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EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

Column Title One Line or Two Lines

lmost everybody I know is in a hurry. We are in such a rush that there are not enough hours in the day to get it all done. As taxes escalate … as the economy trickles down … as good jobs get harder and harder to get … as quality medical care become less available … as prescription drugs consume more and more of our earnings … as crime soars out of sight … as national boundaries are redrawn in the blood of fanatical terrorists … as our national value system is plundered … as what is politically correct collides with what is righteous … as Apostolic marks of distinction become less and less acceptable … as iniquity abounds completely out of bounds … as the love of many waxes colder and colder, we need to go to the house of God more and more. (See Hebrews 10:25.) Paul said for us to “[Redeem] the time, because the days are evil” (Ephesians 5:16). This means that we are to ransom or buy time. As the culture becomes more evil, we must be willing to pay any price necessary to have time to come to the house of God. We must make every moment in the house of God count. We may sometimes be tempted to “coast,” but what a mistake! Coasting services don’t reach the lost. Coasting services don’t build and strengthen. Coasting services don’t convict, confront, and challenge. Coasting services are wasted services. After we wade through the clutter of our lives … after we crash through the obstacles that block our way to the house of God … after we finally come panting and exhausted into the house of God … we need to feel like David when he said, “I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go into the house of the Lord” (Psalm 122:1). We need to feel like the psalmist who said, “A day in thy courts is better than a thousand. I had rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God, than to dwell in the tents of wickedness” (Psalm 84:10). Church attendance involves much more than merely mouthing the words of

Pull quote goes here, yeah! Lorem Ispum, this is my fake awesome sentence that would be a pull quote. Blah blah blah blah. Lorem ispsum klingon elvish, Jesus Rocks. the songs, bowing our head during prayer, bringing the tithe, enjoying the choir, and listening to sermons. Three important things should happen in every service: We need to draw near with a true heart; we need to hold fast the profession of our faith; we need to exhort one another. If we don’t do these three things we are marking time and thus wasting time.

The Bible says, “Faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God” (Romans 10:17). Three verses earlier Paul asked, “How shall they hear without a preacher?” (Romans 10:14). Jude wrote of “mockers in the last time, who … walk after their own ungodly lusts. These be they who separate themselves, sensual, having not the Spirit” (Jude 18-19).

Go to Church to Draw Close to God Jesus said, “This people draweth nigh unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lips; but their heart is far from me” (Matthew 15:8). If we are not drawing closer to God in a service, we are getting farther from Him. Someone famously said, “If you are not as close to God as you used to be who moved?” What a tragedy to drift away from God during a church service. Drawing closer to God requires us to focus on His presence.

Go to Church to Encourage One Another “Let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works: not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting one anothapproaching” (Hebrews 10:24-25). Another translation says, “Let us consider how we may spur one another on toward love and good deeds. Let us not give up meeting together, as some are in the habit of doing, but let us encourage one another—and all the more as you see the Day approaching.” One of the most important things we can do is to be creative in finding ways to affirm and lift up and encourage one another. It is easy to dampen others’ enthusiasm, to chip away at their self-esteem, to shatter their dreams, and to dash their hopes. Isaiah said of God’s people: “They helped every one his neighbour; and every one said to his brother, Be of good courage. So the carpenter encouraged the goldsmith, and he that smootheth with the hammer him that smote the anvil, saying, It is ready for the sodering: and he fastened it with nails, that it should not be moved” (Isaiah 41:6-7).

Go to Church to Get a Grip on Your Faith “Let us hold fast the profession of our faith without wavering; (for he is faithful that promised)” (Hebrews 10:23). The word faith in this text refers to what we believe— our core beliefs. Jesus said, “Simon, Simon, behold, Satan hath desired to have you, that he may sift you as wheat: but I have prayed for thee, that thy faith fail not: and when thou art converted, strengthen thy brethren” (Luke 22:31-32). Jesus asked, “When the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth?” (Luke 18:8). This world system will try to siphon off our faith and leave us empty. The devil desires to lull us to sleep, get us drunk with the cares of this life, and then steal our faith.

Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald OC TOBER 2012

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EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

Rules of the Road n both Testaments the highway is used as a metaphor for our journey through this world to Heaven. In the Old Testament Isaiah said, “An highway shall be there, and a way, and it shall be called the way of holiness; the unclean shall not pass over it; but it shall be for those: the wayfaring men, though fools, shall not err therein. No lion shall be there, nor any ravenous beast shall go up thereon, it shall not be found there; but the redeemed shall walk there: and the ransomed of the Lord shall return, and come to Zion with songs and everlasting joy upon their heads: they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away” (Isaiah 35:8-10). Though these verses were originally meant for the Jews returning to their homeland from captivity, through the ages they have been aptly applied to our Christian pilgrimage. The imagery here depicts a highway defined by both its restrictions and its exclusiveness. Though the highway of holiness is unpopular with most, it is the path of righteousness that the redeemed travel. In the New Testament, Jesus said, “Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it” (Matthew 7:13-14). (The word way here is sometimes translated “road.”) Jesus said to Thomas, “I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me” (John 14:6). Jesus’ words in both passages make many feel so uncomfortable that they brush them aside without a second thought. Their nonchalance, however, does not negate the words of Jesus. Unfortunately, to hear many talk about going to Heaven, one might be led to think that the highway to Heaven is under reconstruction and that an ambitious highway project is under way to turn the narrow highway of holiness into a wide thoroughfare with no guardrails or rules.

The ransomed of the Lord travel the way of holiness “with songs and everlasting joy upon their heads: they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away” (Isaiah 35: 10). While it is certainly true that God saves us by His grace apart from our works, His grace does not cancel the rules of the road; nor does it widen the narrow way. Paul asked, “Shall we continue in sin, that grace may abound?” Then he answered his own rhetorical question with, “God forbid” (Romans 6:1-2). The writer of the Book of Hebrews said, “Follow peace with all men, and holiness, without which no man shall see the Lord” (Hebrews 12:14). That’s rather straight and narrow, is it not? Jesus said, “Whosoever doth not bear his cross, and come after me, cannot be my disciple” (Luke 14:27). Too legalistic and narrow-minded for many, but true nonetheless. Grace that saves us also teaches us the rules of the road. Paul said, “The grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world; looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ; who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works” (Titus 2:11-14). Sounds like Paul, one of the New Testament’s greatest proponents of salvation by grace, believed that there are rigid rules to follow on our heavenward journey. Following are thirteen biblical (and binding) rules of the road to Heaven: 1. We should walk in newness of life (Romans 6:4).

2. W  e should walk by faith, not by sight (II Corinthians 5:7). 3. We should walk in the Spirit, not in the flesh (Galatians 5:16). 4. We should walk worthy of our calling (Ephesians 4:1). 5. We should walk in love (Ephesians 5:2). 6. We should walk circumspectly, not as fools (Ephesians 5:15). 7. We should walk in wisdom (Colossians 4:5). 8.  We should walk worthy of God (I Thessalonians 2:12). 9. We should walk honestly (I Thessalonians 4:12). 10. We should walk in the light (I John 1:7). 11.  We should walk as Jesus walked (I John 2:6). 12. We should walk after His commandments (II John 6.) 13. We should walk in truth (III John 4). Micah’s words have encouraged millions of pilgrims who walk the narrow way of holiness: “Rejoice not against me, O mine enemy: when I fall, I shall arise; when I sit in darkness, the Lord shall be a light unto me” (Micah 7:8). The ransomed of the Lord travel the way of holiness “with songs and everlasting joy upon their heads: they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away” (Isaiah 35:10). Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

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PENTECOSTAL HERALD | OCTOBER 2012 Fundamental Doctrine

EDITOR

Simeon Young Sr.

The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

The One True God We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain CREATIVE DIRECTOR Abraham LaVoi DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laura Merchant EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Rebecca Miller PROOFREADER Patrica Bollmann The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2012 by United Pentecostal Church International. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com Single Subscriptions (USA) $25.00 Single Subscriptions (Canada) $35.00 Single Subscriptions (Foreign) $44.00 Bundle Subscriptions (USA) $ 1.75 for 6 or more copies; $2.25 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Canada) $ 2.50 for 6 or more copies; $3.00 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Foreign) $ 3.50 for 6 or more copies; $4.00 each for 2-5 copies An international publication published monthly. VOL. 88, NO. 9. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional offices. Official publication of the UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL

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The Pentecostal Herald in every Pentecostal home

Our Mission:

To publish an Apostolic magazine that strengthens the hands of Apostolic pastors, encourages and challenges Apostolic believers, and reaches beyond the doors of Apostolic churches

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Letters to the Editor

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Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or to: Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299.

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Customer Care Send subscription and renewal requests and inquiries to pentecostalherald.com or email Becky Miller at bmiller@upci.org.

Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony,, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton L. Coon Sr., Floyd E. Covill, Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Alonzo Dummitt, David Elms, Daniel Fleming, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, J. Mark Jordan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Ronnie Mullings, Gordon Parrish, John E. Putnam, Ronald Ramsey, David A. Robinson, D.R. Russo, William J. Singleton, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, Melvin Thacker, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, H.E. Wheatly, Steve Willeford, C. Patton Williams, Richard A. Wittmeier, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

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EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

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ASSISTANT EDITOR

Lee Ann Alexander

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Columns 3 | Editorial

Simeon Young Sr.

7 | The General Superintendent Speaks

David K. Bernard

11 | My Hope Radio

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Kerri & Eugene Wilson

31 | Worldline

12

Roy Barnhill

37 | Multicultural Ministries

Jeffery Chavis

41 | Children’s Evangelists of the Month

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One Mission: Falling for Strangers

“Love is not always easy. It is not always understood. Or welcomed. Or appreciated. Especially in America. Where I grew up the gospel is craved, requested, easily responded to.” Melinda Poitras

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Ephesians and the Purpose of One Church

“The church by its very nature is a singularity formed out of two inherently antagonistic peoples.” Jeremy Painter

46 | Letters to the Editor 47 | Health

Dr. Clay Jackson

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Clay Jackson

44 | The Testimony of Ruth Laura Merchant

48 | Plowing Before the Planter Flo Shaw

50 | Enemies of the Cross

Rodney V. Pamer Cover photo by Abraham LaVoi

One In Him

“Contrary to popular belief, at this time adult singles ministry is not a dating service. It is not a place to specifically search for a mate.” Shelia Lee-Smith

Pentecostal Life 38 | Among the Broken

One Church

“We must not leave the world to false religion; we must know that everyone needs what we have.” Daniel M. Davy

Bruce A. Howell

33 | New Start

Our God Is One

“The most profound truth ever revealed is the truth about God Himself, His loving, eternal character, distinguishing Him from all other deities as the one God.” Talmadge L. French

Tiffini Countaway

25 | Faith & Culture

[ O N E G O D, O N E C H U RC H, ONE MISSION]

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One Mission

“Returning to one mission from one God is more important than new strategies for attracting people to the church today.” James A. Littles Jr.

32

There Is Only One Church

“Not only should we strive for unity on the local level, we should seek unity in our wider fellowship. After all, there is only one church and it belongs to Him.” Robin Johnston

34

One Church: It Does Matter

“God is going to have a church. Regardless of whether we are a part of it does not thwart His plan. It is simply up to us to choose.” Bonnie Peacock OC TOBER 2012

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A breakfast event designed specifically for ministers’ wives and lady ministers NEW TIME! Wednesday, October 3, 2012 from 10:00 AM - 12:00 NOON

Location – Renaissance Grand, Majestic Ballroom D-H St. Louis, Missouri Speaker – Bunch and Breeze

$22 per individual

A table for 10 may be reserved in advance for $250

Ladies Talk Time

Friday, October 5, 2012 from 10:00 AM - 12:00 NOON Location – America’s Center, America’s Ballroom St. Louis, Missouri Speaker – Vesta Mangun

To purchase tickets online visit www.upcigc.com and click on Agenda and select Ladies Breakfast.

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THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS BY DAVID K. BERNARD

One God, One Church, One Mission s a church, we are distinguished by our emphasis on the oneness of God and the absolute deity of Jesus Christ. Because we understand that God is one, we also realize that the church should be one in identity and purpose. The purpose of the church is to glorify the one God and to evangelize the world with His message. Therefore, we have dedicated ourselves to the supreme mission of proclaiming the gospel of Jesus Christ to all people. One God The Old Testament declares, “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God is one Lord. And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might” (Deuteronomy 6:4-5). Jesus taught that this is the first and greatest commandment (Mark 12:28-30). The New Testament reveals that the Lord Jesus Christ is the human manifestation of the one true God (I Timothy 3:16). In Jesus dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily (Colossians 2:9). He is “God with us,” who came to be our Savior (Matthew 1:21-23). Jesus Christ was thus one with God in the sense of identity (John 10:30-33). He was the visible manifestation of the invisible Father (John 14:9). As a human He lived in complete obedience to the will of God. Thus according to His humanity He was also one with God in the sense of perfect submission and unity of purpose. One Church In this sense of oneness of purpose, Jesus bids believers to become one with God and one with each other (John 17:21-23). As Christians, we are “called in one body” (Colossians 3:15). The early church was born in unity. On the Day of Pentecost, as the believers waited for the promise of the Spirit, “they were with one accord in one place” (Acts 2:1). They were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in tongues as the Spirit gave them utterance. This common experience united

 he purpose of the United Pentecostal Church T International is to carry the whole gospel to the whole world by the whole church. them. “By one Spirit are we all baptized into one body” (I Corinthians 12:13). The early church maintained unity as they “continued stedfastly in the apostles’ doctrine and fellowship” (Acts 2:42). They “earnestly contend[ed] for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints” (Jude 3). Thus the oneness of the church is based on both the Word and the Spirit. While there are some differences of customs, practices, and personal convictions from one church to another and even from one believer to another, we maintain unity because we agree on the apostolic message: the oneness of God in Christ Jesus, the plan of salvation, and the life of holiness unto the Lord. Thus we work together, “endeavouring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace,” while continuing to grow into maturity “till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ” (Ephesians 4:3, 13). It is important for each believer to be part of a local congregation and to follow the leadership of a godly pastor. It is also important for each local church to be united with other churches for the sake of identity, fellowship, cooperation, and evangelism. In this way the church is one both locally and globally. One Mission An important reason for the church to be united is to fulfill the Great Commission given by Jesus Christ: “Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20, NKJV).

We are to proclaim the only saving name of Jesus (Acts 4:12) and make disciples of Jesus throughout the world. Like the apostles, we must preach repentance from sin, water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking in tongues, and living a transformed life in obedience to the Lord’s commands (Acts 2:38-40). The United Pentecostal Church International is a human yet spiritual organization designed to promote and fulfill the biblical principles we have discussed. It is not equivalent to the body of Christ, but it is composed of people who are a significant part of the body of Christ. It is the most effective vehicle today for the worldwide proclamation of the apostolic message. We call ourselves “United” because we value the unity of the body. We call ourselves “Pentecostal” because we embrace the experience and message of the apostles on the Day of Pentecost, the birthday of the Christian church. We call ourselves “Church” because we are not only a ministerial fellowship or a religious organization but part of the church of Jesus Christ, composed of people of God everywhere. We call ourselves “International” because we believe in the unity of believers worldwide and in the global mission of the church. We are one church, we serve one God, and we have one mission. As the UPCI constitution states, “The purpose of the United Pentecostal Church International is to carry the whole gospel to the whole world by the whole church.” David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International. OC TOBER 2012

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[ONE GOD, ONE CHURCH, ONE MISSION]

Our God Is One TA L M A D G E L . F R E N C H

he most profound truth ever revealed is the truth about God Himself, His loving, eternal character, which distinguishes Him from all other deities as the one God. The amazing life-changing story of God’s Word is that Jesus Christ, though fully man, is revealed to be that one God come in human form to redeem and save us. With painstaking care, God’s absolute, indivisible, unqualified oneness is established as the central doctrine of both the Old and New Testaments. God is one. God is one in the absolute sense, precluding any possibility of a divine plurality. The Book of Isaiah, for example, emphasizes this absolute oneness of God: “I, even I, am the Lord; and beside me there is no Saviour” (Isaiah 43:11). “Here, O Israel: The Lord our God is one Lord” (Deuteronomy 6:4) has been known by Jews throughout the centuries as the Shema, or the central verse and theme of Holy Scripture. Crucial to understanding the identity of Jesus, therefore, is the fact that Christ reaffirmed the Shema as the central teaching for the New Testament church, calling it the “first of all the commandments” (Mark 12:29). It is clear that the centrality of the oneness of God was not replaced by Jesus or the apostles with a new concept of God, as though Father, Son, and Holy Ghost were meant to alter the Old Testament meaning of God in some mind-boggling philosophical manner. No, Jesus made it clear that when you saw Him you were seeing in His human revelation the one true invisible God. Jesus said, “He that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Shew us the Father?” (John 14:9). Jesus, therefore, is not another, separate divine being, but, as Paul wrote, Jesus is the one God who “was manifest in the flesh” (I Timothy 3:16). Thomas, a life-long worshiper of the Hebrew God Jehovah, made his marvelous and precise confession about Jesus following the miracle of resurrection when he realized the infallible conviction of who Jesus really was. He saw the nail prints and the wound in Christ’s side and exclaimed, “My Lord and my God” (John 20:28). Thomas saw clearly the revelation that Jesus was his God, the one God, the invisible Jehovah of the Old Testament come as man, as the Savior of the world, and not another. The New Testament 8

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declares Jesus to be “the great God and our Saviour” (Titus 2:13). Here it is quite unmistakable. Paul used the grammatical precision of the definite article: Jesus is “the” great God, the one God! The reality of Christ’s wonder and the onset of the infilling of believers with the Holy Spirit in no way altered the oneness of God. Any theological attempt to insert a notion of plurality into the eternal Godhead is misguided and mistaken. God certainly would have no reason to hide from His people Israel a supposed plurality. Rather than look for hints in the Old Testament of some sort of plurality in God, the oneness of God must be the grid through which we understand Jesus Christ. First, Jesus was not another or second divine person from the God revealed to Moses. Jesus explained that He was indwelt of the Father. He was Deity incarnate. Jesus said, “The Father that dwelleth in me, he doeth the works” (John 14:10). Jesus was not indwelt by a second person; He was indwelt by God—the Father Himself. The wonder of the Incarnation is, of course, what shook the very gates of Hell. Jesus was both God and man, the Shepherd and the Lamb, at the same time. In the last chapter of the last book of the Bible Jesus says of Himself: “I am the root and the offspring of David” (Revelation 22:16). Christ never said that He and Father were two, but stated clearly, “I and my Father are one” (John 10:30). This revelation rattled the theological sensitivities of the Pharisees and they rejected it as blasphemy. The Pharisees understood precisely the meaning and implication of what Jesus was saying. They said, “For a good work we stone thee not; but for blasphemy; and because that thou, being a man, makest thyself God” (John 10:33). The declaration of the oneness of God in the miracle of Incarnation is what the church professed in its earliest kerygmatic confession—“Jesus is Lord”—and recognized in Paul’s writings, such as Philippians 2:11 and Romans 10:9. Like the Shema, “Je-

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sus is Lord” pointed to the centrality of the doctrine of the one God Himself, now manifest in the flesh as Jesus Christ. As Paul says elsewhere, “God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself” (II Corinthians 5:19). This was no temporary union, but rather God (referred to as the Word) was “made flesh, and dwelt among us” (John 1:1, 14). The Greek word here translated as made means “to become”; thus, the Word (God) became flesh in permanent union. Oh sweet wonder! In Jesus we have the incomparable miracle of the union of the divine and the human in one person. We see this in splendid clarity in the name Jesus, “which is above every name” (Philippians 2:9). In the name Jesus is reflected the sacred Hebrew name of God (Yahweh), again, demonstrating that He is the one God in human form who now bears a revealed name that not only means “Yahweh is Savior,” but which actually is a saving and delivering name. Matthew reported the angel’s declaration: “Thou shalt call his name JESUS: for he shall save his people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21). He is Emmanuel, “God with us” (Matthew 1:23). Peter exalted the name of Jesus in the Book of Acts in the same manner, consistent with the recognition of Jesus as the one God “with us.” He said, “Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved” (Acts 4:12).

Jesus was surely a man, but He was by no means merely a man. He was the great God Jehovah in the flesh. Paul, for example, was careful to describe the Incarnation and the reality of who Jesus is by clarifying for us that He is God, not as though He were somehow merely a part of God, or part of the Godhead, but God in His totality. Therefore, New Testament baptism is in the singular name of Jesus. We are to “do all in the name of the Lord Jesus” (Colossians 3:17). Jesus is the God in whom we are complete: “For in him dwelleth all the fullness of the Godhead bodily. And ye are complete in him” (Colossians 2:9-10). This Scripture is indeed the quintessential description of Jesus as “my Lord and my God” and the New Testament fulfillment of the Hebrew Shema: “Our God Is One.” Talmadge L. French serves as pastor in Atlanta (South) of Apostolic Tabernacle UPC (Jonesboro, Georgia). He received his PhD in 2011 from the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom, with the dissertation “Early Interracial Oneness Pentecostalism, G.T. Haywood and the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World.”

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COMING SOON... Available at General Conference 2012

BREAD One Year Bible Presenting a convenient way to read the entire Bible in one year, this resource provides a selection of Scriptures to read each day in an easily accessible format. SPECIAL FEATURES: • Daily readings to complete the Bible in one calendar year • King James Version • Coordinates with annual BREAD program • Passages from the Old and New Testaments for each day

• Focused thoughts to begin each reading • A certificate for recording your completion of reading the Bible • Detachable book marks

In Case You Were Wandering By Travis Miller

In Case You Were Wandering is a book and small group resource designed to help twentysomethings find direction, discover God’s leading, and locate like-minded believers along the way. While the book is valuable on its own, the small group resource packages a book, DVD, and Facilitator’s Guide to make In Case You Were Wandering a dynamic curriculum for older teens and college age groups.

Also Available at General Conference: Devotions With Dad By Daniel Koren

A collection of 52 devotions dads can share with their children.

The War Within: The Gladiator

The Master’s Cowboy: an Autobiography

By Nathan D. Maki

By Arless Glass

Santa Biblia— Reina Valera 1960

This exciting new fiction book takes readers through the perilous life of the gladiator Antonius in AD 196.

Read the compelling biography of longtime pastor and leader Arless Glass.

New Spanish Bible that includes Essential Doctrines of the Bible, Essentials of New Birth, and the Manual of Basic Doctrines by David K. Bernard.

By Word Aflame Press

www.pentecostalpublishing.com | 866.819.7667 10

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0:01 AM

MY HOPE RADIO BY TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Three Minutes With Kalyx Ballestero

ell us about your family. My dad is the pastor of New Destiny Worship Center in Clearwater, Florida, where my family lives. My mom is the music director at our church. I have two brothers: Carlton is twelve and Braden is ten. I also have a puppy named Luigi.

your schedule so full that you get distracted from your first love. It really spoke to me because I have a tendency to want to do more than I have time for. She later told me to just go to God’s river of living water daily and drink it in. It’s helped me to realize that ministering when you yourself are on empty is dangerous.

Describe your spiritual journey. I received the Holy Ghost and was baptized when I was six years old. God has kept me ever since that day. My testimony is that I’ve never known what it’s like to live for the world because I’ve been hidden in the shadow of the Almighty. He’s all I’ve ever known, and I’m thankful for that.

What is one of your musical dreams or goals that you would love to see come to pass? I want to go to Bible college and major in music. I would also love to record an album of my own original songs.

What is your music background? I started taking piano lessons when I was four years old; I also sang the song “Jesus, Light of the World” on my Mom’s CD when I was four. Singing and playing piano have been my two biggest passions ever since. My mom influenced me, made me practice every day, and took me to lessons through the years. My parents allowed me to be in charge of kids’ music at our church when I was about nine years old; that helped me to become comfortable leading kids in worship and being in front of people. What was the inspiration for you to do a CD? I’ve always dreamed of recording an album, but I didn’t think it would actually happen until I was in my forties or something. When this opportunity arose, I was unprepared but excited for the challenge. The idea behind the album’s title Everyday is that God’s mercy and grace are following us every day that we live. So, we don’t have to worry. I hope it also challenges people to live wholeheartedly for Him every day of their lives. I hope people will love the CD so much they want to listen to it every day.

What was your favorite part about making this CD? I loved getting to sing a duet with my girl Jessica Bounds. We had a blast, and she made the song “People Get Ready” sound amazing. Her voice is incredible. Tell us about your experience at the 2011 North American Talent Search. Wow! What a life-changing experience it was! I was surprised that I even made it to the final round of the Talent Search. My family helped me decide which song I needed to sing. After I had tried just about every contemporary song I could think of, I started singing an old hymn about the name of Jesus. As soon as I did we felt the Holy Ghost come right into our living room. That’s how we knew which song to choose. When they called my name as first place winner that night I was totally stunned. Afterward, I went back to my seat and just cried. I couldn’t believe God’s favor, and at the same time I was like “What? I can’t record a CD! How am I going to do that?” But God led the way, and I learned so much throughout the entire experience. I’m thankful to Him for the opportunity. What is the best musical advice you have ever been given? Technical: “Get in there and practice piano, Kalyx!” Spiritual: I recently heard Vani Marshall speak at a conference about not allowing things (even ministry) to make

Where can we listen, purchase, and connect with you? You can listen to and purchase my recent project Everyday on cdbaby.com and pentecostalpublishing.com. You connect with me on Facebook.

Fun Stuff What would you do with a million dollars? Pay my tithes of course :-)! Also, I would give to missions, pay all my college tuition, and buy my parents a mansion. Ooh, and I might buy a VW Jetta. They’re so cute! If you could sing anywhere in the world, where would you sing? I think it would be awesome to sing in and be a part of a crusade overseas. I’ve never been on a missions trip. But I do hope to go someday. Who do you want to send a shout out to? All the people I look up to. Thanks Kristen Keller, Cortt Chavis, and Lia Matthews for being amazing role models! Tiffini Countaway is the producer of MyHopeRadio.com.

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[ONE GOD, ONE CHURCH, ONE MISSION]

One Church DA N I E L M . DAV Y

e are living in a time of change and challenge for our world. One of the key components of change in our world is the rapid technological advancement. In his book, Slouching Towards Gomorrah, Robert H. Bork writes, “A culture obsessed with technology will come to value personal convenience above almost all else, and ours does… . The most frightening aspect of the march of technology, however, is the potential for reshaping human beings and their nature through genetic science.” Judge Bork systematically lists the various alarming trends in the decline of our modern society. But as Charles Dickens wrote, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” This alarming declension in our society creates a wonderful opportunity for the church of the living God to step to the plate. Paul listed twenty things that would characterize the last days. (See II Timothy 3:1-7.) We must bring back to our declining culture the only sure remedy that will work—the church of the living God. Paul said, “I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek” (Romans 1:16). There are three things for us to consider in these changing times. First, we must insist on genuine biblical conversion. Pseudo conversion will not work. We must continue to preach and insist on the apostles’ doctrine. Jude encouraged us to “earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints” (Jude 3). Jeremiah said, “Stand ye in the ways, and see, and ask for the old paths, where is the good way, and walk therein, and ye shall find rest for your souls” (Jeremiah 6:16). Solomon 12

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said, “Remove not the ancient landmark, which thy fathers have set” (Proverbs 22:28). People were initiated into the first century church through repentance, water baptism in Jesus’ name, and the infilling of the Holy Ghost with the evidence of speaking in tongues. This cannot be questioned and it must never change. We must do everything we can to save the lost. And we must speak the truth in love, even if some are offended. People were offended with Jesus. If the Bible offends people, that is not our problem; they have a problem with God, not us. God said, “So shall my word be that goeth forth out of my mouth: it shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it” (Isaiah 55:11). The writer of the Book of Hebrews said, “The word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart” (Hebrews 4:12). Second, we must continue to exalt and lift up the name of Jesus. Paul said the name of Jesus Christ is above every name (Philippians 2:9). Peter said the name of Jesus is the saving name (Acts 4:12) and that it is the name that brings healing (Acts 4:10). When the name of Jesus is lifted up, Pentecost can be repeated and people will come to enjoy genuine salvation instead of the insipid religious life that is offered by much of Christianity today. The church is called by the name of Jesus because it belongs to Him. Jesus said, “Upon this rock I will build my church” (Matthew 16:18). Paul said the church was purchased by His own blood. (See Acts 20:28.) Paul said we “are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone” (Ephesians 2:20). Let us continue to lift up the name of Jesus Christ and the Lord will continue to draw people to the church of the living God. Third, the church must be sold out on seeking and saving the lost. In reading the history of the church in Acts, we are given high standards of evangelism to reach. Specifically, in Acts 19:10 where Paul goes to Asia, we are told by Luke

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 e must do everything W we can to save the lost. And we must speak the truth in love, even if some are offended. People were offended with Jesus.”

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Our world is spiraling out of control with all the technological advances being made, but one thing remains constant—God. that in about two and a half years all of Asia heard the preaching of the gospel. It is believed that during this time the seven churches addressed in the second and third chapters of the Book of Revelation were established. We must not leave the world to false religion; we must know that everyone needs what we have. We are the church of the living God, the pillar and ground of truth, and we are the church of the firstborn which are written in Heaven. (See Hebrews 12:22-23.) We have an obligation to reach our world with Bible salvation.

[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

One of the most effective ways to win the lost is through the home Bible study introduced to our fellowship many years ago by Jack Yonts. When done systematically and consistently, it will build a church even at the gates of Hell. This is so because the teaching of the Word of God brings results. The church here in Tampa is currently teaching about one hundred home Bible studies every week, using Exploring God’s Word. Teaching home Bible studies results in two things. First, people are brought under conviction. Second, they are discipled. At the end of the twelve lessons many will become solid members. We must be about our Father’s business—seeking and saving the lost. We can do no less. Our world is spiraling out of control with all the technological advances being made, but God remains constant. He has given to the church the gospel that will work in every age. We must faithfully proclaim this message, lift up the name of Jesus Christ, and constantly reach for the lost using everything at our disposal and watch God build the church before our very eyes. Daniel M. Davy pastors New Life Tabernacle United Pentecostal Church in Tampa, Florida. The church has over two thousand members.

ONE PRAYER One Prayer is scheduled to be held at the Saint Louis Arch at 12 Noon on Saturday, September 29. The rally will help kickoff the general conference. Imagine the Grand Staircase leading to the Arch being filled with Apostolics joining together in ONE PRAYER for our world.  Several teams will meet at 10:00 am to pass out prayer request cards to those visiting the Arch and downtown St. Louis. We will pray over those prayer request cards during the prayer rally, as well as over five thousand prayer cloths that will be distributed after the rally. We will also have focused prayers to cover various ministries and needs around the world. We are asking people to let us know if they are interested in being involved with the distribution of the prayer request cards. (573.471.5334 or 870.405.8106 or thesanctuaryofsikeston.com). This event is for the entire church—youth groups, Sunday school classes, senior groups, or individuals who would like to join in ONE PRAYER for the salvation of our world. We hope to see you there.

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Ran


General Conference 2012

Global Missions Service

iChurch Seminars

St. Louis, Missouri • Wednesday, October 3rd

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Thursday, October 4th: 9 am - 10 am

Global Missions in the Local Church

10 am - 11 am

Sensing God’s Direction and Life’s Purpose

9 am - 11 am

Utilizing Social and Digital Media in Realizing Vision

Bryan Abernathy

Bruce Howell/Jim and Linda Poitras Matt Dugas/Nicole McCoy

Friday, October 5th: 9 am - 10 am

Global Opportunities for Missions Involvement

10 am - 11 am

Developing a Local Church with a Global Impact

Brad Thompson/Charles Robinette Jerry Dean/Raymond Woodward

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[ONE GOD, ONE CHURCH, ONE MISSION]

One Mission: Falling for Strangers MELINDA POITRAS

re you still writing that blog of yours?” he asked me out of the blue. I was standing at the altar of my last service as a member of the Indiana Bible College chorale as I hesitantly informed him that I had not been writing all that much lately. “I’m sorry to hear that,” he replied. “I remember when you first moved to Indianapolis, how you wrote about it like you were falling for a stranger.” Those words stayed with me throughout the weeks that followed as I really began to think about them. You see, I grew up in West Africa. I lived there until I was nineteen years old, at which time I moved straight into my dorm room at IBC—my first home in America. I had loved everything about Africa. I loved the people. I loved the culture. I loved the heat, humidity, and dust. I loved the long bumpy roads and the crowded markets. I loved the gourmet food they make out of fermented corn. I loved the sound the city makes while it’s sleeping. Ghana, in particular, was the first great love of my life and leaving it was the hardest thing I have ever had to do. We belt out with gusto that we will “surrender all” and that “where He leads us, we will follow.” However, during those first few months in the college 16

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dorm, in a strange city surrounded by strangers, with everything I knew and loved thousands of miles away, I began to wonder if maybe I should start singing different songs. Sometimes, the Great Commission, which encompasses our one mission, requires us to “go.” Most people assume that statement refers to a faraway mission field. However, I began to learn the true meaning of that command. Bestselling author Ann Voskamp once wrote a blog called “This is My Africa.” She pointed out that while it is important to give and go in missions, it is also important not to forget the “Africa” that stands right next to you in the supermarket aisle—the hungry, the needy, the lost without God who live right next door. Ann said that wherever you are is your Africa. That was a metaphor that I easily understood. My kinship with Nigeria was birthed seven weeks after I was. Carried in the arms of my brave parents to an often-restless country teeming with unease, I never noticed the land’s flaws; I knew only that I belonged to it. My love affair with Ghana began the year that I turned six, and with all of the weak-kneed breathlessness of a heartsick teenager, I fell into the dark heart of the Gold Coast. As for Indianapolis, Timothy Wachtstetter summed that up with startling accuracy that night on chorale tour. My relationship with Indianapolis was not easy. It was cried over, laughed about, screamed about into my pillow many a night. It was building new bridges and forming new alliances and forcing myself to care when I would have much preferred to run back into the waiting arms of Africa. Not all at once, and not always noticeably, I began to fall for the stranger.

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© iStockphoto.com/RudyBalasko

925-1000 word article INCLUDING THE BIO.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

Love is not always easy. It is not always understood. Or welcomed. Or appreciated. Especially in America. Where I grew up the gospel is craved, requested, easily responded to. Here, doors are often slammed in the face of truth by the very people who need it most. The point I am attempting to make is, though receptive or not, they still need Him. And we still have Him. There they are craving life eternal. Here we sit, holding it. The thing that got me through that awkward time of transition as a teenager was the simple fact that I was not alone. I am not the only person to ever make a big move in their lifetime. He came with one mission—to seek and save those who were lost (Luke 19:10). Then He left the mission in the hands of humanity. While the Great Commission found in Matthew 28:19 is the obvious place to look for a mission statement, it seems that the greatest mission statement can be found in Mark 12:30-31: “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this is the first commandment. And the second is like, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is none other commandment greater than these.” In my opinion, it is all wrapped up in love. If you truly love God and those around you, you will show up to church on Sunday. You will show up next door when your neighbor needs you. You will go out of your way to witness. You will sacrifice yourself willingly in the service of Him. The thing about love is that it is not always convenient—especially if it requires falling for a stranger. And if you do chance to go out of your way for love of a stranger, it is desirable for

all conditions to be perfect. There should be writing on the wall, butterflies, fireworks, gelatin knees inducing a fainting spell. We desire our one mission of love to be easy, but it isn’t. Giving some consideration to what many romantics and twelve-year-old girls consider to be the early signs of true love, I cross-referenced “fainting” in my concordance. And while Proverbs 24:10-12 refers to a different kind of fainting than I intended, I found it remarkably applicable: “If thou faint in the day of adversity, thy strength is small. If thou forbear to deliver them that are drawn unto death, and those that are ready to be slain; if thou sayest, Behold, we knew it not; doth not he that pondereth the heart consider it? and he that keepeth thy soul, doth not he know it? and shall not he render to every man according to his works?” The days are few and the mission is clear. The time is now. This is your Africa. Don’t faint. Just fall. Melinda Poitras lives her life among multiple continents, countries, cultures, and characters. She plans to return to Ghana in January 2013. Find her blog at www.momentswithmelinda. blogspot.com.

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[ONE GOD, ONE CHURCH, ONE MISSION]

J E R E M Y PA I N T E R

Ephesians

and the Purpose of

One Church

he Christian church’s claim to exclusivity has become implausible to the wider culture. Where Cyprian of Carthage’s (ca. AD 250) axiomatic Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus (“Outside the Church there is no salvation”) was once considered self-evident, our pluralistic culture has little patience with such a notion. In fact, contemporary culture would be more likely to argue: Intra Ecclesiam nulla salus (“Inside the church there is no salvation”). How many times have we heard from a friend or acquaintance, “I believe in God, but not in organized religion”? Though I cannot ignore the error and abuse that accompanied the construction of medieval cathedrals, I find it difficult—relative to our day—not to be impressed with the not-so-subtle symbolism of ornate giant stone churches soaring high above small thatch-roofed hamlets and shires. The simple peasants who peopled these shires must have watched the construction of such an unearthly edifice with something like the wonder we today might have watching an extraterrestrial spaceship land in one of our cities. I am also impressed with a more recent phenomenon regarding church buildings and symbolism: Churches had bell-towers, which were used not only to notify a village on Sunday morn that church was about to begin, but they also rang the hours of the day throughout the week. Both of these phenomena speak to Western Christianity’s former relationship to the wider culture. It enjoyed an unrivaled hegemony over society for fourteen centuries. The beauty of the cathedral was a source of pride for men and women for whom life was hard and uncertain; the breathtaking contrast between the complexity of the cathedral and the simplicity of the shire served as a visual reminder that something beyond the earth had come to terra 18

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firma. The church bells ringing on the hour—especially when no one in the village had the means to tell the time precisely—served to remind the world that only the church knew what time it really was. That is, Christianity “told the time.” Or better, it ordered and set the rhythm of the life of the community. To say that things are markedly different today is a vast understatement. The world’s greatest minds and architects are no longer commissioned to design church buildings: they design banks. Christianity does not seem to be setting the pace and ordering life. We generally get our time from a computer screen or cell phone; science and technology are now the pacesetters; our personal sense of success, as silly as it sounds, is often viewed in direct proportion to our possession of a more recent car, cell phone, or laptop model. In other words, the exclusive claims of the Christian church have been replaced by money and science—gods more amiable to a pluralistic culture. However countercultural it may be to reassert, the Christian must insist upon the exclusivity of the Christian church. It is time again to think deeply about the nature of the church and avoid the twin errors of, on the one hand, sinfully caving to the pluralistic spirit of the times and, on the other, devolving into a defensive self-righteousness by rejoicing as much over the many who are outside of it as it does over the few within. Perhaps one way to avoid either of these betrayals of the gospel is to consider the purpose of one church. The exclusive and singular nature of the church—far from being either a liability in the contemporary Western context or a source of sinfully defensive arrogance—is an indispensible quality in the making of a saint. Paul speaks of the mystery hid from the ages but now revealed to him: The revealed mystery is the church; and, specifically, when God’s mystery is unveiled, Paul sees that God intended to use the church to make one new man from the two. (See Ephesians 2:15.) That is, God’s express

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purpose was to form a new humanity, using the stone from two separate quarries. Thus the church by its very nature is a singularity formed out of two inherently antagonistic peoples. Our pluralistically oriented milieu might ask: Why not create as many churches as there are national or ethnic groups? In fact, why not allow people to come to God on their own terms in isolation? Paul must have been asked a similar question in his day. Why not a Jewish church in one place—and a distinctly Gentile church in another? This would make things easier for everyone; all could be reconciled to God and no one would have to endure the painful experience of having one’s cultural or personal sensibilities disturbed. Why does God need to shove us all together into a cramped vehicle when He can make as many vehicles as there are people? In this narrow space our personalities clash, our personal preferences are consistently violated, and the worst side of our nature is always in danger of being exposed. Why would God risk losing people who just cannot put up with all of the “stuff” one has to put up with when forced to share time and identity with people who are, to put it mildly, just plain different? This is a reasonable line of questioning; however, when asked, it begins to answer itself. It is in the loss of one’s own life or identity that one finds life/identity (Matthew 10:39). Narcissus stared at the reflection of himself in still waters. He died staring into those waters; his attention finally could not be wrested from himself. His name has therefore become synonymous with self-love and all that rejects “the other.” Unlike the man or woman who becomes one with another of the opposite sex to produce offspring, his love is utterly sterile. I suspect that our culture’s pluralism—which at first may have grown out of a hatred of the wars of sectarianism—has taken a narcissistic turn. The yearning to worship with people who share our ethnicity, our age demographic, social status, and—above all—beliefs formed on the basis not of revelation but on personal convenience is an appalling form of narcissism. Though it ostensibly exists as a movement of open-mindedness, it is in fact a rejection of the liberality of the gospel. It all but declares that while God has to accept me just as I am, I do not have to accept God as He is; neither do I have to accept God’s people as they are. Suffice it to say, this is a spiritual cul-de-sac; a worldview destined for sterility. The oneness of the church encourages us to grow outside of the universe of “me.” It asks me to look not only to my own interests, but also upon the interests of others (Philippians 2:4); to take ownership not only of my own faults, but also of the faults of my brothers and sisters; to learn to rejoice not only in my own triumphs, but also in the triumphs of others. This scenario creates the possibility of what Paul calls a “bond of peace” (Ephesians 4:3). “Bond” and “peace” seem to form a contradiction; the former speaks of slavery, the latter of complete freedom. However, the oxymoron speaks to the nature of the one church. The contents of the bond of peace are, according to Paul, “one body, one Spirit, one calling, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one Father” (Ephesians 4:4-5). My submission to this oneness, to the dictates of a larger conscience, and to an identity outside of my own demonstrates peace. Paradoxically, it is the church’s narrowness that develops a broadness in its members. I become more myself when the “myself” I speak of ceases to be a centripetal identity. How often do we hear the intelligentsia and politicians campaign on the platform of peace? Yet these are the very same people who reject this precondition of peace. In what is surely a case of over-realized eschatology, some proclaim that peace is only a 20

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presidential election away; we don’t need new natures—we merely need new philosophies. But the old humanity is incompatible with peace. I’ve heard that a Los Angeles zoo, attempting to enact the prophecy of Isaiah 11:6, has actually been able to get a wolf and a lamb to lie down together. The trouble is that the zoo has to get a new lamb every morning. The church, according to Paul, however, is a demonstration of true peace; a foretaste of the kind of peace that will be finally achieved in the fully realized kingdom of Heaven (Ephesians 3:910). This peace will come not as the result of an atomizing of the church along idiosyncratic lines; it will come as the result of our voluntary bondage to a new nature, wholly disparate from our own. The nature of which I speak is the “new humanity” or “new creature”; namely, the church—one new humanity made out of two.

Jeremy Painter is assistant professor of English and Writing Center director at Urshan College.

NOVEMBER 4, 2012

Join with Tupelo Children's Mansion in becoming the hands of God to the most vulnerable of our society—the fatherless. Give a special Mansion Sunday offering on November 4th, National Orphan Sunday!

www.mansionkids.org

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[ONE GOD, ONE CHURCH, ONE MISSION]

One In Him SHELIA LEE SMITH

ause for just a moment and reflect upon life—its joys, family, career, church involvement, and ministries. Life may not be perfect, but for many people it is probably going pretty well. God has blessed us in more ways than can be counted.  Our churches have been blessed with many resources and outlets to reach various groups of our society, such as ministries for children, youth, young adults, men, women, different cultures and races, the deaf, crisis pregnancy, alcohol and drug addiction, and marriage counseling. Whatever the need, it can usually be found within the ranks of the United Pentecostal Church because someone had a burden to start and maintain these ministries. Some of these ministries are ongoing, consistent, and strong. They are accessible when needed. The purpose of this article is to help raise awareness about a particular sector of our society that is often overlooked and undervalued. It is one that possesses significant untapped energy, resourcefulness, and ministry skills. Sadly, it is often a category of people that instead of being supported and encouraged are ostracized and criticized by the very people who profess to be the church. They do not always fit in with the other ministries in the church. Look around you—I assure you these people are in our churches. Have you taken the time to empathize with them? Have you taken the time to pray for them and their specific needs?  Do you consider what happened to them the second unpardonable sin? The purpose of this article is not to cast a dark shadow upon the church, its people, or its leadership. It is a plea for people to momentarily shift their focus to an often-neglected sector of our society that could very well make a tremendous difference within our congregations. Please allow me to introduce you to Apostolic adult singles. We are single, never-married, divorced, or widowed people. Look around your congregation. They are there, maybe only one or two, or perhaps quite a few. Their actual number is not important, but their spiritual wellbeing is. They probably have a smile on their face and may be involved in everything. Some may think that divorce and death occurs only in the world, not within the church. Unfortunately, God’s people are not 22

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exempt from loss, betrayal, and devastation associated with divorce and death. It happens to church leadership, pastors, ministers, and ordinary people in our congregations. They did not want it to turn out the way it did; they tried everything within their power to keep it from happening, but still it happened.  Joy Eggerichs (daughter of Dr. Emerson Eggerichs, author of Focus on the Family Love and Respect books) said, “We cannot control another human being’s free will or their choices. We can control our reactions to it, whether or not to move forward in spite of the pain and heartache we feel. We must continue to trust God to have complete control of our lives, even in our relationships.” There is a social stigma associated with divorce—not to mention the shame, guilt, and loneliness that is difficult to overcome without support and encouragement by every individual within the affected person’s social network, including the church.  The 2010 United States census reports that approximately 51 percent of our population’s households are comprised of single, divorced, or widowed individuals. Out of 114,567,419 total households, 58,862,638 (52.3 percent) are single-family households. To get an even closer look, consider that 5,385,788 (5 percent) are male householders with a family but no wife present; 14,998,476 (13 percent are female householders with a family but no husband present; 38,478,374 (34 percent) are non-family households living alone; and 10,908,469 (10 percent non-family householders are aged sixtyfive and older. Married couple households with family consist of 55,704,781 (49 percent of the total households in the United States). What would happen if our children and youth did not have access to youth camps, Sunday school, and kids crusades? What if there were no places like New Beginnings in Tupelo, Mississippi, to help women in crisis pregnancy situations? What if there were no ministry departments for men and ladies to coordinate conferences and retreats and publish magazines? Aren’t we remiss if we fail to

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© iStockphoto.com/laflor

reach out to people of every culture, color, and race in our country? During my ongoing participation in regional singles ministry I have met individuals (including pastors) who are now divorced due to infidelity on the part of a spouse—people who were subsequently ostracized and criticized by others for something that was not their fault. They didn’t ask for the spouse to commit adultery or abandon them. I have met widowed individuals who have had to seek grief counseling outside of the church to effectively cope with their loss and are raising young children alone as a single parent. I have met adult singles in their forties who never married because they were restricted from participating in social opportunities and were unaware of the few conferences, events, and resources available to them because of isolation, regardless of the ministry potential a single individual might have within the kingdom of God. How many potential ministers, missionaries, music ministers, Sunday school teachers, and youth workers are we losing to the world because their needs are not met within the church? Contrary to popular belief, at this time adult singles ministry is not a dating service. It is not a place to specifically search for a mate. Some people do find their mate as a result of meeting other people, but that is not the primary focus of this ministry. Individuals currently involved in singles ministry seek fellowship and a deeper relationship with God. We are people who, when properly supported, are anointed, involved in our churches, and effective at what we

do because we have been through major struggles. We have persevered and survived spiritually to testify about it. We are a group of people who are so outreach-minded and in touch with God’s Spirit that when we gather together as a unified body of special believers, amazing things happen. Need proof? What are most Apostolic singles in our church assemblies involved in? Usually, they are youth workers, ladies leaders, or Sunday school teachers. They are often found on the front line involved in church workdays, building things, music departments, altar work, and outreach.   Look no farther than the “Cracker Barrel Experience” in Memphis, Tennessee, during the Power of One National Singles Conference hosted by Terry Black’s singles ministry department in June 2011. After the Saturday evening service, Apostolic adult singles converged upon the local Cracker Barrel restaurant ready for godly fellowship and prepared to enjoy a great meal. One of the waitstaff knew instantly who we were. What started out as good natured church-related fellowship soon turned into Apostolic singles worshiping together. Before the evening was over, eight members of the waitstaff had received the Holy Ghost. The Pentecostal Church in Memphis was there to establish contact with these individuals and several were later baptized in Jesus’ name. Can you imagine two hundred singles having church in Cracker Barrel and not getting run off by the management for disturbing the peace or even arrested? The door opened and we OC TOBER 2012

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were spiritually prepared to walk through it. We had just concluded an exhilarating conference consisting of classes where our practical, emotional, and spiritual needs were met. We had just attended a conference with amazing worship services and the preaching of Lee Stoneking instructing us to go forth into our world sharing Jesus. At a 100 percent self-funded singles retreat in the Alexandria, Louisiana, area last year, several singles speakers and ministers spoke to a group of about one hundred singles encouraging them to get busy doing the work assigned to us in the kingdom of God; to follow through and act upon our purpose and calling; trust in the Lord and lean not on our own understanding; heal wounds and life circumstances that prevent us from reaching our fullest potential; and remove all the obstacles in our lives that hinder us from achieving the will of God. Several unsaved singles were also present. Even during the talent show worship and praise broke out instantaneously. We know how to worship and follow the leading of the Spirit. We are not afraid to move with it because there is liberty for us to do so. Our future goals are to conduct outreach activities within each of the areas we visit, promoting emotional and spiritual healing and inviting those in need of restoration to be a part of what God is doing. Once our basic needs are met, we are free to focus on the kingdom of God. We are focusing on things that will please the Lord. A mighty revival spirit is among Apostolic adult singles and it is sweeping across Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and other states.  It is true that some Apostolic adult singles are self-centered and desire only to find someone to date. These individuals have given our sector of society a less than pleasant reputation. But the vast majority of us are more focused on ministering to both the saved and unsaved. We are courageously stepping up and facing the battles before us, seeing the mighty harvest field within the 58,862,638 single households of America. We are one with, through, and in Him. 

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Will you join us in prayer and spiritual support as we endeavor to accomplish these goals? Will you encourage other Apostolic adults ages twenty-one plus to get involved with single events? Will you join us in prayer and spiritual support as we endeavor to accomplish these goals? Will you encourage other Apostolic adult singles ages twenty-one plus to get involved with all singles events (both district-sponsored and local/regional self-funded)? Will you be sensitive to those without spouses during family-centered activities that focus on the traditional family unit that often exclude single adults? Will you direct Apostolic singles to ministries that will help them recover, be restored, and ultimately persevere within the kingdom of God? Refer them to us. We can help them and love them. Together we can help fully restore them to the kingdom of God. Single individuals, pastors, or local singles leaders desiring to get more involved in singles ministry and fellowship at the regional level can contact me at musicldy66@yahoo.com or on Facebook. Or you can contact David Sancillo (Singles Ministry coordinator for the Mississippi District UPCI) at davidsancillo@gmail.com for additional information. Shelia Lee-Smith is a member of the Mississippi District Christian Writer’s Association.

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FAITH & CULTURE BY KERRI AND EUGENE WILSON

The Right Stance in the Face of Opposition ecently, our family visited a local Chick-fil-A restaurant. We chose to eat at this establishment on this occasion for several reasons: the day had been announced as Chick-fil-A Day, we enjoy their food, and it was time for lunch. Upon our arrival, we found the parking lot filled to capacity and a line extending beyond the entrance. Pausing, we contemplated whether the wait was worthy of our time. Backlash against Chick-fil-A Dan Cathy, CEO of Chick-fil-A and son of the restaurant’s founder, Truett Cathy, had recently taken heat for unashamedly acknowledging his opposition to marriage equality when responding to interview questions concerning his views on family. He and the Chick-fil-A establishment have consequently been accused of violating the First Amendment because of his unabashed stance. Boston mayor, Thomas Menino, claimed he would make it difficult for Chick-fil-A establishments to enter his city. And Chicago alderman, Joe Moreno, voiced his intentions to block Chick-fil-A from operating in his area. In a CNN interview, Las Vegas First Amendment attorney Marc J. Randazza responded to Cathy’s opposition by maintaining that Cathy’s statement was not in violation of the First Amendment. He explained the First Amendment actually allows people to voice their beliefs. Furthermore, it does not protect people from negative reactions from others to what has been voiced nor from the criticism of voiced views. However, as Randazza further clarified, the First Amendment does protect citizens from government usage of power to suppress freedom of speech. Thus, while politicians such as Menino and Moreno have a right to voice their opinions, they do not have a right to back their views by using the force of law to limit or prohibit Chick-fil-A from operation.

While we have a First Amendment right to voice our beliefs, as Christians we must do so in a manner that pleases God. It is right to take a stand for what is right; however, we must do so respectfully. Biblical Response to Backlash Our decision to stay and participate in Chick-fil-A Day was indeed worth our time. As we entered the establishment, one of us (Kerri) was interviewed about our presence. She confirmed our support of Dan Cathy’s right to voice his opinion as well as his opposition to “same-sex marriage.” We were encouraged as we witnessed the strong showing of support alongside us as well as across the United States throughout the day. However, we know outcries similar to what Cathy has endured are likely to become louder and more frequent. Without a doubt, we will experience increased pressure from society to conform to their way of thinking. We will continue to be ridiculed for our stance against the “normal” of our culture. We are finding it easier to identify with the readers of I Peter—the strangers in parts of Asia Minor. Peter wrote his first letter around the year ad 67, shortly after the first persecution of Christians by Nero. The verbal abuse against the saints in Asia Minor can be seen throughout Peter’s letter. Society was pressuring them to conform to a more acceptable way of life. Peter acknowledged that his readers were distressed by various trials (1:6), experiencing slander (2:12), and enduring pain while suffering unjustly (2:19). He spoke of suffering for doing right (3:14) and said a fiery ordeal would try his readers (4:12). He also exhorted them to rejoice in partaking of Christ’s sufferings (4:13). Peter knew the present suffering of the readers would not lessen—it would become worse. The persecution in Rome would soon spread to include those in Asia Minor.

Consequently, Peter sought to encourage his readers. He reminded them they were the “elect” (a term used in Peter’s letters more than in any other New Testament book). He also presented his readers with a code of conduct to help guide their relationships with others. He admonished his readers to display respectful attitudes toward others, to show love. Peter said, “Even if you should suffer for righteousness’ sake, you are blessed. ‘And do not be afraid of their threats, nor be troubled’” (I Peter 3:14, NKJV). Peter further explained, “Having a good conscience, that when they defame you as evildoers, those who revile your good conduct in Christ may be ashamed. For it is better, if it is the will of God, to suffer for doing good than for doing evil” (I Peter 3:16-17, NKJV). Peter’s exhortation is applicable for today. While we have a First Amendment right to voice our beliefs, as Christians we must do so in a manner that pleases God. We must allow the Word of God to shape our behavior. We should not be afraid of society’s threats nor cave in to pressure to conform to society’s way of thinking. It is right to take a stand for what is right; however, we must do so respectfully. Kerri and Eugene Wilson and family are transitioning to Dallas, Texas, where they will be involved in the training and developing of leaders and planting churches.

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(Room 132)

5:00 – 7:00 pm Friday – Ken Stewart, Rick Perry, Brent Brosam, George Szabolcsi, Clarence Jackson

5:00 – 7:00 pm Thursday – Darrell Collins, Jay Jones, Scott Sistrunk, Steve Smith

5:00 – 7:00 pm Wednesday – Edwin Forkpa, Tim Gaddy, Jim Lumpkin, Jerald Staten

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Church Planting Life the Book of Acts (Tim Gaddy) Why Young Men Plant Churches (Rashidi Collins, Jimmy Toney & Mark Brown)

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Establishing a Launch: Your Ministry in Your Local Church (Forum with Nathan Scoggins & Mark Johnson) Establishing Preaching Points CrossCulturally (Forum with Randy Keyes, Bill Chapman & Paul Graham)

Friday, October 5th

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9:00 – 10:00

Thursday, October 4th

Speaker: Jimmy Toney St. Louis, Missouri | America’s Center

Thursday, October 4, 2012 @ 7:00

iChurch Seminars

7/6/12 2:26 8:57 PM AM 8/29/12


[ONE GOD, ONE CHURCH, ONE MISSION]

One Mission JAMES A. LITTLES JR

early every leadership seminar on negotiating periods of change includes the importance of a core mission statement. Changing cultural landscapes and a suspicion that old methods may not be as effective as they once were create a crisis for relevance. Returning to one mission from one God is more important than new strategies for attracting people to the church today. History is filled with religious groups that have lost their purpose. While traveling in Iowa a few years ago, my wife and I exited the highway to visit a historical religious site from the 1800s. Well-meaning men and women migrated from the old world to follow the leading of the Spirit in a radical way. Somehow these dedicated Christians lost their missional focus. Today they are known only to sightseers, historians of new religious movements (a.k.a. cults), or purchasers of microwaves and refrigerators. Yes, the successful Amana corporation 28

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was formed as a people seeking to hear God afresh, but they wound up on the cutting edge of appliance technology. The church must understand it has only one mission. This mission must be maintained during times of shifting cultural contexts. A faithful church will keep the mission as its central focus. One Mission under God A blessed church is a church that receives its mission from God rather than a brainstorming session. The one people of God must understand their mission is found in the life and ministry of Jesus. In His farewell prayer Jesus said, “As thou hast sent me into the world, even so have I also sent them into the world” (John 17:18). As we have seen in the articles on one God in this magazine, the fullness of God came into the world with the life and ministry of Jesus Christ. The sins of humanity required this unbelievable act. “God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them” (II Corinthians 5:19). Apostolic strategic planning asks two significant questions. The first is, “What in the world is God up to?” The second naturally follows: “How can we get in on what God is doing?” Paul affirms this central reconciliation mission of God is now the only

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The Last Supper, by Leonardo Da Vinci, painted in 1495–1498 at Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan

925-1000 word article INCLUDING THE BIO.

reason the church exists. God has given to us both the ministry and words of reconciliation. The earth-shattering truth of our common mission is that we are invited to participate in the divine work of reconciliation. Any other attempt to define the mission either denigrates the work of Christ or removes the right for us to be called the church. Two events from Jesus’ last days underscore the service nature of this common mission. At the Last Supper Jesus served others by giving of His body and blood. This sharing of Himself was needed for the disciples to receive the strength for the journey ahead. The divine meal remembers the past work of Christ, serves to give grace to share what we have received with others, and points forward to the end when He eats with us again. The other event was Jesus’ breathing on the disciples to signify the coming of the Spirit (John 20:21-23). Just as the Spirit led Jesus into the wilderness at the beginning of His ministry (Matthew 4), the Spirit would come as that promised gift from the Father that would empower them to be witnesses to the edges of earth (Acts 1). Jesus’ body, blood, and spirit will ensure our focus on the right mission. They guarantee His body will successfully achieve the mission He has given it.

Shifting Contexts As I write this article my hometown in Missouri is suffering through an early summer heat wave. The whole world is torn by the possibility that we are undergoing climate change that will alter our lives in a myriad of unknown ways. While I am somewhat conflicted about the various arguments presented on both sides of this geopolitical discussion, I am sure that our world is undergoing an equally radical process of social change. The ongoing power of Pentecost is found in the gospel’s ability to be heard in every culture. Surely few would disagree that our world is as confused as it was at the breakup of Babel’s unity. God brought confusion with diversity. Pentecostal power is found in reversing this confusion by providing the only true reconciling message. This mission values all people regardless of culture of origin. Pentecost’s new birth provides the means to bring all into one family of God. The unifying mission makes all believers Kingdom-agents. If our mission is only to be saved, then our focus is inward and selfcentered. This pseudo-mission builds a maintenance church. If our mission is to be God’s agents of reconciliation in the world, then our focus is on the opportunity to care for others in Christ’s name. This “unnatural” shift from rights and needs of the self to divine purposes is achieved only by dying to sin and living in the Spirit. OC TOBER 2012

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Mission-Centered Church Since the church is rooted in Christ’s identity, the unified mission must be centered as well. As with the Amana community, all human-centered missions have the potential of missional shift. A missionary core will keep the church’s theology and practices purposeful. The Oneness message stays missional rather than simply an item of debate. Holiness retains its mission-essential purpose when God’s mission is kept at the center. This kind of holiness brings us out of the world and cleans us up, but it refuses to major on staying clean. Holiness always exists with a commission in mind. The Tabernacle furnishings were sanctified so they could fulfill their purpose. Saints are living in holiness only when that holiness sends and keeps them on the mission. Yes, holiness is a salvation issue— the world must be saved! Keeping the mission central prepares the way for all people to live in the Spirit. A mission-marginal church might see the purpose of the Spirit fulfilled in new birth; a mission-central church sees new birth as a beginning and lives out its call for every member to fulfill a vital function in the body as designated by God’s own plan. (See I Corinthians 12 and Romans 12.) If space allowed we could discuss the effect of mission centrality on uses of buildings, technology, church budgets, stewardship, worship, Christian education, marriage, and other church and saint behavior.

Everything we know about being a disciple of Christ is rooted in this mission of serving the world. Jesus lived the truth that we must love God and love our neighbor as ourselves (Luke 10:27-28).

Conclusion Everything we know about being a disciple of Christ is rooted in this mission of serving the world. Jesus lived the truth that we

James A. Littles Jr., PhD is academic dean and professor of practical theology at Urshan Graduate School of Theology and Urshan College.

must love God and love our neighbor as ourselves (Luke 10:27-28). He sent His followers to make disciples in all the world. We live in a wonderful hour to be a mission-central church. When we know that all power belongs to Jesus, we can easily trust Him to lead us by His Spirit (Matthew 28:18-20). Though the world may be changing, God’s mission does not. Perhaps global migration, despair over progress of science, education, human wisdom, and even a disquieted church can be evidences of God’s work in the world today. A mission-centered church will always participate in God’s work in the world.

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8/29/12 8/23/12 2:26 2:37 PM


2:37 PM

WORLDLINE BY BRUCE A. HOWELL

World Reports UATEMALA: The Institute of Pentecostal Ministries had 393 students enrolled in 2011. There were thirty ministerial graduates. There are currently fifty-seven teachers and ten training programs held throughout the nation. It is our desire to make training available to all our pastors and leadership. —Brad and Regina Thompson CAMEROON: Sama Raphael and Julius Titatah took a group of Bible school students to Mamfe for evangelism where they held services, passed out tracts, and prayed with people in the village. Five people were filled with the Holy Ghost and several were delivered from spiritual depression. —Rusty and Adriane Riddick RUSSIA: Pastors and leaders from the Moslem nations of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan gathered in April for a threeday Apostolic Renewal Conference at Lake Ysyk-Kol in Kyrgyzstan. Professor David Norris of Urshan Graduate School of Theology in St. Louis, along with Global Missions director Bruce Howell and his wife, Diane, joined Mark Shutes and William and Elizabeth Turner to conduct this pivotal training and evangelism event. The result: ten were baptized in Jesus’ name, three of whom are pastors. Two pastors from Tajikistan were filled with the Holy Ghost and several claimed healing. Another nation of the former Soviet Union, Uzbekistan, was opened for the UPCI as well. We also learned that over two thousand believers in Uzbekistan have been baptized in Jesus’ name. Thank you for your prayers! —William and Elizabeth Turner MADAGASCAR: During the months of April, May, and June, conferences were held in the six regions of Madagascar. Approximately ten thousand attended the conference in the central region, and 1,303 were filled with the Holy Ghost. Please pray for continued success in these meetings. —Chris and Paula Richardson

BRAZIL: Our recent convention was held in an arena in North Manaus beside the huge Vivaldão stadium where the 2015 world cup soccer series will be played. This was a donation from our Amazon state governor. There was plenty of parking and bus services. Paul Reynolds from Canada ministered. Reports came in of healings, miracles, people receiving the Holy Ghost, and people being renewed. In March, the UPC of Brazil, with assistance from regional missions, registered the new UPC in Angola with one Angolan visitor present, which added a spirit of victory to the meetings. We were blessed with the ministry of Regional Director Darry Crossley and Global Missions director Bruce Howell in ministers’ meetings. —Bennie and Theresa DeMerchant PARAGUAY: The Paraguayan national conference was held in April 2012. Missionaries Michael and Miriam Sponsler from Argentina were the special speakers. They were anointed and used of the Lord. Many people were healed and filled with the Spirit. —Joseph and Loretta Bir KENYA: Over the last several months we have traveled to several areas and seen many new souls filled with the Holy Ghost, baptized in Jesus’ name, and healed. In our ministers’ conference in February 2012, we heard several accounts of miracles. One of the pastors in one of our village churches testified that after prayer the Lord raised a man from the dead. This brought great revival to that area as the people saw the power of God demonstrated and became convinced of the Apostolic message. Pastors Sammy Stewart and David Drysdale blessed the conference with their anointed ministry. —Patrick and Jean Groves FRANCE: Pastor Gary Randol and his son Nathan taught various pertinent themes regarding Sunday school education to about ninety teachers and aides during a recent national Sunday school seminar. Pastor Randol kept us on the edge of our seats in the overcrowded sanctuary as he ministered the

Word of God. Several children and adults received the Holy Spirit baptism. There is revival also among children in our churches. —Sam and Pat Balca CHILE: The earth did quake! Simultaneously the power of the Holy Ghost and the 7.2 quake twenty-one miles deep in the earth rocked Chile. A team of ministers met in Santiago for “Pentecostal Invasion.” Invaded by the power of God, a total of fifty-three received the Holy Ghost, twenty-five proclaimed healing, and the glory of the Lord filled the house. As the earth trembled we kept on exalting this precious name, Jesus Christ! Thank you, Brother Mario Zunzunegui and team, for blessing Chile with your ministry. —Darry and Kathy Crossley PAKISTAN: During this quarter, four of our New Life Theological Seminary students were baptized in Jesus’ name! As we have such a strong reputation for quality teaching in the Christian community, many of our students come to us from other denominations. These young men quickly see the biblical evidence of the Acts 2:38 message. —Curtis and Amanda Scott FINLAND: On April 11, 2012, our family celebrated with two young ladies as they received the gift of the Holy Spirit during our weekly home group meeting. We met them at our first language class and both have been attending since 2011. One lady told us that she has been talking to her coworkers about our home group and sharing how God’s presence is real there. Praise God! —Mark and Glenda Alphin Bruce A. Howell is the general director of Global Missions. He seeks with a passion to spread the word of our King and His ransom throughout the entire world.

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[ONE GOD, ONE CHURCH, ONE MISSION]

There Is Only One Church ROBIN JOHNSTON

iterary classics do not become recognized as such arbitrarily. They gain their stature partially because they speak to timeless aspects of the human condition. And make no mistake; while culture and technology undergo consistent change, humans from across the historical landscape are more like each other than they are different. It is for this reason that for believers and even skeptics the Bible remains a literary classic. Although its first readers lived thousands of years ago, the issues to which it speaks are remarkably contemporary. And in my opinion, of all the books of the Bible I Corinthians is the most contemporary, especially for Pentecostals. If you made a few minor adjustments, it could have been written last week. The letter was written to a Spirit-filled church struggling from a lack of unity. Paul founded the church at Corinth while on his second missionary journey. He stayed longer in Corinth—almost eighteen months—than he typically stayed when planting a church. When he left Corinth the church was thriving. However, conflict soon erupted. The church divided into factions and as a result it lost its apostolic focus. One symptom of that loss of focus was disunity. The letter we know as I Corinthians was Paul’s attempt to help the church get back on track. In the second half of I Corinthians 12, Paul crafted an extended metaphor using the human body as a type of the church. With more than a little tongue-in-cheek personification he demonstrated the absurdity of a church where each member functions without concern for the whole. The mental images conjured up by his metaphor illustrate the resulting loss of function. Much to the chagrin of Pentecostals, Paul placed this metaphor in the middle of a discussion of the place of spiritual gifts in the church. While he was a strong advocate for these gifts, he also recognized that even Spirit-filled Christians can lose unity. Ongoing unity does not seem to be the natural state for humans. At root we are selfish and unless this basic impulse is resisted we will divide. In First Corinthians Paul outlined a number of ways to push back against the impulse to divide. First he reminded the Corinthians that everyone is equal at the foot of the Cross. The church is first and foremost about Jesus Christ. It is His church. He purchased 32

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it with His blood. Dividing into camps because of pet doctrines or favorite preachers does not just miss the mark, it is shooting at the wrong target. Next Paul attempted to help the Corinthians understand what it meant to be truly spiritual. They were convinced they were poster children for spirituality. After all, they were filled with the Spirit. However, Paul rebuked them for the tolerance—perhaps even celebration—of blatant sinful conduct. In addition to his rebuke of their understanding of their freedom in Christ, he challenged them to consider the impact of their actions on others. Unity can exist onlywhere people consistently consider others before they act or speak. In chapter 13, perhaps the best-known chapter in the letter, Paul eloquently made the case for the priority of love. In this poetically crafted piece, he elevated love to a position of prominence. He placed it above spiritual gifts and great acts of service. In this key passage, he addressed the heart of unity—its motivation. Unity is not a check box on a list of best practices. It is an outgrowth of a heart condition. It is seldom automatic. More often it is a work in progress, primarily because keeping the heart pure is difficult and requires constant attention. One way to keep the heart pure is to focus on what is eternal. Chapter 15 of I Corinthians is Paul’s most extended teaching on the eternal. In it he challenged the Corinthians’ shortsighted view of Heaven. It was a leading cause of their disunity. We are not different. A focus on the eternal helps to correct our perception of the present. There is just one eternal destination. Nothing in the Bible even hints at the possibility of any kind of segregation in Heaven. In what is commonly called the “Lord’s Prayer,” Jesus instructed His disciples to pray, “Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.” There will be unity in Heaven, so it follows that we should attempt the same on earth. First Corinthians was written to a local congregation but the principles outlined in this letter apply to a broader context. Not only should we strive for unity on the local level, we should seek unity in our wider fellowship. After all, there is only one church and it belongs to Him. Robin Johnston serves as the editor in chief for the United Pentecostal Church International.

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NEW START BY ROY BARNHILL

Conquering Quebec ontréal is the second largest city in Canada. With a population of 3.8 million, it is called “Canada’s Culture Capital.” Montreal boasts of more than one hundred different culture-communities. The entire province of Quebec is home to approximately eight million, most of whom have never heard the Apostolic message. Three hours east of Montreal to Quebec City there are 900,000 people with no United Pentecostal Church. Quebec City is the largest such city in North America. Who is feeling the tug of this lost city today? Between Montreal and Quebec City is Trois Rivieres with a population of 130,000. Several years ago, under the leadership of Jack Cunningham, North American Missions made a sacrificial, yet wise, investment and purchased five acres and a building for an unbelievable price of $105,000.00. Today that property is valued at around $500,000.00. More important, on July 29 of this year eighty-five people gathered there to worship. The emotions that rushed through my spirit as I stood on one of the highest peaks overlooking Montreal screamed within me, “If I was only thirty years younger.” As I walked the streets of breathtaking Quebec City, the beautiful sights were blurred by the reality of the multitudes of lost souls, with not one Apostolic messenger. Lost souls for whom our Lord died and few—very few— who have answered the “Macedonian call.” Who is feeling the tug of this lost city today? The Quebec camp meeting was more than another place to preach; it was the place where God ministered to me about the lost condition of the world He died for. “When he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them, because they fainted, and were scattered abroad, as sheep having no shepherd” (Matthew 9:36). The shock and awe I felt over this unevangelized province was momentarily eased when I walked into the Quebec camp meeting hosted by the United Pentecostal Church of Saint Laurent. Over fifty cultures and a

The ministers in Quebec are Spirit-driven with an unquenchable quest to reach their region. They are developing a generation of powerful men and women of God. variety of languages gathered under one roof lifting up Jesus Christ. The upper and lower levels of the building were packed beyond capacity. Overflow rooms accommodated those who could not get in. Few came by car—most traveled on city buses and other means of metro transportation. The ministers in Quebec are Spiritdriven with an unquenchable quest to reach their region. They are doing all things by all means to win all they can with the limited resources and manpower they have. They are praying and hoping for others to come and help evangelize their province. In the meantime they are developing a generation of powerful men and women of God. Paul Graham, pastor of the Saint Laurent church, is a modern-day apostle as he teaches, trains, and tethers young men to his burden to reach Quebec. District Secretary William Price has built a strong and stable church in metro Montreal with a burden to plant preaching points and daughter works. Fidel Valenciano has developed a strong Filipino church that benefitted from Church in a Day. Metro Missionary Scott Grant is giving back more than his metro budget gives to him. The church he pastors in Montreal holds their weekend service on Saturday night. On Sunday morning he drives two hours to Trois Rivieres to preach to a growing congregation. During the week he teaches and invests in men and women who feel compelled by a burden to reach Quebec. Teaming up with area pastors who willingly give their time as instructors, Purpose Institute has become a vehicle for teaching and training men and women who someday may become church

planters in Quebec. Montreal has led the way in breaking down the walls of territorialism. Pastors work and worship together without the fear of their neighbor becoming a sheep stealer. They have one common cause—reaching Quebec with the gospel! As my flight lifted off the runway and metro Montreal became smaller, my spirit began to shout, “Yes, we can! Yes, we can! Yes, we will!” The conquest for Quebec is a reality because the burden of the Lord is becoming the burden of a man or woman somewhere that God may be speaking to right now. If you are interested in Quebec City, planting a church in Montreal or one of Quebec’s other unchurched cities, or in financially supporting Scott and Liane Grant, please contact Paul Graham, district director for North American Missions. His email address is prlgraham@gmail.com. Can we reach North America? Yes, we can! Yes, we can! Yes, we will! Roy Barnhill serves as the Southeast director for North American Missions and is the liaison to North American Missions sectional directors.

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[ONE GOD, ONE CHURCH, ONE MISSION]

One Church: It Does Matter BONNIE PEACOCK

eople make statements such as, “All churches lead to Heaven.” Too many people have a lackadaisical attitude about God. “It doesn’t matter. It really doesn’t matter what you do, where you go, or what you believe.” I remember a childhood chant, “You go to your church, I’ll go to mine. We’ll all get to Heaven at the very same time.” I repeated this to my mother when I got home from school. She was quick to explain to me the error of such a statement. The problem with this warm, fuzzy, no-one-is-wrong approach to church is that it simply does not line up with the Word of God. It is possible that the purpose of the church has been lost. God spoke of His church as His bride. Jesus spoke about returning for a bride. Not just any bride, but a specific bride. One who makes herself ready for Him. This Bride is not one who has lived a haphazard life. She is one who has kept herself pure, clean, and holy. Paul said, “That he might present it to himself a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; but that it should be holy and without blemish” (Ephesians 5:27). This Bride Jesus is coming back for is so valuable to God that He purchased it with His own blood. (See Acts 20:28.) God knows exactly who is in His church. The question begs to be asked, “Do we?” The Bible tells a story of ten virgins. All ten virgins had good intentions and thought they were ready for the bridegroom. They looked the part. It appeared they were doing all the right things. But the bridegroom lingered and five of them failed to grasp the significance of staying prepared for his return. While they were performing the outward activities that made them look as ready as everyone else, their vessels were empty. The oil necessary to keep their lamps burning was gone. (See Matthew 25:1-13.) Life has a way of diluting the initial passion that enveloped us when we came to Christ. The cares of this world, the quest for things and success, and a preference for a bed of ease drain the oil from our lamps. Gradually and insidiously, the enemy wears us down with stress, problems, and distractions. Our eyes are no longer turned toward the sky, awaiting Christ’s return. Oh, we ex34

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pect Him to come. We all know the Rapture is ahead. But who believes Jesus will come today? In the Gospels, we read of well-meaning people who had been taught for generations that a Messiah would come. This Messiah would deliver them from the 613 laws of Moses and the even heavier man-made interpretation of those laws. They were convinced that Messiah was coming. Their parents and grandparents believed. These conscientious people taught this to their children and grandchildren. “Someday things will be different. Messiah is coming to deliver God’s chosen people. It will be a great day. Just think! It might happen in your lifetime.” They were convinced Messiah was coming but they really did not expect to see it for themselves. So when Jesus came many of them did not receive Him. The very One they had talked about for so long walked among them. Still, they missed their time of visitation. (See Luke 19:44.) We are not so different. We live in exciting times. The return of Christ is upon us, yet we can be so distracted with keeping up with the Joneses, social networking, and climbing the career ladder that we miss out on what God is doing around us. We have the opportunity to be a vital part of revival, yet our flesh prefers a non-offensive, watered-down, people-friendly religion that makes us feel we are OK just the way we are. God is going to have a church. Regardless of whether we are a part of it does not thwart His plan. It is simply up to us to choose. Will we take the easy way or the high road? The high road always comes with the cross of self-denial. Perhaps it is that very cross that our society wishes to avoid. The cross is uncomfortable and we are vulnerable and weak. But it is the only way. Jesus said, “If any man will come after me, let him deny him-

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self, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: and whosoever will lose his life for my sake shall find it. For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?” (Matthew 16:24-26). C.M. Becton used to make the statement, “God is high maintenance.” This is true. He expects us to live by His rules. Nothing in the Word of God indicates that God has a nonchalant attitude about His bride. A phrase from my own wedding ceremony stated, “Forsaking all others.” That is what God expects of us too. We are to be exclusively His. Peter said, “Ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light” (I Peter 2:9). Being a part of the church of Jesus Christ is a great privilege. Life is too short to live it any other way!

Bonnie Peacock was an author and freelance contributor to various Christian publications. She attended the First United Pentecostal Church in Odessa, Texas. Terry Pugh was her pastor. She passed from this life on June 5, 2012. Editor’s note: Bonnie Peacock accepted this writing assignment for the Pentecostal Herald after she was told she had only a short time to live. She finished the assignment ahead of time because “I wished to go ahead and submit the article you requested as early as possible. While I am believing that God is a healer and He is not through with my life, I am trying to be prudent and not leave commitments dangling. I realize that I have not given this article the usual ‘marinating’ time.” Bonnie Peacock was a prolific writer and several of her articles were published in the Pentecostal Herald. We will miss her valuable contributions. OC TOBER 2012

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9:25 AM

MULTICULTURAL MINISTRIES BY JEFFERY CHAVIS

Celebrating Every Tribe eing misunderstood is one of the most frustrating predicaments one can experience. One of the most common questions asked me as the coordinator of Native American Ministries and Evangelism (NAME) originates in misunderstanding: “I live near a large Native community. How can I reach out to such a superstitious and traditional people?” The blame for this and similar misconceptions may be attributed in part to Hollywood and its fictitious portrayal of Indian culture. The NAME team is on a mission to erase the negative stigma attached to this beautiful people, for nearly every part of Native culture has positive and amazing significance. Winning Native Americans to Jesus is not difficult. But first, you must win their friendship and trust. Understanding their culture will help accomplish this goal. Libraries are full of literature. The Worldwide Web is bursting with information. While every tribe is unique, with its own government and guidelines, your research combined with sincere prayer will get you way ahead of the game in your endeavor to reach into this mission field. Understand that Native people are a people of celebration. If you study the tribal group of your area, you will find celebrations for every season. They always give thanks to God for every good thing. In spring, they pray and celebrate as they plant their crops. In summer, they give thanks for the sunshine and ask God for good rainfall. In autumn, they give thanks and rejoice over the harvest. In winter they celebrate the blessings of the past year and give thanks for good health as they pray for protection from sickness during the coming months. Powwows commemorate these events as dancers don their colorful Native dress to celebrate the goodness in their lives and give honor to their ancestors and heritage. Hundreds of Natives travel the powwow circuit, entwining their talents with their cultural history. Tribes advertise and invite friends of their clan to join them in feasting, music, and dance. They welcome nonnatives with

Winning Native Americans to Jesus is not difficult. But first, you must win their friendship and trust. their interest and questions. What a great place to make a new friend and educate yourself at the same time! Understand that Native Americans are innately sensitive to the Spirit of God. They have always believed in one God whom they simply call the “Great Spirit.” It is exciting to introduce to them the revelation of who that God is—and His name is Jesus! Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce tribe said, “Our fathers gave us many laws, which they had learned from their fathers. These laws were good. They told us to treat all people as they treated us; that we should never be the first to break a bargain; that it was a disgrace to tell a lie; that we should only speak the truth; that it was a shame for one man to take from another his wife or his property without paying for it. We were taught to believe that the Great Spirit sees and hears everything, and that he never forgets, that hereafter he will give to every man a spirit home according to his deserts: If he has been a good man, he will have a good home; if he has been a bad man, he will have a bad home. This I believe, and all my people believe the same.” Embracing Apostolic truth is usually not difficult for the First Nations because much of our doctrine correlates with their beliefs. When we manifest our love and respect for their culture, they easily open up and listen to our testimony and biblical perspectives. Understand that respect for elders, children, their leaders, and heritage are important factors. There has been much in the media of late concerning Native suicide, drugs, depression, and gambling. These issues are our challenges but we cannot afford to make them our focus. The enemy wants to overwhelm us with statistics and newsfeed,

but the name of Jesus is stronger than any addiction, affliction, or stronghold the devil concocts. Asking permission to offer sincere prayers for their leaders, elders, and children usually guarantees you an open door into their tribal meetings and into their hearts. Sessions at our NAME conferences are dedicated to teaching the proper approach to tribal government. Our ministry has seen great success using these positive, nonabrasive methods. Understand that church as usual won’t work. We must think out of the box to evangelize Native communities. Due to injustices suffered in the name of religion, many Native people do not trust church organizations. In-home fellowship or prayer and Bible study in the tribal center may be the best course of action. We can’t expect them to come to our churches until we have gone to them and shown our respect and love. Armed with prayer, love, and understanding, we pursue our vision, “No Tribe Left Behind!” Jeffery Chavis resides in Spring Lake, North Carolina, where he serves as senior pastor of the church he has pastored since 1985. Jeff Chavis is a full-blood registered Lumbee tribal member, and is the coordinator for the Native American Ministries and Evangelism under Multicultural Ministries of the UPCI. For more information on how to get involved in this ministry go to www.upciname.com.

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

C L AY J A C K S O N

Among the Broken estiny is seldom perceived in advance, but when a divine appointment occurs, the spiritually aware feel its weight in unmistakable fashion. So it was in late July for a North American missionary couple and a group of student leaders. A youth mission team—thirty-one people strong— descended on Aurora, Colorado, to help Pastor Robbie Mitchell and his wife, Lisa, expand community awareness of the Vertical Church, a new church plant in the Denver metro area. Pastor Mitchell had planned multiple events, including neighborhood canvassing, a block party (complete with free food and bounce toys for children), and a celebration service. Early on the morning of July 20, however, the lives of many in Aurora changed forever. Three miles from the hotel where the mission team was lodging, a gunman brought death and destruction to 38

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a theater, leaving twelve people dead, scores wounded, and a community in shock, horror, and grief. The team’s plans for community outreach shifted dramatically. Pastor Mitchell conferred with Jason Huckaby, student pastor of The Pentecostal Church of Memphis. They agreed to set aside prematurely the sightseeing schedule for the youth and spring into action. After a prayer meeting in the motel, which at this point was bursting at the seams with eighteen rooms rented to national media members, the group traveled the short distance to the Aurora city center where the theater was located. Although police had the immediate area cordoned off, the ministry team, comprised of members of both The Pentecostal Church and the Vertical Church, were able to access two areas where makeshift memorials had been placed. As hundreds of people came by to pay their respects at the candlelight vigils, ministry team members greeted them, expressed solidarity in their grief, and invited them to services that weekend specifically geared to lead the community in prayers of mourning and healing. Many people were weeping openly in the street, as tears of grief blended with the response to the Spirit of God they felt during prayer.

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Your coming here is critical for our healing.” Colorado State Senator Morgan Carroll prays with the ministry team in Aurora, Colorado.

Right: People gather for prayer at the school where Vertical Church meets each Sunday. Left: Pastor Robbie Mitchell speaking at Vertical Church.

“I had never felt a need to reach out to people like that before,” said John Shepherd, one of the youngest members of the student ministry team. “[We] just wanted to help them.” The impromptu gatherings around the street memorials often turned into prayer meetings when those who attended expressed a willingness to pray. Ministry team members were able to gain access to the restricted grounds housing the media trailers, and invited them to be a part of the planned weekend services. Pastor Mitchell was interviewed by multiple media outlets, including reporters from local, national, and international television stations. The ministry team was caught up in the moment of opportunity and implored their leaders to allow them to remain at the memorials until late in the night as people were still gathering spontaneously for prayer and personal ministry. At 3 am they finally returned to the hotel, overcome with a panoply of emotions: sadness, compassion, and exhilaration at being placed in the epicenter of a God moment. The following day, the ministry team fanned out in the immediate area surrounding the school where Vertical Church meets each Sunday, distributing door-hangers to several hundred homes. At an OC TOBER 2012

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Continued from page 39

The attention of reporters and governmental leaders, however, was not the remarkable aspect of any of the services. According to Pastor Mitchell, “The greatest part was that Jesus was there.”

C

hildren’ s Evangelists of the Month

Ken and Amber James 1779 Bay Avenue Hannibal, MO 63401 Cell: (217) 653-7865

afternoon memorial service led by the church, several members of the community came to express their grief and to ask for prayer, including a young man whose friend was shot and undergoing surgery that day. Not even high temperatures and standing on the asphalt could deter those seeking God’s peace in the time of trouble. As the presence of the Lord swept over the gathered crowd, Tim Milligan reminded all of the timeless truth of Luke 4:18 that Jesus had come to live out a ministry that offered healing to the brokenhearted. During her remarks, Colorado State Senator and Majority Caucus Leader Morgan Carroll acknowledged the work of the guest ministry team and the passion of the Vertical Church by saying, “Your coming here is critical for our healing.” Many guests who were present at the Saturday afternoon prayer service sought the Lord openly and were touched deeply by the Spirit of God. On Sunday the Vertical Church was again the scene of a visitation of the anointing of God. Pastor Mitchell reminded the congregation and guests that the root of the tragedy lay in the depravity of man. He said, “There was murder in the first family.” In the midst of the aftermath of sin, however, the church should do the work of Christ by offering hope and healing to the hurting. “Where Jesus would be [this weekend] is on the street with the broken.” Terry Black, senior pastor of The Pentecostal Church, underscored the necessity of looking to God in times of trauma. “It is possible in moments like these to feel inadequate. The needs are far-reaching and can be met only by the Lord. That’s the great thing about knowing who we know. God is a master of timing. He does not control the choices of humans with free will, but He does foresee and He makes plans to meet the needs.” Jason Huckaby said, “When understanding stops, the peace of God goes beyond understanding.” Following the message by Tim Milligan of TPC another beautiful move of the Spirit of God swept the congregation and scores were blessed to receive that peace. With the press of national and international media surrounding the community events, the combined ministry team became a focus of interest, providing exposure of the mission of the church to a wide audience through various media outlets. The attention of reporters and governmental leaders, however, was not the most remarkable aspect of any of the services. According to Pastor Mitchell, “The greatest part was that Jesus was there.”

email: kenamberjames@yahoo.com Website: www.reach-ministries.org Full Time Nature of Evangelistic Ministry: REACH Ministries (Reaching Every Adult Child & Home) presents the message of God’s love and plan of salvation for all ages through exciting songs, skits, object lessons, and signature puppets. Available for camps, children’s revivals, VBS, and teacher training seminars. Subjects Taught: • Learning Styles—Connecting with Your Students • The Spirit-Minded Teacher • Object Lessons, Songs, Props and Costumes to Spark Your Sunday School • Starting a Puppet Ministry • Puppetry Techniques 101 • Outreach Techniques to Build Your Sunday School and Achieve Bible Studies • Praying with Children

Clay Jackson attends The Pentecostal Church in Memphis. Terry Black is the pastor.

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

The Testimony of Ruth LAURA MERCHANT

he story of Ruth focuses on three main characters: Ruth, Naomi, and Boaz. The first chapter of the book sets up the historical and geographical context of the story. It is interesting to note that the main characters of Ruth are not kings, judges, or prophets but common Israelites. This shows us that God can use common people and the difficult parts of life to accomplish His perfect will. The events begin in Moab where Elimelech and Naomi live with their sons Mahlon and Chilion. Elimelech dies and Naomi’s sons marry two Moabite women, Ruth and Orpah. After only ten years of living in Moab, both sons die as well, leaving Naomi with her widowed daughters-in-law. After losing her family, Naomi prepares to go back to her hometown of Bethlehem and sends Ruth and Orpah away. However, out of devotion to her mother-in-law, Ruth refuses to leave her side, saying, “Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God.” (See Ruth 1:16.) Ruth’s commitment to Naomi—adopting the God of Israel and requesting to be buried with her—is even unto death. Upon reaching Bethlehem Naomi tells the women to call her Mara, which means bitter. She does not realize at this time that the Moabite woman with her will bring a solution to her plight and soothe the bitterness of her losses. The beginning of the second chapter introduces our next important character, Boaz. Boaz is a relative of Naomi’s husband, Elimelech. Ruth volunteers to glean in the fields and she chooses the field of Boaz. He takes notice of her and bestows favor upon her, telling his servants to leave stalks behind for her to pick up. Naomi praises the Lord for His provision for the two of them, even though it is not actually stated that God intervened in any way on their behalf. God is seen as the invisible force working everything out. Israelites had a custom of the kinsman-redeemer, which is spelled out in Deuteronomy 25:5-10 and Leviticus 25:23-28. Boaz qualifies as the kinsman-redeemer of Naomi and Ruth, so Naomi comes up with a plan. She tells Ruth to dress her best and put on perfume and go sit at the feet of Boaz when he is on the threshing floor. Ruth obeys her mother-in-law and when Boaz awakes in the middle of the night he discovers a woman lying at his feet and asks who she is. When Boaz realizes it is Ruth and understands that her actions mean an offer to redeem her, he tells her of a closer kinsmen that he will consult first. If the closer relative will not redeem her, he promises to do so. The customs of the Israelites seem strange to us but Boaz clearly understands that Ruth is making a request of marriage 44

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to him and that becoming her husband would fulfill his role as kinsman-redeemer. (This tradition becomes more significant in the New Testament where Christ is the ultimate Redeemer.) He then sends her away to Naomi with grain and she waits as he settles the matter with the relative. In the fourth chapter, Boaz meets with the kinsman at the town gate, where business transactions are made, and tells him of the land and widow that must be redeemed. The man, however willing to redeem the land, cannot because he is afraid to endanger his own estate. He fears this because the law requires that to redeem the property he must marry the widow of the deceased owner. Then, in order to maintain the name of the dead with his property, any children born to them would carry the name of the first husband. Having more children would cause him to have to divide his estate further among his heirs and possibly jeopardize the continuation of his own family line. In the relative’s refusal to marry Ruth and become the kinsman-redeemer, Boaz is free to do so. The man removes his sandal and makes the transaction of property legal. Boaz announces his redemption of Ruth and the property of Elimelech to the elders and the people gathered at the gate. They, in turn, bless the union, saying, “We are witnesses. The Lord make the woman who is coming to your house like Rachel and Leah, the two who built the house of Israel; and may you prosper in Ephrathah and be famous in Bethlehem.” (See Ruth 4:11.) What the elders do not know is that through this union, Ruth will become part of the lineage of David, and later, the Messiah. All within a single verse, Boaz marries Ruth and she bears a son who is named Obed. Naomi once again resumes center stage in the story as women praise the Lord for what He has done for her. After losing her husband and two sons, she is said to have a new son. This is a powerful testimony of the mercy and grace of God as our provider. When a life is fully committed to Him, he faithfully takes care of us and meets our needs. It is mentioned at the end of the book that Obed is the father of Jesse, who is then the father of David. This book shows that God’s covenant can extend beyond the chosen people of Israel. His love was shown to Ruth, a Moabite woman, who gave up the idols of her own past, and lived a life of faith despite her ethnic background. Her inclusion in the lineage of the Messiah further shows that God looks beyond gender or race; He is truly not a respecter of persons. (See Acts 10:34-35.) He accepts any who choose to follow and worship Him, including Gentiles. Laura Merchant currently works as a graphic designer at the Pentecostal Publishing House and resides in Florissant, Missouri, with her husband, Jonathan.

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This is a powerful testimony of the mercy and grace of God as our provider.”

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Letters to the Editor Hats off to the wonderful August 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald. I was blessed by every article, but I want to give thanks to the following special writers: “What Goes on in a Pentecostal Service?” by P. Danield Buford; “Dead Religion or Living Relationship” by Chuck Welch; “Clean Off the Cobwebs” by Bonnie Peacock; “Salt of the Earth” by Stacey Guerra; “God Places the Lonely in Families” by Carol Clemans —Louise Bonnie The August 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald published an article by R.L Gilstrap titled “Substance or Shadow.” I found this to be an excellent article. Gilstrap said, “Shadow worshiping has caused many to seek tongues instead of the Holy Ghost. We need to help them turn around and face the Light.” I completely agree. But how do we do this? This is a question that needs to be addressed. If something could be printed in the Pentecostal Herald, it would be a great help to many who wish to give an answer to a most difficult question. —Frederick C. Williams What is required to reprint articles from the Pentecostal Herald? The Jena Times, at no cost will let me place an article each week in the newspaper—it is widely read and especially by Pentecostals of different organizations. Some of the articles are so excellent the whole world needs to read them. —Jackie Davidson The editorial in the September 2012 Pentecostal Herald is outstanding. After reading through this issue, my feelings are even stronger adverse than when we talked earlier concerning the subject matter. The questions are not answered concerning the authority that is in the five-fold ministry. Women in ministry is good. Women in the five-fold ministry turns words like “submission to the husband” into an oxymoron. Please don’t misunderstand, I have always respected others’ views and expect the same. But if we can devote an entire issue to this view of women, why not give an issue to the other side, which I feel exalts women to their rightful and Godgiven place—God, Christ, husband, wife, children. Who does a lady pastor submit to and who does her husband submit to? What part of the five-fold does not speak of authority? My hope is to continue receiving bundles of the Pentecostal Herald in the future. Thank you for all you do in the promotion of the gospel. Please receive this in the spirit of love. —Mark Abernathy I have been a licensed minister in the United Pentecostal Church since 1974—preaching even before then. I am a woman of seventy-two years. I evangelized for twenty years and have been pastoring for twenty-two years in Iowa, Louisiana. The 46

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September 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald (“Women in Ministry”) makes me want to weep and rejoice. It is about forty years late. I still pastor and I can now happily die knowing that our organization has finally recognized openly that women can minister. This pleases me well. I would like to order twenty copies. How can I do so? —Elsye Sonnier Thank you so much for the focus of “Women in Ministry” in the September issue of the Pentecostal Herald. I especially enjoyed Mel and Lisa Reddy’s article “To Be or Not to Be (Licensed)?” As a young minister’s wife who is also called to pulpit ministry, I appreciated that this was addressed. Our story is much the same as the Reddy’s. I only wish I had read this article ten years ago. The entire issue was so encouraging! Thank you for another great issue. —Harmony Pace I am a home missions pastor in Largo, Florida. Thank you for the September 2012 edition of the Pentecostal Herald. It is encouraging to see the Pentecostal Herald focus an entire issue on “Women in ministry.” I especially enjoyed the historical articles and the article Cindy Miller wrote. Thank you and keep up the good work. —Gregory Bowe We received our copy of the September 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald. I read every single article on “Women in Ministry.” I was thrilled to read such inspirational, motivational, and well-written articles regarding past and present women in ministry. After reading Cara’s Call I felt that we are about to see a tremendous move of women stepping into and up to their calling. It was a surprise to read in David Norris’ interview that when the UPC was formed 22 percent of licensed ministers were women. At the age of eight, I had been attending Sunday school for just a short time, when my pastor, Paul Moulton, took me to a tent meeting. Janet Trout was the speaker. It was at this meeting that I first felt the Spirit of God moving on me; it forever changed the course of my life. —Sherry Phillips I especially enjoyed the September 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald (“Women in Ministry”). Loved all the colored pictures of these great women of God! I really enjoy reading Tiffini Countaway’s column each month, introducing us to new people each month. Please include a picture of the person she is writing about so we can get a better connection and identify them :) Thanks. —Donna Hogue ___________________________________ Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or Pentecostlal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299. Letters may be edited for style, grammar, punctuation, or length.

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HEALTH BY DR. CLAY JACKSON

The Affordable Care Act : The central feature of the upcoming election, with respect to healthcare, has been the Affordable Care Act (ACA). How has the legislation affected you personally, and what implications do you see for healthcare after November? A: The ACA legislation is a huge bill, with lots of provisions—many of which have not been implemented. So it’s a little tough to say what effects it will have once it’s fully in place. The law’s constitutionality was upheld, of course, in June’s controversial decision by the Supreme Court. But Mr. Romney said if he is elected, his first priority as President would be to repeal the law. Q: Are you in favor of such a move? CJ: As I said, it’s a huge piece of legislation, with many parts that I think are good for healthcare, and some parts that cause me serious concerns. The ACA gets some things right, and we have reason to believe that those elements will have salutary effects. Any clinician is happy to see more Americans receive healthcare coverage. In addition, the ACA helps to tilt the playing field to favor primary care, and to favor promotion of health, not just treatment of disease. Q: Please explain. CJ: The ACA has resulted in a shift of some payments from expensive procedures (and the subspecialists who perform them) to preventive counseling and quality improvements (and the clinicians in primary care who routinely perform these tasks). Primary care clinicians now receive a quarterly bonus payment from Medicare of 10 percent, just by virtue of providing primary care to patients. Q: So we’re spending more money? How does that help? CJ: The American system of care has always been an inverted pyramid, with far too many subspecialists and far too few generalists. One reason is that pay for subspecialists has historically been much higher than that for generalists. When medical students graduate with debts averaging about

If the government can demand a purchase that creates a precedent, that makes me uneasy. The penalty for employers not covering employees is less than the cost of covering the employees. $150,000, they tend to go where they have a chance to recoup those expenses. Q: Why is having too many subspecialists a problem for the healthcare system? CJ: All those subspecialists tend to do lots of procedures, which results in a high cost of care. Q: Doesn’t supply and demand come into play here? CJ: Not really. The strange economics of healthcare are derived from a fundamental discrepancy in the American system—we want to trade healthcare as many other goods and services, but we view it as a right (or at least as a moral obligation on the part of caregivers to provide). So there are fixed payments that accrue to clinicians from third parties. More specialists equal more procedures at the same price: it adds up to more costs. Q: How does having more generalists help? Wouldn’t that drive up costs too? CJ: Not really, because generalists tend to prevent disease, which helps us to avoid the expensive procedures. For example, primary care clinicians attempt to control blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and discourage smoking before the heart attack occurs. Q: You mentioned some other concerns about the ACA. Can you share a few of those with our readers? CJ: Well, one is a philosophical point, and that is the individual coverage mandate. It represents a fundamental shift in the relationship of the federal government to the citizen. If the government can demand a purchase that creates a precedent, that makes me uneasy. The penalty for employers not covering employees is actually less than the cost of covering the employees; some analysts predict that employers will begin dropping their

staff’s insurance, because they will have a federally regulated “safety net” coverage. Q: Are there any practical challenges that you see with ACA? CJ: There’s the cost, of course. We spend about 17 percent of our Gross Domestic Product (GDP) on healthcare. Many analysts think that cost savings will help increase efficiencies, but I’m not so sure. Q: What about the increased demand created by the additional folks with coverage? Will there be enough doctors to go around? CJ: Unfortunately, no. The aging population, the lack of increases in Medicare funding for residency training, and pending retirement of large groups of doctors all point to a significant shortage in the next decade—up to 63,000 doctors by 2015. Q: How will the healthcare system cope? CJ: It’s likely that the care gap will be met, in part, by a growing supply of nurse practitioners and physician assistants. Rather than doctors working independently, they’ll be leaders of healthcare teams (in integrated practices called medical homes) that will be delivering care. Dr. Clay Jackson practices in Memphis, Tennessee. He attends The Pentecostal Church in Memphis. Terry Black is the pastor. NOTE: The contents of this article are intended to convey information, and should not be interpreted as medical advice.

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F LO S H AW

Plowing Before the Planter “Praying On-site with Insight”

ust around the corner something historic and significant will happen. Beginning in October 2012, prayer teams will be trained and equipped to bombard strategic locations with prayer across North America. A partnership has been formed between World Network of Prayer (WNOP) and North American Missions (NAM) for the sake of spiritual warfare in cities and communities where churches are being planted or in settings where churches are needed. It’s Time to Plow I have heard the expression, “You’ll never plow a field by turning it over in your mind.” In the agricultural context, can a planter or farmer sow the seed without plowing the ground? The obvious answer is no. In applying the agricultural analogy, it is essential that weeds, thorns, stones, rocks, and so forth first be removed. Then the hard land can be plowed to break up the fallow (unused) ground in order to produce fertile ground to sow the seed so that it may germinate and grow into maturity. Spiritually speaking, we must plow the ground in advance with prayer and prepare the soil of the hearts of potential souls so the seeds of the gospel of Christ may penetrate the soil as it is sown and cultivated by the planter. This is necessary to bring forth 48

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a fruitful harvest. Paul said, “He that ploweth should plow in hope; and that he that thresheth in hope should be partaker of his hope” (I Corinthians 9:10). Prayer is part of the energy that pulls the guided plow and tills the soil of unconverted, hard, unregenerated hearts of humanity that are likened unto deficient types of soils. As WNOP “pray-ers” and NAM planters work together, in due season an appointed harvest will be reaped. Genesis 26:12 says, “Then Isaac sowed in that land, and received in the same year an hundredfold: and the Lord blessed him.” It was not until Isaac sowed—apparently after the dry desolate land was first plowed and the soil prepared—that God then blessed him. Instituting a consistent prayer base is essential to assist in fulfilling the biblical mandate of evangelism and discipleship for effective church growth and establishment. To help accomplish this goal, two major joint initiatives will be implemented: “Plowing Before the Planter” and “Church Planter S.I.T.E. (Spiritual Intercessory Team Elite).” Plowing Before the Planter WNOP and NAM will host effective prayer walks and coverage at targeted church plant localities by utilizing a selected group of local and nonlocal intercessors (financially self-supporting). The design and application will be “Praying on-site with insight.” Over a weekend, this group will pray on-site for three days. A key

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appointed trained district prayer coordinator or prayer leader will direct the group. Prayer will be rendered so that fertile groundwork may be prepared for a great harvest. Training is essential to ensure that all participating in prayer missions are adequately prepared. The first training session will convene at the 2012 UPCI general conference on Friday, from 1 pm to 4 pm in room 132 in the America’s Center. An invitation is extended to the following: 1. WNOP district, sectional, local, and national prayer coordinators 2. NAM directors 3. Selective intercessors invited by WNOP/NAM 4. Interested intercessors who apply and meet the qualifications of pastoral approval and training criteria (guidelines posted at wnop.org) 5. Church planters with committed or tentative event dates Future training sessions will be videoed and available to view online. A team will be assigned to “Plow Before the Planter” in prayer for each mission trip. A sign-up log will be available at the training session. Initial “beta tests” of church plant location(s) and dates or (“plow times”) of chosen targeted areas will occur: November 1618, 2012 in Portland, Oregon; January 2013 in Vancouver, British Columbia; and March 2013 in Seattle, Washington. An official fullscale launch of this operation will occur in April 2013 in the Rocky Mountain District. Other locations to be added later.

Church Planter S.I.T.E. (Spiritual Intercessory Team Elite) Church planters become excited when they get their own “SITE.” This is true, both in the spiritual and in the natural. Church planters can have their own Spiritual Intercessory Team Elite assigned to them to pray for both their personal and church needs. Upon completion of on-site prayer, to provide prayer maintenance and personal prayer connection, a group will commit to ongoing prayer and fasting support for the planter and his or her church. This prayer team will consist of at least ten or more people called the “Church Planter S.I.T.E.” This team will become part of a church planter’s prayer team to give consistent support for specific prayer needs submitted by the planter. Individuals will be recruited online through the efforts of local and sectional church prayer coordinators under the supervision of WNOP. Plowing Ahead It is WNOP’s vision and burden to continue to implement a successful prayer structure that greater supports UPCI leadership, laity, and others, including NAM. God has given us the land, as well as the tools, resources, and abilities to possess it and to plant and to grow in His kingdom for His glory. So, we will plow forward! Flo Shaw is the international coordinator for World Network of Prayer.

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Enemies of the Cross R O D N E Y V. PA M E R

n otherwise unexceptional hill in northern Lithuania stands as a most remarkable sight. No one knows for sure why the custom started, but in the fourteenth century crosses began appearing as a symbol of Lithuanian defiance toward foreign invaders.  Since the medieval period, the Hill of Crosses has represented the resistance of Lithuanian Catholicism to enemy oppression. Crosses were placed there in 1795 when portions of the country were incorporated into Russia. Later, during the peasant uprising of 1831 to 1863, many crosses were erected on the hill in a call for freedom. By 1895, there were at least one hundred fifty large crosses standing, and by 1914, the number had grown to two hundred. By 1940, four hundred large crosses were surrounded by thousands of smaller ones. The German war machine drove out the Soviets in World War II, only to see the surrounding area suffer even more when Soviet Russia retook it at the war’s end, making it a part of the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic. During the post-war Soviet era, patriots continued to declare their hope for freedom from foreign domination by placing crosses on the hill. The sizes and variety of crosses are as amazing as their number. Beautifully carved out of wood or sculpted from metal, the crosses range from ten feet tall to the limitless tiny examples that cover the larger crosses like wallpaper. The Soviets tried repeatedly to destroy the cry for freedom by the Lithuanians. Three times the hill was bulldozed: in 1961, 1973, and again in 1975. The crosses were set on fire or melted into scrap metal, and the area was covered with waste and sewage. There were even plans by authorities to build a dam on the nearby Kulve River, so the hill would end up under water. Following each of these tormenting experiences, local residents and pilgrims from all over Lithuania would systematically replace the crosses on the sacred hill. In 1961, the Soviets destroyed an estimated five thousand 50

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crosses; in 1975, another twelve hundred were destroyed. By 1991, when Lithuania finally gained their independence, the number had grown to over fifty thousand. Notwithstanding the repeated attempts by these enemies of freedom in leveling the hill three times, burning the crosses and turning them into scrap metal, even covering the area with waste and sewage, the Hill of Crosses stands to this day. In 2006, there was thought to be over one hundred thousand symbolic markers of freedom on the Hill of Crosses. Despite the efforts of their enemies, the symbol of the cross and its message of freedom could not be destroyed.  Just as oppressive political enemies have tried repeatedly to destroy the Hill of Crosses, there have been enemies who seek to destroy the message of the Cross and delete it from our faith. Paul said there would be many who “are the enemies of the cross of Christ” (Philippians 3:18). But the Cross is still a declaration of the freedom from the oppression of sin that has plagued mankind. No evil enemy can destroy the power of the sacrifice purchased at Calvary. What does the symbol of the cross mean to us? The cross of Christ is the center of our faith, the message that the atonement for sin was paid by the supreme sacrifice. By the Cross, we mean that Jesus Christ, the mighty God in the flesh, did actually and literally die and was nailed to a Roman symbol of death.  Numbered with the transgressors, He of His own volition took upon Himself the sins of the world. And being found with that sin upon Him, He suffered and died to pay the price of sin for every man, woman, and child—for you and for me. He did bare our sins in His own body

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1000-1100 word article INCLUDING THE BIO.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

on the tree that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness. It remains the greatest symbol of hope for freedom from sin. The Cross calls men and women to repentance and a change in their lifestyle. Or it should. But we live in a world where many are unwilling to accept the message of the Cross. We live in a world that accepts homosexuality as just an alternate lifestyle, a society that looks the other way when it comes to abortion and where infidelity in marriage has become just a way of life, even celebrated by some. These are the enemies of the Cross: the infidel, the curser, the profane person, the adulterer, and the proud. Those whose hearts are filled with evil thoughts, adulteries, fornications, murders, covetousness, wickedness, deceit, lasciviousness, blasphemy, and pride are enemies of the Cross. By their lifestyle, they seek to destroy the symbol that calls for the death of sin.  This is what Paul meant when he spoke of the enemies of the Cross—those who hate it because it condemns their lives; those who live in opposition to it and choose to ignore its message of freedom; those who find it a rebuke to their wrongness, their inconsistency, their hypocrisy, their sins.

The antidote for sin is nothing more and nothing less than the Cross. There is but one sacrifice for sin. Only one cross had such ubiquitous power to save mankind from sin. Not many crosses— just one—purchased our freedom. Just one cross carried the only Lamb of God who alone could pay the penalty of sin. Not many crosses—just one. But that one was sufficient. The Book of Hebrews says, “This man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God … . For by one offering he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified” (Hebrews 10:12-14). Despite the efforts of man and Satan to destroy the message of the Cross, this one sacrifice purchased our freedom from sin forever. It is little wonder that the instrument of torture on which Jesus died has become the greatest symbol of hope for freedom from sin. No enemy can destroy the power of the Cross. Rodney V. Pamer and his wife, Nan, serve the Apostolic Church of Barberton in Barberton, Ohio. OC TOBER 2012

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10Pentecostal Herald October 2012