA ELGAZZAR (left) and general manager Maxine Steil of Okanagan K9 at the counter of their new business in Penticton which offers a variety of services to dog owners throughout the region.

“We encourage people to come down and see the location and please bring your dogs, that is a perk for us.” — Zeina Elgazzar ager Maxine Steil are currently working with the City of Penticton with the hope of expanding their business to include a certified dog physical therapist, groomers, dog walkers and have a daycare service. “We encourage people to come down and see the location and please bring your dogs, that is a perk for us,” said Elgazzar. “Then people will get to see the direction we have and the calibre of services we hope to offer.” The pair ran into zoning issues with the city in December, but will be returning to coun-

cil chambers looking to get a second chance at dispelling any misconceptions about what services they want to offer. “That was part of the challenge with getting zoning because people felt it wasn’t the right location, but we on the other hand feel it is the ideal location because we are close to the park, green space and the river channel walkway,” said Steil. “There was a bit of a misconception of what the facility was going to be. There was an impression it was a caged environment and there would be barking dogs left unattended. We

There will be at least one new face on the board when the Summerland Chamber of Economic Development and Tourism selects its directors for the coming year. Chamber manager Lisa Jaager said the annual general meeting will be held on Tuesday, March 29 at the Summerland Arena Banquet Room with a reception at 5 p.m. and the meeting at 5:30 p.m. She said there are two spots on the board which need to be filled. One member whose term is expir-

ing will seek re-election. The meeting will also include the 2010 financial statement and the 2011 strategic plan presentation. Additional details about the meeting are available at the chamber’s website at www.summerlandchamber.com. All business licence holders in Summerland are members of the chamber and are able to participate in the decision-making process for the organization.

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hope through the appeal process people will visit the facility and see it is the complete opposite.” Space in their location already is allocated for a therapist, grooming room and a dog play area. They plan on having a camera in the play area so customers can log onto their website www.okanagank9.com at any time and see what their pet is up to. “It is really going to be customer orientated. We worked hard and really planned it out and feel it is going to be a really strong business for Penticton,” said Elgazzar. Okanagan K9 is located at 3693 Skaha Lake Rd. and open Tuesday to Saturday from 10 am. to 6 p.m., Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. and closed on Mondays. Elgazzar said if they get the green light from the city to offer additional services they may change their hours of operation to include Mondays.

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21

Business

Health insurance of growing importance to investors T

his is the second segment in a look at insurance from an investing perspective. Various kinds of health and care insurance are of growing investor importance. Disability and critical illness insurance can be of real value to investors building a savings or investment portfolio and who need some protection from premature withdrawal of funds as a result of a prolonged illness or disability. The real value of a disability or critical illness policy (and assessing if the premiums are worth the coverage) depends on a clear understanding and knowledge of exactly what your coverage is and the claims qualifica-

tions and conditions. For instance, it is important to know how the policy defines disability. The insurance can initially define a disability as a person’s inability to do work for which they are trained and qualified. But there is usually a time limit. After two years, the insurance coverage may be limited to your inability to perform any kind of work at all. The reason for the disability — accident or illness — may also be specifically defined in the policy. The cost of a disability policy also depends on the wait period — up to 180 days — before the first disability cheque arrives, and for how long the benefit can be expected to last. A critical illness policy

JUDY POOLE WOMEN AND MONEY defines very specifically what illnesses or diseases are covered by the policy and the lump sum you will receive. Payment is made usually within 30 days of a claim’s acceptance after a physician confirms the diagnosis. From an investor’s point of view, critical illness insurance can have distinct advantages. The prompt, onetime payment has no

restrictions on how it’s used. It could pay debts, take items off the “bucket list”, be invested or used to finance medical treatment. Some critical illness policies will return paid premiums if the contract is surrendered without a claim. Long-term care insurance is another protection option. It covers the cost of in-home or institutional care for the insured and protects against the financial hardship of maintaining a loved one in an assisted-care facility for a long period of time. The value of this type of insurance depends on the details of the policy and on the circumstances of individual investors. Insurance can be an important part of any

investment strategy, especially if it means you’re able to sleep better at night. Investors need to be perfectly clear on how their insurance protects them, and the conditions and terms under which they can expect to make a successful claim. The amount of the insurance benefit is determined by what you and your family need to protect both present and future assets. If wealth management and asset protection are becoming part of your investment thinking, then your financial advisor can arrange a meeting with an estate planning and insurance specialist who can help you focus on insurance products that prepare and protect you and your family for the future.

Judy Poole is a financial advisor with Raymond James, and has spent the last 39 years involved in the financial industry. You can reach her at judy. poole@raymondjames.ca. This article is provided as a general source of information and should not be considered personal investment advice. The views expressed are

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Okanagan businesses extending their reach Western News Staff

Attractinginternational business to Penticton and the Okanagan has become one of the focuses for the Okanagan Valley Economic Development Society. In partnership with the Okanagan Valley Economic Development Society, which includes the Penticton Economic Development Services, a trade and investment officer has been contracted from the United Kingdom. It’s a move to assist in the development and implementation of a trade and investment program for communities in the Okanagan Valley, linking firms in the U.K. with local companies seeking trade, investment and overall collaboration. “There is a lot of expats that have been moving, or are interested in

moving to Canada. We want to be the first place they think of,” said David Arsenault, economic development officer in Penticton. “People will see what the Okanagan has to offer and bring their business and their skills to the area.” Arsenault said U.K. businesses are attracted to Canada because there is no language barrier and there is a draw to the business climate and lifestyle. “We have the infrastructure, the people and we are starting to be wellknown in the tech field. Of course that means jobs, innovation, green technology and bringing people and new ideas here. It helps local companies that have innovative businesses to potentially sign joint ventures in technology opportunities,” said Arsenault.

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He said there are currently 19 working partnerships in the Okanagan with the U.K. The Penticton economic office has also assisted

local companies in connecting with business in Germany, Russia, Romania, Hungary and China. “It’s interesting that

those of the author and not necessarily those of Raymond James Ltd. Securities offered through Raymond James Ltd., member - Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Financial planning and insurance offered through Raymond James Financial Planning Ltd., not a member - Canadian Investor Protection Fund.

from a little industrial park in Penticton, there are some really innovating companies that are doing work around the world.”

ON THE CHANNEL PARKWAY

250-492-3800

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Call 250-487-2450 or click on www.bcaa.com/auto Visit BCAA Penticton at 2100 Main Street Auto Insurance is sold through BCAA Insurance Agency and underwritten by Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance Company of Canada and the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia. *Some restrictions apply. Maximum of $40 savings are with a combination of BCAA Advantage Auto Insurance and BCAA Advantage Home Insurance. Savings are on an annual basis and will be pro-rated when added mid-term.

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22

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Your community. Your classifieds.

250.492.0444 fax 250.492.9843 email classifieds@pentictonwesternnews.com

INFO

Classified

• CHECK YOUR AD! Notice of error must be given in time for correction before the second insertion of any advertisement. The publisher will not be responsible for omissions or for more than one incorrect insertion, or for damages or costs beyond the cost of the space actually occupied by the error. • Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved. • Readers: In ads where ‘male’ is referred to, please read also as ‘female’ and where ‘female’ is used, read also as ‘male’.

Word Classified Advertising Deadlines: WEDNESDAY PAPER TUESDAY 10 A.M. FRIDAY PAPER THURSDAY 10 A.M. OPEN EARLY 8 AM MONDAY MORNINGS TO SERVE YOU BETTER!

250-492-0444

Regular office hours: Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Announcements

Announcements

Funeral Homes

Funeral Homes

Credible Cremation

Nunes-Pottinger Funeral Service & Crematorium

Services Ltd.

Serving our South Okanagan communities with compassion, respect, and understanding.

Basic Cremation $990 +taxes

John Nunes Daryn Pottinger

559 Ellis St., Penticton

Sensible prices for practical people

250-493-3912 24 hrs “No Hidden Costs”

www.crediblecremation.com

Phone 250-498-0167 (24 hrs) 34505 - 89th St. Oliver, BC www.nunes-pottinger.com

Pre-Pay & Save Lets You Live Life.

Obituaries

Obituaries

Announcements

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Employment

Obituaries

Personals

Business Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

Karl Krueckemeier

My dear husband, good friend of 47 years, Father, Opa and Great Grand Opa, passed away suddenly Feb. 2011. Born in Germany, Pota West Falica. Survived by 4 daughters, Ingrid Voigt (husband Gunter) Jutta Clarke (husband James), Marianne Thomas. Step daughter Diana Koch, grandchildren James (deceased), Christine (husband Chad), Jennifer, Jimmi, David, Stephanie, great grandchildren Parker, Paxton, Mitchel, Hudson, Desmond. He will be missed by all.

Information By request afternoon & evening readings at the Ye Olde Welcome Inn, Oliver with Corlyn. Call pub 250-498-8840

Personals

ALL Pro Escorts. Female & Male Escorts & Strippers. 24hr fast & friendly service. Cash/Visa/MC. Always hiring. Penticton:250-487-2334 Kelowna:250-860-7738 Vernon:250-542-8448 Salmon Arm:250-832-6922 www.allproescorts.com or www.allprostrippers.com

Children Childcare Available LOVE’S Family Daycare, Young St. area, licensed, (3-5yr olds), 1 full-time day spot avail. for your child April 1, evening spots now avail. 4:30-11pm at night, (250)4930566 Ok Falls Daycare has one spot starting April 1st. Qualified and experienced w/references call Julie 250-486-2798

Employment Automotive SERVICE Manager/Technician for independant repair shop in Penticton. Must be capable of running full service desk and automotive diagnostics. Please provide history and experience. Apply by email or in person. Ok Sales & Service, 997 Westminister Ave W, Pent, oklease@shaw.ca

PROFESSIONAL SUPER B drivers wanted for mostly Okanagan double shifted runs. Good wages, benefits and equipment. Fax resume & drivers abstract to: 604-513-8004.

Information

Information

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

K-Rod Steel requires rebar placers for the Kelowna area. Experienced only need apply. Email resume: tracey.mcbryan@krodsteel.ca fax 250-549-1662

Information

C I T Y PA G E

Education/Trade Schools

Education/Trade Schools

NOTICE OF A SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETINGS CORRECTIONAL FACILITY

Congratulations Chelsea Stowers Graduate 2008

FREE INFORMATION SESSION CALL TODAY TO REGISTER On-Campus or Online • Call (250)717-0412

250-494-7752

Help Wanted ACCOUNTING & PAYROLL Trainees Needed! Large & Small Firms Seeking Certified A&P Staff Now. No Experience? Need Training? Career Training & Job Placement Available. 1-888-424-9417 APPLY NOW! Expanding Kelowna co. now accepting applications for FT work in various positions. No exp nec. 250860-3590 or email resume to info@plazio.ca DEMO PEOPLE Mature and responsible people needed to demonstrate new concept in water. 4hr shifts, excellent pay. Sales or demo experience preferred but not required. Send resumes to: info@sweetwatersprings.ca

THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF PENTICTON 171 Main Street Penticton, B.C. V2A 5A9 250-490-2400 (phone) 250-490-2402 (fax) web page: <www.penticton.ca>

Accelerated skill training - the practical alternative to a 4 year degree.

Providence Funeral Homes

Taylor Pro Training Ltd. Call toll free 1-877-860-7627 www.taylorprotraining.com TRAIN AS a Traffic Control Person (Flagger).Next courses Kelowna. 5-6 or 9-10 March. 250-212-0770 or www.aljsafety.com

ATTENTION Learn to generate excellent income from your home computer, free online training, unlimited earnings. www.FreedomKey123.com

Work with adults/youth in community agencies and private practice.

“Summerland’s Rosedale Chapel”

Successful established carpet/upholstery cleaning business truck mount system for sale in Penticton. Everything you need to go to work today, some working knowledge would be an asset. Thoroughly maintained and reliable. Consider offers to $8000. Selling due to health. Call 250-4927808

Financial Aid Available (for qualified students)

Alcoholics Anonymous, if your drinking is affecting you and those around you, call 250-490-9216

EARN YOUR DIPLOMA IN 1 YEAR!

of Summerland, BC, passed away after a brief illness, with his family by his side on February 13, 2011 at the age of 71 years. Survived by his loving wife Gloria, daughters Barbara (Samuel) Gillespie of Ottawa, ON, Brenda (Kelly) Gillard of Penticton, BC, grandchildren Kara (Ian), Candace, Caylie, Brett, Robert, Rebecca, great grandson Keegan, sister Marilynn (Ron) Scott of Summerland, BC. Sadly predeceased by parents James and Lillian Dunsdon, brothers Raymond Dunsdon and Vernon Dunsdon. Doug, who was also known as “Skip” to family and friends, spent most of his working life in many areas of the construction business. He was also known to tackle any problem and was the general builder/fix it person wherever he went. His greatest love was his family and they were always placed first with him. The warm weather suited him best; he enjoyed the summers at home and vacationing in warm climates where he golfed with many of this friends. We will miss his sense of humour and generous heart. He touched all that knew him and will be greatly missed. A celebration of Doug’s life will be held on Saturday, May 7, 2011 at 2:00 p.m., at Summerland Funeral Home, 13205 Rosedale Avenue, Summerland, BC, with Pastor Rick Gay officiating. Memorial tributes may be made in Doug’s honour to Penticton Hospital, 550 Carmi Ave., Penticton, BC, V2A 3G6 or BC Children’s Hospital, 938 West 28th Ave., Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4H4. Condolences may be directed to the family through providencefuneralhomes.com.

SERVICE FRANCHISE, Industry rated #1, Financing available. All new equipment, full training and support. Opportunity is knocking. www.oxy-dry.ca 204-346-5510

Mountain & City Training Heavy Equipment Operator Training

Business Opportunities

INTERESTED IN PSYCHOLOGY?

Douglas Mitchell Dunsdon

Earn $500-$2000/m. Operate a Mini-Office Outlet from home. Free online training, flex hrs, great income. www.how2bfree.org

EARN EXTRA INCOME. Learn to operate a Mini Office Outlet from your home. Free online training, flexible hours, great income. No selling required. www.123bossfree.com

Electricians and Apprentices needed Summit Electric Ltd. with offices in Kamloops and Quesnel is looking for certified electricians and 3rd and 4th year apprentices for full time work. Applicants must have the ability to travel to job sites across Western Canada. Company pays for travel, LOA and any flights. CORE COMPETENCIES • Industrial and commercial experience an asset • Must demonstrate the ability to work under pressure and adapt easily to severe time constraints as needed • Able to work with little or no supervision • Must be able to pass mandatory drug testings Reply To: robcouturler@summitelec.com or by fax to: (250)992-7855 Full-time Logging Danglehead Processor Operator needed immediately for the Vernon area. 1-2 yrs experience a must. Fax resume 250-5423587 or email: spence06@telus.net.

CLASS 1-2-3-4-5-7 DRIVER TRAINING

www.counsellortraining.com

PCTIA

ACCREDITED

KELOWNA COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL COUNSELLING Automotive

Automotive

The City of Penticton, RDOS, District of Summerland and Penticton Indian Band Councils have made a commitment to work collaboratively in moving forward with identifying potential sites for a provincial correctional facility in the South Okanagan Region. As part of this process, public meetings will be held where Ministry representatives will be in attendance to discuss and answer questions regarding the technical aspects of correctional facilities. Sites in the South Okanagan that meet the Ministry’s criteria will also be revealed to the public for feedback. The public meeting schedule is as follows: Hosted by:

Date

Time

Location

District of Summerland

Monday, March 7th

6:30 p.m.

City of Penticton

Tues., March 8th

6:00 p.m.

Penticton Indian Band

Wed., March 9th

7:00 p.m.

Centre Stage Theatre Summerland High School - 9518 Main Street Trade and Convention Centre Community Hall – 53 Green Mountain Road

ELECTRIC RATE INCREASE is seeking a reliable, motivated,

LICENSED AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN experienced in brakes, suspension, front end, wheel alignments and all related services. Candidates should posses quality workmanship, superior customer experience, and able to work in a team environment. At Fountain Tire, you'd have a great place to work - competitive compensation, a manager with a large support network, and the chance to learn and grow. This position can lead to bigger opportunities! Apply in person with resume to 359 Dawson Ave, attention Scott.

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that the City of Penticton received notice of an increase in the cost of electricity that is purchased from FortisBC of approximately 6% effective April, 2011. In conjunction with the City of Penticton’s public input policy the City will provide details of the cost of purchasing electricity and the impact of approving various levels of electric rate increases. The additional proposed Electric Rate increase is scheduled to take effect in April. The City purchases power from FortisBC at wholesale rates and resells the power at retail rates. The margin between retail and wholesale is utilized by the City to operate the Electric Utility as well as to return a dividend to the citizens of Penticton which is utilized for various capital works projects throughout the City. Without this dividend the capital works budget would be reduced accordingly. The public is invited to attend the Regular Council meeting at 6:00 p.m. Monday, March 7, 2011 in Council Chambers at 171 Main Street, Penticton BC to voice your opinion regarding the proposed increase. For further details please visit the City’s website at www.penticton. ca and click on Electric Rates Public Report.


23

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Employment Help Wanted Garage/Man Door Technicians needed-Looking for individuals with experience capable to deal with customers, orders, installs, repairs and service work. Live at home and work up north with many benefits. Our company will provide full time work, out of town, overtime, flights, accommodations and vehicles for work in Fort McMurray area. Send your driver’s abstract, resume & references. to : blackmacsoo@live.com and or call (780)-715-7616. $7-$8,500/monthstartingd.o.e MEDICAL OFFICE Trainees Needed! Hospitals & Dr’s Need Medical Office & Medical Admin staff! No Experience? Need Training? Local Career Training & Job Placement also Available! 1-888-778-0459 “The Big Tease Salon” expansion mode! Stylists with clientele are needed at our salon. We are seeking 2 stylist who would enjoy working in a busy, high-end salon that is focused on quality work and exceptional customer service. Benefit plan and education opportunities available. Please contact Lynn at 250-490-8677 or drop in to see us at 126-197 Warren Ave E. The Penticton Farmer’s Market is seeking an energetic individual to manage a Saturday outdoor market. Approximately 16 hour/week from April to October with some off season work. It is a contract position that reports to a Board of Directors. A complete job description is available upon request: estew@nethop.net Send resume to: Box 22002 Penticton BC, V2A 8L1

Hotel, Restaurant, Food Services CRYSTAL GARDEN Restaurant - Enderby hiring 1 Cantonese Cook, Cook Cert., min. 3 years exp. $17/hr. 40/hr. wk. Email CV to info@etlo.ca

Employment

Services

Sales

Financial Services

WE are looking for a professional salesperson, experience preferred but will train the right candidate must have valid drivers license. Please send your resume in confidence to oklease@shaw.ca or fax 250-493-1981

Trades, Technical CERTIFIED HEAD MARINE MECHANIC. Shuswap Lake. Great work environment! Start $25/hr+ Accommodation avail. Please contact 250.675.2250 gareth@shuswapmarina.com ELECTRICAL ESTIMATOR/ PROJECT MANAGER wanted to join our growing team with a local Vancouver Island progressive company. We are in the BC Industrial Power sector and are seeking the following: - Appropriate trade education in electrical engineering and/or construction - Min of 5 yrs exp electrical industrial power construction environment. Min 5 yrs proven first principles estimating exp. - High level of proficiency in MS Excel, MS Project and MS Word. Please submit your resume and refs: khorstmann@fminstallations.ca

JOURNEYMAN MAZAK CNC MACHINIST Live, Work and Play in the Sunny Shuswap. Mazak exp. is an asset ( Mills and Lathes).

Competitive Wages & Full Benefits Package. Fax: (1) 250-832-8950 Apply on-line at: www.accessprecision.com

Services

Art/Music/Dancing PIANO lessons for all ages, Royal Conservatory trained teacher with Church Music Major degree, call Beth Ann, 250-276-3546

Classifieds, Give us a call! 250.492.0444

Help Wanted

Services

Services

Services

Computer Services

Garden & Lawn

Misc Services

Tree Services

DEBT CONSOLIDATION PROGRAM Helping Canadians repay debts, reduce or eliminate interest, regardless of your credit. Steady Income? You may qualify for instant help. Considering Bankruptcy? Call 1-877-220-3328 FREE Consultation Government Approved, BBB Member

Virus & Spyware Removal Reasonable Rates. Upgrades, Repairs And New Custom Computers. 250-488-6964

GOLD STAR Lawn Care Ltd. is now booking Spring Aeration and power raking , fertilization packages , weekly mowing and general yard maintenance. Over 40 years of experience and locally owned and operated . Call 770-8984

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

150 COLORS TO CHOOSE FROM

Legal Services ICBC, MVA’S, SLIP & FALL or Any Injury? MARCO D. CEDRONE Making The Difference in Personal Injury Claims! 24hrs.1-866-913-3110 Cascade Law Corporation

Accounting/Tax/ Bookkeeping SMITTYS Income Tax Service. Doing business since 1973 in the Penticton area and South. Specializing in the Trucking Industry and the General Public. Contact R.M (Smitty) Smith 250-490-5996

Cleaning Services Clean as a Whistle; thorough, dependable, affordable housecleaning $20/hr Penticton only, Darlene (250)486-1229 HOUSE/COMMERCIAL cleaning. Honest, reliable, hardworking. $22/hr. Please call Amanda at 778-476-3409. Need cleaners/painters? Over 20yrs exp., reasonable pricing, Katherine (250)490-4163

Computer Services Simple Computers, can fix any problems or you don’t pay, virus removal, recover lost data, fix crashing computers, private computer lessons, call Dave for fast, friendly, local service, 250-770-0827

Services

Countertops CUSTOMROCKCOUNTERS GRANITE BLOWOUT SALE GRANITE SUPER SALE! GRANITE KITCHENS Starting at $2495. INCL DELIVERY & INSTALLS Open 9-4 Mon-Fri, 10-2 Sat. Showroom: 1115 Gordon Dr. 250-870-1577 MIKE’S ELITE CountertopsAll Countertops - Granite, Caesar Stone, Sile Stone, Han Stone, Quartz and Laminate Surfaces. Hundreds of colours to choose from. We also supply and/or install any Tile application. We offer a special every month, call Mike to find out this month’s deal! Please call (250)575-8543. REFACE Countertops. 1/2 the Cost of Replacing. Granite & Corian Designs. 470-2235.

Drywall Certified & Guaranteed Drywall Services Texturing - Ceiling Repairs New & Small Reno’s Certified Ticketed Journeyman 20 + yrs exp 250-487-8678 COMPLETE DRYWALL Services. No job too big or small. Satisfaction guaranteed. Call for a free estimate today Penticton Interior Drywall Andy 250-809-5881

Garden & Lawn Four Seasons Yard Maintenance now taking bookings for aeration and garden rototilling, (250)492-0805 Fully experienced pruner; fruit trees, ornamentals, evergreen hedges, landscapes, reference list and picture portfolio available, call Gerald at 250493-5161 Lake Breeze Lawn Care, Early Spring Clean-up, shrub pruning, weeding. Licensed & insured, (250)809-2398

Handypersons ALL RENOVATIONS and home repairs, any size job inside & out. Ron 250 276-0744

Home Improvements ARE you thinking of renovating? 25 yrs exp, top quality work, includes: carpentry, tiling, flooring, painting, indoor/outdoor. Ref’s avail, honest and hardworking. “Get it done right the first time”. Call Ted Lund 250-490-7991 or 250-496-5797 BELCAN Painting & Renos over 15 years in business

Trades, Technical

Trades, Technical

The Kamloops Pulp Mill is seeking

Journeyperson Millwrights, Pipefitters, Electricians, Welders and Carpenters (qualified to erect Scaffolding) to assist with their annual maintenance shutdown. The shutdown is scheduled for April 24/11 – May 7/11. There may be up to 10 additional days of work on either side of the shutdown dates. You must possess a Trades Qualification (TQ) Journeyman Ticket within your trade as well as several years of experience (Industrial experience would be a definite asset). Please include a copy of your TQ Journeyman ticket with your application. Please submit your applications to: Human Resources 2005 Mission Flats Road Kamloops, B.C. V2C 1A9 Or via email to: kamloopshr@domtar.com Applications will be accepted until March 15, 2011. Thank you for applying at Domtar. Please note only selected candidates for an interview will be contacted. Domtar is an equal opportunity employer.

Penguin Mfg. 250-493-5706

Feed & Hay

PENTICTON Junk Removal! Anything goes! Household waste, furniture and appliances to the dump 250-770-0827

Farm Services

Farm Services

Moving & Storage FAMILY Movers. Moving? Anything, anywhere. Local and long distance throughout 2010 Packing service available, weekly trips to Vancouver, Alberta, full and partial loads. Cheapest rates in the valley. Free Estimates, 250-493-2687

Painting & Decorating FRESHEN up a room or rooms or your whole home. Interior Decorator Certified. Reasonable rates. Free estimates. Call 250-809-0120

DRYWALL, plaster, paint repairs & any other interior renovations. Call John for a free estimate 250-809-8708 Rob Hurren Carpentry, renovations big and small, kitchen and bath remodeling, doors trim work, finishing and more, professional design available, call Rob 250-809-7131

Rubbish Removal

Farm Services

Pets & Livestock 800lb round bales, alfalfa grass, 1st crop, $50/bale. 3rd cut haylage, Grinrod. 250-3091420. ALL TYPES of hay for sale! all in medium squares (3x4x8). For all your Dairy, Horse, Feeder Hay needs, visit www.hubkahay.com or call Cale @ 403-635-0104. Delivery available and Min order is a semi-load. Good quality hay, alfalfa grass mix, heavy square bales, barn stored. 542-9419 or 309-5956 Grass hay, $7.00 bale. Oat hay $5.00 bale, lrge bales, no rain, barn stored, ex horse feed, located in Armstrong. 250-546-6422. Hay for sale dry rounds & haylage. $50.00 & $55.00. Armstrong 250-546-0420. HAY FOR SALE; Grass or Grass Alfalfa mix, Round bales $70 each, approx. 800lbs, delivery avail. on larger orders, also Silege bales or Feeder hay. 250-838-6630 *HAY-SALES-GUARANTEED Quality Grass, Alfalfa, Mixed square bales, round bales & Silage bales. Delivery avail. (250)804-6081,(250)833-6763.

Licensed, Insured, WCB Painting Ceramic tile, Flooring, Finishing Carpentry, Kitchen & Bath Reno’s Len 250-486-8800

250-808-0733 SKYHIGH DISPOSAL. Full service Junk Removal & Bin Rentals.

A & G Vineyard Management Ltd. We can help with all jobs big or small

• Pruning • Consulting • Maintenance • Irrigation • Developing Vineyards

FREE ESTIMATES

ARE YOU EXPERIENCING FINANCIAL DISTRESS? RELIEF IS ONLY A CALL AWAY!

Join the fastest growing Dealership team in the South Okanagan. Penticton Kia requires Sales Personnel and Service Technicians. Send resume to: jnewman@pentictonkia.com or fax 250-276-8099

. Extra Aluminum Reinforcement . Marine vinyl . Custom fit to any tub . We will measure your tub & deliver at no charge

OK Tree Removers, bucket truck avail, no job too small. Free estimates 250-493-2687

Vineyard Supplies: Bird Nets, Posts & Wire

Help Wanted

Call Anne Hamilton, Estate Administrator, 12 years experience, at 1-800-661-3661 today for appointment in Penticton to set up your FREE consultation. Jim Gilchrist CA, CIRP, KPMG Inc. Trustee in Bankruptcy, 300-1674 Bertram Street, Kelowna, B.C. V1Y 9G4.

HOT TUB COVERS . 3” high density foam

Help Wanted

Balwinder. S. Aulakh

250-498-1335 Career Opportunities

Sant. S. Gill

250-498-7268

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

7-Eleven Canada, Inc.

Apply Within

STORE MANAGER TRAINEE (SMT) Okanagan/Interior, BC We are hiring for ambitious and experienced Store Manager Trainees to grow their Management career with the world’s largest convenience retailer! As an SMT, you’ll essentially run a small business with an international company behind you! You’ll oversee store operations, supervise employees, manage inventory and promote 7-11 to your customers and community. You’ll maximize sales and proÀts by using sound business practices to implement the 7-11 strategy…all the while setting a high standard for customer service and satisfaction by making your store a model of our company’s Five Fundamentals – Quality, Assortment, Service, Value and Cleanliness. You MUST possess exceptional leadership, communication and customer service skills, 3-5 years retail/food service background, a Bachelor’s Degree in related Àeld preferred or equivalent experience will be considered. A willingness to work “on call” and desire to be part of a performance-driven team is also essential to your success. This is an opportunity to be a part of the world’s most recognized brands! We will provide you with incredible beneÀts, great training; the foundation for exceptional performance and a working environment that encourages and rewards excellence!

Your path to a better job starts here.

We thank you for your interest however only qualiÀed applicants will be contacted and selected for an interview. Please apply online to: www.7-eleven.com/careers or email your resume with your salary expectations to 711recruiting@gmail.com


24

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Pets & Livestock

Merchandise for Sale

Real Estate

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent

Feed & Hay

Misc. for Sale

Houses For Sale

Organic hay (Alfalfa & Brome) extremely high quality. $8.00 bale. 250-503-7889.

HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com

3.69 Acres Home and Shop in Vernon Completely updated home, Detached 1000 sqft Shop with hoist. Great holding property! Call Wade 250-5506364. 6177 Okanagan Ave

Pets Beautiful Maremma/ Kangal guardian puppies,to keep predators away,for a c r e a g e / fa r m , d ewo r m e d , 1 . vaccination,$350, phone 250 547 6253 Golden retriever male puppy ready for Spring Break, $500, 1st shots and vet checked, (250)493-6350 Miniature Dachshund pup. CKC registered. Red female, smooth coat. Family raised, vet checked, vaccination MC. $750. (250)832-9941 WOLF HYBRID Cubs res. now. Sun Valley Wolf Kennels www.sunvalleywolfkennels.com 250-765-4996 Kelowna, BC

Merchandise for Sale

Appliances EXTREMELY LOW PRICES on popular BRAND NAMES because of slight scratch and dent. SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS. Washer/Dryer set starting at $399 Ranges starting at $299 LG TV 50â&#x20AC;? $599

CANADIAN LIQUIDATORS #104 2100 Dartmouth Rd, Pent, 250-490-0554 1-877390-0554

Why buy retail? When you can buy BELOW WHOLESALE

I Robot Roomba vaccuum, still in box, $125, 778-515-4553 washer and dryer, $150 set, can deliver, queen box spring & mattress w/frame $150. Can deliver (250)770-0827

Building Supplies Discount Overstocked Windows & Doors Large Selection Of Patio Doors Too! In Stock and Ready To Go @ Heritage Millwork 165 Okanagan Ave East Penticton Steel Buildings. 30x40, 50x100 - Others. Time to Buy Now at Old Price. Prices going up! www.sunwardsteel.com Source# 1KD 800-964-8335

Free Items 1 year old husky shepherd cross, male, neutered, all shots, energetic, needs loving home, (250)492-6582 Desperate! Loving green-eyed shy kitty found weeks ago, needs patient, quiet, inside home, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get hugs, kisses & talks, needs to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;only childâ&#x20AC;? (250)492-5046

Firewood/Fuel LODGEPOLE Pine. Split, dry, delivered. Ted 250-276-5415 or cell 250-486-7300

Furniture PENTICTON BARGAIN STORE We buy and sell quality furniture NEW IN THIS WEEK: t)J&OE(FSBSE$PMMJO0BL Furniture t1FQQMFSTPMJEXPPE#FE 3PPNTVJUF t$PMMFDUBCMFEPVCMFESPQ leaf table t-FBUIFSTPGBT MPWFTFBUT t5FBLCPPLDBTFT t.BQMFEJOJOHSPPNTFUT t4PGBT -PWF4FBUT  t'VUPOT IJEFBCFE "OENVDINVDINPSF

8FTUNJOTUFS"WF8 4IPXSPPN0QFO 778-476-5919

Garden Equipment Garden start rototiller, 5hp, rear tine, locking hubs, $700obo, 778-515-4553

Misc. for Sale BRAND new 5 stage reverse osmosis water ďŹ ltration system. Retail price: $795. Now: $250. Call 250-863-1544

Massive Closing Sale All items must go! 22 truck loads of new product. Featuring a huge assortment of rare & exceptional estate outdoor decor items ranging from iron garden gates to palm trees & waterworks. Visit our website: www.newcountrydecor.com Moving in sale, large entertainment center, sofa & loveseat, Truckmate tool box, offers, 250-492-3662 PRIVATE Collector will buy gold & silver coins! All conditions. Check your safety deposit box! Todd, 250-864-3521

Misc. Wanted Cash paid for Silver coins. Paying 10 times face value. 250-545-7140.sumas@shaw.ca â??â?? I Collect Coins. Paying more than Silver. ConďŹ dential. Chad 1-250-863-3082 â??â??

Vernonwww.okhomeseller.com #26513l

Reduced $258,000obo Perfect starter home on family street, vacant 3bdrm, 1ba 990sqft home, new paint, laminate ďŹ&#x201A;, 5appl, laundry & extra room in basement, wired workshop w/loft, not far to beach, close to schools, Wendy (250)809-8197 Penticton

Mobile Homes & Parks

Acreage for Sale 3 Acres, Whitevale Area, Lumby. Flat, trees, drilled well, gas/hydro to driveway. Price $235,000.00 + HST OBO. 250-547-6932.

Duplex/4 Plex

Apt/Condo for Rent

BROCKTON COURT 241 Scott Avenue

Cable & All Utilities Included, Senior Building, No Smoking, No Pets, Secure Building, Parking, Balcony

Move In Incentive Available immediatelyâ&#x20AC;Ś 1 or 2 Bedroom

250-488-2881

******* OKHomeseller.com Where smart sellers meet smart buyers! View Thompson Okanagan properties for sale.// Selling? No Commission. (250) 545-2383 or 1-877-291-7576

1bdrm apts. in clean, quiet, 50+ bldg, near Cherry Lane, elevator, in-suite storage, s/f.dw/ac, coin laundry, on-site mgrs, n/s, n/p, $650-$700+ util 250-492-4265 1BDRM apt, totally renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d, 3 new appl, a/c, in-suite storage, NP, NS, clean, quiet, secure, on bus route, near Walmart 250-493-8500 1BDRM lakeview roof top deck, quiet adult bldg, n/s, n/p refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $650+util 250-492-4558 2bdrm, 1ba, 3appl., $800, 3bdrm, 2ba, 5appl., $1450, (250)276-4486 2bdrm, great location, private parking, quiet, secure building, wheelchair accessible, large storage room, laminate ďŹ&#x201A;oors, $800, heat/cable incl., adult building, avail. March 15, cat ok with deposit, NS, 250-4887902 2bdrm, lakeview, spacious apt., historic house, oak ďŹ&#x201A;oors, on bus route, clean, quiet person, NP, 250-492-6319

Open Houses

Open Houses

Full Duplex-Penticton. Great tenants, great revenue producer for many years! Photos @ w w w. b u y - t h i s - h o u s e . c a . $379,900 250-490-8888 250328-8105

For Sale By Owner PRICED TO SELL! Beautiful 4 bedroom home with pool and sauna. 128 Dunant Place, Pent. By appt only. $419,900. Call 250-493-0988 or email: tina-nevin@shaw.ca. Single wide in seniors park, 2bdrm, addition, sundeck, carport,$33,900, (250)847-9453

Houses For Sale

Large 2bdrm apt. for rent. +40 bldg, $850 +util, refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s req. 250-487-1136

Penticton Kiwanis Housing Society has 1 and 2 bdrm apartments avail. in its new affordable senior housing project, ns, np, 778-476-4112

Rentals

Real Estate

Large 2bdrm 2nd ďŹ&#x201A;oor, DT Penticton, ns, np, incl. w/d/f/s, mature tenant, refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s req., Vito 604-291-1059

Mortgages

Sporting Goods

10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;6â&#x20AC;? Tapco aluminum brake c/w stand, decoiler & slitter $1500 ďŹ rm. 250-859-2594

FURNISHED housekeeping room in quiet 40+ bldg, DT Penticton, n/p, n/s. $475 util incl, April 1st 250-490-8888

LARGE 2bdrm, Penticton Ave., close to schools/transit, $875, call Dennis at Realty Executives, (250)493-4372

BANK ON US! Mortgages for purchases, renos, debt consolidation, foreclosure. Bank rates. Many alternative lending programs.Let Dave Fitzpatrick, your Mortgage Warrior, simplify the process!1-888-711-8818 dave@mountaincitymortgage.ca

Tools

Brandnew Executive 1bdrm @ Prestigious Meritage Lofts on Front St, 1block from lake/park $1100. Dennis, Realty Executives 250-493-4372

WHOLESALE FACTORY DIRECT. Manufactured, Modular & Park models. Tremendous savings. Luxurious 1512 sq. ft home including delivery and installation only $ 109,950. Many other plans available. 877-976-3737 or 250-814-3788 www.hbmodular.com

Penticton resident is actively seeking a female MD for his 47 year old wife. We are covered by BC Medical and also extended medical. Please email â&#x20AC;&#x153;CJâ&#x20AC;?: lakestr@shaw.ca, a good sense of humor would help, thank you Wanted electric typewriter with correction features. Call Bernie 250-492-6094

MENS bike & girls bike as new, incl., helmets $100ea. Dunlop golf clubs + bag $50, ladies Cobra irons includes bag $50. Call 778-515-0014

998 Creston, 1bdrm apt, living room. Incl f/s, laundry, rent starts @$600 incl util 250490-1700

FOR SALE BY OWNER Open House Sat. Mar.5,10am-2pm

176 Westview Drive, Penticton sBDRMS BATHEAPC LIVING DINING FAMILY LAUNDRY LARGEKITCHENWITHISLANDANDEATINGNOOK LARGEGARAGE WITHCRAWLSPACEENTRANCE EXTRA26PARKING s5NDERGROUNDSPRINKLERS HOTTUB s.EW7INDOWS PAINTED APPLIANCESINCLUDED

 #ALL 

PENTICTON Bright 900 S.F. 2bdrm apt. Insuite w/d, storage, parking, N/S, 1 yr. lease. $850. Immed 604-241-0490 or 1-888-669-9844 toll free

Commercial/ Industrial 1200sq.ft shop, overhead door, good exposure, ofďŹ ce, washroom, 250-809-0728, 250-492-8324 1200sqft shop with crane, 2 o/h doors, ofďŹ ce, set up for wood-working shop, $10/sqft+ triple net, fantastic location, (250)490-6467 2000SQ.FT total. Approx 1100sq.ft is warehouse. Freight door access. One reception area 2 separate ofďŹ ces, heated & a/c. Large parking lot for customers, great for manufacturing and space for retail sales. $1250/mo, lease or sublease avail. Please ask for Therese or Elaine 250-492-0555 APPLE Plaza 770sq.ft, suited for food related retail business. Call Barbara 250-492-6319 SHOP space 19x24x12 for $325+ utilities. Contact Ron 250-493-2828

Duplex / 4 Plex DT upper duplex unit, spacious, clean, bright, 2bdr, 1.5ba, all appl., covered deck, fenced yard, np, ns, avail. March 1, $1050 (incl. util.) (604)533-0302, 604-970-7491 Penticton 1/2 duplex, 3bdrm, 1.5ba, new carpet/paint, near downtown, ns, pet neg., avail. April 1, $1200+util., 1 year lease, 250-494-4125

Rentals

Rentals

Homes for Rent

Shared Accommodation

128 Roy Ave, 2bdrm+den, huge yard, workshop, vacant, $1100/mo, #207-1410 Penticton Ave, 2bdrm, $800/mo., 250-490-1530 13611 BloomďŹ eld in Summerland, 3bdrm, 2 full bath, carport, upper ďŹ&#x201A;oor only, incl util $1400/mo. 250-490-1700 2bdrm Kiliney Beach lakeview 1bath, huge lot, Apr. 1. $1050. refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a must, 604-596-5645 Avail. April 1, large 2bdrm house in Keremeos, $750+util., refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d, 250493-1744 KEREMEOS 3bdrm, 2bth 5/ appl, dbl garage, hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors, Avail now. $1300/month Refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Req. 250-497-7172 NARAMATA Village, 2bdrm MH in organic orchard, private, large deck, n/s, pet? $800 mo + DD. Call 250-496-5435. NEWLY renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d 2bdrm, 1bath, f/s w/d, woodstove, lg fenced yard, avail April 1st $1200/mo. N/S, N/P, refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d, 1 yr lease. Call 250-462-3732 #365 Townley St, Penticton NOW AVAILABLE! Lovely & immac. 2 bdrm Rancher w/ sunroom, all appls, propane ďŹ replace, updated ďŹ&#x201A;ooring and paint throughout. Large lot, det. garage, and steps to lake Okanagan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;FINTRYâ&#x20AC;? is a small quiet lake community, 35min to Kelowna or Vernon. Pet neg, N/S, refs req. $1200 mo. Long term avail. Call Kristi 1-604-862-8039 or email: kristip@telus.net Penticton, 3bdrm, 2 up, 1 down, rec room, fenced yard, f/s/w/d/m, ns, np, avail. Mar. 15, $1200+util., 250-767-6709 side by side 1/2 duplex, 5bdrm, 3bath, ns, np, inlaw suite, double carport, covered deck, big yard, near Cherry Lane, $1500+util. (250)4862032, 250-490-3023

Motels,Hotels 2BDRM, 1bth, avail April 1st, f/s, w/d, monthly rental 250493-9357 LARGE 1bdrm suites & bachelor suites, available for rental until May 2011. Fully furnished, utilities/cable included, quiet location, near Mall and bus route. Call Valley Star Motel 250-492-7205 MOTEL SUITES and RV park $480 up. located at Holiday House Motel Penticton and Pleasantview Motel & RV park Summerland. 250-487-0268

OfďŹ ce/Retail 1000sqft OfďŹ ce Retail, 5-ofďŹ ces w/reception area for sale or rent. Penticton 250-493-5133

Shared Accommodation

SUMMERLAND, near town, 2bdrm, 1bath, ns, np, $775+ util., (250)494-9331

Private bdrm semi-pri bth, quiet person, $400-$500, everything incl., 250-492-2543 REDUCED rent for s/f to share home w/mature disabled male in Summerland. 250-404-0187

Mobile Homes & Parks

Mobile Homes & Parks

at

Suites, Lower 13611 BloomďŹ eld, 3bdrm, f/s/w/d, fp, 250-490-1700, 250486-3791 1BDRM basement, daylight, near Wiltse school, n/s, n/p, util incl, $650/mo avail March 1, 250-492-7312 2BDRM suite near Cherry Lane, n/p. Avail now, call 4924238 BRIGHT 1 BDRM, near hosp, $850 incl all utils. HD cble, net, pvt entry/lndry. N/S, small pet neg. Mar 16. (250)488-5348. BRIGHT, 635 sq ft 1 bdrm bsmt. New appliances, fridge, oven/stove, microwave, and in-suite washer/dryer. $800.00 (utilities, full cable, wireless internet and laundry).Ref req. N/S. April 1. 250-540-5605 Bright, roomy 1bdrm basement suite for 1 working person, ns, np, nd, fully furnished, $675 util incl., avail. April 1, ref. & dep. req., 250-493-5881 JETTED SPA designer tub, You pick up. $500 obo. 778478-1431 or 306-581-2898. new 2bdrm ground level, Close to Wiltse School, np/ns, $800(incl. util), (250)493-6449

LOWER THE PRICE!

Examples: Regular 2 bdrm, 2 bath $85,364 Single Wide (14x66) 2 bdrm, 2 bath $97,762 Single Wide (14x66) 3 bdrm, 2 bath $146,617 Double Wide (27x48) 2 bdrm, 2 bath $184,368 1 Den-Double Wide (27x54/56)

SUPER SAVE PRICE! $75,120

Apt/Condo for Rent

Call Ralph or Scott

250-493-6751

4 excellent Kal Tire P215/60R16â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s-XL Nokian all weather tires, (snowďŹ&#x201A;ake design) 8000kms, cost $800, sell for $495. 250-497-0008 Used Tires, Huge Selection of used tires ands wheels in stock. We might have what you need. Prices vary according to size and quality. Starting at $25.00. Call us or drop in to Larsens Excel 555 Okanagan Ave East 250-492-5630 Penticton

Auto Financing

Apt/Condo for Rent

FOR RENT â&#x20AC;˘ 250-493-7626 1 - BEDROOM 2 - BEDROOM $750 / Month $850 / Month Utilities Included

Utilities Included

RENTALS Property Management

(250) 770-1948 101-3547 SKAHA LAKE RD.

Braid St. 2 bdrm + house, f/s, w/d, nice yard with garage and lane parking. $1050.00 plus util................................ ......................................Avail March 1

Apt/Condos for Sale

Dec. 1 Alysen Pl. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, executive condo, f/s, w/d, d/w, f/p, built-in vac, large deck facing east, 2 sec. pkg stalls...$1300.00 incl. water

Apt/Condos for Sale

REALTY EXECUTIVES PENTICTON APARTMENTS: $650

$675 $775

$850 $900 $950

$100 reduction on 1st months rent with 6 mth lease 1 bdrm, f,s, elevator, coin-op laundry. Avail. Now (A304) 1 bdrms $100 off 1st months rent, f,s elevator, coin-op laundry. Avail. Now (EFR) 1 bdrm + den, near dwntwn, grd ďŹ&#x201A;r, fridge, stove, coin-op laundry, extra storage. Avail. April 1 (A329-2) 2 bdrm on the corner of Sydney and Churchill, 1 bth, f,s, coin-op laundry. Avail. Now (A334-2) 2 bdrm in four plex, close to school and bus, f,s, laminate ďŹ&#x201A;oors. Avail. Now (H686-1) 55+, near Skaha Beach, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 appl, secâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d parking, extra storage. Avail. Now (A432) 2 bdrm on Dynes Ave, 2 bath, 2 parking spots, gas fp, upstairs unit, f,s,w.d. Avail. Now (A350) Brand New, 1bdrm + den condo near dwntwn, 6 appl., 2 parking spots, 6 month lease reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. Avail. Now (A426)

$129,117

$975

Government Rebates to Dealer

Auto Accessories/Parts

Kingsview Properties

HOUSES:

All prices include delivery, blocking and levelling and skirting! These home are new and carry a ten year warranty! Built by Moduline Industries with 40 years experience.

Transportation

298-296 Maple St. townhouse Penticton. 3-4 bdrm, 2.5 bath, w/basement, garage, Rent starts at $1200. under new management, Call Judy 250486-3791, 250-490-1700 3bdrm in Baskin Gardens, f/s/w/d, freshly painted, renovated, large storage, kids welcome, small pet ok, avail. Mar. 1st, $1050, (250)490-9082

$85,076

$162,243

SUMMERLAND. PROVIDENCE Place, seniors 55+, retire with us! Bright spacious 2-bdrm townhome wonderfully updated in quiet area of town, walking distance to everything you need. Huge balcony, private yard. $850/mo includes garden/ lawn care and lots of parking. On-site owner, N/S, N/P, references, credit check. 250-404-0327 or 490-1739.

Townhouses

$775

Time to rotate our â&#x20AC;&#x153;Showhomesâ&#x20AC;?...how??

Townhouses

ROOM for rent use of whole home, recent reno, sat/int all in $600, 250-462-2194

$625

March Madness!

Rentals

3 bdrm home, 1 bath, some renoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, older home, new furnace & roof, f,s, storage shed. Avail. Now (H612) $985 2 bdrm top half of home, f,s, shared laundry, large deck and spacious fenced back yard. Avail. Now (H673-1) $1200 2 bdrm, 1 bath home w/laminate ďŹ&#x201A;rs, updated bathroom, 2 car garage, large yard, No pets, No smoking. Avail. Now (H740) $1300 Newer 3 bdrm duplex, 2.5 bath, laminate ďŹ&#x201A;rs, ss appliances, concrete patio area. Avail. March 1 (ot416) Prospective tenants must complete an application form at:

280 MAIN STREET, PENTICTON, B.C. V2A 5B2 PHONE: 250-493-4372 - www.rentalspenticton.com Only qualiďŹ ed applicants will be contacted.


25

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Transportation

Transportation

Adult

Auto Financing

Scrap Car Removal

Escorts

Autocredit911.com. Best rates Free delivery, BC/ABcars/trucks/vans/suvs, trades welcome. Good Bad Ugly Credit You’re approved. Call 1888-635-9911 or apply online

1AA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Min $60 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 250-899-0460

Cars - Domestic 2000 Chrysler Neon, new tires, excellent condition, $2000obo, (250)462-1165 2001 Mitsubishi, Monterio, 4dr, sport, 4 whdr, very good cond., 173,000 miles, $6500, (250)495-4319 2001 Taurus, 6cyl, auto, cruise, 100,165kms, $3900, (250)492-3247, leave msg. 2003 Silver PT Cruiser, 76,000kms, ICBC history check, very clean, $6995, (250)493-7937, 250-486-7937 2005 Hyundai Tuscon. 2 ltr, front wheel drive, AM/FM stereo w/MP3 CD, alloy wheels, anti-lock brakes, power brakes/steering/mirrors/windows/locks. Roof rack, five doors, tilt steering, 4 wheel disc brakes, electronic stability control, block heater, heated front windshield & heated mirrors. New winter tires, timing belt, windshield & front brakes. Good on gas +/- hwy 30, town 28 m/g. 100,000 kms. EXCELLENT CONDITION, great winter vehicle. Asking $9,500 obo. Call: Cell 250-617-9944

Cars - Sports & Imports 1990 TOYOTA CAMRY LE 176,000k, pwr windows, a/c V6, cruise control Well maintained! 4 win/4 sum tires. 12 disc CD plyr 5 yrs service records 250-558-1967 $3200 2000 Honda Civic, 5spd, ac, cd, 162,000kms, sum/win rims, $3500obo, 250-494-5197 2004 Toyota Matrix XR, 4wd loaded, priced below Black Book. Asking $6200. 250-5427381 2006 VW Jetta, 2.0T, 55KM, heated leather seats, sunroof, 6spd MT, exc cond., warranty. $17,500 obo. 250-260-6588

Motorcycles 1978 Ironhead 1000 total custom, multiple show winner, $8000 obo. 250-838-5929 Kelowna Motorcycle Swap Meet. March 26-2011, held at the Rutland Centennial Hall. Doors open @ 9:30-4pm. $2 admin. Vendor space avail. Info & table reservations 1-604-910-1090 specialeventsbc@hotmail.com www.specialeventsbc.com

Recreational/Sale 1980 Okanagan 10.5 foot truck camper. Fridge, stove, toilet w/shower. Roof recently redone. New water heater/pump, furnace, electrical. $1800 250-488-6877 2000 Travelaire Tour Edition, 34ft 5th wheel, come with w/d, like new, asking $18,000obo, (250)498-8368 to view

Auto Financing

SCRAP BATTERIES WANTED We buy scrap batteries from cars & trucks & heavy equipment. $4.00 each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Call Toll Free 1.877.334.2288

FIND EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

Trucks & Vans 06 Ford Escape XLT 4x4, copper in color, leather, ac, power options, gently driven for 80kms. Incredible deal for this vehicle $15,000 firm, 778476-0111, 250-487-0373 1997 Chevy Venture, 220,000kms, great shape, lots of work done, $1700 (incl. new windshield), (250)809-2220 2000 GMC Sierra SLE Extended cab 4x4, well maintained good running truck, $4500 obo.250-762-4163 2002 Chev Silverado Crew Cab,1500HD, 6L, auto, trailer tow pkg, canopy, boat rack, 2sets of tires on rims, 155kms, 8600GVW, 4.10 r.end, fully loaded, leather int., 250-4927315 $15,000 OBO 2003 GMC 1500 ext cab, 4x4, loaded, heated leather seats, dual dvd players, fold tube running boards, box side rails, rollup tonneau cover, alloy wheels, 115kms, $15,500obo 250-492-2194 2004 GMC 16ft cube van with ramp, $17,500, Penticton, 250-493-5133 2005 F150 XLT, s/c, 4.6, new tires, d/box incl., $14,000 obo, (250)488-1486 2006 GMC Sierra 1500 4x4 V8 auto, 119k, loaded, exc. cond in/out, $14,500. 250-503-0320 2006 Tacoma 4dr, ext cab, auto, loaded, 96,000km. $16,975 Gov’t inspected rebuilt vehicles. Lego Auto Sales Vernon. 250-260-4415. DL# 9462 2010 Ford Lariat, fully loaded, black, brand new Range Rider canopy included, low km’s. asking $40,000 call 250-8097055

Recreational/Sale

1st Choice Charley’s Escorts In or Out Calls. VERNON & KAMLOOPS LOCATIONS Charley’s Newest Girls Lexus - Raven - Nikita - Kat Vernon Location - 250-5407769 or 250-540-7069 Kamloops - 778-257-0431 Always Hiring. CharleysEscorts.com

1ST Class Mystique Escorts. Gorgeous Ladies & Men of all ages to suit every need. 24/7 out calls. Quick arrival time reasonable rates. 860-6778 (Kelowna), (250) 558-5500 (Vernon). NOW HIRING. www.mystiqueescorts.ca BEACH BUNNIES New First Class Spa Now Open! #32-2789 Blue Heights www.beachbunnies.ca 250-448-8854 We only hire the very best Beautiful Korean Girl, Ruby, 23 years old, 110lbs, 5’4”, 34C-25-35, hot, sexy & lovely, 778-476-2232 CHAT live with Charley’s girls and guys. 1-900-528-1051, 1-900-548-1051, 1-900-7831051. CLOVER, Penticton In/Out 34B-26-30 5’4”, 120lbs, long hair, green eyes, very attractive. Tight, toned, tanned. From mild to wild 24-7. Trained in massage, 250-4623510

It takes 11 muscles to read this ad.

EBONY Beauty, Tiara, 19 yrs. Bikini Babe Jenna, 20 yrs. In/out. 9am-? 250-859-9584. MALE 4 Male Erotic Massage, $95. Winfield, 9-9 Daily 250766-2048 NEW to This. Jazmine, 24 yrs. Busty, Casey, Greek avail. 21 yrs. In/out. 250-859-9584. TIFFANY In Vernon. Petite, 5’1, 100lbs, open minded beauty, 19. 250-859-9584. XXX’s and O’s by Donna, Independant, Penticton & area (out calls), 250-809-7444

Find the car of your dreams 250.492.0444

Recreational/Sale

ervice!

Built on S RV CENTRE LTD.

DL#31054

WELCOME TO COUNTRY RV PENTICTON 2010 models on sale now

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Auto Financing

Auto Financing

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26

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Springers

m n a sti c s GyAdventures

Spring Camps

FRIDAY

Community Calendar

March 4

Classes are available for Children walking to High School Age DROP-IN CLASSES 250-486-0787 0787

ELKS CLUB on Ellis Street has drop in pool/darts and karaoke by Okie Dokie. FRATERNAL ORDER OF Eagles has dinners from

www.pentictonspringers.com

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5 to 7 p.m. Proceeds to charity. Entertainment by Diane Ball. All members and guests welcome to their hall of 1197 Main St. COMPUTER SENIORS’ CLUB meets at the Leisure Centre, 439 Winnipeg St. Members drop-in from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in the main hall. Call 250-493-0789 for more information. SENIORS SINGLES LUNCH Club welcomes 65-plus each Friday. For location call 250-496-5980 or 250770-8622. PDSCL has bingo at 1 p.m. in the Leisure Centre on Winnipeg Street. Call Tarra at 250-490-0200, ext. 1 for more information. ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION branch 40 hosts a branch dinner at 5:30 p.m. with karaoke by Anita. SENIORS’ DROP-IN CENTRE has social bridge and beginner’s line dancing at 1 p.m. ANAVETS HAS KARAOKE by John (Cash) at 5:30 p.m. Stu’s kitchen open. Drink specials and prizes. THE FUNTIMERS BALLROOM Dance Club meets most Fridays upstairs at the Elks Club from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. for ballroom and Latin dancing. New members welcome. For information call Brian 250-492-7036. SOUTH MAIN DROP-IN Centre on 2965 South Main St. is having an evening of dance with Destiny. Music starting at 7:30 p.m. $5 per person. All welcome. CELEBRATE WORLD DAY of Prayer 2011 at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church at 157 Wade Ave. W. at 2 p.m.

SATURDAY March 5

ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION branch 40 has crib at 10 a.m., baron of beef at 11 a.m. and a meat draw at 2 p.m. and sing a long at 4 p.m. FRATERNAL ORDER OF

Eagles has hamburgers from noon to 4 p.m., Beaver races also at 4 p.m. All members and guests welcome to the hall on 1197 Main St. ANAVETS HAS FUN pool at 12:30 p.m. Dinner at 5:30 p.m. by Stu. Entertainment by Terry Bremner. JEWISH LEARNING CENTRE for Christians at 10 a.m. at St.Andrews Presbyterian. P.D.S.C.L. MARKET HAS fresh fruit, home baked goods, jewelry and other items at the Leisure Centre on 439 Winnipeg St. from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. DINNER AND DANCE to the ABBA tribute band ABRA Cadabra this at the Penticton Lakeside Resort. Prize for best-dressed couple. Complimentary champagne and wine. Live auction with Stockwell Day. Raffle and silent auction. Buy your dinner and dance tickets at the Lakeside, Wings and the Thrift Store on 456 Main St. Phone orders: 493-4366 ext 100 (Leave a message). Women’s awards fundraiser to mark SOWINS’ 30th anniversary. Doors open at 6 p.m. Event starts at 6:30 p.m. Info at www.sowins. com, Facebook fan page SOWINS womens awards dinner and dance 2011, donna@sowins.com, or 488-0825. ELKS CLUB on Ellis Street has crib at 10 a.m., a meat draw at 4:30 p.m. with a lasagna dinner to follow and Music by Shindigger.

SUNDAY

March 6 SUNDAY EVENING DANCES at 7 p.m. with DJ Emil Sajna at the South Main Dropin Centre on South Main St. Call 250-493-2111 for more info. CRIBBAGE CONGRESS, grass roots club meets every Sunday at 7 p.m. in the Drop-in Centre on South Main. Call Joe at 250-4935073 for more informa-

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MONDAY March 7

KIWANIS K-KIDS meets at 6:30 p.m. in the Concordia Lutheran Church at 2800 South Main. Open to all kids ages 6 to 13. For more information visit www. kiwanispenticton.com or call Colleen Emshay at 250-490-0976. WELLNESS MENTAL CENTRE has Brown Bag family support group from noon to 1 p.m. weekly and individual support for family members from 2 to 4 p.m. weekly. FITNESS FRIENDS MEET every Monday in the hall, 502 Martin St. at 10 a.m. Come and get in shape, everyone is welcome. Phone Dot 492-5400. SENIORS’ DROP-IN CENTRE has beginner’s line dancing at 9 a.m. scrabble at 10 a.m., carpet bowling at 10:45 a.m. and intermediate to advanced line dancing and duplicate bridge at 1 p.m.

ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION branch 40 has hot dogs and hamburgers for $2, and bridge at 1 p.m. AL-ANON has a meeting for friends and family, men’s only at 7 p.m. at the United Church. Call 250-490-9272 for info. SENIOR’S COMPUTER CLUB has sessions at 439 Winnipeg St. from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Call 250-4930789 for more info. FRATERNAL ORDER OF Eagles on 1197 Main St. has the Monday dart league at 7:30 p.m. WELLNESS SENIORS SOCIETY has stress and relaxation from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the United Church on 696 Main St. ANAVETS HAS DART and pool leagues at 7 p.m. S OUTH O KANAGAN SENIORS Wellness Society has Stress and Relaxation every Monday from 1 to 2:30 p.m. on 696 Main St. United Church. PENTICTON ACADEMY OF Music has a children’s choir every Monday from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. for kids aged five to 12 at the Leir House on 220 Manor Park Ave. Also, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. a ladies’ choir. New members welcome. SOUTH MAIN DROP-IN Centre has table tennis starting at 7 p.m. at 2965 South Main St. For more information call Francis at 778-476-4916 or Brian at 250-492-0578. S OUTH O KANAGAN R ETIRED Teacher’s luncheon at the Ramada Inn. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. serving an Italian buffet served at noon. Guest speaker will be Lynn Popoff, Grandmothers for Africa, with a slide show presentation about her recent trip to Swaziland. HARD TIMES LUNCH will be at Sage and Vines Restaurant at 11:30 a.m. There will be a silent auction. $25 per peson. Seating limited. Call Kathleen Jasper at 250493-0335 for tickets.

Penticton Elks the Fun 51 presents a

JAM SESSION

Sunday, March 13th @ 3:00pm Join us ~ Bring your instruments

in Penticton

Since beginning in 1987, ProCare has trained over 3,000 care aides. The majority are employed in senior care facilities, group homes, provincial health regions including Interior Health.

tion. ELKS CLUB on Ellis Street has drop in pool/darts with dog races starting at 2:30 p.m. with last man standing and an M&M food draw. ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION branch 40 has cancelled its Sunday menu breakfast at 8 a.m. There is a meat draw at 2:30 p.m. ANAVETS HAS DROP-IN pool at noon. Horse races at 2 p.m. and meat draws. FRATERNAL ORDER OF Eagles has mystery draw at 4 p.m. Lorraine’s chicken wings at 4 to 6 p.m. Members and guests welcome to the hall on 1197 Main St. THE CELEBRATION CENTRE and Metaphysical Society has guest speaker Hartley Clelland on Numerology. The meeting begins at 10:30 a.m. Everyone welcome. OKANAGAN NETWORK FOR the Environment on 200304 Martin St. is playing the educational movie The World According to Monsato at 6:30 p.m.

198 PARKWAY PLACE ON THE CHANNEL PARKWAY

250-492-3800

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Potluck Snacks and Chili

C’mon down & dance, sing, eat & play! for information email: halamigo1@hotmail.com or call the Elks 343 Ellis Street • 250-492-2949 (Non members welcome)


27

PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

Community Calendar

TUESDAY

March. 8

FREE DROP-IN after school club for elementary aged children every Tuesday from 2:45 to 5 p.m. in The Ark at First Baptist Church. Supervised activities, crafts, games, gym time. Call 259-492-3824 for more info. BUDDHIST VIPASSANA MEDITATION and discussion group meets Tuesdays 7:15 to 9:15 p.m. Call 250-462-1044 for details. FRATERNAL ORDER OF Eagles on 1197 Main St. has euchre starting at 7 p.m. All members and guests welcome. THE PENTICTON WOMEN In Business luncheon is at the Ramada Hotel. Speaker is author Lorna Schultz Nicholson, who wrote She Shoots, She Scores. Showcaser is Rebecca Russell of the Okangan Hockey School. Members $20. Guests $25. SOUTH OKANAGAN GENEALOGICAL Society meets every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Penticton Public Library/Museum located at 875 Main St. For further information call Nola

Reid at 250-492-0751. Tuesday’s workshop is Oral Interviews by Shirley Larsen. TOPS B.C. 4454 meets from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in the basement of the Bethel Church, 945 Main St. Phone Tina at 250-7701613 or Susan at 250-4965931 for more information. SENIORS’ DROP-IN CENTRE has intermediate line dancing at 9 a.m. and a luncheon at 11:30 a.m. SQUARE DANCE CLUB has mainstream, plus and round dancing from 6:45 to 9:30 p.m. at the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre. Call 250493-8274 for info. PENTICTON MUSEUM BROWN Bag lectures has Yasmin John-Thorpe speaking about her 790-kilometre pilgrimage along the Camino de Santiago de Compostela trail that ended in northern Spain. This will be from noon to 1 p.m. PENTICTON CONCERT BAND holds rehearsals every Tuesday from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Dixieland, Broadway, big band music, classical and more. New members welcome. Phone Gerald at 250-809-2087 for info. ANAVETS IS HOSTING kara-

oke with Hazel at 5:30 p.m. Stu’s kitchen open. THE PEACH BLOSSOM Chorus invites the public to participate in the joy of barbershop harmony. Join any or every Tuesday evening. Experience not necessary, just a voice in tune from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Victory Church on 352 Winnipeg St. Call 250-492-3032 or 250494-0815. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY activities will be happening in the Sunoka foyer at Okanagan College from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. focusing on United Nations and equal access to education. At 6 p.m. the evening events will start to celebrate the gains and achievements in gender equality in Canada and around the world. Evening events include an art show, live music, a local poet, yoga, bellydancing, food and beverages. THE PENTICTON BRANCH of the FSNA federal retirees is having their first quarterly meeting at the Legion Hall at 502 Martin St. Coffee at 9:30 a.m. meeting at 10 a.m. including interest-

ing speaker with lunch to follow. S OUTH O KANAGAN TOASTMASTERS meet every Tuesday at 7 p.m. at the Best Western in Osoyoos. Become a more confident speaker. Call Corinne at 250-6890676 for details. VICTORY CHURCH OF Penticton has a weekly men’s breakfast bible study Tuesdays at 6 a.m. at Debbie’s Diner. PENTICTON PIECEFUL EVENING Quilt Guild meets the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Penticton Seniors Dropin Centre on 2965 South Main St. For more info call Treena 250-4978901 or Fran 250-4977850. AL-ANON for friends and family of alcoholics meets at 10:30 a.m. at 2800 South Main and 6:45 p.m. on 431 Winnipeg St. Use entrance to right of main door. 8 p.m. at the Anglican Church in Okanagan Falls. Call 250-490-9272 for information. SENIOR’S COMPUTER CLUB on 439 Winnipeg St. has membership infomation at 10:30 a.m. in

the computer annex room to be followed by a class sign-up for January and February in the main hall from 11 a.m. to noon. M ENTAL W ELLNESS CENTRE has individual support for family members in Summerland from 10 a.m. to noon. at 13211 Henry St. PENTICTON ACADEMY OF Music has the children’s choir under the direction of Joanne Forsyth for children ages five to 12 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. and a Music Ladies Choir from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Leir House on 220 Manor Park Ave. THE RED CROSS is hosting an open house at it’s Health Equipment Loan Program depot at 216 Hastings Ave. from 2 to 5:30 p.m. During the open house there will be tours of the depot and educating people on the programs and services of the Canadian Red Cross. SUMMERLAND MUSEUM HAS its annual general meeting with Susan McIvor speaking at 7 p.m. Meeting takes place at the Rebekah hall on 9536 Main St. Everyone is welcome.

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PENTICTON WESTERN NEWS March 4, 2011

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Penticton Western News  

March 4th, 2011 Edition

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