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EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

Learning to Count ath was not my easiest subject in school. Of course, I learned the multiplication tables in grade school, so I am able to do simple math equations. But it is not easy for me to calculate the sum of several numbers quickly in my head. I took one semester of geometry in high school. Alas, I cannot tell you one thing about geometry. Algebra? Forget about it. Maybe that’s because the part of my brain that controls my ability with words is more active than the part that controls my ability with numbers. Or maybe at an early age I developed a mental block about numbers. Saul of Tarsus was an educated man— he had sat at the feet of Gamaliel where he learned the Law of Moses. But Saul did not learn to count until he met Jesus of Nazareth on his way to Damascus. As he lay prostrate on the road Jesus began teaching him to count. In the process of learning to count, Saul learned what counts. Before he learned to count, Saul placed great stock in his pedigree and in his birth and station in life. He wore the badges of success with pride and honor. Before he learned to count what really counts, Saul was impressed by the trappings of his accomplishments. He carefully counted the rungs on the ladder of his upward mobility. But after his encounter with Jesus, Paul said, “What things were gain to me, these I have counted loss for Christ. Yet indeed I also count all things loss for the excellence of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and count them as rubbish, that I may gain Christ (Philippians 3:7-8, NKJV). In his comments to Ephesian church elders, Paul said, “Neither count I my life dear unto myself” (Acts 20:24). The things that once counted to Paul, no longer counted. A godless worldview teaches us to count incorrectly. A corrupt worldview shapes our values and teaches us that the wrong things count. We are led to believe

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Before he learned to count, Saul placed great stock in his pedigree and in his birth and station in life. He wore the badges of success with pride and honor. Before he learned to count what really counts, Saul was impressed by the trappings of his accomplishments. that material possessions matter more than they do. We are told that connections count. We are brainwashed into believing that life has meaning and significance only if we can claw our way to the top of the heap. What a distorted sense of values it is for us to think that our worth is tied to stuff—the car we drive, the home we live in, the labels in our clothes, the balance in our savings account, the vacations we take, the positions we hold, the bottom line. Jesus, on the other hand, teaches us to “take heed, and beware of covetousness: for a man’s life consisteth not in the abundance of the things which he possesseth” (Luke 12:15). We must not count the way the world counts. We must not take our cues from the world. We must not imitate the way the world acts and reacts. We must not use the world’s yardstick to measure our lives. Ultimately, the only thing that counts is knowing Jesus Christ. Paul counted the knowledge of Jesus far more valuable than everything he had accumulated in his entire life. He was willing to pile it up in a heap and lose it all in exchange for the knowledge of Jesus Christ his Lord. In that, he wanted to excel. However, Paul was not willing to forfeit all of his accomplishments for mere information about Jesus. He understood that knowing Christ and accumulating data

about Him were not the same. To “know” Christ, for Paul, was more than mere head knowledge; he wanted to be in Christ. Compared to that one overarching goal, Paul counted everything else as worthless refuse to be forsaken and forgotten. He said, “I count not myself to have apprehended: but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the high calling of God in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 3:13-14). Queen Victoria is quoted as saying, “My kingdom for a moment.” I read those poignant words and wonder if that was her way of saying, “I never learned to count.” I am not good at geometry and I have never tried trigonometry, but I have been learning to count what counts for most of my life. Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald. NOTE: I want to thank Cindy Miller for her invaluable help on this issue. The idea for having an issue on Women in Ministry was hers. She contacted all the writers and helped with copy editing.

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PENTECOSTAL HERALD | SEPTEMBER 2012 Fundamental Doctrine

EDITOR

Simeon Young Sr.

The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

The One True God We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain CREATIVE DIRECTOR Abraham LaVoi DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laura Merchant EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Rebecca Miller PROOFREADER Patrica Bollmann The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2012 by United Pentecostal Church International. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com Single Subscriptions (USA) $25.00 Single Subscriptions (Canada) $35.00 Single Subscriptions (Foreign) $44.00 Bundle Subscriptions (USA) $ 1.75 for 6 or more copies; $2.25 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Canada) $ 2.50 for 6 or more copies; $3.00 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Foreign) $ 3.50 for 6 or more copies; $4.00 each for 2-5 copies An international publication published monthly. VOL. 88, NO. 9. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional offices. Official publication of the UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL

Our Vision:

The Pentecostal Herald in every Pentecostal home

Our Mission:

To publish an Apostolic magazine that strengthens the hands of Apostolic pastors, encourages and challenges Apostolic believers, and reaches beyond the doors of Apostolic churches

Disclaimer:

The Pentecostal Herald (or UPCI) assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of claims of advertisers or for the quality of their service or products.

We Want to Hear from You Letters to the Editor Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or to: Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road | Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299.

Customer Care Send subscription and renewal requests and inquiries to pentecostalherald.com or email Becky Miller at bmiller@upci.org.

Advertising Go to pentecostalherald.com and follow the prompts. Follow us on Twitter

pentecostherald CORRECTION: The July 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald said in “A Call to Prayer” that Gary Reed is the area coordinator of Eastern Europe. Roger Buckland is the area coordinator of Eastern Europe. I regret the error. —Editor

HOW TO REACH US: Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299, Telephone: 1.314.837.7300 Extension 411 Email: bmiller@upci.org, main@upci.org. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com

USPS 427-240 United Pentecostal Church International GENERAL OFFICIALS

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney* GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Jerry Jones* DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell* DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton L. Coon Sr.* EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston GENERAL SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR Steve L. Cannon GENERAL YOUTH DIRECTOR Shay Mann SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Dan Batchelor

GENERAL PRESBYTERS

Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony,, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton L. Coon Sr., Floyd E. Covill, Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Alonzo Dummitt, David Elms, Daniel Fleming, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, J. Mark Jordan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Ronnie Mullings, Arthur Naylor, Gordon Parrish, John E. Putnam, David A. Robinson, D.R. Russo, William J. Singleton, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, Melvin Thacker, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, H.E. Wheatly, Steve Willeford, C. Patton Williams, Richard A. Wittmeier, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

GENERAL EXECUTIVE PRESBYTERS Clifford Barnett* David T. Elms* Rick Keyes* David MacDonald* Anthony Mangun* Bryan Parkey* Stephen Willeford* C. Patton Williams* Raymond Woodward*

HONORARY PRESBYTERS

J.R. Blackshear, Ernest Breithaupt, W.L. Clayton, B.S. Cole, Daniel Garlitz, Arless Glass, John Grant, Tommy Hudson, James Kelley, Carrol D. Kennedy, Carl Lagow, Roger Lewis, R.J. McIntyre, John D. Mean, James Merrick, Paul Price, Paul Reynolds, J.M. Russell, Harry Scism, Scotty Teets, T.F. Tenney, B.J. Thomas, Wayne Trout, G.L. Vittitow, Ted Wagner, David O. Walters, R.D. Whalen, Jesse Williams, Jack Yonts * Member of the Executive Board

EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

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ASSISTANT EDITOR

Lee Ann Alexander

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY] 6 Women in Ministry

“The United Pentecostal Church International has always recognized the ministry of women.” David K. Bernard

8 Bernadine Caldwell, Ferne Scism,

and Wanda Potter

Columns 3 | Editorial Simeon Young Sr. 11 | My Hope Radio Tiffini Countaway 14 | Letters to the Editor 21 | Book Review Vance Bowman 25 | Faith & Culture Eugene Wilson 31 | Worldline Bruce A. Howell 33 | New Start Rob Mckee 37 | Multicultural Ministries Don Hanscom Sr.

Pentecostal Life 18 | The Heart Mender Bonnie Peacock 42 | One Prayer 48 | Becoming Financially Free to Serve the Lord Matthew D. Ring

Ann Ahrens focusses on three women ministers who are used by God to bless His church. Ann Ahrens

12 Your Daughters Shall Prophesy

“I would have never guessed that my daughter would be in the ministry.” David L. Fauss with Shelaine Fauss-Everhart

16 To Be or Not to Be [Licensed]? A “His” and “Hers” perspective. Mel and Lisa Reddy

22 Interview with David Norris

“I’m a big proponent of ministry, and that includes both men and women.” Crystal Micko

29 The Lady in the Pulpit

“Women in ministry serve as role models for young women who also feel called.” Cindy Miller

32 When a Woman Holds the Hammer

“What about when God calls a woman to pick up a hammer?” Laura Payne

34 Women in the Five-Fold Ministry

“Will God use women to equip and build His church? Did God use women within Paul’s churches to bring His church to maturity?” Steven J. Beardsley

38 Agnes Rich, My Pastor

“Agnes Rich’s pulpit ministry was powerful.” J. R. Blackshear

40 Women on a Mission

“More women have valiantly responded to a missionary calling than have men.” Alan and Valerie Demos

46 The Elect Ladies

“I spent twenty-one years on the foreign mission field and my life was touched by the sacrifice of many women in ministry.” Franklin Howard

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

Women in Ministry DAV I D K . B E R N A R D

he United Pentecostal Church International has always recognized the ministry of women, including ordination to the preaching and teaching ministry. Historically, the Roman Catholic and Protestant churches restricted pulpit ministry to males, but the Holiness movement in the nineteenth century and the Pentecostal movement in the twentieth century recognized the ministry of women based on the anointing of the Spirit. In the earliest Oneness Pentecostal ministerial directory that we have (1919), 203 of 704 ministers, or 29 percent, were women. In the UPCI, women have served as general youth secretary, general Sunday school secretary, district youth president, district home missions director, Bible college president, national board member (outside North America), and General Conference evening speaker, as well as pastors, evangelists, teachers, and missionaries. My mother, Loretta Bernard, has been a licensed minister for fifty years, serving alongside my father as missionary, evangelist, teacher, writer, church planter, and pastor. For several years he pastored one church while she pastored another in metropolitan Seoul, Korea. My wife’s grandmother, Edith Sharpe, founded a church in 6

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Austin, Texas, that grew to two hundred in attendance, and she was my wife’s pastor until my wife was fifteen. I preached my first revival for Hazel Frusha, founder and pastor of the United Pentecostal Church in Marble Falls, Texas. Another pastor who gave me early opportunities to preach was Billie Fluitt, founder and pastor of the United Pentecostal Church in Johnson City, Texas. Her husband was also a licensed minister and the leader of their home, but she fulfilled the primary preaching and pastoral responsibilities. In the Old Testament God used women as judges and prophetesses. (See Judges 4:4; II Kings 22:14; Isaiah 8:3.) The new covenant opened the door for greater involvement in ministry by everyone, including public prophecy (anointed proclamation) by both male and female (Acts 2:17; I Corinthians 14:31). The general principle is that in the body of Christ opportunities are not restricted on the basis of ethnicity, socioeconomic status, or gender (Galatians 3:28). In the early church, women served in various leadership and ministry roles. The daughters of Philip were prophetesses (Acts 21:9). Priscilla was a teacher and apparently a pastor along with her husband, Aquila (Acts 18:26; Romans 16:3-5). Phoebe was a deaconness (Romans 16:1). Tryphena, Tryphosa, Persis, Euodia, and Syntyche were Paul’s coworkers in the gospel (Romans 16:12; Philippians 4:2-3). Junia was an apostle along with Andronicus, apparently her husband (Romans 16:7).

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Left to right: Loretta Bernard, Edith Sharpe, and Billie Fluitt

In dealing with a situation in Ephesus, Paul explained that women were not to usurp authority over men but were to minister under proper spiritual authority (I Timothy 2:11-12). Apparently some women there had begun teaching contrary to the established doctrine of the church. Thus he instructed Timothy, the overseer, that they had no authority to teach but needed to be silent. Because of a problem in the Corinthian church, Paul also explained that women were not to interrupt a public assembly to ask questions (I Corinthians 14:34-35). The instruction to be silent is not absolute but specific to the conditions being addressed. Otherwise, if interpreted absolutely, women could not sing, pray aloud, testify, or teach Sunday school, contrary to the principles of New Testament ministry that we have already seen. Paul taught that women could speak in public worship as long as they did so with proper respect for authority and while upholding their feminine identity (I Corinthians 11:5-6). We should recognize the ministry of women as long as they follow biblical authority in the church and in the home. The same is true of men. Women are not to imitate men but are to exercise their ministry in distinctively feminine fashion, for God has called them as women. Indeed all ministers are to fulfill their ministry in the context of their own unique identity, personality, gifts, and calling. The ministerial style of a woman will be different from that of a typical male, but it can still be effective. In fact,

we need different types of ministries and churches to reach our diverse population. We need every available worker in the harvest. Those who are dying need immediate attention, and it doesn’t matter whether the physician is male or female. We urgently need more preachers, teachers, pastors, pastoral counselors, and missionaries who can minister effectively in a variety of ways and relate to different kinds of people. There are many reasons why women in ministry should receive ministerial license: accountability to spiritual authority, validation of ministry, credibility inside and outside the church, participation in ministerial fellowship and decision making, and establishing of role models for young women who are seeking God’s will. Our world desperately needs more Apostolic ministers, both male and female. David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International. For a historical discussion see David K. Bernard, A History of Christian Doctrine, vol. 3. For a scholarly biblical discussion, see David K. Bernard, The Apostolic Life, ch. 33. For an exploration of the subject in fictional form, see David Norris, Cara’s Call. SEPTEMBER 2012

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

Bernadine Caldwell ANN AHRENS

hroughout the history of the Illinois District of the United Pentecostal Church, women have played a prominent role. Women such as Eva Hunt, Laverne McClintock, Nila Mean, and Dorothy Underwood evangelized and established new churches in the district. Among these remarkable women is Bernadine Caldwell, who at age ninety continues to pastor in Buckner, Illinois. Bernadine received the Holy Spirit in 1932 at age nine in Mt Vernon, Illinois. One year later she preached her first sermon in her living room to her mother and another woman, confirming the calling she had felt at age ten. Not until age thirty did she accept the calling because she felt she could not manage her family obligations and minister simultaneously. In 1955, what began as a one-night speaking engagement in Ashley, Illinois, continued for a month with twenty-two people being baptized and receiving the Holy Spirit. Nine months later Bernadine preached a four-week revival at Calvary Tabernacle in Indianapolis where twenty-five were baptized the Holy Spirit. The Lord continued to open opportunities to speak at churches near her home. During the summer months her children accom8

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panied her on longer trips. With the support of her husband and family, she was able to fulfill her calling while properly caring for her family. Especially appreciative of her husband, she comments, “He was always accepting of my calling and never tried to hold me back.” Once when asked how he supported her, he simply said he “rubbed her back and helped her find her glasses.” Over a fifty-seven-year span, Bernadine has ministered in twenty-seven states and now is the pastor of Full Gospel Church in Buckner, Illinois, where she has served for twenty-eight years. Although she has never kept a formal record, she estimates one thousand or more people have come to know the Lord under her ministry. Encouraged by the lively worship, Bernadine is optimistic about the state of the church. She does, however, regret the loss of extended revivals, noting that today people are distracted by the wide array of entertainment options. When asked how she would advise young ladies who desire to answer the call to preach despite resistance from within and without the church, she said, “First you are called and then you are sent. Don’t force yourself on anyone. I never asked for a revival. It is a ministry, not a business. Trust that your gifts will make room for you.”

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

Ferne Scism ANN AHRENS

or nearly as long as the UPCI has been an organized body, the name Scism has been associated with world missions, and particularly with the country of India. Ellis Scism departed the United States for India in 1949, taking his wife and children, fifteen-year-old Harry and fourteen-yearold Ferne. After being placed in an America-operated boarding school in India with her brother, Harry, upon their arrival, Ferne immediately felt the many hundreds of miles separating her from her parents. Upon graduation from the school and receiving their ministerial license, Harry and Ferne stayed in India, working alongside their parents until their seven-year term of service ended and they came home to raise funds for their return to continue the work in India. Returning to the United States was a relief for Ferne, who wanted no part of missionary work. After all, she had her own plans, hopes, and dreams for her life, and India was not a part of them. Enrolling at Conquerors Bible College in Oregon with Harry, Ferne settled in and looked forward to her life in the United States. Shortly after enrolling, Ferne was asked, with her brother, to speak at a missionary conference in British Columbia where she was as-

signed the topic “Doing the Will of God.” Conviction that God was calling her back to India sat upon her heavily as she found her way to the altar where she repented and submitted herself to the Lord’s will. After completing one year at Bible college, she prepared for the trip back to India. Returning to India, Ferne threw herself into the hard work of a missionary. Often separated from her parents for long periods, she did whatever task was assigned her, be it preaching, teaching, even working in a leper colony. Though she found joy in her work, it was not without hardship. In addition to sickness and exhaustion, she was once imprisoned from which she was miraculously delivered, walking past unmanned guard posts, much like Peter in Acts 12. For Ferne, miracles became an expected part of her life as she continued to live by faith. Upon her marriage in 1981, Ferne returned home and evangelized. Today, at age seventy-seven, Ferne continues to make herself available to the Lord, ministering across the country. Her advice to young ministers is, “Never cease to look for opportunities to work for the Lord.”

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

Wanda Potter ANN AHRENS

uthor Gregory Boyle, in his book, Tattoos on the Heart, states, “Compassion is not a relationship between the healer and the wounded. It’s a covenant between equals.” Orphaned at a young age, Wanda Louise Potter came to understand the value of compassion taught by caring family members who took her in. Alongside her husband, Wanda continued this mission, caring for orphaned boys at their Wings of Love Teenage Living Center for ten years. God took the negative circumstances of her childhood and used them to foster in her this beautiful spiritual gift. Besides caring for her younger brother, her children, and the boys at Wings of Love, Wanda supported her husband who was assistant pastor in Martinsville, Indiana. At age thirty-seven, God spoke to her about a preaching ministry, something she had never considered. Wanting to be sure it was the Lord leading her, she “fleeced” the Lord, telling Him that she would tell no one but instead wait for confirmation from another person. A few days 10

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later, her brother asked her to preach in his church. Apprehensive at first, she finally said, “I’ll come and we’ll see what the Lord does.” And so began a preaching ministry that would last well into her eighties. Staying primarily in the Indiana region, she preached revivals lasting from a few nights to ten weeks straight. Still she always managed to be home to see her children off to school and care for her family. Knowing God had called her, she never turned down a revival, sometimes taking as few as ten days off in a year. At age fifty, God opened the next chapter of her ministry, leading her overseas to several countries. Miracles came to define her ministry as God provided and used her gift of compassion to touch those who had not yet heard the gospel. She ministered regularly on Mauritius Island off the coast of Madagascar where she became affectionately known as “Mother Potter.” Her final journey at age seventy-eight took her to Kenya and Liberia where she ministered and taught in the local Bible college. At eighty-nine Wanda is still vibrant and speaks often of her love for the Lord and for the lost, praying with an authority that years have not diminished. As she continues to write, exhort, and care for people her mantra remains, “If you can love that soul, you can win that soul.”

Ann Ahrens is the music program director and assistant professor of music at Urshan College.

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MY HOPE RADIO BY TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Three Minutes with Alexa Willis

ell us a little about your family. I have a wonderful family. My parents are John and Carrie Willis. They have always been very supportive of me. Their encouraging words have helped get me to where I am today. They have always believed in me every step of the way and I thank them for that. I have been blessed with twin fourteen-year-old bothers, Collin and Parker. My brothers are awesome! We like to have jam sessions every now and then. They were able to go with me on the second recording journey. I am glad they were able to experience the studio process. Describe your spiritual journey. I was seven years old when I received the Holy Ghost. My father was doing sound at a minister’s conference and I had attended children’s church. That is where I met God. Upon returning home the next Sunday I was baptized in the name of Jesus. As far as living an overcoming life, I would first have to say that I am not perfect. There is only One who is perfect. However, we are to strive for perfection. I have fallen and made mistakes many times, but I continue to serve God and His mercy and grace have never failed me. Overcoming the obstacles of life is not always easy; but through the valleys I have always remembered that God will never give me anything that He will not equip me to handle. I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. I repeat that daily to myself, because whatever I am facing, it is not too big for God. I will overcome!   What is your music background? I have sung pretty much all my life. The first song I ever wrote (at four years old) was “Jesus Went to the Mall and Ate at Papa Hut.” Very interesting, I know. I started music at a young age. Music from all genres was playing in my house continuously. My grandparents, John and Sheila

Willis, traveled, sang, and evangelized for several years. The song “You Go” was written about them portraying their positive influence on my life. Numerous people have influenced me through the years. What are the vision, purpose, and comprehensive message in your latest CD? The vision for my latest project was to let people know there is hope. There is a song called “OK” on my latest EP. I wrote this song when I was going through a difficult time in my life. The song speaks of tests and trials. Maybe one does not understand how things used to be so simple and now they are in total chaos. The lyrics are meant to assure everyone that it will be OK. There is everlasting hope, everyone can find joy, and God will give peace that passes understanding. I have also been a victim of the lies the devil has told: “You are fat, you’re ugly, you’re worthless, no one loves you, you are nothing.” I wrote this song to tell people those are the lies of the enemy. He wants us to think these negative things that are not of God. God wants you to know that you are His. He made everyone beautiful. You’re indescribable. The next time the devil tries to fill your mind with negative thoughts, you need to say, “Wait a minute, I am His!” Describe the nature of your ministry. I sing with the praise team at First Apostolic Church, North Vernon, Indiana. I have been blessed to travel and sing at camps, conferences, youth events, and concerts. My brothers accompany me on stage and assist with music.   What do you feel is the most rewarding aspect of your ministry? Seeing people touched by God. He is the reason for putting pen to paper or picking up a microphone; it is not for anyone or anything else. When people surrender to Him and say, “Lord, I will do what You want me to do,” He honors those words.

When I sing I always pray, “God have Your way, let someone be touched, and please anoint me.” When I see someone getting a blessing from God that blesses me. What is the best musical advice you have ever been given from a mentor in music ministry? The best advice I ever received was when I was a young girl singing in our camp choir. Our director told us to pray for the anointing not only when we were taking the stage to sing, but that the anointing would follow us everywhere we went. That advice has stuck with me for years.   Who do you want to send a shout out to?  I would like to send a shout out to two of the most amazing people I know. Adam and Rebekah Phillippe. Thank you for all of your support, your prayers, and your love. I don’t know what I would do without you. You have always been there for me. Thank you for being the true friends you are. I pray God blesses you.   Where can we listen, purchase, and connect with you? You can listen on MyHopeRadio.com and purchase on iTunes, Amazon, Zune, and more. Connect with me on facebook: AlexaWillisMusic and twitter: @alexa_willis. Tiffini Countaway is the producer of MyHopeRadio.com. Like us on Facebook!

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

D AV I D L . FAU S S W I T H S H E L A I N E FAU S S - E V E R H A R T

Your Daughters Shall Prophesy everal years ago when my daughter, Shelaine, expressed a call to ministry, it was a surprise. As she described this deep spiritual experience, I listened intently, deciding to treat this conversation with the same approach and respect as I have for others who came to me over the years with a feeling that they had been called into the ministry. I allowed myself to show the excitement I felt in my heart, knowing we would wait and see when, if, and how this would unfold according to God’s will. Afterward, I found myself often pondering this in my heart. I viewed this as the continuance of God’s 12

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blessing on another generation of the rich heritage of the Fauss family. I was grateful for this turn of events. For the past fourteen years I have served as pastor of Bethel Tabernacle, a church my grandfather began on July 17, 1929, and my father has served for over fifty years. I would have never guessed that my daughter would be in the ministry, although I knew God had His hand on her life. As an adult, Shelaine had a strong desire to be used in the work of God. I felt this probably would be expressed in music, since she is gifted with talents in this area. She has served our church as minister of music since 2005. When she told me not only that she felt a call to preach, but God had confirmed it to her in many ways before she ever told anyone about it, I knew if this was God it would not go away. Over a period of several years, when either of us would bring it up in private conversation, her burden was always the same. She was

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About the photo: This was a prayer for Shelaine before she took the pulpit for the first time in Bethel Tabernacle.

constant. This was going to happen and she looked forward to it. My question was how? How would the church feel about it? I knew that during my childhood my dad and grandfather used numerous women ministers, but today? There were not that many around and it had been many years since a woman had ministered in our church. During Bethel Tabernacle’s eightieth anniversary celebration, we highlighted the generations of Fauss ministry in our church. I asked Shelaine to follow me and my dad as we talked about our fathers in the ministry. It was here that she expressed publicly for the first time that she felt the burden and call to preach. Our church received this unexpected news with excitement. About a year after the anniversary, Shelaine and I decided to do what we called “tag-team preaching” for her first time to speak in one of our Sunday services. Although she had spoken on numerous occasions in youth services, this would be the first to the congrega-

tion. I allowed her to choose the message she felt on her heart, then we divided the message in two parts. She would open and I would close. God moved in that service in a wonderful way. The church was touched and challenged greatly. God’s approval on the service was an encouragement to my daughter in the launching of her ministry. Since that time she has spoken on numerous occasions and God has blessed. It is exciting to see what God will do through her calling as her ministry develops. As it is with all ministers, timing is important for women in ministry. In today’s church it is not often that a young lady expresses a call into the ministry. Finding the direction of God in this area is important. After Shelaine’s announcement that she felt called, I purposely waited to use her. This allowed the people time to accept it. By the time she spoke for the first time, our congregation was anxious to hear her. For those with this burden, patience is necessary. SEPTEMBER 2012

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In today’s church, we often think of ministers only in the male gender. The Scriptures, however, show there were also women used in the ministry in the New Testament church. You do not have to go past Acts 2 to see it is in the plan of God: “Your sons and your daughters shall prophesy” (Acts 2:17). Also, one of the great doctrines of holiness in Scripture concerning women and long hair mentions it. “But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head” (I Corinthians 11:5). Prophesying here not only means foretelling, but also declaring under the inspiration of God. Without a doubt, it is God’s plan to use women in ministry today. I embrace it! David L. Fauss serves as pastor at Bethel Tabernacle in Houston, Texas. He has held credentials with the UPCI for forty years. He presently serves as a committee member for the Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism. Shelaine Fauss-Everhart is the minister of music at Bethel Tabernacle in Houston, Texas. She graduated with her bachelors degree in psychology from University of St. Thomas. She is wife to Shawn Everhart and mother to Ainsley Everhart.

A few words from

Shelaine Fauss-Everhart

I

think one of the hardest things for a woman who feels called into ministry is making her calling known to those around her. I am blessed to have a wonderful support group in my family and church family. It took me several years to muster up the courage to tell my pastor—who also happens to be my dad—that I felt that God had called me. I had no idea how he’d respond or if he would feel it too. I did know I had placed my life in God’s hands. He reassured me that He had a plan for me. Thankfully, my dad became one of my biggest supporters and joined with me in praying about what the future held for me. I would like to challenge the women who may be struggling with fear and insecurity to step out and make your calling known. Pray about it and then go to your pastor. God will help you. The calling of God is not exclusive to male or female. God needs both men and women to work diligently in this last hour of the church. There is a field to be harvested, and all who are called need to be laboring while it is day.

Letters to the Editor For me the June 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald certainly lived up to its mission to “inform” its readers of things that likely they would not have read elsewhere. Eugene Wilson’s article “A Right to Life” fits this description. Maybe I have been living under a rock and have been missing news like this, but I was very thankful to the Pentecostal Herald for bringing me such current and important information. —Granville McKenzie Thank you for the marvelous job you and your team have done and are doing with our flagship magazine. —L. Chancy Gore I’m from the United Pentecostal Church of Batavia, New York. Our pastor is John Hatch. We’ve just begun a wonderful Spanish ministry. Do you offer the Pentecostal Herald in a Spanish version as well as English? Please let me know as soon as possible. I’d love to share this magazine with our newest converts. —Jennifer Urvizu Editor’s response: Thank you for your inquiry. The Pentecostal Herald is published only in English. 14

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I enjoyed Daniel Buford’s article “What Goes on in a Pentecostal Church” in the August 2012 Pentecostal Herald. Thanks for sharing your experience. —Steve Drury “What Goes On in a Pentecostal Service?” was an exceptional article in the August 2012 Pentecostal Herald. Not only do I always enjoy Daniel Buford’s writing style, I also like the subject matter. His articles always appear so classy and to the point, but with plenty of human interest and warmth included. He makes writing look so easy; don’t know how he does it! —Sue Woolley

Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or to: Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

To Be or Not to Be [Licensed]? A “His” and “Hers” Perspective MEL AND LISA REDDY Lisa’s Story n many ways my story was no different from other young ministers, except that I was a girl. I can take you back to the spot where I received my calling from God. I was sixteen years old, in St. Louis for a Youth on Missions training just prior to my two-week journey. A group of girls were having a prayer meeting in our room at the Mary K motel. A precious young lady was praying with me, and God used her through tongues and interpretation to speak into my life. I was humbled and in awe. In the weeks to come, I sought further confirmation from God that I had correctly understood His call in my life. Each time He let me know that He had not changed His mind and that He knew what He was doing with me. From that point forward I tried my best to serve faithfully in whatever ministry opportunity arose and gave God space to open doors in His time. I preached my first sermon in a chapel service during my junior year at Meredith College. I was selected by my peers to speak, and my pastor, Ray Cole, drove forty-five minutes to offer his support. His encouragement did not stop there however; he asked if I would preach the same sermon on Sunday night at our church. The message was about giving God our dreams and allowing Him to fulfill His call in our lives. The sweet irony was that through his blessing my pastor had given me permission to submit to the dreams God had for my own life. In the years to come I learned the challenges of being a single lady in ministry. For the most part I learned to keep my calling to myself and to minister only to youth and ladies. By the time I learned those unspoken guidelines I was engaged to be married. Suddenly the rules changed. A well-meaning minister’s wife instructed me that I needed to be very careful not to let my ministry bring shame to my husband. She cautioned that my husband’s ministry would be limited because many people would not support a woman in the pulpit. She warned that most of all, I could not let my gifts overshadow my husband’s abilities, and for that reason it was probably best for me to step back from my calling. I never forgot her warning, and subconsciously I found myself tuning out God’s call in my life. I was now a preacher’s wife. 16

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My calling, God’s dreams for me, my role in His kingdom—I quietly wrestled with these elements of my faith and identity. As a single woman in ministry I possessed God-confidence in my calling. As a married woman in ministry I wanted to hide behind my husband. I rationalized that it would be unfair for my husband to be ridiculed because of my calling. I did not need to be licensed because he was licensed and his voice could speak for me. But God nudged my heart, “What about the voice I have given you?” Mel urged me, “Isn’t God’s calling on your life bigger than who accepts us or rejects us?” That initial sermon on the topic of allowing God’s dreams to become our dreams seemed a million miles away. I no longer possessed the courage to do the very thing I encouraged others to do. I did not want my calling to cause pain for our family. Thankfully, I have an amazing and incredibly gifted husband who loves me, believes in me, and is secure in his own calling. Through his encouragement, Mel helped me to see that God called us and that he could not be fulfilled in ministry unless I was living out everything God had for me. As a ministry team, we both had to be fully surrendered to the calling God had placed on our lives. I do not necessarily need a ministerial license to serve in my current capacity at our church. For our journey, however, I did need a license to affirm once again that I was fully surrendered to God’s calling in my life. My license validates to others the giftings God has placed in my life and reminds me that He is faithful to complete the work He begins in us.

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Mel’s Story y commitment to God’s call in my wife’s life is based on firm convictions I hold, convictions that were birthed from the study of God’s Word and then affirmed through our personal experiences. In the face of rampant cultural biases Paul established the leveling effects of the cross in Galatians 3:28: “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.” One of the benefits of Christ’s shed blood is that all believers are in Christ, and God exhibits no partiality among His children. Experientially, Lisa’s life and ministry demonstrate this biblical truth as well. God called her to minister on His behalf, as a woman. Her gender does not limit her capacity to minister; rather, she offers a different yet complementary perspective in our congregation that would be missing if I were the sole voice they heard. When we shared with our congregation that Lisa would receive her ministerial license I expressed to them that it really did not change anything she was doing in our local context. From our

church’s beginning she has been doing the work of a pastor. Becoming licensed was a step that honored the calling of God in her life and validated the ministry she has performed for the past twenty years. Further, it gave Lisa another level of accountability in her life as she pledged to submit to our governing body and affirmed the fundamental doctrines of our organization. Finally, it modeled our commitment to empower all believers to seek and cherish God’s calling in their lives and to courageously live their lives in such a manner that glorifies God through the unique work He desires them to accomplish. Ultimately, calling comes from God and cannot be given or limited by people. Surrendering to the call of God is a life-long process, not a once-and-for-all event. Most often it is the continued “Yes, Lord” that determines the shape and depth of our ministry, rather than our initial response to His calling. Pursuing ministerial license is an important aspect of our ongoing response to that call because it allows a community of fellow laborers to affirm the work of God and bless one’s ministry moving forward. When we all commit to blessing the God-given dreams of others, we will find there is room for everyone to serve in the kingdom of God. Mel and Lisa Reddy are blessed to pastor The Sanctuary in Cedar Park, Texas. Their home is full of joy and laughter thanks to their two-year-old miracle from God, Jude Jameson Reddy. SEPTEMBER 2012

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

The Heart Mender BONNIE PEACOCK

e’s gone.” The words sliced through my heart. His struggle was over, but it was difficult to comprehend. My father’s body was still; thin beyond belief. He had fought valiantly, but his eightyeight-year-old body had failed him. I had chosen to spend the night with him at Hospice House where I placed my cot alongside his bed. My mother and brothers had gone home to sleep for a few hours. We knew the end was near, but denial had kept us going for months. Our pastor came to pray for my father around midnight. I doubt my dad heard his words of reassurance, but I needed them. “Brother Emery, your living right is about to pay off. You have nothing to fear. You are about to step through a door. God is waiting, and there is peace. The part of you that chose to come to church and decided which tie to wear will never die. You are going to leave this rickety body and continue living the eternal life. I will see you on the other side.” As I waited for my family to return, I sat alone with my father. Amid scattered thoughts, I realized something: I can feel God. I have peace. Peace? How is that possible? I thought of the changes, illnesses, and stresses that had been a part of the last few years. After a lifetime of shouldering responsibilities, facing commitments, paying bills, and caring for his family, little by little, bits of my father’s life had been erased. These changes affected the entire family. During one discouraging time I had asked God, “Please give me good memories. I don’t want this to be all I remember.” As I sat, holding my father’s still warm hand, I realized that God had answered my prayers. It wasn’t the pain and struggles I remembered. It was the good times that filled my mind. I had read the Scripture, “I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you” (John 14:18). But it was at that moment I realized how precious this promise is to a believer. As grief overwhelmed me, I felt the presence of God. I sensed His arms around me. During the days, weeks, and months that followed, each time I found myself 18

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in the throes of grief I would feel God surround me with His love, comfort, and peace. Life is brutal. No one is exempt. When problems, crises, and grief avalanche through our lives, we are left reeling and broken. Have you ever wondered where God is in the midst of your pain? I have. Disaster never comes alone. Catastrophes have aunts, uncles, and cousins. When one visits, they all come. It is amazing the domino effect that is set in motion with one mishap. The feelings of helplessness and hopelessness are paralyzing. When prolonged problems have invaded my life, I have found myself unable to pray beyond, “Please don’t let me have an accident on my way home.” Or “Lord, I don’t know how to put one foot in front of the other. You’re going to have to help me through get this day.” I have whined and questioned God. I have even failed to read His Word. Yet when I did not know where He was, He never left me. Job also encountered a time of searching for God amid problems, trials, and pain. He said, “Behold, I go forward, but he is not there; and backward, but I cannot perceive him … But he knoweth the way that I take” (Job 23:8, 10). The psalmist also admitted to despair and desperation: “I cried unto the Lord with my voice … I poured out my complaint before him: I shewed before him my trouble. When my spirit was overwhelmed within me, then thou knewest my path” (Psalms 142:1-3). I have reached the conclusion that it is possible to survive anything as long as God is there. And He is always present. He promised, “I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee” (Hebrews 13:5). No wonder David wrote, “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me” (Psalms 23:4). My father’s favorite hymn was “What a Friend.” Jesus is our friend, our healer, and our Savior. He heals broken lives, broken bodies, broken minds, broken families, and broken hearts. “What a privilege to carry everything to God in prayer!” Bonnie Peacock passed from this life on June 5, 2012, in Odessa, Texas. Terry Pugh was her pastor.

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BOOK REVIEW BY VANCE BOWMAN

You Wouldn’t Want An Ostrich For Your Mama By Carlton L. Coon Sr. o ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the world. Amen” (Matthew 28:19-20). These words, spoken by Jesus Christ, are referred to as the Great Commission, the plan He desired His disciples to follow in building His kingdom. The mission has not changed over the course of the last two thousand years. Go … Teach … Baptize … Teach. Yes, the word teach appears again after baptism. The Lord did not want His disciples to simply go and make converts. His plan was for them to make disciples. Therefore, after baptism there must be continued teaching in order to turn the new convert into a committed disciple. Far too many souls have been lost due to a lack of discipleship. While it is not likely that we can retain every convert, we must do all we can to disciple each and every one. My last statement is the heartbeat of an excellent new book by Carlton L. Coon Sr. entitled You Wouldn’t Want an Ostrich For Your Mama. Coon serves as the director of North American Missions for the United Pentecostal Church International. He is passionate about new church planting. And as you will see when you read this book, he understands, believes, and preaches that churches are built by the process of disciplemaking. In the first chapter of You Wouldn’t Want an Ostrich For Your Mama, you will discover that the “Bottom Line” (chapter title) of the church is to make disciples. In this chapter he quotes something said by John Wesley: “How dare you lead people to Christ without providing opportunity

for growth and nurture! Anything less than growth and nurture is simply begetting children for the murderer.” In this quote we can see the necessity of teaching, training, nurturing, and mentoring new converts. Later in chapter one he lists a few reasons that discipleship fails, expounding on each: 1) We diminish the significance of the baby we have in pursuit of the one yet to be born; 2) The grand is more attractive than the consistent; 3) Disciple-making is hard work. The first chapter leaves the reader with the challenge that the development of a disciple is a job that requires the involvement of the entire church. The title of this book came from a passage in the Book of Job: “Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich? which leaveth her eggs in the earth, and warmeth them in dust, and forgetteth that the foot may crush them, or that the wild beast may break them. She is hardened against her young ones, as though they were not hers: her labour is in vain without fear; because God hath deprived her of wisdom, neither hath he imparted to her understanding. What time she lifteth up herself on high, she scorneth the horse and his rider” (Job 39:13-18). An ostrich isn’t a quality mother. Every new believer deserves a mother (church) who cares and comforts. Just as the rearing of a child isn’t instantaneous, the author understands the making of a disciple isn’t an overnight endeavor. Consider this passage from the book: “Making disciples cannot be rushed. There has to be a progressive revelation of God. Think of how little the average new convert actually knows about God and the Bible. Giving that new believer the knowledge base to become what they can become takes time.” You Wouldn’t Want an Ostrich For Your Mama does more than remind the

reader of the need to make disciples; it gives advice on how to get the job done and it contains comprehensive tools to assist us in the process. One of the many characteristics of the book that I appreciated most is how the author presents dilemma after dilemma that many of our churches have and then answers every one with a remedy that is clear and thorough. I found myself thinking, OK that’s my church, but what do I do about it and That’s the way we’ve always done it, how do we change? As soon as I thought those things, the answers to my questions were on the page before me. In You Wouldn’t Want an Ostrich For Your Mama you will find in-depth ways to begin a discipleship class as well as how to access materials. You will discover three vital objectives for making disciples. You will be given ideas on how to create hunger for the Word in the new believer. You will see the necessity and power of prayer in the disciple-making process. You will understand how vital an altar counselor is and exactly what his or her role should be. The author also provides information for other resources to aid the reader in the making of disciples. This timely book can be read in a day or two. You will be blessed by reading You Wouldn’t Want an Ostrich For Your Mama. It is available as an e-book through pentecostalpublishing.com and hmdsales.com. Vance Bowman is the pastor of the United Pentecostal Church in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

C R YS TA L M I C KO

Interview with David Norris about Cara’s Call

n 2011, David S. Norris, a professor at UGST and ordained minister in the United Pentecostal Church International wrote a book entitled Cara’s Call. It is a story about a girl, Cara, who finds God calling her to ministry in His kingdom. There are moments of humor, sadness, joy, and love. The book is filled with layers of stories that capture your heart and attention. In the moments of uncertainty in Cara’s life, the reader is filled with parallel feelings. The questions of how God can and will fulfill the dreams He has given take hold of the reader. Whether you are a woman or a man, the book will speak to you. We have all struggled with questions of faith, questions that ponder the power and purpose of God. But, where did these stories come from? Where did Norris find the inspiration to create these characters? Why did Norris write Cara’s Call? In an interview with Norris, I found some of these answers.

David Norris: I’m a big proponent of ministry, and that includes both men and women.

Crystal Micko: Are you a big proponent of women in ministry?

CM: What kind of teaching?

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CM: But you wrote what some may call a controversial novel about women in ministry, didn’t you? DN: You could call it a novel, but it’s very real, a narrative I have heard more than once. CM: In your book, Cara’s Call, you tell a specific story of a young lady who wants to minister. Both her father and her boyfriend question her call. They are both ministers. That sounds somewhat controversial to me. DN: When the UPC was formed, about 22 percent of licensed ministers were women. Because of a certain kind of teaching that became prevalent, that percentage has shrunk to around 3 percent.

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DN: I first learned about it when I was a teenager and asked a question to my grandmother, Jessie A. Norris, a licensed minister who taught at Apostolic Bible Institute (ABI). CM: What did you ask? DN: I asked her how she reconciled her teaching in the classroom with passages in I Timothy and I Corinthians that seems to prohibit women from doing so.

CM: Did that answer satisfy you? DN: Not really. She was over seventy years old at the time and had been teaching for decades. It seemed to me that if God was really interested in finding a man, He could have probably already accomplished it. Besides, my grandmother was a very anointed teacher. The clear evidence of her calling was obvious to anyone whenever she taught. CM: But why did your grandmother believe what she did?

CM: What did she say?

DN: It was only a few years ago that I discovered where her ideas about women in ministry originated. In an interview, Catherine Chambers shared a book with me written against women in ministry utilizing the very words my grandmother shared with me. It was written by a very prominent leader from about the time when the UPCI was formed.

DN: She said, “God uses a woman until He can find a man.”

CM: How did you come to believe in women in ministry?

CM: Did that offend her? DN: I wasn’t trying to offend her, but I think I did. I just wanted to have clarity.

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DN: When I studied the text in the original language and context, it seemed very clear to me that not only did the New Testament not prohibit women in ministry; it encouraged it. CM: But back to the controversial points in your book. You seem to treat the ministry of men and woman as somehow equal. DN: For ten years I served as dean of theology at Kent Christian College under Janet Trout. What was refreshing to me at the college was the way there was room for both men and women to freely develop in their ministries. Gender simply was not a hindrance. CM: But why should women be licensed as ministers? Can’t they minister without a license? DN: I suppose so. But couldn’t that same sort of logic apply to men? Couldn’t men do ministry without getting a license? The real question is why anyone should bother being ordained for ministry in the first place. The answer, of course, is that it is a biblical mandate to do so. When we as the UPCI credential someone to minister, we are publicly acknowledging that person as a God-called minister and are as well providing mutual accountability. It is vital for someone who is called and is active in ministry to pursue a path to licensure, whether the person is a man or a woman. CM: You still haven’t answered what prompted you to write a book about a girl called to ministry. DN: I have been thinking about this subject for a long time. But a couple of years ago, I was with Claudette Walker and some other ladies at a meeting where they were mentoring young pastor’s wives. A number of these ladies sensed God’s call on their lives in specific ways and were already active in speaking in their church, but they were very sensitive to criticism. They didn’t want to put a label on what they were doing. Even Claudette Walker, one of the most anointed speakers I know, seemed hesitant. She said something like, “I teach but I’m not a preacher.” That upset me. I said, “If you’re not a preacher, then no one’s a preacher.” More than anything else, it was that incident that motivated me to complete Cara’s Call.

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It is vital for someone who is called and is active in ministry to pursue a path to licensure, whether the person is a man or a woman. CM: Where can someone get a copy of the book? DN: You can purchase Cara’s Call from North American Missions Department or on Amazon.com. I also have a website carascall.com, which highlights young women in ministry. CM: What kind of response are you getting from Cara’s Call? DN: Mostly positive. Cara’s Call reminds people who they are. It weaves a narrative of how someone can wait for God to open doors that seem to be absolutely closed. Young women tell me that the book helps them see a path; more seasoned women in ministry have also found the book incredibly affirming to them. District superintendents have shared that this is a much-needed book. We must not forget that Jesus gave us a very specific prayer request: to pray for laborers to enter a field that is white and ready for harvest. The same One who calls men and women is also the One who leads us in right paths. With seven billion people in need of the gospel, we dare not forget our Pentecostal roots. Again, it is God who calls. We can’t altogether know God’s plan, but we can certainly understand His heart. Crystal Micko holds her general license, works as a hospital chaplain, is an MDiv student at UGST, and attends New Life Center with Luke Schmalz, her fiancé. Garry Tracy is the pastor.

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FAITH & CULTURE BY EUGENE WILSON

There Is Room at the Cross for All hild sex abuse is a problem of epic proportions. The negative impact of child sexual abuse lingers long after the initial act. The psychological, emotional, physical, and social effects of child sexual abuse include depression, eating disorders, and poor self-esteem. Behavior problems involving substance abuse and self-destructive behavior are also common. Moreover, the abused often experience spiritual problems while struggling to understand why a loving God would allow such things to happen. Others believe they are responsible for what occurred and experience unwarranted feelings of guilt. Child sex abuse is defined by the America Society on the Abuse of Children as the “maltreatment that involves the child in sexual activity to provide sexual gratification or financial benefit to the perpetrator.” Forms of child sex abuse include asking or pressuring a child to engage in sexual activities, indecent exposure with sexual intentions, and physical sexual contact with a child. According to research, approximately one out of every six boys and one out of every four girls are sexually abused. Yet in spite of the millions of victims, many people mistakenly believe that child sex abuse has nothing to do with them. However, nothing could be further from the truth. An editorial in Christianity Today titled “The ‘Monsters’ Among Us: How Christians Should Respond to the Child Sex Abusers in Our Midst” stated, “Faith-based institutions can no longer afford to assume that predators are somewhere ‘out there’ over the clean Christian rainbows. They are not just in college locker rooms and Catholic rectories either.” Sexually abused people sit on our church pews each Sunday, and some of them are children who are presently being abused. Protect the Innocent Research shows that most child sex abuse offenders are well acquainted with their victims: approximately 30 percent are related to the child and 60 percent are

William Struthers, a neuroscientist at Wheaton College, asks, “Christ died for the murderer and the thief—did he not also die for the child molester? Or am I going to create categories of people who are no longer able to be saved by the blood of Christ?” close friends of the family, babysitters, or neighbors, while strangers account for approximately 10 percent of child sexual abuse cases. These statistics show that children are more at risk of being harmed by those who should be watching out for them. The family and friend connection explains why so many children never tell. They want to protect their abuser because he or she is part of their family, or is a close friend of the family, and they want to save others from the pain of knowing. Most of our efforts in preventing child sexual abuse are focused on protecting our children from the stranger. However, as the research indicates, we would be better served by focusing our efforts on protecting our children from those who are not strangers—the molesters who are in our families and are our friends. Just because a person calls himself or herself a Christian does not mean he or she is living like one. We must be wise and observant, and we must educate ourselves about who our children are with. It is our responsibility as adults to protect our children to the best of our ability. One mother told her daughter who had been sexually abused that she too had been abused as a child and that her daughter just needed to get over it. This was not a proper response. If a child has been sexually abused we must be supportive and help bring healing. And we must be careful not to downplay the abuse or blame the child. Our response can go a long way in helping to bring about healing.

Extend Grace to the Perpetrator Jesus said, “It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck, and he were thrown into the sea, than that he should offend one of these little ones” (Luke 17:2). However, hope is not lost. William Struthers, a neuroscientist at Wheaton College, asks, “Christ died for the murderer and the thief—did he not also die for the child molester? Or am I going to create categories of people who are no longer able to be saved by the blood of Christ?” Christianity Today’s editorial’s conclusion was, “Restoring molesters doesn’t mean full or automatic inclusion in community life. It certainly means jail time, psychological testing, and an intensive recovery program. It should mean complete barring from children’s ministry. But for the gospelshaped community, it will, by God’s grace, also mean holding on to hope that the lives destroyed by the molester—among them his own—will be made new on the Final Day by the loving judgment of Jesus.” I agree. There is room at the cross for all. Eugene Wilson and his family are transitioning to Dallas, Texas, where he will be involved in the training and developing of leaders and planting churches.

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am

10:00 – 11:00

am

am

9:00 – 10:00

10:00 – 11:00

(Room 132)

5:00 – 7:00 pm Friday – Ken Stewart, Rick Perry, Brent Brosam, George Szabolcsi, Clarence Jackson

5:00 – 7:00 pm Thursday – Darrell Collins, Jay Jones, Scott Sistrunk, Steve Smith

5:00 – 7:00 pm Wednesday – Edwin Forkpa, Tim Gaddy, Jim Lumpkin, Jerald Staten

Receive answers to your questions from veteran church planters, daughter work planters, and metro missionaries in the NAM booth.

Bring your children to the NAM booth and they can “build a church” while you shop.

“Build a church” for children

What’s going on in the NAM booth?

pm

Visit www.namupci.com for more information.

Church Planting Life the Book of Acts (Tim Gaddy) Why Young Men Plant Churches (Rashidi Collins, Jimmy Toney & Mark Brown)

(Room 132)

Establishing a Launch: Your Ministry in Your Local Church (Forum with Nathan Scoggins & Mark Johnson) Establishing Preaching Points CrossCulturally (Forum with Randy Keyes, Bill Chapman & Paul Graham)

Friday, October 5th

am

9:00 – 10:00

Thursday, October 4th

Speaker: Jimmy Toney St. Louis, Missouri | America’s Center

Thursday, October 4, 2012 @ 7:00

iChurch Seminars

7/27/12 7/6/12 8:57 9:23 AM


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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

The Lady in the Pulpit CINDY MILLER

tanding in a small airport bookstore scanning the magazine options for the flight home, my eye caught the title of an article on the cover of Newsweek: “Women Make Lousy Men.” Intrigued I bought the magazine. The author, Kathleen Parker, spoke of American women who “in trying to find a place in a male-ordered world were not just trying to be as good as men, but to be men.” She looked forward to “the day when women will no longer have to twist into male versions of themselves.” My curiosity was stirred and the phrase “women make lousy men” stuck in my thinking. I frequently reread Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s Gift from the Sea. Shortly after the airport encounter with Newsweek magazine I decided to peruse the book once again. It was on page fifty-one that I had another jolt when I read, “But in our recent efforts to emancipate ourselves, to prove ourselves the equal of man, we have naturally enough perhaps, been drawn into competing with him in his outward activities, to the neglect of our own inner springs.” Fifty years prior to Parker’s article Morrow had already observed the propensity of women to twist into male versions of themselves and she knew that women truly do make lousy men. Is it possible that in trying to fulfill a call within a primarily malepopulated ministry arena and male-governed denomination, women have misunderstood the purpose for which God called them? Coming to understand the simple beauty of the fact that God not only needed another preacher, teacher, pastor, evangelist, He needed me—a woman—was truly liberating. Since I believe God called me, a woman, to minister then I must believe it is the very quality of being a woman that makes my calling specific and unique. Janet Parshall said it well: I took my definition from a higher source. I knew that God, in His infinite wisdom, had created me as a woman purposely. He had a custom designed plan for my life and part of His purpose was to make me female. I did not consider that fashioning to be a deficit, but rather a reflection of His imprint on my life. Understanding the value of being a woman should enlarge your vision for fulfilling your calling. Your gender should be a launching pad rather than a stumbling block. In accepting your calling you also celebrate what only you can bring to the ministry. There are God-given differences between men and women, and working together allows us to represent Him more fully and effectively. You are not going out

into a man’s world to do a man’s job. You are entering into the field of your calling, chosen for you by God, because you have the specific requirements to successfully accomplish what He has called you to do. Being a woman in ministry brings many privileges, and with every privilege comes responsibility. We have the privilege of ministering and the responsibility to do so in a distinctively feminine fashion. We are not competing with or trying to imitate men. We can be feminine and still minister under the anointing of God. I will always be grateful for the example and influence of Isabel Schweiger in my life. She was a powerful preacher and a feminine pastor. Being kind, gentle, and ladylike did not hinder her effectiveness in the pulpit or as a pastor. She was loved, respected, and willingly followed by everyone in her congregation. She modeled for me how to be a lady in the pulpit. Women in ministry serve as role models for young women who also feel called to ministry and are looking to us for guidance. Amazing women have gone before us paving the way for us to follow. We should continue to generously make room for and give place to those who come after us by sharing the life lessons many had to learn the hard way. What life lessons would I like to share with women struggling in their calling or frustrated in their ministry? Women make lousy men. Twisting yourself into some masculine version of preacher and competing with men causes you to lose focus and other women to lose face. Using your gender as an excuse to avoid your calling is unacceptable. God would never call you to do something you could not succeed in. If God called you, He will equip you and open the doors for you. Being the woman God called you to be is liberating. The real women’s liberation movement will occur when women embrace their callings and live out who they were meant to be—created in the image of God. The questions have been answered. The arguments addressed. The issue is not can you but will you? This is a great time for you, a woman called by God, to step forward and bring to the ministry what only you can bring. Cindy Miller is a licensed minister, associate pastor, with her husband, Stanton, of Calvary Tabernacle UPC of Wrightstown, New Jersey. She is also professor of Practical Theology at Urshan Graduate School of Theoloogy.

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COMING SOON... Available at General Conference 2012

BREAD One Year Bible Presenting a convenient way to read the entire Bible in one year, this resource provides a selection of Scriptures to read each day in an easily accessible format. SPECIAL FEATURES: • Daily readings to complete the Bible in one calendar year • King James Version • Coordinates with annual BREAD program • Passages from the Old and New Testaments for each day

• Focused thoughts to begin each reading • A certificate for recording your completion of reading the Bible • Detachable book marks

In Case You Were Wandering By Travis Miller

In Case You Were Wandering is a book and small group resource designed to help twentysomethings find direction, discover God’s leading, and locate like-minded believers along the way. While the book is valuable on its own, the small group resource packages a book, DVD, and Facilitator’s Guide to make In Case You Were Wandering a dynamic curriculum for older teens and college age groups.

Also Available at General Conference: Devotions With Dad

The War Within – The Gladiator

A collection of 52 devotions dads can share with their children.

This exciting new fiction book takes readers through the perilous life of the gladiator Antonius in AD 196. When tragedy befalls him and his family, Antonius finds vengeance consuming his life, and he must make the gripping choice between his faith and his duty to his emperor.

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By Nathan D. Maki

The Master’s Cowboy: the Life of Arless Glass By Arless Glass

Read the compelling biography of longtime pastor and leader Arless Glass.

www.pentecostalpublishing.com | 866.819.7667 30

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JUNE 2012

7/27/12 2:20 2:17 PM


8:55 AM

WORLD LINE BY BRUCE A. HOWELL

A King’s Ransom he idea of a king’s ransom comes from the great sum it would cost to pay for a hostage king to be freed. Richard I of England (Richard the Lionheart, as we remember him from childhood tales of Robin Hood) is probably the most well known example of a ransomed king. Encyclopedia Britannica tells the story of how he was captured while returning from a crusade. An estimate cited by the BBC online magazine says England had to pay the equivalent of more than three billion dollars in today’s value for his release. As born-again believers, we have a story to tell about a King’s ransom. But it was not our King’s release that was paid for. It was ours! We did not pay the cost. Our King paid it all! And it was costly. Peter said we were redeemed “with the precious blood of Christ” (I Peter 1:18-19). No other price would have been adequate. He ransomed everyone who had ever been a prisoner to sin from captivity. “The man Christ Jesus … gave himself a ransom for all” (I Timothy 2:5-6). Now, “whosoever will” can come to freedom. The challenge, as always, is getting this good news to the prisoners. A World Bank report in 2008 revealed that more than three billion people today live on less than two dollars and fifty cents per day. That’s almost half the world’s population. We in North America are blessed materially, but it is not without purpose. The Lord has put the resources and the responsibility in our hands to lead the way in reaching the entire world with the gospel before He returns. Financial poverty, while truly difficult, is nothing compared to spiritual poverty. The greatest need today is not to have money—it is for people to go into

all the world and preach the gospel to every creature! Going enables that preaching. Praying enables that preaching. Giving enables that preaching. It has been calculated that for approximately every three hundred dollars given to Global Missions, one soul is born again somewhere around the world. Of course, it is not possible to put monetary value on a priceless soul that Christ died for. Whether we are able to give millions or a widow’s mite, our giving makes a difference. In one example of this, Eddy and Della Mae Kennedy wrote from New Caledonia about a letter they received from a sixth-grade girl in New Hampshire named Rachael. One night while her grandmother was praying, Rachael decided to give all of a twenty-dollar birthday gift to missionaries. Every sacrifice, great or small, helps make the difference for lost souls. The more resources are available, the more fuel it is possible to buy for Bennie and Theresa DeMerchant’s plane in the Brazilian Amazon and Steve and Kari Shirley’s Sheaves For Christ vehicle in the Dominican Republic. The more resources are available, the more invitations Kirby and Mary Parker can print and pass out in Malta, and the more bricks Curtis and Amanda Scott can witness being laid in the new seminary in Pakistan. The more you and I give, the more Bibles Peter and Robyn Gration can give to people in Vanuatu, and the longer AIMers Chris and Penny Gibbs can keep ministering in Malawi, even after the government has devalued the national currency. The more resources are available, the longer missionaries can remain in distant nations, paying for the necessities of groceries, rent, and electricity. The more we give to

“As born-again believers, we have a story to tell about a King’s ransom. But it was not our King’s release that was paid for. It was ours! We did not pay the cost. Our King paid it all!”

the work of the Lord, the more people can be ransomed from the path to Hell. Here are some reports of what your giving has made possible: Darry Crossley reported from Chile: “Simultaneously the power of the Holy Ghost and a 7.2 quake rocked Chile. At a conference in Santiago, a total of fifty-three received the Holy Ghost, twenty-five proclaimed healing, and the glory of the Lord filled the house. As the earth trembled, we kept on exalting this precious name, Jesus.” Kathy Crossley wrote about a conference in Argentina: “A sacrificial spirit descended in one service with people giving money, watches, and wedding rings, which amounted to twenty thousand dollars. People were instantly healed. One pastor’s wife was healed when she gave, not even thinking of her need for a miracle. Her rotator cuff was totally destroyed and she could not lift her arm at all. She realized after giving that she was raising her arm above her head!” Vladimir and Kim Goodrum wrote from Paraguay, “Eleven more men were baptized in the prison where we continue to preach and teach every week. With a new trailer to haul all the equipment, the evangelism team has already facilitated two three-day tent revivals, and a total of nine people received the Holy Ghost and three were baptized. We have kept the duplicator busy printing thousands of invitations to special events and tracts that boldly share the Acts 2:38 message.” Your giving directly enables this work of missions around the world. Our missionaries often say in their newsletters to Partners in Missions, “We could not do what we do without you.” Yes, it’s true. Your giving gets the word out about the King’s ransom. Bruce Howell is the general director of Global Missions. He seeks with a passion to spread the Word of our King and His ransom throughout the entire world.

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Jael and Sisera by Gustave Doré

[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

When a Woman Holds the Hammer L A U R A PAY N E

here once was a woman who used her feminine wiles and gift of hospitality to trick an unsuspecting evil captain. She invited him into her cool tent, away from the heat of battle, and served him soothing milk to quench his thirst. But when he fell asleep, she took up a hammer and violently drove a tent peg through his temple. The story is found in Judges 4. The enemy of God’s people was defeated at the hands of a brave hostess named Jael. Women are often trademarked in the church for their gifts of hospitality and service. Need a decorator? Call a woman. Need food for a banquet? Call a woman. Does the situation demand compassion or nurturing or soothing? Call a woman. We perpetuate this paradigm by frequently teaching our young girls the story of Esther, who skillfully employed her beauty and won the affection of a king, thereby saving her people. Even Martha, who was somewhat rebuked by Jesus for occupying herself with busywork, still earns our kudos for her servant’s heart. There is no doubt that the kingdom of God has been greatly enriched because women have lent their feminine touch. But what about when God calls a woman to pick up a hammer? It is possible to diminish the potency of God’s church in this hour if we endorse only women who approach ministry from the role of a nurturer or decorator or hostess. The Bible gives just as clear a message that some women will carry a distinctly prophetic mantle, such as the four daughters of Philip, the evangelist in the New Testament, or the prophetess Huldah. Others might have a gifting for administration, as did Deborah the judge. And some may be experts in trade and business, as was said of the Proverbs 31 virtuous woman. The Epistles record several dynamic women who helped to spread the gospel aggressively beyond the Jewish culture into the Gentile world. Phoebe is identified as a servant or diakonos (a deaconess). Lydia led church meetings in her home. The challenges 32

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of the early church necessitated women who were gifted in church planting and leading fledgling groups of new believers. Acts 18 tells about another woman who, like Jael, was comfortable around tent pegs because she and her husband were tent makers. Her name was Priscilla. Paul identifies her as a fellow laborer in the gospel. Alongside her husband, Priscilla played a key role in expounding the gospel to Paul. Her repeated mention qualifies her significance in the early church. The lesson for us? There are moments where a woman is divinely appointed to wield a proverbial weapon. A woman who feels the unction to drive a tent-peg can become quickly frustrated if she feels that the body of Christ frowns upon her God-given assignment. If the weapon is wielded by a woman, who are we to criticize? Instead, should we not celebrate that the enemy is defeated? What we must honestly address is the uncomfortable feelings we discover in ourselves when God chooses to use a woman in this manner. Are we allowing our own cultural stereotypes to create an atmosphere where women lack the confidence to drive the tent peg? And will God rebuke us one day because, instead of stirring up the gifts, we demanded that they remain dormant? If we yield to God’s sovereignty (even with regard to how women contribute to this later-day revival) we may look around and find that God has divinely appointed Priscillas and Jaels alongside our Esthers and Marthas. And the hammer found in their hands will be the very instrument God intended for them to use. Laura Payne grew up the daughter of missionaries and spent her formative years in Athens, Greece. She now serves as music and creative arts pastor at Goodlettsvile Pentecostal Church in Nashville, Tennessee. Tim Zuniga is the pastor.

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NEW START BY ROB MCKEE

God’s Strategy for Church Planting Victory he Lord spake unto Moses, saying, Send thou men, that they may search the land of Canaan, which I give unto the children of Israel” (Numbers 13:1-2). Have you ever wondered why God sent spies to search out a land He had already given? The Israelites had never relied on intelligence reports before. Was God unsure of what kind of defenses the enemy possessed? Why spy out the land when the all-knowing God is architect of every victory? God didn’t need information to defeat the armies of Canaan. Eventually, when they conquered Jericho, it was with God’s unorthodox strategy of marching and shouting, not surgical strikes based on intelligence. God wanted all of them to return with reports of faith. However, only Joshua and Caleb focused on the positive fruit of the land. The evil report of the others declared, “We are too small” and “The competition is too overwhelming.” In a moment of intimidation, Israel’s lack of faith in God derailed their victory. Like most church planters, I’ve shared those twelve spies’ dismay at the challenge presented by a “promised land.” In September of 2000, I met the Texas District board and was approved to start a church in Katy, Texas. It didn’t start well. In our first two years we held services and Bible studies in nine locations. Having evangelized for ten years, I quickly learned that I still knew little about planting a revival church. The first few months of planting were awkward and clumsy, especially when it came to my preaching. Many Mondays I contemplated calling every church I had preached in to apologize for my ignorance about how churches grew. I pled with God for the key to Katy but none of the in-vogue concepts worked and a better solution floated to the top slower than a cheerio in buttermilk. I didn’t know what

Getting new believers involved in a “shallow-endof-the-pool” ministry is a key to our momentum. to do, but I was pretty sure I wasn’t doing it. What follows are principles we learned to use. We continue to use them to this day. Get New People Involved  One night in prayer the Lord gave me a key to church planting victory. The Spirit asked, “How fast can you get people involved in ministry?” I answered, “A few weeks.” God spoke into my spirit that our speedometer of growth would match the pace at which we prompted new converts to engage in ministry. Getting new believers involved in a “shallow-end-of-the-pool” ministry is a key to our momentum. Job descriptions (we call them covenants) with ministry requirements protect our leadership’s Apostolic integrity. The guidelines for ministry are simple and easily understood by the volunteer and include accountability measures. Our ministry covenants include an agreement signature line, which increases the volunteer’s focus on what they are agreeing to. If one is highly motivated to serve, he or she has little trouble conforming to godly practices. It has proven easier to allow the Spirit to “lead and guide them into all truth” if a new believer is engaged in the work of the Lord. Focus on the Harvest The second key to victory came as I surveyed guest cards. It seemed most guests were invited by a handful of our members.  Pastor friends confirmed my observation that churches have a small handful of inviters or harvesters. We decided to use it to our advantage. If someone does not excel as a harvester we decided to celebrate wherever they were serving in ministry. Our Sunday morning service was refocused to

respond to the opportunities presented by the harvesters. Why do harvesters bring guests to their young church? With this in mind, our Sunday morning became a soulwinning machine. Every Sunday morning, with the focus on harvest, we: A. Talk about the gospel: Death-BurialResurrection (I Corinthians 15:1-4) B. Explain Acts 2:38, Acts 19 (for those who need to be re-baptized) and John 3 (Nicodemus: a good man needing a new birth). C.  Explain potentially confusing things like how and why we praise as we do, as well as any demonstration of gifts of the Spirit. D. Briefly explain the name “Pentecostal.” E. Personally connect with every guest. F. Intentionally motivate first-time guests to return. G.  Any second-time guest is asked to commit to a “Membership Experience Lunch with Pastor” (We keep 86 percent of those who attend the lunch.) Again, like most church planters, with some simple readjustments, my dismay has become an experience of effectiveness. God has a strategy for your community. However it is developed, that strategy will likely include involving people and clearly focusing on the harvest. Rob McKee is in Katy, Texas. If you have questions or would like to learn more about the McKee’s journey of discovery, you can contact him at robmckee@aol.com.

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

Women in the Five-Fold Ministry STEVEN J. BEARDSLEY

he apostle Paul wrote to the Ephesian church that Christ “gave some as apostles, some as prophets, some as evangelists, and some as pastors and teachers” (Ephesians 4:11-13). It is through these members of the body that Christ will equip and build His church into a mature body that measures up to His full stature. Based upon the words used, there are either four or five different types of people. Neither Paul, nor the rest of Scripture, presents these roles as mutually exclusive. In fact, when the meanings of the words are examined, it seems obvious that a single individual could and would fulfill several roles. The meanings, based solely upon the Greek word, are as follows: 1) “Apostle” comes from apostolos and is a person who is sent as a messenger; 2) “Prophet” comes from prophētēs and is a person who possesses insight into God’s will and proclaims this will on God’s behalf—one who speaks for God by means of God’s inspiration; 3) “Evangelist” comes from euangelistēs and is a person who bears and preaches the good news of the gospel; 4) “Pastor” comes from poimēn and is a person who tends, rules, and cares for the church as a shepherd for sheep; 5) “Teacher” comes from didaskalos and is a person who instructs. The church will be equipped and built through those who are sent with a divine message, with divine insight into His will, speaking for God and under His inspiration both the good news and doctrine. Now the real question: Will God use women to equip and build His church? Did God use women within Paul’s churches to bring His church to maturity? Do women have a place in the five-fold ministry? To answer these questions, I would like to (re)introduce you to some women from Paul’s churches: Junia, the women of Corinth, Euodia and Syntyche, Phoebe, and Priscilla. May their place within the early church allow us to understand how our Lord views His body and the place women have within it. 34

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In his letter to the Roman church, the apostle sent greetings to a number of people, including Andronicus and Junia. He described them as kinsmen (perhaps fellow Hellenistic Jews) and fellow-prisoners. He further described them as being in Christ before him and well-known among the apostles. It seems this passage is describing a man (Andronicus) and a woman (Junia) as apostles. While this meaning is contested based upon Junia not being a woman (clearly and definitively refuted) and them being well known to the apostles, the testimony of the early church is unequivocal—Junia was an apostle. Paul instructed the Corinthian church in his letter of correction on the importance of proper prayer and prophecy, particularly with regard to men having short, cut hair and women having long, uncut hair. The obvious assumption on Paul’s part was that this instruction was necessary because women were intended to be active members of the body as “pray-ers” and prophets. In his letter to the Philippian church, Paul spoke of Euodia and Syntyche. He described them as workers with him in the work of the good news of the gospel with Clement. This description is unambiguous in meaning. Euodia and Syntyche were clearly evangelists, bearers, and preachers of the good news of the gospel. In the same letter to the Romans in which he addressed Andronicus and Junia as prominent apostles, Paul asked the church at Rome to welcome Phoebe and provide her any needed assistance. He described her as a great help to him and a deacon from the church in Cenchrea, the eastern port of Corinth. In the early church, deacons were ministers who helped care for the church in both shepherding them and in teaching. In many urban centers, as the church grew, the many home churches were presided over by a bishop with the assistance of presbyters and deacons. In fact, at a later time in Rome, the bishop was assisted in each of seven districts by a deacon. It is also important to recognize that Paul did not refer to Phoebe as a deaconess (a female form of deacon invented by the later church) but rather as a deacon. As such, most scholars agree that she was entrusted to bear the important letter to the Roman church. In fact, many scholars of ancient media believe she

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Now the real question: Will God use women to equip and build His church? Did God use women within Paul’s churches to bring His church to maturity? Do women have a place in the five-fold ministry? not only bore the letter but also performed (spoke) it as the voice of Paul to the Roman church. Finally, again in his letter to the Romans, Paul greeted Priscilla and Aquila as co-workers in the ministry of Christ. This was the same couple who, when they heard Apollos speaking eloquently in Ephesus, took him aside and instructed him in the way of God more accurately. It is significant that in both the Acts narrative and in Paul’s letter, the convention of addressing the husband first and then the wife was not followed. Instead Priscilla was addressed first. While the specifics of their marriage and ministry relationship cannot be described, Priscilla was presented as an equal of both Paul and Aquila in the ministry and teaching. It seems likely that Priscilla, along with Aquila, instructed Apollos. Based upon these examples from the women within the Pauline churches, it seems improbable, even impossible, that women did not and do not have place within all of the roles of the five-fold ministry. But what about I Corinthians 14 and I Timothy 2? I would submit that given the evidence reviewed, we should revisit our understanding of these passages in light of the clear practice of women in the five-fold ministry within the Pauline churches.

The testimony from the earliest Christian churches speaks loudly. Surely we can also affirm with the apostle Paul his declaration to the Galatians: “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28, NKJV). Jesus views His body as a reflection of His image, an image He created male and female. He embraces both men and women within the church and calls us to also embrace them as He calls each individual into their place within the body. Steven J. Beardsley is husband to Regina and father to Vincent, Caleb, Marcus, Candace, and Cassandra. He serves as pastor of Newark United Pentecostal Church and professor at Urshan Graduate School of Theology.

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General Conference 2012

Global Missions Service

iChurch Seminars

St. Louis, Missouri • Wednesday, October 3rd

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Thursday, October 4th: 9 am - 10 am

Global Missions in the Local Church

10 am - 11 am

Sensing God’s Direction and Life’s Purpose

9 am - 11 am

Utilizing Social and Digital Media in Realizing Vision

Bryan Abernathy

Bruce Howell/Jim and Linda Poitras Matt Dugas/Nicole McCoy

Friday, October 5th: 9 am - 10 am

Global Opportunities for Missions Involvement

10 am - 11 am

Developing a Local Church with a Global Impact

Brad Thompson/Charles Robinette Jerry Dean/Raymond Woodward

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MULTICULTURAL MINISTRIES BY DON HANSCOM SR.

All Nations Sunday PCI churches now rally around a concerted cross-cultural evangelistic outreach effort called All Nations Sunday. On this one Sunday each year emphasis is placed upon evangelism into another culture or language group. Each member invites someone of another culture or language to attend the service. Churches that use these strategies will experience great success. The focus is not to just have a large attendance, but to make all members aware of the growing potential in North America for a great breakthrough into the multicultural harvest with Apostolic revival. Although our services are different from what they may be used to, they are looking for services that are exciting and alive. Remember, these people are tired of dead religion and superstition. Don’t “tone down” your services for their sake. It is extremely important that they feel welcome in our church. The United Pentecostal Church ought to be the friendliest church in town. Expect people to receive the Holy Ghost in the service. Make it evangelistic.

A Plan That Works

• The kickoff - The following must be determined: ** Numerical goal for attendance ** Total cultural/language groups to reach ** Total goal for Holy Ghost infillings ** Number of teams and team members for each ** A timeline and calendar ** A things-to-do list for all involved •N  ursery - A well-staffed and efficiently run nursery will put guest parents at ease. • Music - The music needs to be at its best on this Sunday. • Train altar workers - Trained altar workers are vital to a successful All Nations Sunday service. • Church etiquette - Church members must make the guests feel welcome. • Speak faith - The pastor must speak in faith that God is going to pour out His Spirit upon all flesh. • Prepare for harvest - Teach: ** How to witness

**  How to effectively teach a Home Bible study ** How to prepare people to receive the Holy Ghost ** How to assist people to receive the Holy Ghost in the altar • Promote with purpose - The promotion needs to be done creatively and enthusiastically. The greatest method of evangelism is the personal one-on-one style. • Prayer is a must - The church must undergird this evangelistic drive with prayer. • Execute the service effectively - The entire service must focus on faith and salvation. The objective of this service is to ensure that everyone who needs the Holy Ghost receives it. • Follow-up - The goal of the follow-up team is turning first-timers into full-timers. For a copy of this plan in great detail, go to www.allnationssunday.com.

Pastors Say …

Pastor David Kent – Christian Life Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota “In a world with heightened tensions, class envy, tribal warfare, and ethnic strife, All Nations Sunday is a great opportunity for any church to promote that our diversity and differences all still reflect the very image of God. It is for this reason, that on All Nations Sunday, CLC took time to celebrate how unique and blessed we are to represent so many different backgrounds on any given Sunday. On All Nations Sunday precious saints and visitors from ten different countries assembled to worship the Lord together and hear the preaching of the Word of God.  Pastor Rodney Shirel – First UPC of Lawton, Oklahoma “Biggest event that our church has ever witnessed in many years with 215 in attendance; had a Korean choir sing in the service with many of the choir members receiving the Holy Ghost in the service.” Pastor Joseph Arata – TurnPoint Apostolic Church, Groveport, Ohio “We had fourteen language groups present. Most of these already have the Holy Ghost and are members of our church. We had a multicultural food fair after service

with eight nations represented for cuisine sampling. It was very successful. Pastor Miguel Garrick – Open Door Apostolic Tabernacle, Brooklyn, New York “All Nations Sunday was very exciting for our assembly. Our goal was to promote evangelism by dissolving our differences while highlighting unity and cultural diversity.” Pastor David Sagil – New Horizon Temple, Elmwood Park (Chicago), Illinois “We had fifty nationalities present for this year’s All Nations Sunday. Three received the Holy Ghost. The most fun we’ve had in a promotion in years!” Pastor Garry Tracy – New Life Center, Bridgeton, Missouri “We had five language groups present. One was baptized in Jesus’ name, two received the Holy Ghost, and we had a total attendance of four hundred.” Pastor Craig Warren – Renaissance Apostolic Church – Renton, Washington “We had eighteen different nationalities represented for All Nations Sunday.” Pastor Edward Sermon – Pentecostals of Billings, Montana “Thank you for the wonderful resources, testimonies, and ideas in relation to reaching our multicultural society. Our All Nations Sunday celebration was a multicultural worship experience. Many good contacts were made. We are thankful for the opening doors among the various cultures in our city. The www.allnationssunday.com website has much information including free downloads of high quality graphics, videos which can be used to promote the service, a detailed plan of action to assure success, and a list of different ways of involving everyone in the church to make this the most exciting weekend of the entire year. The www.globaltracts.com website provides Apostolic literature and tracts in over fifty-three different languages. People are excited to receive literature in their own language. What better thing to give them than the tract “The Truth about God” in their own language. Don Hanscom Sr. is the director of Multicultural Ministries for the UPCI. SEPTEMBER 2012

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

Agnes Rich, My Pastor J.R. BLACKSHEAR

am honored to be able to relate some of my experiences of serving under the pastoral care of a wonderful lady pastor, Agnes Rich, when she was serving the kingdom of the Lord in Anchorage, Alaska. The Scripture says, “Your sons and daughters shall prophesy” (Acts 2:17). The second letter of John the apostle was addressed to the “elect lady and her children” (II John 1:1). John most likely was referring to spiritual children. Jesus first appeared to women after His resurrection, Perhaps it was because they were committed followers of Jesus who did not run away or deny Him (as some men did) during the time of His arrest and trial before the religious zealots of the day. It is said in the Book of Acts that women of prestige became followers of Jesus. My personal experience of having the privilege of sitting under a great woman pastor confirms to me the validity of women in the ministry. I first met Sister Rich in January 1960 when I was serving in the US Army and stationed at Fort Richardson, in Anchorage, Alaska. She was pastor of the United Pentecostal Church in Anchorage and was in the process of building a new church facility to house her small but growing congregation. She welcomed me to her congrega38

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tion with warmth and genuine concern for a young soldier boy who was many thousands of miles away from his home. As I became a part of her congregation, I felt comfortable in consulting with her as my pastor and sharing my feelings about what the Lord was dealing with me about. I had received a call to preach as a young lad but had not heeded the call. I was serving in the army with the intention of attending medical school and becoming a doctor. The Lord, however, had a different purpose in sending me to Alaska. When I arrived at Fort Rich and reported in at the medical clinic to serve as a laboratory technician, I was informed that the lab was overstaffed and I was not needed. Other opportunities were opened to me to further my preparation for medical school but the Lord had worked this out to place me under this great woman pastor who was helpful in directing my path into the ministry. I shared with Sister Rich my feelings toward ministry and she undertook a tremendous mentoring role, as well as a protective role in my life. She watched over me and protected me in many areas of life. Sister Rich gave me the opportunity to preach my first sermon in her church, May 15, 1960. She encouraged me in the ministry as she opened the door of opportunity for preaching during the several months before my being discharged from the army. I remember her serving in the unique position of authoritative pastor and also serving as a submissive and supportive wife to her husband, Leonas Rich, a wonderful man who loved the Lord, the

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church, and his pastor. Sister Rich was able to be authoritative when necessary and kind when needed. I find that combination difficult to attain, even at my age and attempting to fulfill the role as an elder. Agnes Rich was a master at it. She had a unique relationship with the Lord Jesus as she walked with Him and gave herself to His work. I recall one occasion when there was an uncomfortable situation developing in the church in Anchorage. She was taking her desired Sunday afternoon time of rest, and as she fell asleep she had a dream (or vision) and observed some folks of her congregation having a conversation that was not in the best interest of the Kingdom. She addressed the people privately quoting to them exactly what was said during their time of conversing. That shocked them and the situation got better right away. Agnes Rich’s pulpit ministry was powerful. Her preaching and teaching certainly “read my mail” and let me know for certain that the Lord’s anointing was upon her. It also reinforced in me a great respect and admiration for her as my pastor. She had great respect among her peers in the mission field of Alaska. Some of the men had requested her to become the secretary of the limited organizational structure. However, she refused to do so, telling her peers that that was not a job she felt she should perform. A man was selected to do that work. She, being the woman she was, made another strong impression on her fellow pastors.

I had the privilege of being with her for a short time during the private Christian school crisis she endured after her departure from Alaska. The charge of infractions of the state educational system’s rules brought her much grief. When she was instructed to do certain things that she could not conscientiously do, the threats held over her were severe. Her personal strength and devotion to the task she had been called to made a strong impression on both me and on the official who was conducting the meeting. This was just another example of a woman being strong and committed during a difficult crisis. During the years I have had the privilege of serving the UPCI, I attribute much of the ability to make some difficult decisions that had to be made to the foundation that was laid under me (and at the time not even known by me) by a great lady pastor, Agnes Rich. I look forward to thanking her again when I see her in the New Jerusalem. J. R. Blackshear served the Alaska-Yukon District as district superintendent for thirty-five years. He presently serves as an honorary member of the General Board of the UPCI and the Alaska District Board. He and his wife, Betty, minister throughout the UPCI.

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

Women on a Mission A L A N A N D VA L E R I E D E M O S

he first person documented to have received the Holy Ghost in the twentieth century outpouring (1901) was a woman named Agnes Ozman. She asked for Charles Parham to lay hands on her at the Bethel Bible College in Topeka, Kansas. She was seeking empowerment for a missionary calling. She began to speak in Chinese as the Holy Ghost came upon her and over the next three days not only spoke but also wrote in Chinese. She was one of many women at the forefront of God’s callings as Pentecostal renewal swept the world. In this twenty-first century, we proudly identify ourselves as Apostolics. The dictionary meaning of the term calls for us to be vigorous and pioneering advocates or supporters of the cause of Jesus Christ. This categorization is not gender-specific. The men and the women and the youth and the children among us are all Apostolics! While everyone in our ranks should be a vigorous supporter of the kingdom of God, not every one of us will be sent out as a missionary or be a pioneer. When we call someone an apostle, we are generally referring to the pioneering aspect of being apostolic. In any case, we would correctly say that the distinction is one of calling and placement rather than gender. From the apostolic era until now, tradition and culture have always shaped the roles women were allowed to play in the unfolding body of Christ. Our challenge is to harmonize the leading of the Spirit with the ways of man. It is refreshing to note that today’s church seeks to restore the callings of God to the whole body without gender bias. 40

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In the Pentecostal renewal era, women were readily accepted as leaders in the missionary cause but few were placed as pastors. In the UPCI, PAJC, and PAW organizations, Apostolic women regularly served the cause of worldwide missions. Missionary Elizabeth Stieglitz went to China in 1910, where she received a booklet written by Frank Ewart that initiated her understanding of baptism in the name of Jesus. She took this exciting revelation to her male colleague, Missionary F. S. Ramsey, who baptized their national pastor. The pastor, in turn, baptized Missionary Ramsey, who went on to baptize his wife, Elizabeth, and the local Chinese church members. Alice Kugler left Seattle as a single woman in 1914 with thirteen other Pentecostal missionaries to brave paganism, opium-addiction, robber bands, revolution, and occupying Japanese soldiers. As a married woman, she and husband Dan Sheets returned as a missionary team to China. In 1943, their illustrious missionary work concluded with interment in Japanese prison camps for seven months. By 1957, they began a pastoral ministry in Arizona where Alice lived to be ninety-six years of age. May Iry, a woman suffering from the effects of childhood polio, a widow with four children, also ministered in China. She arrived in 1921, and did not furlough until 1934. When she returned two years later she brought Kathryn Hendricks and Virginia Weddle with her as missionary helpers. As the Japanese were invading China, 416 were baptized in one month alone, including 289 business and professional men. These were women reaching influential men for Jesus Christ. Many years ago, a Reader’s Digest story under the byline of “My Most Unforgettable Character” featured Mother Pearl Holmes, an Apostolic missionary in Liberia who, with her husband, paved the way for single women like Georgia Regenhardt, Gladys Robinson, and Pauline Gruse to become missionar-

Clockwise from top left to bottom left: Alice Kugler, Nona Freeman, Georgia Regenhardt, Bennie and Theresa DeMerchant, Mae Iry, and LaVerne Collins

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In the history of missions, more women have always served than men. In our times, the statistics are the same. More women have valiantly responded to a missionary calling than have men. ies. LaVerne Collins arrived in Fasama in the 1950s to help teach in that Liberian field (she died just seven short months after arrival). Valda Russell, a native of Jamaica, was another single woman serving on Liberian soil. Lucille Farmer, leaving four grown children behind, helped pioneer our missionary work in Ecuador. Women in Indianapolis raised funds by washing laundry so that Mother McCarty could answer her call to India. Three Scism women served later in India: Marjorie, serving by her husband’s (Ellis) side; Audrene, by her husband’s (Harry) side; and Ferne, serving as a single woman. Tens of thousands entered the kingdom of God because women like these led the missionary charge. In more recent times, Margaret Calhoun was called to be a missionary after her salvation in Wisconsin. Her divine direction to serve in Brazil was motivation enough to sacrifice a teacher’s salary for a minimal missionary’s wage in the 1970s. She was licensed as a UPCI minister for the sole purpose of getting a missionary appointment. Her license was granted on the condition that it would not be valid upon her return to America. Her death on the field seven years later precluded that eventuality. Also from Wisconsin, Genny Miller began working as an Associate in Missions in Greece, went on to Singapore to establish a work, and recently concluded her global ministry to hundreds in China who were baptized in both water and Spirit. In the last few decades, our fellowship has laid powerful missionary women like Nona Freeman (married), Wilma Ruth Nix (single), and Cathy Killoren (single) to rest following years of faithful ministry overseas. Else Lund retired in 2004 from a teaching ministry in Africa, forty-two years after sailing by ship

[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

out of Brooklyn to fulfill her “burning desire to teach the Word.” Theresa DeMerchant, our senior missionary wife still on the field, has given forty-eight years of her life to Brazil along with her husband, Bennie. In 1933, the PAJC used the “mite-box campaign” to raise sixty-three hundred dollars in support of missionary endeavors for the year. Chairman W.T. Witherspoon asked for donations of thirty cents per month and Andrew Urshan used his considerable influence to help gather the funds. By contrast, in the 1930s a supportive woman singly gave fifty dollars a month to the missionary cause. In the history of missions, more women have served than men. In our times, the statistics are the same. More women have valiantly responded to a missionary calling than have men. Women are substantially outnumbering men in short-term missionary assignments in the UPCI at this present time. Women have left children and grandchildren behind in North America because God gave them a specific call to missions. Women have sacrificed the possibility of being married in order to do the will of God. Means of fund-raising, transportation, and communications have drastically changed since God began to call women into overseas ministries. One thing that will never change is godly, capable, and dedicated Apostolic women continuing to answer as long as the Lord of harvest continues to call women of whom the world is not worthy. Alan and Valerie Demos have served abroad for thirty-nine years as UPCI missionaries in Greece and Germany.

ONE PRAYER

One Prayer is scheduled to be held at the Saint Louis Arch at 12 Noon on Saturday, September 29. The rally will help kickoff the general conference. Imagine the Grand Staircase leading to the Arch being filled with Apostolics joining together in ONE PRAYER for our world. Several teams will meet at 10:00 am to pass out prayer request cards to those visiting the Arch and downtown St. Louis. We will pray over those prayer request cards during the prayer rally, as well as over five thousand prayer cloths that will be distributed after the rally. We will also have focused prayers to cover various ministries and needs around the world.  We are asking people to let us know if they  are interested in being involved with the distribution of the prayer request cards. (573.471.5334 or 870.405.8106 or thesanctuaryofsikeston.com). This event is for the entire church—youth groups, Sunday school classes, senior groups, or individuals who would like to join in ONE PRAYER for the salvation of our world. We hope to see you there. 42

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A breakfast event designed specifically for ministers’ wives and lady ministers NEW TIME! Wednesday, October 3, 2012 from 10:00 AM - 12:00 NOON

Location – Renaissance Grand, Majestic Ballroom D-H St. Louis, Missouri Speaker – Bunch and Breeze

$22 per individual

A table for 10 may be reserved in advance for $250

Ladies Talk Time

Friday, October 5, 2012 from 10:00 AM - 12:00 NOON Location – America’s Center, America’s Ballroom St. Louis, Missouri Speaker – Vesta Mangun

To purchase tickets online visit www.upcigc.com and click on Agenda and select Ladies Breakfast.

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[WOMEN IN MINISTRY]

The Elect Ladies F R A N K L I N H OWA R D

he elder unto the elect lady and her children, whom I love in the truth; and not I only, but also all they that have known the truth” (II John 1:1). I gladly tip my hat to the elect ladies in our Apostolic movement. I admire them for their stamina, zeal, and unique ability to bring messages of inspiration, hope, and encouragement from the throne of God. There is not enough space for me to give thanks to all of these elect ladies. Let me share a few with you. My new birth experience started when I was fifteen years old in the First Apostolic Church in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where Mary Williams was my pastor’s wife. She and her sister, Sybil, were known across our movement as evangelists. Mary Williams’ messages were straight from the throne, heartfelt, and stirring. Her ministry as an evangelist changed the lives of many ministers and missionaries. Through her teaching at the Apostolic College she put her fingerprints on the lives of many. This elect lady was a great warrior in prayer and a prophetess whose stories captivated us. She told of being in prayer and seeing a vision of Gene Bailey, then a missionary to Liberia, beating a leopard to death with the butt of a rifle. At that exact moment Gene Bailey was in her chicken house trying to see what was killing her chickens. When she looked up, a leopard sprang from above to attack her. While Mary Williams was praying about this and seeing the vision, the Lord gave Gene Bailey supernatural strength to take her rifle and kill the leopard. Thank God for women who can hear from God. These elect ladies know how to herald the good news. It started at the tomb, with the words of a woman who said, “He is not here, He is risen!” 46

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I spent twenty-one years on the foreign mission field, and my life was touched by the sacrifice of many women in ministry. My wife, Janet, walked beside me to evangelize and open up new regions with the gospel. As we pioneered areas and started new churches she was there when every door was knocked and every tract was given. She selflessly taught beside me as we became the directors of Instituto Biblico Apostolico (Apostolic Bible Institute) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for ten years. Her life left a great imprint on many students and pastors all over the country of Brazil. I remember going through a time of great struggle in Brazil where a fresh word was needed from Heaven. I received a set of cassette tapes from the Pentecostals of Alexandria. I listened to Vesta Mangun preaching “What Things Soever You Desire, When You Pray!” Her words still ring in my ears years later, “Pray! Pray! Pray!” The message uplifted my wife and me as we stood and praised God. It gave us spiritual energy and motivated us to continue to fight in this good fight of faith. How many have found themselves crying, travailing, and making a pledge to God to carry a burden for the lost and conquer any evil force that would try to dismantle, destroy, or damage the church or their families as they listened to Nona Freeman preach? She was always on the go, always reaching out, always trying to help repair the shattered lives of anyone who would listen. Elect ladies will take their place in the heroes’ hall of faith. They will stand beside Hannah who cried out, “Give me children lest I die!” So many could stand beside Deborah, fearless and ready to

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do battle for God’s people. These elect ladies stand with grace and commitment, yet when moved upon by the Lord, they do battle in intercessory prayer. How many churches have they helped birth? How many districts in our organization were started in the living rooms of these great women? These elect ladies have subdued the enemy, preached great sermons, and built great churches. I thank God for the voices of these elect ladies who not only encourage our churches, but strengthen the hands of those in leadership. Their messages are clear, precise, and goal-centered. Their prayers are for the entire body of Christ; their burdens are for the lost children of the saints; and their goal to take a lost world to the cross of Calvary. Their desire is to change the world for Jesus Christ. I tried to make out a list of every elect lady who has touched my life, but they are too numerous to count. I close this article with two very special people. The first, Cindy Miller, is a counselor, mediator, speaker, writer, professor, and a tremendous preacher of the Word. She opens up the Scripture and expounds every word of her text to fit our everyday living. Then she skillfully takes you into the presence of the King of kings and has you kneeling at the foot of the cross.

Secondly, I walk into our sanctuary and hear “Hallelujah” vibrate around the walls as Aletha Vickery, better known as Granny Vickery, rises from her pew and lifts her hands and voice and cries, “Hallelujah!” Every time the power of God would fall, tears would stream down our cheeks as this little evangelist, with her frail body with one word would open up Heaven, subdue the enemy, cause Hell to tremble, and the saints to rejoice. Her grave lies between my home and the church. On my bookshelf sits a pair of her shoes. Her memory lives deep in our hearts. It was only one word. It took a lot of her energy just to stand and speak. It was a resounding “Hallelujah!” It was worship. It was anointing. Elect ladies, don’t stop! Franklin Howard is the senior pastor at Christian Life Center in Cleveland, Texas. He is a Vietnam war veteran, a former missionary to Brazil, and a former metro missionary and church planter in Los Angeles, California.

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

Becoming Financially Free to Serve the Lord What is the Bible’s Perspective on Retirement? M AT T H E W D. R I N G

ccording to Webster’s Dictionary, retirement is defined as: “The act of retiring or the state of being retired. Removal or withdrawal from an office or active service.” Interestingly, the Bible is virtually silent on the concept of retirement (as many of us would define it), and it does not specifically mandate that one is to stop working at a certain age, like sixty-five. Instead of using the term retirement, I prefer to think of it as “re-wirement” because I believe that while we are on this earth God would always desire that we “work” for Him and continuously carry out the charge of the Great Commission. However, I do believe that there comes a point in time when a new phase of life begins where one’s service to God’s kingdom may look different than it did before. The best biblical example of this vocational transition in terms of withdrawing from one’s primary labor comes from the Book of Numbers 8:23-26 (NKJV): Then the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, “This is what pertains to the Levites: From twenty-five years old and above one may enter to perform service in the work of the tabernacle of meeting; and at the age of fifty years they must cease performing this work, and shall work no more. They may minister with their brethren in the tabernacle of meeting, to attend to needs, but they themselves shall do no work. Thus you shall do to the Levites regarding their duties. These verses illustrate the “changing of the guard,” so to speak, where men transitioned from one role to another as time passed. It did not mean that they would cease serving the Lord, but the nature in which they served manifested 48

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itself differently. Over the past year, I have had the blessing of being able to meet a number of you—church leaders and ministers alike. And while I have certainly enjoyed those interactions, there is one concern that has surfaced repeatedly in those conversations. The concern is that ministers today aren’t taking the necessary steps to allow themselves to make that next transition that God would have for them. Why would that be the case? Why would ministers not be making plans for the next phase of life? I am sure there are a myriad of answers to these questions, but the consequences of not making provisions today for the “re-wirement” phase of life could be crippling to one’s family and their church body. Most churches today cannot afford the burden of providing lifetime income to a retired minister and continue to have the financial strength to pay their current minister and carry out all the ministry operations of the church. Saving for these later years really should be a shared vision of the church and the minister whereby they can mutually benefit one another. So the question is, “Are you making the appropriate provisions along life’s way to allow for this transition later in life?” The Bible clearly speaks to the importance of making these provisions and saving for your family as seen in the following passages: There is desirable treasure, And oil in the dwelling of the wise, But a foolish man squanders it. ­—Proverbs 21:20 (NKJV)— If anyone does not provide for his own, and especially for those of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever. —I Timothy 5:8 (NKJV)— The plans of the diligent lead surely to plenty, But those of everyone who is hasty, surely to poverty. —Proverbs 21:5 (NKJV)—

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Sunday School Service

2

ference 201

General Con

October 4, 2012 @ 12:00 Noon

“From Generation to Generation” FEATURI

NG:

Kanon Tipton – Five-year-old who will preach and represent one generation

Y: MUSIC B

Keith Pace and Urshan College

GUEST SP

EAKER:

Raymond Woodward

With discipline and prudent planning, one can have the financial freedom to use his or her abilities and talents to fulfill God’s next purpose for his or her life once the primary pastoral role is completed. Saving for the retirement years isn’t about greed or accumulating earthly riches, but rather being good stewards of God’s possessions He has entrusted to us while on earth. Being intentional about saving a portion of your annual compensation today allows you to eventually diminish your dependence upon that annual salary later. Saving steadily along the way as Proverbs suggests grants you the flexibility to follow other callings when the time and call are right. I don’t believe any minister would want to burden his or her church with an unsustainable financial commitment it cannot afford. Likewise, I think a church body would also want to make sure it cares appropriately for their minister in the later years of his or her life. Thus, the need for a retirement planning strategy for a minister is an important and healthy discussion to get out on the table sooner rather than later. Now, the obvious question: “How does a minister and church begin a retirement savings program?” The good news is that United Pentecostal Church International has sponsored an excellent program called the Minister’s Retirement Fund (or “MRF” as many refer to it). The MRF was created to provide an easy-toimplement, cost-effective retirement savings vehicle that can be funded by the minister, the church, or a combination of both. In addition to being easy to implement and cost effective, the MRF offers a number of tax advantages to those who participate, including immediate tax deductions on contributions, tax deferral on the investment growth, tax-free housing allowance distributions at retirement, and the potential to avoid mandatory IRS distributions at age 70½ if you continue to minister. Furthermore, this past year the MRF incorporated some significant enhancements to the program, which included improved investment options, better website interaction, daily valuation of the assets, a dedicated MRF service team, and an overall reduction in expenses. We who serve the MRF welcome the opportunity to speak with you about how to initiate a retirement savings program. We’ve already had this conversation with many of your fellow ministers. Take a minute to contact our dedicated service team by calling 1-855-MRF-UPCI or visit us on the MRF Website at http:// mrfupci.org. In addition, we are excited that we will have the opportunity to see many of you at the upcoming general conference in St. Louis. Please stop by the MRF booth for a visit, and don’t miss the opportunity to attend one of our educational seminars that we will be hosting that week! Matthew D. Ring, CPA, CFP is with the Moneta Group. Moneta Group Investment Advisors, LLC

Steve Cannon General Sunday School Director

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Robbie Knox

General Sunday School Secretary

Donnie Sheerin General Sunday School Promotions

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