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EDITORIAL

Count the Worshipers By Simeon Young Sr.

The Doctrine of God in Early Church History By David K. Bernard

Worship and the

Millennial Generation

All of Life Is

Worship The Pentecostal Life

> An Interview with Ken Gurley > God Does All Things Well


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EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

Count the Worshipers ohn’s words in Revelation 11:1 grade, and divert our worship. But God and the twenty-four elders sing a new song wants us to lift up holy hands without wrath saying, “Thou art worthy … for thou wast (“Measure the temple of God, and the altar, and them that and doubting. He wants us to worship Him slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy in spirit and truth. He wants us to give unto blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and worship therein”) are prophetic in scope and foresee the rebuild- Him the glory due unto His name. He wants people, and nation; and hast made us unto ing of the Jewish Temple in the us to worship Him in the beauty of holiness. our God kings and priests: and we shall He wants us to come before His presence international city of Jerusalem. reign on the earth” (Revelation 5:9-10). with singing. He wants us to enter into His Jesus’ command for John to count the As this cosmic cacophony of praise gates with thanksgiving. He wants us to clap worshipers has spiritual implications for rises, one hundred million plus angels pick our hands. He wants us to make a joyful us today. Whether it is worship in a rebuilt up the refrain and say with a loud voice, noise unto Him. He wants us to come near “Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to reJewish temple in Jerusalem or in our church services, worship and worshipers matter to and bow before Him in worship. He wants ceive power, and riches, and wisdom, and Jesus. It is not how many people strength, and honour, and glory, among us who have academic deand blessing. And every creature grees that counts. How expensive which is in heaven, and on the If a person does not worship God, earth, and under the earth, and such our clothes are does not count with Jesus. He is not impressed with our are in the sea, and all that are his or her social status does not as automobiles. It does not matter to in them, heard I saying, Blessing, Him how many professions we matter. If we do not worship God, and honour, and glory, and power, have in our churches. Nor is He imbe unto Him that sitteth upon the our tenure in the church, our marks throne, and unto the Lamb for ever pressed with how many well-heeled members attend our churches. Let (Revelation 5:11-13). of distinction, our church atten- and ever” the rich and the poor come, but let It seems that now the voices them worship. Let the white and dance, our singing, our shouting, of the blasphemers are far louder the black and the red and the yelthan the voices of the blessers. Our our financial contributions, and God is defamed and cursed and low and the brown come, but let them worship. Let the garbage colridiculed and mocked and blasour talents do not count. lector and the college professor and phemed now. But one day soon the plumber and the doctor and the multiplied millions of redeemed farmer and the lawyer and the ditchpeople will join the angelic host us to cover our faces and say, “Holy, holy, to ascribe blessing and honor and glory and digger come, but let them worship. holy is the Lord of hosts.” He wants us to be If a person does not worship God, his or power to Him who sits on the throne. On that her social status does not matter. If we do not joyful in His house of praise. He wants us to glorious day the voices of millions of people offer sacrifices of praise. worship God, our tenure in the church, our who adore God with their praises will drown Jesus said, “The hour cometh, and now marks of distinction, our church attendance, out the voices of those who have plundered is, when the true worshippers shall worship our singing, our shouting, our financial conHim with their blasphemies. the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Fatributions, and our talents do not count. We But we don’t have to wait for some futher seeketh such to worship Him. God is ture prophetic opportunity for our heartfelt must worship for anything else to matter. It a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship that blesses God to counterbaldoes not matter how big and beautiful and worship him in spirit and in truth” (John costly the building is if there is no worship ance the blasphemy. The blasphemers don’t in the building. Worship is what counts with 4:23-24). Humility and wonder and sincer- care who hears them curse God, and we Jesus, not square footage. It is not the tech- ity and authenticity add up to worship that shouldn’t care what the world thinks about nology, or the latest gadgetry, or the tasteful the Father seeks, and worship is what counts our worship. appointments, or the eye-catching architec- with Him. We must ask ourselves, “Do I love Him It is widely held among theologians that ture that matter. In light of the fact that only as much as the world hates Him?” the worshipers count with Jesus, we must the four living creatures and the twenty-four elders of Revelation represent the redeemed all ask ourselves, “Do I measure up when it of every age since the fall in the Garden of comes to worship?” Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the PenEden. John heard the four living creatures Satan wants to dilute, diminish, detecostal Herald. NOVEMBER 2013

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PENTECOSTAL HERALD | NOVEMBER 2013 Fundamental Doctrine The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

The One True God

EDITOR

Simeon Young Sr. PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain CREATIVE DIRECTOR Abraham LaVoi DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Laura Merchant, Dennis Fiorini EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Brooke Rosser COPY EDITOR Patrica Bollmann

Cover photo by Abraham LaVoi.

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CORRECTION: The title of Jeremy Painter’s article in the October 2013 issue of the Pentecostal Herald should have been “What Is Pentecost?” not “What Is Worship?” pentecostherald ThePentecostalHerald We regret the mistake. —Editor

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USPS 427-240 United Pentecostal Church International GENERAL OFFICIALS

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney* GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Jerry Jones* DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell* DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton L. Coon Sr.* EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston GENERAL SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR Steve L. Cannon GENERAL YOUTH DIRECTOR Shay Mann SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Dan Batchelor

GENERAL PRESBYTERS

Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton L. Coon Sr., Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Daniel Fleming, Edward Goddard, Scott Graham, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, Wayne Huntley, Darrell Johns, J. Mark Jordan, Ron Lichtle, Arnold MacLauchlan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Mark Morgan, Arthur Naylor, Trevor Neil Gordon Parrish, Kevin Prince, John E. Putnam, Stephen P. Spite, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, C. Patton Williams, Richard A. Wittmeier, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

GENERAL EXECUTIVE PRESBYTERS

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Clifford Barnett* Brent Coltharp* Bernard Elms* Daniel Garlitz* Scott Graham* Marty Johnson* Anthony Mangun* Bryan Parkey* Raymond Woodward*

HONORARY PRESBYTERS

J.R. Blackshear, Ernest Breithaupt, W.L. Clayton, B.S. Cole, Daniel Garlitz, Arless Glass, John Grant, Tommy Hudson, James Kelley, Carrol D. Kennedy, Carl Lagow, Roger Lewis, R.J. McIntyre, John D. Mean, James Merrick, Paul Price, Paul Reynolds, J.M. Russell, Harry Scism, Scotty Teets, T.F. Tenney, B.J. Thomas, Wayne Trout, G.L. Vittitow, Ted Wagner, David O. Walters, R.D. Whalen, Jesse Williams, Jack Yonts * Member of the Executive Board

EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Lee Ann Alexander


[WHAT DOES WORSHIP LOOK LIKE?] 8 Captivated by Worship Scott Graham

Columns 3 | Editorial Simeon Young Sr.

7 | The General

Superintendent Speaks

David K. Bernard

13 | My Hope Radio

Tiffini Countaway

17 | Faith & Culture

Eugene Wilson

31 | Worldline

B  ruce A. Howell

33 | New Start

Kent Elliot

41 | Multicultural Ministries

Lionel Dabbs

47 | Launch Your Ministry

14 Our Inspired Hymnal Daniel L. Seagraves

18 Worship and the Millennial Generation Kristin Keller

Pentecostal Life

22 What Does God Get Out

10 | Family Helps

of a Worship Service?

Establish Pentecostal Church in Berlin, Germany

Justin Conway

24 Transforming Worship

Gretchen Gregory

Ann Ahrens

27 | If God Has

28 What Does Worship

Forgiven Me, Why Can’t I Forgive Myself?

Look Like? Sound Like? Don Martin

34 North American Youth Congress 2013 Matthew Johnson and Sarah Slusser

40 | An Interview

with Ken Gurley

38 What Time Does Church Start?

Brooke Rosser

Rick Lovall

50 | God Does All

42 Pictorial Essay of the Centennial Celebration

of the Arroyo Seco Campmeeting

Nannette Elkins

Things Well

Jack A. Tanner

Robin Johnston

Sylvia Clemons

48 | Letters to

the Editor

49 | Sunday School

Steve Cannon

44 All of Life Is Worship Nathaniel Binion

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THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS BY DAVID K. BERNARD

The Doctrine of God in Early Church History postolic Pentecostals teach that there is one personal God and that Jesus Christ is the manifestation of the one God in human identity. This message contrasts with the traditional Catholic and Protestant doctrine that God consists of three eternally distinct persons. There is a scholarly consensus among theologians and church historians that the Bible does not explicitly teach the modern doctrine of the Trinity. Rather, this doctrine resulted from a historical process and did not attain general acceptance until the end of the fourth century ad. In the Bible, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three manifestations of the one God to accomplish the work of human salvation, and Jesus Christ is the fullness of God incarnate. (See Colossians 2:9; I Timothy 3:16.) Much like the New Testament, the early post-apostolic writings (c. 90-140) proclaim the oneness of God, the deity of Christ, and the humanity of Christ. Ignatius, bishop of Antioch, frequently spoke of Jesus as “our God.” In a letter to Polycarp, bishop of Smyrna, he described Jesus as “the Timeless, the Unseen, the One who became visible for our sakes, who was beyond touch and passion, yet who for our sakes became subject to suffering” (Pol. 3:2). Clement, bishop of Rome, described Jesus as “the scepter of God’s majesty” (1 Clem. 16:2). A sermon from this time says, “We ought to think of Jesus Christ as we do of God” and describes Jesus as both Father and Spirit (2 Clem. 1:1.4; 14:4-5). Later writers began to draw from Greek philosophy, which made a sharp distinction between spirit and matter. According to Plato, the visible, material world is an imperfect reflection of the pure, spiritual world of ideas or forms. He conceived of God in abstract, impersonal terms as the first principle or first cause of everything. In the typical Greek view, then, God is intrinsically unknowable, impassible (incapable of emotion or suffering), unapproachable, and

uninvolved with the lesser world of matter. A group known as the Gnostics taught that spirit is good and matter is evil. They identified the Father as the “fullness” of God. He was too pure to become involved with matter, but many lesser deities emanated from Him and did interact with the world. Jehovah was a lowly deity who created the material world, while Christ was a high deity who came to redeem humans from matter. Their most prominent teacher was Valentinus (c. 100-160). He allegedly wrote a book in Greek called On the Three Natures in which he “was the first to invent three hypostases and three persons of Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and he is discovered to have filched this from Hermes [Trismegistus] and Plato” (Marcellus of Ancyra, On the Holy Church, 9). (“Hypostases” originally meant “natures” or “substances” but was later used for “persons.”) In the mid second century, apologists wrote in Greek to defend Christianity against pagan detractors. The most prominent was Justin Martyr (c. 150), a converted philosopher. These apologists explained Christianity using philosophical concepts. They identified the Father as the supreme God and characterized God as unmovable, impassible, and not directly involved with the material world. They also drew from the Platonic concept of plurality within the one first-principle. They used the popular Greek concept of the Word (Logos) to describe the interaction of the transcendent God with the world. Originally the Word was impersonally inherent in God as His reason. In order to create the world God first brought forth, or begot, the Word out of Himself. The Word is thus God’s Son and God’s agent in creation and in appearances to humans. To act as God’s intermediary in human salvation, the Word came in flesh as Jesus Christ. Jesus is not the supreme God but “another God” who is “numerically distinct” from the Father and subordinate to Him in time, essence, and power (Justin, Dial. 56).

In the early third century, writers such as Tertullian and Origen expanded this thinking into an early form of trinitarianism. Around 210, Tertullian was the first writer to describe God by the Latin term for “trinity” (trinitas) and Father, Son, and Holy Spirit by the Latin phrase for “three persons” (tres personae). While the Son and Spirit are subordinate to the Father in time, rank, and power, the three persons share one “substance” (substantia). Origen said believers should pray only to the Father and not to Christ (Or. 10) and those who considered Jesus the most high God were in error (Cels. 8.14). As Tertullian conceded, the vast majority of believers opposed his new concept; they insisted that trinitarianism compromised the most ancient Christian confession, specifically the historic beliefs in one God and the full deity of Jesus Christ (Prax. 3, 20). Like the Jews, they retained the biblical concept of God as absolutely one, transcendent, yet fully engaged with creation, and fully capable of emotion. Tertullian charged his opponents with the “absurd” conclusion that in the experience of Christ’s death the Father “suffered,” and he rebuked them for reverting to a deficient Jewish concept of God (Prax. 29, 31). Later trinitarians such as Athanasius taught that the three divine persons were coequal, coeternal, and of the same substance. This view was partially endorsed in 325 by the Council of Nicea, and it ultimately prevailed in 381 at the Council of Constantinople. For documentation and discussion, see David K. Bernard, Oneness and Trinity, a.d. 100-300 and A History of Christian Doctrine, vol. 1. David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International.

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[ W H AT D O E S W O R S H I P L O O K L I K E ? ]

SCOTT GRAHAM

Captivated by Worship he worship encounter in an Apostolic church is and should be a unique experi of human existence, and for that I remain unashamedly unapologetic. The sights, the sounds, the rhythm, and feel cannot be replicated anywhere. But it is much more than simply an emotional or musical event. Corporate worship with Holy Ghost-filled people of God has a component that supersedes the natural. We are not moved merely by the beat or harmony or the tempo of the music. Instead, worship brings a spiritual component that captivates the soul more than it moves his or her body. There is a compelling nature to worship. There may be no more clear depiction of this in Scripture than is found in Acts 16. The account found there is very familiar to most Christians. Paul was traveling with Silas and Luke on his second missionary journey when they entered Philippi. Upon arrival in that city, they began to do the work of God as in other locations. They met a successful lady of business named Lydia at a riverside prayer meeting. She was born again, and her home became the base of their operations in Philippi. A demoniac who was utilized by her masters for fortune telling followed them in their daily ministry calling out that they were servants of God. Paul being vexed by her tormenting spirits commanded them to come out of her, and she experienced wonderful deliverance. Her 8

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“owners” were irate at their potential loss of income and had Paul and Silas committed to prison. In that setting we get a glimpse of the captivating power of worship. With their feet fast in the stocks deep in the heart of the inner prison, Paul and Silas demonstrated that circumstances cannot stop true, heart-felt worship. Though their backs were bloodied by the “many stripes” given to them by the jailor’s whips, still at the very darkest point of the night they opened their mouths in praise to God. “And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises unto God: and the prisoners heard them” (Acts 16:25). This was no quiet, reflective, meditative moment. Their adulation and gratitude for God poured out in verbal worship that was noted by the other prisoners. And something miraculous happened! “And suddenly there was a great earthquake, so that the foundations of the prison were shaken: and immediately all the doors were opened, and every one’s bands were loosed” (Acts 16:26). Please note two significant phrases in this verse: “all the doors” and “every one’s bands.” The deliverance that came to Paul and Silas was shared by every inhabitant of the prison. Those who sang and those who heard them sing shared alike in the miracle. What a moment that must have been when unbelievers suddenly felt the shackles drop from their wrists, the stocks on their feet release, and rusty hinges on prison doors screech open in obedience to God! But what is perhaps the most notable facet of this account comes from Paul’s words after the miracle. When in the aftermath of the earthquake the keeper of the prison checked on his wards,


925-1000 word article INCLUDING THE BIO.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

he arrived to find every door of his facility standing ajar. He drew his sword and was preparing to kill himself when the voice of Paul called out to him from the darkness of that horrible place. “Paul cried with a loud voice, saying, Do thyself no harm: for we are all here” (Acts 16:28). There’s that word again—“all.” I suppose I can reconcile in some fashion Paul and Silas remaining behind. They had experienced the miraculous move of the hand of God they knew well in response to their worship. But it is the others who confound me. “All” the prisoners were still there? Every murderer? Every thief? Every violent felon? Every man condemned to die a brutal death? Still there? Their chains were lying on the ground, the doors to their cells were invitingly open, and still Paul says that not one of them had fled from the prison house. Why? What was it that held them captive? What kept them from fleeing into the night when they had to know that at any moment a soldier or a guard was sure to start swinging the doors closed once again? The answer is simply that they had been captivated by something stronger than chains and prison bars. They had encountered for the very first time the power and anointing of apostolic worship. No matter what it might cost them in temporary consequences, they had no desire to leave that place where they had experienced such glory. And neither will those who enter our places of worship. They come expecting a dynamic encounter with God. They come expecting exuberant expressions of joy and celebration. Often they have heard all about us and anticipate shouting and dancing and rejoicing.

And even if they have not, they will not be driven away by sincere praise and worship. To the contrary, they will be captivated by it. They will be held strongly in its grasp in the face of criticism of friends or opposition from Hell. No, I’m not suggesting that our desire or motive should be to put on a show for them. We are not looking to entertain guests; we seek to entertain the Lord. But as we do so, we will extend to our guests the same type of dynamic moment that those prisoners in Philippi had. They will simultaneously experience freedom and captivity. They will taste freedom from the bondage they had known just moments before, and they will be held captive by worship that flows from the hearts and voices of God’s servants. Just let them hear you, and they will not run away. In fact hours, weeks, and even years later you may say as Paul, “They are all still here!” In his twenty-seven years of ministry, Scott Graham has filled a variety of ministry capacities both in local churches and in the United Pentecostal Church International. He currently serves as pastor of The Sanctuary in Hazelwood, Missouri. He is also the district superintendent of the Missouri District. Scott is the happy husband of Michelle and the proud dad of Jeremy and Jessica.

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

Family Helps Establish Pentecostal Church in Berlin, Germany GRETCHEN GREGORY

On top of the Reichstag

e at the Pentecostal Herald love to see positive stories about the work of the United Pentecostal Church International featured in mainstream media. Below is an article featured in the Logan Daily about the James Speckman family and their recent work in the country of Germany. We are excited to see what God is doing around the world! Posted: Monday, August 12, 2013 5:00 am | Updated: 3:12 pm, Tue Aug 13, 2013. Local family helps establish Pentecostal church in Berlin, Germany By GRETCHEN GREGORY Logan Daily News Editor ggregory@logandaily.com Logan Daily News It isn’t every day that a family sets out to establish a church in another part of the world, but that’s exactly what the family of Matt and Amy Speckman of Logan did when they traveled to Berlin, Germany for three weeks. With a large, diverse population of 3.5 million living within the capital city of Berlin, there are several churches of many denominations within its 12 vast and distinct districts, including other Pentecostal churches. Yet the United Pentecostal Church International, which the Speckman family is a member of, lacks even one church. Matt and Amy Speckman and their 13-year-old son Joel met with the pastor of the future Pentecostal church, Austrian-native Bernhard Suppan and his Texas-born wife, Shelley, and spent three weeks finding families in Berlin who shared their same faith and values. While there, they realized just how much work is truly needed. “When you look at a city like Berlin that has had so much turnover and so much strife and so much fighting, and look at what happened in World War I and World War II, and you know from 1961 when the wall went up and how many people were killed, there’s a 10

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lot of people there who just don’t have hope, and they have a high drug problem, worse than here,” said Matt Speckman, standing with his back leaning against the kitchen counter of his home located just south of Logan. As a crime-fighter who has worked in law enforcement since 1990, Speckman has seen a lot during his industrious career. He started working as a deputy at the Hocking County Sheriff’s Office before branching out and moving to the Logan Police Department, back to the HCSO where he eventually served as the chief deputy, second only in command to Hocking County Sheriff Lanny North, and onto his current job in the investigative unit of the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation under Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine. While Speckman still works as an auxiliary officer with the LPD from time to time, his primary responsibility these days is performing lie detector tests at BCI’s office in Athens. Speckman’s faith and relationship with God has even led him to become a licensed minister, furthering his already innate ability at talking with people about their everyday lives in his law enforcement career. He knows the names of those who have committed crimes in Hocking County, knows their family members and how they’re related, who their friends are, and can recall specific details about their crimes. Though he doesn’t preach the Bible outwardly in his law enforcement career, he instead believes in showing others that being kind, thoughtful and respectful towards each other lends a hand in fulfilling God’s goals for Earth. It’s a skill that current HCSO Chief Deputy Dave Valkinburg says helps people open up to Speckman, and it may have been an attribute in gaining the confession of Sandra Inman, who told Speckman where the body of her daughter-in-law, Summer Cook Inman, could be found/ Although Speckman said he has never “beat the drum” and preached during his career in law enforcement, or publicized it to any large degree, any job can be in ministry. “The way you write your articles can comfort or bless or help somebody,” he explained. “I look at some of the stuff on the street we’ve been able to do all these years, and how we help people, and


that’s what we’re supposed to do. That’s what Jesus wants us to do, is help one another, but the problem with the job [in law enforcement] is that there’s so much negativity that comes with it and there’s a grind there… There were some times when the job got really heavy, and it was hard to carry that.” But there are other times, he notes, like the Summer Inman homicide, when he was able to help. Summer’s parents, Mike and Debbie Cook, also attend a Pentecostal church. “They go to the one here in town and we’re friends with them, so being able to sit and talk with them, knowing that there’s somebody that believes what we believe, helps bring some closure,” he said. “Even though it was rough, I found some solace in knowing we were able to help them through some of that. There’s times you can really help people and there are times when you can’t really help anybody, so it has it’s good and bad.” When an opportunity arose for his family to travel to Germany to establish a new Pentecostal church in the capital of Berlin, a city that celebrates their German heritage, Speckman says they felt compelled to help spread God’s word. The first church service was simple, and held inside the home of a Berlin woman who had been praying for a Pentecostal church to begin near her home after frequenting one she enjoyed in Barbados, where she lives during the winter months. “When she was there, she had an experience with God and received the born-again experience and so she went back home and she just began to pray for a church in Berlin,” Speckman explained. While talking with people and inviting them to services, Speckman and his family set out to lay the framework for parishioners to follow. He compared establishing the church to the opposite of completing a jigsaw puzzle, which is put together piece-by-piece starting with the framework and then moves to the inside, matching up colors and shapes in the center. “When you plan a church, it’s totally opposite,” he said. “You have to start with the core. You have to start with two or three families, and then you build it by making contacts, and God directs you to people who are interested or hungry, so to speak, and there’s a lot of people in Berlin who have never been around a church. Now, you go to Germany and there’s old churches, and they’re everywhere, but as far as people actually attending, it’s really a different thing.” People interested in the new church also were invited to a special service at an evangelical church in Creutzburg, just south of the downtown area, at an evangelical church that was more than 150 years old. What struckv Speckman about the church was it had partially survived the bombing from World War II. While the larger section of the church that held the congregation had been destroyed, the foyer of the church had been converted to a new congregation area and could hold 300 to 400 people. “It was really a cool place, the place had survived… It had been partially damaged during bombing in the 1940s, and then they rebuilt the sides and edges of the church, but the whole back was gone,” Speckman explained.

In front of the Brandenburg Tor

While visiting the city, they came across a group of eight teens who inquired about the Apostolic Youth Choir. The AYC consisted of American teens ages 16 to 24 who were visiting Germany as part of United Pentecostal Church International. Their job in Germany was to spread the word of God. After speaking with the teens about the AYC and its mission to establish a new church, some of them started attending church services. This was especially important to Matt and Amy, because the teenagers they encountered knew homeless teenagers in the area and were willing to help spread the word about the new church. In Berlin, an estimated 9,000 homeless children and teenagers have nowhere to go, and the Speckman family is hoping to return sometime in 2014 to continue their mission and work to create a safe place for the children to go and eat. On Saturday, the family even held a yard sale at their home as a way to raise money for expenses during their trip. This year’s trip was paid for by holding several fundraisers, including bake sales and relying on the generosity of the community. “We’re so thankful,” Amy said. “There were many businesses and individuals who helped.” Matt says his favorite part of the trip was helping Bernhard Suppan and his wife Shelley. “We went into a place and helped this man who’s going to dedicate a good portion of his future to a huge city with a huge population, and we were able to help get him on his feet and help him move in the right direction and we’re going to be able to help him as much as we can from the outside,” he said. Amy, who sings ministry and plays the piano, said that being in Germany and not having so much of life going on that they were able to focus on meeting people and spreading the gospel was the most important. “We could totally plug into what we were there for and on many, many days we went and handed out fliers, and weren’t distracted by [other] things in life,” she said. For more information about United Pentecostal Church International, visit www.upci.org. The above material was used with permission of the Logan Daily. It is copyrighted work and was not edited for content.

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MY HOPE RADIO BY TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Three Minutes with Cedric White (W.E.L.L. CED)

ell us a little about your family. I am the second oldest of six kids—five boys and one girl. I am married to a great singer/ songwriter, Nicole White. We have two kids: Micah and Abrielle. My father is a UPC pastor in Georgetown, South Carolina, where I grew up. Describe your spiritual journey. My family was introduced to the Apostolic doctrine and joined the church when I was seven years old. Within a year, I was taught and understood the importance of daily repentance, being baptized in the name of Jesus, and the infilling of the Holy Ghost. At the age of eight, I received the Holy Ghost and was baptized in the local bay in Jesus’ name! What is your music background? I grew up playing the drums at my local church and listening to several genres of Christian music. At a point in my life, when I was desperate for more of God, I picked up a pen and pad to see if I could express my desire for Him through song. Shortly thereafter I wrote and recorded my very first song called, “Complete Control.” I posted it on YouTube and within months it received over one thousand views. At that moment, I figured people may want to hear more of what was on my heart. So I began to write more music. Where do you get inspiration to write your songs? My inspiration to write songs comes from my relationship with God. This includes studying the Scriptures and my prayer time with the Lord Jesus. Inspiration also comes from my experiences. What is the concept/vision of your CD? The concept of my recent album, Instant Message to the Body is simply that—a message to the church. The title of each track is the topic I felt the Lord led me to discuss with the body of Christ. Topics include “Purpose,” “Trust You,” “Moving Forward,” “Individual,” “Come Home,” and more. The vision

What is the best musical advice you have ever been given? I’ve heard advice like “practice makes perfect,” “connect with your audience,” “let God inspire your music,” etc.; however, because of the genre of music I do, the best musical advice I have been given is from my pastor, Ben Cooke. He said, “Stay separate” (simple and sweet). In essence, he said God’s blessings for my ministry lie in my willingness to never compromise. If you had the attention of the world, what would you say? Wow, this is an amazing question! If I is to enlighten and remind the body of Christ had the attention of the world, I would say who they are in Christ and His plan to accom- what I’m already commissioned to say as an plish a lot through us as vessels if we allow ambassador of Jesus Christ: Jesus is Lord and Him to work. He’s coming back for a church without spot or blemish! Therefore, repent and be baptized What is your favorite part of the albumin the name of Jesus Christ and receive the making process? gift of the Holy Ghost. Then continue to ocI enjoy the final product of the album be- cupy until He returns. cause of all the hard work and prayer that went into making it. I really enjoyed having an ini- Whom do you want to send a “shout out” to? I want to send a “shout out” to my Lord tial vision and then seeing my thoughts come Jesus Christ; my wife, Nicole White; my partogether in the form of a recorded album. ents, Donel and Elizabeth White, who raised me up in Christ; my home church, The First Describe the nature of your ministry. The nature of my ministry is to reach UPC of Conway, South Carolina; and last, my out to this generation of youth that enjoys BOC-Music family who grind it out week after the genre of rap music and needs to hear the week on behalf of our youth of today! gospel of Jesus Christ. My music is designed to glorify God, persuade people to live for Je- Where can we listen, purchase, and consus, edify the body of Christ, and testify of nect with you? You can listen to, purchase, and stay what He’s done in my life. connected to my music along with other apostolic artists on our record label at bocWhat do you feel is the most rewarding music.com, or at pentecostalpublishing.com, aspect of your ministry? The most rewarding aspects of my min- and myhoperadio.com. My music is also on istry are getting to see young people come iTunes and YouTube. I am also on facebook to the knowledge of Jesus Christ and make (www.facebook.com/wellced) and Twitter a decision to live for Him for the rest of (@WellCED). their lives. I enjoy seeing young people who would never give Christian music a chance Tiffini Countaway is the producer of Mynow hearing the gospel in the form of rap. I HopeRadio.com. also enjoy hearing of youth who have now decided to use their gifts and talents only to myhoperadio myhoperadio glorify God. These are priceless. NOVEMBER 2013

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[ W H AT D O E S W O R S H I P L O O K L I K E ? ]

Our Inspired Hymnal DA N I E L L . S E G R AV E S

hat would it be like to hear Jesus sing? We often think about how it would have been to hear Jesus teach or even to pray. But did He sing? He did. At the end of the Lord’s Supper, Jesus and His disciples sang a hymn (Matthew 26:30). We can only imagine the sound of their blended voices, but we probably know the words. Psalms 113 through 118 and Psalm 136 were the songs traditionally sung at the conclusion of the Passover meal. This indicates that the psalms were a significant part of the worship experience for the people of Israel. This is not the only reference to Jesus’ singing. We know Jesus considered Psalm 22 to be descriptive of His experience on the cross, for He prayed the opening words of the psalm. There is also every indication that the first twenty-two verses of the psalm were included in His prayer, not only because of the detailed content of these verses, but also because Psalm 22:22 is quoted as the words of Jesus in the New Testament: “I will declare Your name to My brethren; in the midst of the assembly I will sing praise to You” (Hebrews 2:12, NKJV). In Psalms, the verse does not specifically describe the Messiah’s praise as singing, but the Book of Hebrews quotes the Septuagint form of the verse, which does. Since the New Testament is inspired equally with the Old Testament, and since the majority of references to the Old Testament in the New Testament follow the Septuagint, a Greek translation, we can trust the use of this translation by the writers of the New Testament. In a sense, we might think of the Book of Psalms as an inspired hymnal. This is how it was viewed by first century 14

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Christians. Paul wrote that we should speak “to one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody” in our hearts “to the Lord” (Ephesians 5:19, NKJV). He also wrote, “Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom, teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord” (Colossians 3:16, NKJV). Is it worship if we are speaking to one another or teaching and admonishing one another as we sing psalms? It is, for we are doing this “to the Lord.” In other words, worship should include teaching moments and admonishment or exhortation. This requires thoughtfulness on the part of worshipers, and there is no richer source of instruction or exhortation than Scripture. There may be other dimensions of worship, but according to Paul, our worship experiences should result in better instructed and encouraged believers. Paul was not alone in his view of the value of the psalms for worship. James wrote, “Is anyone cheerful? Let him sing psalms” (James 5:13, NKJV). Although many of the psalms express deep pain and sorrow, like Psalm 22, others break forth in unrestrained joy and gladness, like Psalm 100. The psalter sees itself as a source of joyous worship: “Let us come before His presence with thanksgiving; let us shout joyfully to Him with psalms” (Psalm 95:2, NKJV); “Sing to Him, sing psalms to Him; talk of all His wondrous works!” (Psalm 105:2, NKJV). The Book of Psalms takes its English title from the Septuagint title Psalmoi, a Greek word that means “hymns” sung to musical accompaniment. Although the Hebrew mizmor, meaning “a song sung with musical accompaniment,” appears fifty-seven times in the superscriptions, the title of the book in the Hebrew text is Tehillim, meaning “praises.” The superscriptions of many of the psalms offer a bit of fascinating insight into the musical nature of this book. It is to be regretted that many English readers pay little attention to these superscriptions, for in the Hebrew text they are the


A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design. This photo of the Book of Psalms is taken of the original 1611 King James Bible

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When we incorporate the Book of Psalms into our worship, we are singing from an inspired, Christ-centered hymnal. As we do so, we will enjoy the spiritual depth of these divine songs. We will be taught and admonished even as we worship. first verse of the psalm. Some readers think the superscriptions were added by translators, but that is not the case. Another reason many disregard them is that portions of some superscriptions are not translated in the King James Version. When you see these unrecognized words in Scripture it is easy to overlook them. For example, few make the effort to discover the meaning of “Neginoth” in the superscription of Psalm 4. The word refers to stringed instruments. The word “Nehiloth” in the superscription of Psalm 5 refers to flutes. This may seem trivial, but these words are part of the Hebrew text and at the least inform us that these psalms were to be sung with musical accompaniment and that the psalter does not consist of dull repetition even in instrumentation. Some psalms are sung with strings, some with flutes, and so forth. Perhaps even more intriguing is that quite a few psalms specify in their superscriptions the tune to which the psalm is to be sung. We don’t know any of these tunes today, but their titles offer clues to the significance of these psalms. For instance, the King James Version does not translate Muthlabben in the superscription of Psalm 9. Thus, the English reader is not informed that this psalm was to be sung to the tune of another song called “Death of the Son.” The importance of this tune is suggested by the context of Psalm 9, which is preceded by Psalm 8 with its reference to “the son of man.” The New Testament understands Psalm 8 to refer to the Messiah. (See I Corinthians 15:27; Hebrews 2:6-8.) Here are other tunes to which specific psalms are to be sung: “The Lilies” (Psalms 45; 69); “The Silent Dove in Distant Lands” (Psalm 56); “Do Not Destroy” (Psalms 57; 58; 59; 75); “Lily of the Testimony” (Psalm 60); “The Lilies of the Testimony” (Psalm 80). The biblical view of the psalter as an inspired songbook suggests the following perspectives on worship: (1) We should

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welcome the use of the psalms in worship. To sing an entire psalm or a portion of a psalm is to follow the example of people of faith in both testaments. When we do this, we are following even the example of our Lord Jesus Christ; (2) since the psalms include the full range of human emotions in their expressions, we should incorporate this idea into our worship. Although we can sing psalms when we are cheerful, we can sing them also when we feel alone, sad, or even forsaken. On His cross, Jesus prayed the words of Psalm 22, “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?” (Matthew 27:46, NKJV); (3) we should embrace the full range of musical instruments to accompany our worship. The psalter concludes with the command to incorporate trumpets, harps, timbrels, dances, stringed instruments, flutes, and loud and clashing cymbals into our worship (Psalm 150); and (4) we should encourage our musicians to develop their skills as much as possible. Worship offered to our Lord deserves excellence: “Sing to Him a new song: play skillfully with a shout of joy” (Psalm 33:3, NKJV). In some of His last words before His ascension, Jesus said, “All things must be fulfilled which were written in the Law of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms concerning Me” (Luke 24:44, NKJV). When we incorporate the Book of Psalms into our worship, we are singing from an inspired, Christ-centered hymnal. As we do so, we will enjoy the spiritual depth of these divine songs. We will be taught and admonished even as we worship. Daniel L. Segraves is professor of biblical studies at Urshan Graduate School of Theology. His commentary on Psalms is titled The Messiah in the Psalms: Discovering Christ in Unexpected Places.


FAITH & CULTURE BY EUGENE WILSON

Discipleship vs. Evangelism shift is taking place within Christianity across North America. Much focus is being placed on discipleship. This past spring, over five thousand church leaders gathered in Orlando, Florida, for Exponential, a conference specifically designed for church planters. In addition, I along with forty thousand others attended via webcast. The central theme was a call for church leaders to shift from reaching to making, from teaching to modeling, from attending to participating, from connecting to transforming, and from attracting to deploying. Church leaders are coming to the realization that generating a crowd on Sunday is not enough. Change must occur within the hearts of the people in the crowd. We must get back to the basics—making disciples. The concept of discipleship is often misunderstood. Many view it as a twelveweek class or a process in which new believers are trained in spiritual disciplines such as prayer, tithing, church attendance, evangelism, spiritual gift discovery, and so on. Some feel that evangelism brings people to Christ, while discipleship develops Christ in people. This thinking, however, is not biblically accurate. Matthew 28:19 says, “Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” (NKJV). Whom did Jesus say we are to baptize? We are to baptize those who become disciples. Discipleship is not post-new birth. Nor is discipleship postevangelization. We baptize those we disciple, and we disciple those we have baptized. Discipleship involves both the introduction to Christ as well as Christ-formation. A disciple of Christ is a person who is a student of the teachings of Christ, a follower of Christ, and someone who makes other disciples of Christ. The Seeker-Sensitive Church Model One of the most popular church models is the seeker-sensitive model. It focuses on creating a comfortable atmosphere that

causes people to want to attend church services. The problem is that attendance does not equate change. Going to church does not make someone a disciple. While speaking at the Leadership Summit, a Christian leadership training event, megachurch pastor Bill Hybels, a longtime proponent of the seeker-sensitive approach, said, “We made a mistake. What we should have done when people crossed the line of faith and became Christians, we should have started telling people and teaching people that they have to take responsibility to become self-feeders. We should have gotten people, taught people how to read their Bible between services, how to do the spiritual practices much more aggressively on their own.” The problem with the seeker-sensitive church model, however, is deeper than its lack of emphasis on spiritual growth. Seeker-sensitive churches focus on attracting a crowd to build a church. But we are not called to build a church. Jesus said He would build the church. We are called to make disciples. When we focus on our responsibility, He will take care of His responsibility. If we will focus on making disciples the church will grow, numerically and spiritually. The Disciple-Making Church Model When I consider the need for churches in metro cities in North America, I find myself asking, “How do we reach so many people? Most do not even know we exist.” Nearly eighty-five percent of the population in the United States lives in metro cities; only fifteen percent live in rural areas. And yet I am told that eighty-five percent of our churches are in rural communities. This means that only fifteen percent of our churches are ministering to eighty-five percent of the population. This must change. We must do something to reach people. Where should we place our focus—on attracting people to our churches or making disciples? The Apostolic church in China is estimated at forty million. If this is accurate, it is the largest Apostolic church in

the world. Interestingly, they do not have billboards, television ministries, or great edifices with signs at the road. There are no door hangers, mailed-out post cards, or marketing schemes used to invite people to attend Sunday service. There are no seeker-sensitive churches in Communist China. It is against the law. However, there are committed believers who are students of the teachings of Jesus, followers of Jesus, and are making disciples. Principles are timeless and universal. The same principles that work in China will work in North America, and vice-versa. Making disciples works in China; it will work in North America as well. Perhaps we can learn something from our Chinese brothers and sisters: if we will focus on making disciples, the church will experience spiritual and numerical growth. Making disciples is not an instruction class for the spiritual formation of new believers. Discipleship involves going as well as baptizing those we have helped to become disciples. Discipleship, at its core, encompasses evangelism. Scripturally, there is no such thing as two camps—those who are centered on evangelism and growing the church, and those who are focused on establishing and maintaining those within the church. Thus, there is no such thing as discipleship versus evangelism. Eugene Wilson lives with his wife, Kerri, and two children, Kade and Jaelyn, in Olive Branch, Mississippi.

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Worship and the Millennial Generation KRISTIN KELLER

he millennial generation is America’s largest generation and is the first generation to have been raised in a purely postmodern culture. We Millennials are made up of young people born between the years 1980-2000. We are expected to have a significant impact on business, the workplace, schools, churches, political advances, and other organizations. We have a tremendous amount of power and influence that will profoundly affect American culture. I count it a privilege to be part of a generation promised to significantly impact the future of America. My concern, however, is that my generation is labeled as the “all about me” generation; even worse, a “spiritually homeless” generation, says David Kinnaman, president of the Barna Group. We are known as a generation of consumers with the belief there is no actual truth and no absolutes (this in and of itself is an absolute). This mindset does not line up with the Word of God. A consumerist mentality is countercultural to living a lifestyle of worship. It cannot be all about me and all about Him at the same time. With each new generation there is a cultural paradigm shift, and this shift has the ability to affect a generation’s desires in worship. The Boomers wanted traditional, Generation X wanted contemporary, and Millennials simply desire a convergence of worship traditions. Each generation is faced with an avalanche of influence not only passed on from the generation before but also influence created within the cur18

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rent generation based on what society and culture dictates to be the norm. But we worship a God who is the same yesterday, today, and forever (Hebrews 13:8). He does not conform to a generation’s countercultural mindset dictated by the world around them and become our God only when we need a quick fix for our own personal benefit. I believe my generation can break the “all about me” stereotype if we remove our personal idols and live a lifestyle of worship only to God. To accomplish this we must build our lives upon a foundation of conviction and sacrifice. In other words, we need to build upon the altar. The altar is what a lifestyle of worship is built upon. Unfortunately the altar is not popular among Millennials. The question is asked in the theme for this month’s issue, “What does worship look like?” My answer for Millennials is it looks messy. This is why the altar is not popular. Worship is countercultural. It’s not all about me. It’s asking God to bring back that spiritual check in our hearts when an idol we once were oblivious and numb to begins to creep into our lives. It’s conviction (a word my generation does not hear much anymore because it involves change that is often unpopular with our flesh). It’s tearing down personal idols already erected; it’s exposing pain; it’s a daily denial of self; it’s picking up a designated cross one would probably rather not have to carry; and it’s following Jesus Christ on a road that is not promised to be easy (Matthew 16:24). It is sacrifice. And it is necessary. It is a lifestyle of worship. A lifestyle of worship turns the classroom, the workplace, the shopping mall, the local coffee shop, and all that is our own personal world into a mission field. Why is this so important? First of all, it allows us to fulfill


 e worship a God who is the same yesterday, W today, and forever (Hebrews 13:8). He does not conform to a generation’s countercultural mindset dictated by the world around them and become our God only when we need a quick fix for our own personal benefit.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.


the Great Commission—“Go ye into all the world” (Mark 16:15). All the world, as stated by Mark, includes our daily world. Our lifestyle speaks to our world every day. This is why we must live a life consecrated in worship unto God. If my generation can get this in their spirit, it will make a difference in this world. We will provide a home for those who are spiritually homeless and a place of refuge and stability for the “wanderers.” Like Abraham who took Isaac and laid him on the altar as a sign of worship unto a Holy God, so must we, the Millennials, take our education and place it on the altar, take our singleness and place it on the altar, take our job and place it on the altar, and take our family and place them on the altar. A life of worship is a life of sacrifice and it causes us to be empty and transparent. If we live like this our world will be able to look at us and see Jesus. When I hear Millennials classified as “wanderers” my mind goes to the forty years the Israelites spent wandering in the wilderness. This desolate place was a journey filled with handfuls of purpose, because it was in the wilderness a generation arose ready to possess the Promised Land. We, the Millennials, are wandering through a world today that is spiritually dry. It’s full of people desperately looking for something to fulfill their desires and quench their thirst. It’s a generation that looks to idols of ideals and philosophies that will continually leave them unfulfilled. If we truly understand what worship is and are able to live it every day, we will possess the Promised Land and we will reach our world with the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Within the span of 365 days, we will experience approximately fifty-two Sunday morning worship sets each made up of four to six songs. The band will play a lot of chords and the singers will sing thousands of words. Emotions will be stirred, tears will fall, shouts of joy will ring out, and hearts will be broken and mended as lyrical melodies with moving music impact the congregation week after week. But God is not limited to the boundaries of fifty-two worship sets. He is not contained in chord structures, and there are not enough words in the three hundred songs we will sing to describe Him. He’s uncontainable, indescribable, and limitless. Worship is more than a song, and it’s more than the few hours we give to church each week. God desires that it would mean more to us than a song. Worship is a lifestyle of sacrifice and consecration. It’s when we live the lyrics we sing. Only when we live like this on Monday at work, Tuesday in class, and Wednesday in the grocery store, will the thirsty world around us find something able to quench their thirst. So, what should worship mean to a twentysomething? Absolutely everything. It is our purpose. It is our calling. It is the reason we were created. Worship is our life! Kristin Keller is the worship leader at New Life Christian Center in Lancaster, Ohio. She is administrator of Hyphen, the young adult ministry of the General Youth Division.

COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE Due to overwhelming response to the January 2013 Pentecostal Herald celebrating the 100 year anniversary of the Jesus Name Message, the Pentecostal Herald has released a special commemorative issue. This keepsake issue contains all the content from the original January issue plus additional content relating to the centennial celebration published in Pentecostal Heralds throughout 2013.

To purchase a copy of the Commemorative Issue, visit

WWW.PENTECOSTALHERALD.COM or call PPH customer service at World Evangelism Center at 314.837.7304 ext. 390.

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Hope. Help him find it again.

New this year!

We are excited to offer certification in CPF Para-Professional Chaplaincy, CPF Anger Management, and CPF Substance Abuse and Recovery Certification. Certification will be available at the end of the conference to participants who have attended all the classes.  Our noted panel of speakers will offer the Certificate of Training.  These speakers include Chaplains, PhD Counselors, Professional Authors, Ministers and Trainers. Hotels: Holiday Inn Express • 770-465-8847 • $85 Country Inn and Suites • 770-465-6515 • $85

2014 Christian Prisoner Fellowship National Conference and Seminar Expo February 19- 21, 2014 | Stone Mountain, Georgia Pentecostals of Stone Mountain, Pastor Dave Henry 6212 Memorial Dr, Stone Mountain, GA 30083 • (770) 879-0205

For more information or to register go to christianprisonerfellowship.net or call (314) 837-7300 ext#348


[ W H AT D O E S W O R S H I P L O O K L I K E ? ]

J U S T I N C O N W AY

What Does God Get Out of a Worship Service? orship is not only a way of communicating with our heavenly Father, but it is a lifestyle that God commands us to live by. At the core of the Bible is God who deeply desires that men and women worship Him. John 4:23-24 describes the Father as seeking those who would “worship him in spirit and in truth.” This demands a response on our part. God created mankind for fellowship that was framed in worship, with obedience at the heart of that relationship (Genesis 2:16-17). But Adam and Eve fell into sin and chose to worship the creature rather than the Creator by obeying their own lust for knowledge (Genesis 3:1-6). In the moment of the fall, sin entered man and woman and fellowship with God was broken. But God sought to bring people back into a relationship with Himself. Jesus Christ, as the Savior of mankind, became the propitiation for our sin so we can enter into fellowship with God. Worship is about God and His desire to enter into a worship relationship with His people. Christians have defined worship in many 22

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ways, but the common thread of these definitions focuses on the covenantal relationship between God and His people. Until Genesis 3:8, God was in communion and harmony with man, walking in the Garden with Adam and Eve and seeking their fellowship. However, this relationship was broken by disobedience and sin. But throughout the Bible, we see that God desires to restore this relationship. A.W. Tozer said, “God created man so He could look into him and see reflected there more of His own glory than He could see reflected in the starry skies above.” Even the name for the Messiah prophesied in Isaiah is one that connotes God’s desire to be near to us: “Emanuel, God with us.” In addition, worship is not only humanity seeking a relationship with God, but also God seeking a relationship with humanity. Mankind is flesh, so God robed Himself in flesh when, as expressed in John 1:4, “the Word became flesh … and we beheld his glory.” Psalm 8:3, 9: “When I consider thy heavens, the work of thy fingers, the moon and the stars, which thou hast ordained; what is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him? … O Lord, our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!” The Book of Psalms does an amazing job at explaining the mighty acts of God, particularly in creation, and these good works are typically the impetus for God’s people responding with praise to


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God. Therefore, worship is both revelation and response, and worship cannot take place without a response from humankind to God. Robert E. Webber stated, “Worship in its broadest sense is a meeting between God and His people in which God becomes present to His people, who respond with praise and thanksgiving.” In Isaiah 6:8, God asked for a response from Isaiah, and he answered, “Here am I; send me.” Offering ourselves to God is what worship is all about. Worship without sacrifice is not worship; therefore, true worship will cost you something. In the Old Testament, when there was no sacrifice, there was no worship. “And Isaac spake unto Abraham his father, and said, My father: and he said, Here am I, my son. And he said, Behold the fire and the wood: but where is the lamb for a burnt offering?” (Genesis 22:7). However, what we view as a sacrifice may be nothing more than just the building of an altar. This is where we as Christians often stop. We build the altar and expect the ram; we build the altar and expect the blessing, the provision of God. But we must remember that God didn’t provide the ram for Abraham until he laid his son on the altar. When Abraham and Isaac started their journey up the mountain, Abraham didn’t say, “We are going to sacrifice.” He said, “We are going to worship.” Was it a sacrifice for Abraham to climb the

mountain? Sure. Was it a sacrifice to gather stones and build the altar? Sure. But the ultimate sacrifice was when Abraham was willing to give that which was most precious to him. As a father, I can’t imagine the emotional struggle Abraham must have gone through as he laid his son on the altar. The image alone causes me to recoil in disbelief that he was willing to go to such great lengths to express his love for God. Isaac was his firstborn son, his lineage, his promise, and God asked him to sacrifice this to Him. The story of Abraham and Isaac is about worshiping God. It is more than a story of incredible sacrifice and obedience. It is a story of a man who loved his God so much he was willing to lay down the life of his son. Sound familiar? Abraham expressed the heart of a true worshiper. He entered a realm of fellowship with God where nothing in this world mattered. God desires from us pure worship that leads to fellowship. Worship is His pursuit. Worship is our passion. Justin Conway lives in Columbia, Mississippi, with his wife Larissa, and two beautiful daughters, Azlynn and Anzly. He attends Woodlawn Church in Columbia under the leadership of Bishop James Carney. Justin is the worship pastor.

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Transforming Worship ANN AHRENS

hat’s in it for me?” This is the question we often ask, whether consciously or unconsciously, when asked to give of ourselves, our time, or our resources. Sadly, this is the attitude with which we often worship God. As we enter a church service, seeking comfort for our hearts and answers to life’s questions, we all too often forget we are not there first to receive, but rather to give to God who is infinitely higher and more vast than we could ever imagine. Psalm 103:1 calls us to focus on God alone in our worship, “Bless the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me, bless his holy name.” Bless his holy name! Author Robbie Castleman in her book, Story-Shaped Worship, writes, “Worship leaders and pastors, of course, are well aware of the congregational needs and do their best to design a service of worship that feeds the flock, soothes troubles souls, and rallies enthusiasm for congregational witness, mission and church programs. None of these are bad things, but they are neither the sole focal point nor ultimate purpose of worship as designed by God throughout the story of Scripture.” What is the purpose of worship? What should we receive from worshipping God? The better question – the correct question – is “What should God receive from worship?” Ordering the question this way not only keeps our attention directed in the right place but also changes our perspective on what, if anything, we expect to receive from worship. To receive in worship is to gain a rightly ordered heart and a changed perspective that calls us to serve God and others. One must first define worship in order to understand its purpose and function. Echoing Psalm 103:1, Herbert Bateman, in his book Authentic Worship, writes, “Authentic worship is solely about obedient and self-sacrificing finite-created beings corporately approaching, engaging, and experiencing their Infinite-CreatorRedeemer.” Worship is the individual and corporate, God-centered, act of the Christian in which we encounter God in all of life with the singular goal of glorifying Him. To the Hebrew mind, worship 24

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and work were inseparable. In fact, the Hebrew word most often used in the Old Testament meaning “to worship” or “to serve” is the same: ‘ābad. Similarly, Paul used the Greek word leitourgia in the New Testament to express worship through service to God and others. Thus, worship is not only what we do in our church services. Worship is not only the musical part of our church services! Rather, worship is a whole-life orientation that flows from love for God and others and gratitude for the reality of our redemption. As redeemed children of God, we are called to delight in, to enjoy, God, to “bless the Lord at all times,” to “make my boast in the Lord,” according to Psalm 34:1. C.S. Lewis in his Reflections on the Psalms writes, “I had never noticed that all enjoyment spontaneously overflows into praise. I had not noticed either that just as men spontaneously praise whatever they value, so they spontaneously urge us to join them in praising it: ‘Isn’t she lovely? Wasn’t it glorious? Don’t you think that magnificent?’ The Psalmists, in telling everyone to praise God, are doing what all men do when they speak of what they care about. I think we delight to praise what we enjoy because the praise not merely expresses but completes the enjoyment; it is its appointed consummation. In commanding us to glorify Him, God is inviting us to enjoy Him.” Lewis realized God was not being egotistical in commanding us to praise Him! If we never received anything in return for our worship of God, it would be just and right. But God in His goodness cannot help but bless by allowing us to enjoy Him as we individually and corporately worship Him. In addition to enjoying God, worship calls us to reorient our perspective, to remember God’s vastness and His sovereignty, that He is in control and we are His servants. The Book of Psalms contains many types of songs, such as songs of lament, praise, rejoicing, even revenge and judgment. Yet no matter the theme, each psalm reminds us of God’s majesty and sovereignty and how to present ourselves honestly in our worship. The writer of Psalm 29 reminds us of God’s power and omnipresence in all of creation: “The voice of the Lord is over the waters…the voice of the


A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.


What do we get out of worship? In short, a transformed heart, a reminder of God’s sovereignty and omnipresence, and the privilege of being like Him as we live and work to fulfill His mission. Lord breaks the cedars....the voice of the Lord shakes the wilderness of Kadesh. The Lord sat enthroned at the Flood, and the Lord sits as King forever.” Psalm 8:3 declares the immeasurable heavens to merely be “the work of Your fingers.” Allen Ross, in Recalling The Hope Of Glory, writes, “This God we claim to know is the one before whom thousands upon thousands of angels and archangels stand, never ceasing to laud and praise him as the holy and glorious majesty. He is unique, truly glorious and incomparably holy – there is no one like him, anywhere at any time. And we say we know him!” The writer of Psalm 8 likely felt overwhelmed with God’s majesty when he wrote, “What is man that You are mindful of him…?” Yes, to worship God reverently reminds us – comforts us! – by reminding us God is not surprised by the events of our lives, but that He is intimately aware, all-powerful, and in control. Worship reminds us that God is always present. Unlike the pagan people surrounding them, the Israelites in the Old Testament did not have to initiate worship to get the attention of their gods. Rather, God’s continual omnipresence was marked by the pillar of cloud and fire that went before them as they journeyed to the Promised Land. God also gave very specific parameters regarding how the priests and people were to approach Him during corporate worship as well as in daily life. Similarly, whether in our corporate or individual worship, He is already present, and it is He who invites us into His presence, 26

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just as he did the Israelites. Realizing God is always present and has called us to a life of total separation and devotion to Him helps us to understand all we do is an act of worship. Most importantly, worship calls me to be like Christ. Hebrews 8:2 calls Jesus the “minister of the sanctuary,” our ultimate worship leader! How did Jesus worship? Jesus lived a life of worship, and we are called to model ourselves after him. In Luke 4:18, Jesus proclaimed His mission: “to preach the gospel to the poor; He has sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who are oppressed.” Paul went on to remind us we are to continue Jesus’ ministry of reconciliation in II Corinthians 5:19. Thus when we serve others, when we care for people holistically, we are worshipping as Christ worshiped. What do we get out of worship? In short, a transformed heart, a reminder of God’s sovereignty and omnipresence, and the privilege of being like Him as we live and work to fulfill His mission. Ann Ahrens is an Associate Professor of Music at Urshan College in St. Louis, MO. She attends New Life Center in Bridgeton, MO where Garry Tracy is her pastor.


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NANNETTE ELKINS

If God Has Forgiven Me, Why Can’t I Forgive Myself? s far as the east is from the west, so far hath he removed our transgression from us” (Psalm 103:12) If you board an airplane and fly east, there will never be a time when you suddenly begin going west, and vice versa. But if you travel north, you can go only so far until you will be going south. And if you travel south and pass Antarctica, you will be heading north. How far is the east from the west? They never meet. God said He has removed our sins from us “as far as the east is from the west.” This is one of the most beautiful figurative descriptions in Scripture of God’s forgiveness. He separates our sins from us and does not remember them. He forgives and wipes the slate clean. Yet we tend to repent about the same sins over and over again, failing to acknowledge God forgave us the first time we repented. “I, even I, am he that blotteth out thy transgressions for mine own sake, and will not remember thy sins” (Isaiah 43:25). When our former sins come to our minds we can dwell on them and feel guilty again, or we can choose to feast on thoughts of the wonderful God who forgave us. God is not pleased with people who do not forgive themselves. Perhaps they enjoy reliving in their minds their past sins. But this in itself is sinful and dangerous. If you have repented, ask God to help you get it out of your thoughts. “He will turn again, he will have compassion upon us; he will subdue our iniquities; and thou will cast all their sins into the depths of the sea” (Micah 7:19). There are times we don’t feel forgiven even though we have honestly repented. That feeling is a lie from Satan, the father of lies.

He puts toxic thoughts in our minds because he knows our past is forgiven and hidden under the blood of Jesus. If God has forgiven us, we must forgive ourselves. “Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered” (Psalm 32:1). Are you struggling with letting go? Is Satan whispering past sins in your ear? Remember, Satan is a liar. The opposite of what he tells you is true. Your sins are under the blood of Jesus. God does not remember them. “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus” (Romans 8:1). “When Jesus had lifted up himself, and saw none but the woman, he said unto her, Woman, where are those thine accusers? hath no man condemned thee? She said, No man, Lord. And Jesus said unto her, Neither do I condemn thee: go, and sin no more” (John 8:10-11). Are you reliving your sin? Let it go! If you have truly repented, you are already forgiven. It is time to move on. The more you dwell on things from your past the harder it is to forget them and make a fresh start. Whatever you have been struggling with, struggle no more. Jesus has already paid the price. If you have repented of the sin, He has removed it as far as the east is from the west. Nannette Elkins and her husband, Douglas, serve as associates in missions with Global Missions and also on the executive committee of Revival By Design.

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What Does Worship Look Like? Sound Like? DON MARTIN

he topic of worship brings a mental array of varied sorts of actions and sounds that range from historical stoicism to the biblical account of King David’s worship as the Ark of the Covenant was moved back to Jerusalem. As a third-generation Oneness Pentecostal I envision many worship experiences that either moved me to sincere awe or absolute silliness. The question is asked, “Is worship necessary for my eternal salvation?” If it is, then what is it, how should I participate, what requirements are necessary to validate my worship experience, and many other questions. I take the position that the Bible is the eternal guide for those who desire spiritual things from God and will not try to dispute with carnal human reasoning (Romans 8:7). I want to give a biblical backdrop for why Pentecostals worship like they do and also discuss briefly the historical influences on Pentecostal worship. Is worship necessary for my eternal salvation? Worship to the Creator by the created has been very important since the beginning of time (Romans 1:25). The most compelling instance in the Old Testament is found in Exodus 34:14: “Thou shalt worship no other god.” The early worship of Cain and Abel to God brought about one acceptable offering and the other unacceptable. God still has acceptable worship methods that we should seek to fulfill. What is worship? During the time of King David, worship to God included music, dancing, and shouting (Psalm 150). Some say this type of worship is not for us today. Things must be done “decently and in order” (I Corinthians 14:40). While I concur that “all things be done decently and in order,” we must look at the first New Testament Jerusalem general conference and their conclusions (Acts 15). The apostle James summed up: “Simeon hath declared how God at the first did visit the Gentiles, to take out of them a people for his name. … After this I will return, and will build again the tabernacle of David, which is fallen down; and I will build 28

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again the ruins thereof, and I will set it up: that the residue of men might seek after the Lord, and all the Gentiles, upon whom my name is called, saith the Lord, who doeth all these things” (Acts 15:14, 16-17). The term “tabernacle of David” is mentioned by Isaiah and Amos as a prophetic entity. The “tabernacle of David” is being fulfilled during our time. It is not just the ritualistic methods of the tabernacle of Moses, but the spirit of the tabernacle of David. Jesus’ victory over the temptation of Satan was won by using the same Old Testament text as we mentioned above: “Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve” (Matthew 4:10). This is a very important spiritual principle in New Testament worship. Worship is imperative for Christians to achieve victory over temptations from Satan. Notice that it is not just the quoting of the written Word, but doing what is written. A person can quote and know the written text but doing the content of the text is what really matters. Jesus told the Samaritan woman that “the hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him. God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth” (John 4:23-24). Please note the differences in the “spirit” (the human spirit of man) and the “Spirit” (the Holy Spirit). True worshipers worship with their “spirit” according to truth of the Bible. This is why our spirit must be in submission to the Holy Spirit or things will not be done “decently and in order.” We must remember that “no flesh should glory in his presence” (I Corinthians 1:29). Our bodies are to be “living sacrifices” (Romans 12:1). We should give sacrificial praise from our lips (Hebrews 13:15). When a group of Pharisees in Luke 19 wanted to reduce the sound and actions of Jesus’ disciples for all of the mighty works of God they had seen, Jesus said, “I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out” (Luke 19:40). Worship includes noise and not just


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“I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out� (Luke 19:40).

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.


Some would not be comfortable in Heaven because it will not be a quiet place. There will be millions saying, “Blessing, and honour, and glory, and power, be unto him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb for ever and ever” (Revelation 5:13). mental assent. The psalmist said, “Let the redeemed of the Lord say so, whom he hath redeemed from the hand of the enemy” (Psalm 107:2). An Air Force Training facility sign says about the noise of the jets, “Pardon the noise but it is the sound of freedom.” The redeemed of the Lord will say so because they are redeemed from the hand of the enemy. The noise of a church service is indicative of the freedom of believers. Some would not be comfortable in Heaven because it will not be a quiet place. There will be millions saying, “Blessing, and honour, and glory, and power, be unto him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb for ever and ever” (Revelation 5:13). Historically, audience response was dictated by a church that chained the Bible to the pulpit, a church that claimed just a few chosen people were holy, a church that said the common man was just a spectator and not a participator. The European influence of this type of church setting is seen in the regimented and quiet church services of many modern denominations. However, with the Methodists claiming that people should seek for sanctification, experience became a part of the salvation process. The Cane Ridge revival of 1801 reported “great emotion, falling to the ground, crying aloud in prayer and song …” From this came the first wave of Pentecostals who claimed salvation was being “saved, sanctified, and filled with the Holy Ghost.” From this came the biblical truth of “repentance, 30

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baptism in Jesus’ name and the infilling of the Holy Ghost evidenced by speaking with tongues.” With this comes sincere worship from the hearts of hungry souls. Worship styles of Pentecostals today are a combination of early Methodist influence and early Afro-American styles of worship. This includes passionate preaching and singing followed by individual responses from the audience. I say worship is essential to my eternal salvation and will continue into eternity. That is why: ✓✓ I clap my hands (Psalm 47:1). ✓✓ I shout with the voice of triumph (Psalm 47:1). ✓✓ I raise my hands (I Timothy 2:8). ✓✓ I forgive as I stand and pray (Mark 11:25). ✓✓ I may dance unto the Lord (Psalm 149:3). ✓✓ I praise God in the sanctuary with musical instruments (Psalm 150). ✓✓ I may run in the church if God does mighty miracles in my life (Acts 3:8).

Don Martin is the pastor of First Pentecostal Church of Collinsville, Oklahoma and Tulsa Metro Pentecostal Church in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He is also the Global Missions director for the Oklahoma District.


WORLDLINE BY BRUCE A. HOWELL

Reports from Around the World GANDA: God is blessing the United Apostolic Church in Uganda. With new churches being planted throughout the nation, churches now number over 602 congregations in Uganda. Lives are being changed as Bible studies and outreach services are being held daily. Hungry peoples are finding hope in the saving message of the gospel. Our Apostolic doctrine seminars are seeing many pastors being baptized in Jesus’ name and many people filled with the Holy Ghost. Healings and miracles are happening. —Phil and Twyla Tolstad FINLAND: Finnish culture emphasizes the Easter holiday, and our teacher enjoys explaining cultural traditions to her immigrant classes. During Easter, she asked Brother Alphin to share “what Easter means to the Christian.” He had to write it in Finnish. It was a great opportunity to share the death, burial, and resurrection to the multicultural students including Muslims, Hindus, and more. A Muslim man asked to have a Bible study. We pray that God will help us be a light of truth to those we meet every day. —Mark and Glenda Alphin GHANA: My heart’s cup of joy overflowed on Easter Monday as fifty young people and two adults were baptized in Jesus’ name in the Upper East Region. Twenty-three of these precious people received the Holy Spirit on the riverbank. —Colleen Carter PUERTO RICO: We are excited to report that the youth in Puerto Rico are involved in taking the gospel into the streets. Recently we had a street meeting in a housing area. From that service two new families have started coming to church and one has been baptized. We plan on more street evangelism throughout the year. —Gary and Kristi Landaw SIBERIA: In January, we were privileged to have missionary William Turner, area coordinator for the former Soviet Union,

missionary Mark Shutes, and regional missionary Alexander Baron travel to the Siberian city of Ulan-Ude to teach about baptism in Jesus’ name and the oneness of God. As a result of these meetings, three new training centers were opened. These training centers are the first UPC training centers in Siberia and we give God the praise. —Scott and Niki Carpenter GUINEA: We were able to travel to the Republic of Guinea, West Africa, for their third annual general conference. We had an average nightly attendance of approximately one hundred. We held doctrinal classes for three days and twenty were baptized in Jesus’ name. Six received the Holy Ghost. Guinea is a predominantly Muslim nation but has allowed some churches to enter the country. UPC Guinea is officially registered with the government and another church is being constructed in Zuapaa, Guinea. —Albert and Tegeste Stewart PARAGUAY: In late April we attended the national conference in Paraguay. Pastor Gerardo Yajo, the new president of the church of Peru, was the special speaker and was greatly used of God. Nineteen received the Holy Ghost and eight were baptized. Pastor Ricardo Martinez was reelected as vice president. Eleven new ministers were presented. The conference was well attended and blessed with a strong spirit of unity. —Joseph and Loretta Bir RUSSIA: In April my wife and I traveled to Kyrgyzstan with fellow missionaries Mark and Robin Shutes, Scott Carpenter, and Pastors David and Joel Wright of Arnold, Maryland, for our second Central Asia conference. Delegates from the nations of Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan attended. A weekend Revival By Design seminar followed, but my wife and I traveled on so I could be in the western Siberian city of Yekaternburg two days later for a training session. Delegates from three churches attended that seminar. In the weeks just prior to those meetings our travels took us to Narva, Estonia, for Bible college ses-

sions. We also went to St. Petersburg, Russia, and Vilinus, Lithuania, and then visited and preached with Robert and Sheri Moses and their son, Anthony, in Moscow, followed by preaching in Tallinn, Estonia, and planning sessions in Riga, Latvia. —William and Elizabeth Turner DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: Our ministers and wives were blessed by the ministry of a fantastic team of pastors and teachers from the Arkansas District: Bill O’Connell (Gurden), Tim Gaddy (Cabot), Don Richardson (Maumelle), Jason Harper (Cabot) and Lloyd Shirley. During the conference there was a wonderful move of God amongst the more than one hundred present. The younger ministers were challenged and prayed for by the older generation to start new churches and reach their generation. —Steve and Kari Shirley PAPUA NEW GUINEA: During Easter weekend the Papua New Guinea church held its annual general conference. We are very happy to report that during the conference 239 people were baptized in Jesus’ name and 170 filled with the Holy Ghost. There was a powerful presence of the Lord throughout the conference. Many people reported miraculous healings. Nothing stopped the people coming to the services, even when it rained and the ground became muddy. They would run to the altar in every service, sometimes without waiting for the preaching to finish. We would like to thank Monte and Dianne Showalter for coming and ministering to the church of Papua New Guinea. —Richard and Andrea Carver Bruce A. Howell is the general director of Global Missions for the United Pentecostal Church International

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Assisting church planters in North America

Don’t miss this year’s Christmas for Christ stories! You’ll hear inspiring testimonies that show the tangible results of Christmas for Christ. Here are some of the stories you’ll find at namupci.com:

A History of CFC

Marion, KY

A Personal “Thank You”

Teens are Church Planters Too!

with Jack Yonts

CFC Story

CFC Update


NEW START BY KENT ELLIOTT

The Harvest Is Great and the Laborers Are Few wenty-two years ago, I arrived in a city and a state that I felt God had led me to. This year will mark more than half of my life living and serving in Manchester, Connecticut. Since I did not grow up in the Northeast, I was not aware of the different cultures and the unique challenges of building a church in this region. I just knew God had called me here. After all these years, I have never regretted one challenge, one hardship, or one difficulty I have encountered. Every victory has blurred any struggle. Every mountaintop has defeated every valley. Our vision is big. It has been mocked. More than once, I have been told we could not build a church and keep Apostolic identity. Let me say it loud and clear in this article—a church can be built in this region and many are doing it! The many men and women I serve with on the Eastern Seaboard realize that the unique challenges that make up this area have strengthened us for the cause of reaching so many unchurched cities and towns. Simply put, the Northeast is under-churched. Those who have grown up in this part of the country will plant many churches but the truth is we cannot conquer this district alone. The statistics are overwhelming. The population versus the number of Apostolic churches is staggering. In Connecticut alone, there is a population of over 3.5 million people and only twenty-one churches. Our district goal is to double plus one within ten years. This would be a great stride for us, but what are forty-three churches in comparison to the lost we need to reach? With over 1.5 million households, how will we ever reach them? The harvest is great and the laborers are few. We are beginning to see preaching points and daughter works planted. Almost

five years ago, our first Metro missionary arrived on the scene in New Haven, Connecticut. The Perrys have begun reaching into the inner city of New Haven and God has been opening doors for them. We are thankful they answered the call. The harvest is great and the laborers are few. God has given me a vision to plant several works in my town of only 60,000 people. Why would I plant more churches in a town of only 60,000 people? I cannot reach every person by myself. I understand that it will take men and women who are different than I to reach those I cannot reach. My plan does not stop with just my

still in high school and feel they’ve been called into the ministry. The harvest is great and the laborers are few. Today, I am making an appeal to the young men and women who have begun to hear God speaking to your heart about a unique field of labor: an overpopulated and unchurched area. At the age of sixteen, I remember God speaking to me about Connecticut. At that point, I had never been to this state and didn’t know anyone. Maybe God has begun to whisper in your ear about a place unknown to you. This place would go against all the plans you thought you had for yourself. However, you know God is calling you. I am also appealing to the seasoned minister. You have felt a call to a unique place. You have been exposed to the need, and just maybe this article is unveiling the plans God has for your life. My first call was to missions. I thought it was global. Then God opened my eyes to a mission field right here in North America. Is God calling you? The harvest is great but the laborers are few.

God has given me a vision to plant several works in my own town of only 60,000 people. Why would I plant more churches in a town of only 60,000 people? I cannot reach every person by myself. city. Once those are established, we will begin reaching out to the five cities and towns that connect to Manchester. These five cities and towns have a combined population of over 140,000. The harvest is great and the laborers are few. This year, we will begin training young men and women who will be campus pastors in the near future. Many of them are already involved in ministry. Some are business professionals. Some, God just pulled off the streets in Hartford (dealing drugs just a few years ago). And some are

To learn more about North American Missions and North American missionaries visit www.namupci. org.

Kent Elliott serves as the senior pastor of Faith Tabernacle in Manchester, Connecticut.

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North American Youth Congress 2013 M AT T H E W J O H N S O N AND SARAH SLUSSER

hey traveled from all across North America and Canada. Some came by charter bus, some by plane, and others by church van or personal vehicles.  They gathered in Louisville, Kentucky for the biennial North American Youth Congress.  For months, students and leaders had been praying for an unprecedented move of the Holy Ghost at the KFC Yum! Center.  God answered those prayers as lives were changed by the untamable power of God.

The theme for NAYC 2013 was “Gravity” and focused on three key words: Attraction. Direction. Mission. Thousands of students and young adults committed to an ever-growing relationship with God as they were attracted by His presence, received life direction from God’s Word and His messengers, and were commissioned into His mission! The 2013 Youth Congress was the largest on record with a conservative estimate of total attendees set at more than 18,000.  The 15,944 registrants was 4,143 higher than the previous record of 11,801 in 2009!

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GENERAL SESSIONS The general sessions were filled with anointed messages from God’s Word. On Wednesday night, Shay Mann kicked off NAYC with a timely message for this generation, charging them to develop a relationship with the Word, so they can speak for themselves. In Thursday’s general session, David McGovern challenged everyone to place the call of God above all else. That evening, Tim Gaddy addressed the three most important altars any of us will ever approach: the altar of marriage, the altar of heritage, and the altar of supernatural demonstration. Friday morning, James Maroney spoke the powerful message of deliverance through Jesus Christ to the youth of today. Finally, on the last night of NAYC Cortt Chavis delivered the convicting truth of having the divine balance between feasting at the Lord’s table and working in the Lord’s fields.

SPLIT SESSIONS After a collective jump-start in the arena, all attendees parted ways as they went to breakouts that were more specific to their lives. The split sessions offered a wide variety of classes for all attendees to participate in. On Thursday, Ryan Dean spoke to the teen split session while Paul and Brooke Pamer tag-teamed in the youth workers’ split session. Meanwhile, Kristen Keller addressed the Hyphen group, and General Superintendent David Bernard offered sound, biblical wisdom for the young ministers in their session. On Friday, Brandon Shanks spoke to the teen session and Nate Rios ministered in the youth workers’ class. Seasoned pastor Jerald Staten challenged the young ministers, while Seth Simmons spoke to the Hyphen session.

SPECIAL EVENTS NAYC 2013 featured several special events that enhanced the overall Youth Congress experience.

RUSH Campus Ministry International held its first event at NAYC – CMI RUSH. Ministry-minded college students met to discuss the need to reach our campuses with the gospel. During the two hour event, over 425 people made their way through RUSH. Every person was provided the opportunity to gain valuable information and meaningful connections that would aid them in their efforts to reach their particular campus with the gospel.

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Eight The Hyphen Young Adults event, Eight, was held under the Clark Memorial Bridge and had a record breaking attendance of over 2,000 attendees all within the ages of 18-30. These godly young adults had the opportunity to fellowship and network with like-minded people their age.

Afterburner The Afterburner was held at the Mall of St. Matthews on Friday night with 6,000 students and chaperones in attendance.  The entire mall was rented for this exclusive event. Various teams from our Bible and Christian colleges, as well as established artists from our movement offered entertainment while these thousands of students, young adults, and chaperones ate, shopped, and walked the mall and spent time with each other.   

PROJECT 7 Project 7, a new ministry of the General Youth Division, was debuted at NAYC. Project 7 is the new Bible club program created in cooperation with the ALJC that aims to challenge students to unlock their faith on secondary school campuses across North America. The “7” is based on the number of years students have from 6th grade to 12th grade.  Students are given access to p7online. com where they can download a free starter kit as they work with their school administration.  Since the launch, hundreds of Project 7 Clubs have already been established, and several more are in the approval process.  Through this new ministry, we believe there will be a great harvest of souls.

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Project 22:39 Students made a noticeable impact on the Louisville area through participation in Project 22:39.  The name Project 22:39 is based on Matthew 22:39: “And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.” Over five hundred students and chaperones partnered with the Louisville Parks & Recreation Department to clean, paint, and landscape area parks.  The locals noticed the bright yellow shirts, and there was news coverage by the local media.  Mayor Greg Fischer and his staff made a trip to the site of the project to greet many of the students participating.  When the day was over the students had helped to carry away hundreds of pounds of garbage and truly made an impact by simply serving. In addition to the cleanup efforts, students passed out thousands of touchpoint cards to area residents inviting them to NAYC. The card included contact information for the many area UPCI churches.

NORTH AMERICAN TALENT SEARCH MyHopeRadio.com coordinated and hosted North American Talent Search 2013 with over sixty students competing in the live finals. On Wednesday, the vocal groups and small bands competed. Then on Thursday, a new category was debuted: Worship Arts. This new category allows students to use various forms of art as an act of worship to God, such as painting, drama, sign language, etc. Finally, Friday was the solo vocal category.  The winners can be found on the NATS website www.natsupci.com.  

CONCLUSION Words cannot fully describe what happened at NAYC 2013. Students left with a renewed passion, direction, and calling. Testimonies continue to stream in from across the country of students and entire youth groups who were forever changed by the power of God and are now making a difference in their local church and community. North American Youth Congress 2015 will be held August 5-7, 2015 at the Chesapeake Arena in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  For additional information, please visit www.northamericanyouthcongress.com.

Matthew Johnson serves at the Director of Promotion for the General Youth Division. Sarah Slusser is a student at Urshan College and a frequent writer for InsideOut.

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[ W H AT D O E S W O R S H I P L O O K L I K E ? ]

R I C K LOVA L L

What Time Does Church Start? A Call to Continuous Church

e are often asked, “What time does church start?” Our quick response is to relay information about the precise time, as in 10:00 am. Let’s take a literal approach to this question. Potential guest: “What time does church start?” Member: “It’s already started.” Potential Guest: “How is that possible? Today is Thursday. I thought you had church on Sundays.” Member: “If you’re asking what time we join back together for the service, then the answer is Sunday morning at 10:00 am. Are you able to come?” A look into the first use of the word church in the Bible reveals a concept that many people today have missed. Jesus said in Matthew 16:18, “I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.” From a literal standpoint, church started almost 2,000 years ago. 38

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What a concept! Jesus started church, and started it off right by proclaiming His authority. All we are doing is joining in with the service at whatever time we schedule it. Church doesn’t start at a certain time. Church is happening constantly. It’s just whether or not we take the right steps to get in the flow of the Spirit. Many pastors, service leaders, and praise singers have complained about how it takes too long for service to “get going.” Some praise teams have to sing two or three songs before people get involved. Why is this? I submit that it’s because we are guilty of trying to start church on our own. If people were in a constant frame of mind for worship there would be no need to “get the service going.” Some services seem to start with a bang. Demonstrative worship seems to break free when the first note is played or with the opening prayer. How is this possible? Because the people of the church never stop having church. They leave one service looking forward to the next one. They leave with strong faith and come back with strong faith. They leave rejoicing and come back rejoicing. They have spent time in prayer, Bible study, and personal worship throughout the week. Therefore when church time rolls around, they can just pick up right where they left off in the last service. What we are seeing here is the concept of “continuous church” as opposed to “stop-and-go church.” The Spirit of God doesn’t start pouring, then stop, then start again. God said in Joel 2:28, “I will


925-1000 word article INCLUDING THE BIO.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

pour out my spirit upon all flesh.” This teaches us that there is a constant flow of His Spirit because people are constantly being born who have never received His Spirit. We experience what we call a move of God at the point we finally get focused on God. He doesn’t start moving on Sunday at 10:17 and stop at 11:57. He’s always moving, reaching, touching, pulling, calling, protecting, and speaking. Jesus wants us to have continuous church, whether we are physically at the church building or not. The question has been asked, “How should we effectively prepare our hearts for worship?” As we have seen, the answer is found in how we approach worship to begin with. Do we actively worship God every day? Do we spend time in Bible study and prayer outside of church? Do we fill our homes, cars, and minds with songs that lead us in worship? Or do we feed on media that promotes sinful pleasures and lustful desires? For our hearts to be effectively prepared for worship we must be in a constant state of worship. Pioneers of the faith tell stories of multi-week revivals with church every night for weeks on end. How was that possible? It was possible because they made it possible. The lifestyles and hectic schedules of our day seem to make extended revivals impossible. But is that the case simply because we have allowed it to be that way? How much revival have we hindered because of our “stop-andgo church” mentality? The first church had continuous church. In Acts 2:42 “they continued stedfastly in the apostles’ doctrine and fellowship, and

in breaking of bread, and in prayers.” Their hearts were always in a state of worship through their continuous Bible study, fellowship, and praying. The result of their continuous church is found in the next verse: “Fear came upon every soul: and many wonders and signs were done by the apostles.” Signs, wonders, and thousands of new converts were the results of their continuous church. The same would be said of us if we would give our hearts to continuous worship. What would happen if we never stopped having church? What if we just picked up where we left off every time the doors of the church opened? Since we normally end with an altar service, what if we start with one too? What could happen if we have continuous church? How far-reaching would the revival be if we decided to never stop having church and if we never stopped our worship? Rick Lovall serves as pastor at The Sanctuary United Pentecostal Church in Sikeston, Missouri. He is also the prayer coordinator for the Missouri District.

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

An Interview with Ken Gurley BROOKE ROSSER

en Gurley is the senior pastor of the First Church of Pearland, Texas, a prolific author, and a beloved member of the Word Aflame Press family. His most recent work, The Point of Low Points, examines God’s purpose behind the low points Joseph faced and how they shaped Joseph into the man God intended him to be. The Pentecostal Herald staff was fortunate enough to be able to take a few minutes to speak with Ken Gurley about The Point of Low Points. What is the inspiration behind The Point of Low Points? Years ago, I heard Joseph called the “Jesus of the Old Testament.” That description has always stuck with me and I purposed to spend some time in the future focusing on the life of Joseph and, specifically, the trials he endured. What pushed this subject to the forefront is described in the interlude of the book, which I called “The Eye of the Storm.” Hurricane Ike—the second costliest storm in US history at the time—struck the Houston-Galveston area with great ferocity. Our church family was displaced with many losing their homes. Our sanctuary was severely damaged and the subsequent delay in managing this damage led to further consequences of mold and other microbial growth. Compounding the crisis was the financial collapse that took place a day or two from Hurricane Ike. The church had to be mostly gutted and rebuilt, but there was inadequate funding to do this. The stress and strain of this situation brought me back to the “Jesus of the Old Testament.” In the life of Joseph, I found solace and strength for what our church family was going through. The insights gained not only helped me and others in dealing with the storm’s aftermath and with the many other struggles we all face. The Point of Low Points is presented in small group format. What are some of the components of the product and how do they effectively communicate lessons from the life of Joseph to small group participants? Some journeys are best made in groups and I think The Point of Low Points is suitable for a group journey. The resources included in the small group package are: the book itself, a facilitator’s guide complete with instructions and sample group discussion questions, a 40

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DVD with six videos by the author from 12-15 minutes in length to be used in the group settings. The videos utilize some of the material in the book, but are largely complementary to the material covered in each section. The questions prompt discussion and understanding for all of the participants. Adult classes, prayer groups, men’s or ladies group, and any other group that chooses to meet to discuss these vital subjects could use this small group study. Would you mind sharing with us how the life of Joseph has impacted your own life? Outside of responding to the message of the life-changing gospel, I don’t think any other study has affected me so deeply as this investigation into the low points of Joseph’s life. It convinced me more than ever that nothing happens to God’s children by accident, but each and every event in our life is designed to manifest God’s ability and character in our lives. It also convinced me that the low points of our lives would be what we would choose for ourselves if we knew as much as God. During the past five years, these insights have kept me patient and persevering through the long, dark valleys. They’ve brought me a measure of peace and contentment as well. He was with Joseph; He will be with me. If you had one hundred words to sum up what you hoped to accomplish through The Point of Low Points what would they be? I wrote this book for two reasons: First, I wanted to challenge the ideas that we possess about what makes for a successful life. We see addition, peace, and serenity as the measure of success. But this is not how God sees it. While we seek relaxation; He seeks realignment. The second reason I wrote this book is to provide comfort to those who are going through times of subtraction and separation. I want each of the readers to know that God sees and He cares very much about what we go through. He does His best work in the worst of times. Brooke Rosser is the editorial assistant for the Pentecostal Herald and a member of the Division of Publications staff. She currently serves as the Director of Guest Care for the Sanctuary UPC, where Scott Graham and Timothy Dugas are the pastors.


MULTICULTURAL MINISTRIES BY LIONEL DABBS

Global Harvest in Our Local Field very nation in the world is represented in the United States and Canada. Drive through the streets of any town or city and you will find Chinese, Latino, or Indian restaurants, Asian markets, convenience stores owned by Pakistanis, Korean-owned dry cleaners, and more. The global harvest surrounds us but we must see it in order to possess it. Recently a friend stated that he often prayed to reach the multicultural mission field but the city in which he pastored had no international people. He told me this while sitting in a Chinese restaurant and after being waited on by a Chinese person with a strong accent. Our communities have an international and multicultural presence, but sometimes we cannot see it. The global representation in our cities and towns is a divine accomplishment, and we have been given a divine directive. We can go and teach all these nations brought by God into the United States and Canada. Each international person represents an unreached village, city, and region of the world beyond our comfortable borders. That is why we must win them. Years are necessary to send a prepared, appointed missionary through deputation to fulfill God’s will. Could it be that God is abbreviating the amount of time necessary to reach the nations? Future missionaries native to unreached global regions are enrolled in our universities, refilling our glasses with water, checking out our snack and gas purchases, and dry cleaning our clothes. They are Buddhists, Muslims, and Hindus who speak multiple languages, who understand the complexities of the cultures in which they were raised, and who can live in nations that we are forbidden to enter. But who will win them? Reaching Uzbekistanis in Oxford, Alabama On deputation, I preached a missions service for Pastor Dunnam in Anniston, Alabama. I felt led of God to have the

congregation pray for divine connections to people from the Central Asian states of Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Tajikistan. After I ministered about winning global citizens who live and work in America and Canada for the purpose of raising up people who would return as missionaries to their home nations, we prayed in faith for God to open a door of ministry that week for the church to win a person from a Central Asian nation. The next day I entered a shop for a haircut in the nearby community of Oxford. I was greeted by Irina Lee who was originally from Uzbekistan. During my haircut, Irina expressed her desire to receive the Holy Spirit, to start a home Bible study, and for her son to attend a good church. Pastor Dunnam has followed up with Irina, several Bible studies have been taught to her, and she has attended a ladies fellowship. Through urgent, focused prayer, the church of Anniston opened God’s door to harvesting the nations. Reaching Asians, Africans, and Middle Eastern people in Del City, Oklahoma A year after starting conversational English classes at a local coffee and cupcake cafe, the Hyphen group of Calvary Christian Center in Del City, Oklahoma, have connected to over seventy people from Russia, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Iraq, Libya, China, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, and Africa. Students have attended church, Bible studies and fellowships, and one student has been water baptized and filled with the Holy Spirit. During one class, Jason Sharp, assistant pastor of Calvary Christian Center, noticed Mohammed, a Muslim Saudi Arabian, rubbing large painful bumps on his arm. Jason Sharp felt to pray for Mohammed at that moment in the coffee shop. After a short prayer, Mohammed expressed surprise. His pain was instantly gone, and the bumps afterward disappeared. Mohammed expressed his desire to learn more about Jesus. A vision of the harvest was seen and a net was cast. Now God is reaching the nations in Oklahoma City.

Reaching Chinese in Dewar, Oklahoma Oklahoma District Superintendent Matthew Martin pastors in Dewar, a town of 818. When Pastor Martin and his assistant, Greg Joki, began eating at the New China restaurant in a nearby community of five thousand, they did not know that God would use them as missionaries to the Chinese. Greg Joki said, “Our families struck up a friendship with our waitress, Helen. She was lonely because she was thousands of miles away from family and friends in China. I think she felt something real and true in us. She eventually asked us to pick her up for church. Her co-workers don’t come to church yet, but they consider us their closest friends, guardians, and helpers. They have attended every holiday dinner with us and the Martins. We love Helen and her brother, Phang. They are like family.” Helen Zhu Yan is now filled with the Holy Spirit and baptized in Jesus’ name. Missions is more than a location. Missions is the motive of God. God’s mission is to bring forgiveness and reconciliation to the nations. I have been reminded of this multiple times on deputation: from visiting African shops owned by immigrants in Syracuse, New York, with Pastor Vona, to hearing the passionate voice of Pastor Soto describe his desire to reach Asians in Appleton, Wisconsin. Your location is your mission field. My location is my mission field. Reaching every person living in our local mission field is the will of God regardless of his or her nationality, language, skin color, or culture. We will reap the nations when we see the global harvest planted in our local fields. Lionel Dabbs is married to the love of his life, Johanna. They are blessed with a son, Lionel-John, who is four years old, and a daughter, Mei Li, who is one year old. Together they work for God as missionaries in East Asia.

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A Pictorial Essay of the Centennial Celebration of the Arroyo Seco Campmeeting ROBIN JOHNSTON

n Saturday, August 24, 2013, about five hundred Apostolics gathered under the sycamore trees in Hermon Park to celebrate the centennial of the Jesus Name movement. SoCal District Superintendent Art Hodges II hosted the gathering held on the site of the 1913 Arroyo Seco campmeeting.

Galen Cantrell re-enacted the landmark 1913 baptismal sermon preached by R.E. McAlister. The original message preached by McAlister pushed early Pentecostals to re-examine Jesus Name baptism.

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David K. Bernard, general superintendent of the UPCI, preached the keynote message using a passage of Scripture underlined in John Schaepe’s Bible as his text. One hundred years ago Schaepe ran through this same campground proclaiming that he had received the revelation of the mighty God in Christ. His revelation and the baptismal sermon preached by R.E. McAlister that preceded it provided the catalyst for the emergence of the Oneness movement.

A number of people were baptized, joining the millions who have been baptized in Jesus’ name since 1913.

The day was climaxed with the dedication of a permanent park bench commemorating the 1913 campmeeting.

Robin Johnston is editor in chief of the UPCI and an adjunct professor at Urshan Graduate School of Theology. Photos courtesy of Matt George Photography: mattgeorge.me

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[ W H AT D O E S W O R S H I P L O O K L I K E ? ]

All of Life Is Worship N AT H A N I E L B I N I O N

he notion that all of our life is an act of worship tends to bring out fear on one end of the “response pendulum”; fear we’ll be tempted to believe that if every action is deemed worship it may open a floodgate to moral nihilism (the belief that nothing is intrinsically moral or immoral). Actions have no meaning. Sweeping across to the other side of the pendulum we find speculation: How can all of life be an act of worship? Exactly how does it connect to the bulk of everyday living from Monday through Saturday? We know we should go to church, believe and follow the Bible, and shun the “big” sins … but what about our careers, our church involvement, our values, our relationships, and the vast array of practical decisions we are called upon to make in a lifetime? How do all of those things equate with what a Christian does on Sunday? This quandary leaves many of us clueless; thus we continue to participate in Sunday religiosity without connecting it to anything outside the walls of the sanctuary. The entire population of church attendees and church leaders lies scattered along the vast sweep of the pendulum, from one extremity to the other. At what point does a person find the happy medium—the truth of the matter? The truth is, all of life is an act of worship! Worship transcends religious activity and styles of music. It includes the intentions and actions under which we order everything in our lives. Whatever we do, even if we are simply eating or drinking, whatever we say in business or in the home or in the church assemblies, we are to do all to the glory of God. Even a Christians’ work is sacred. In his book Worship by the Book D.A. Carson said, “Christians work not only as God’s creatures in God’s creation, but as redeemed men and women offering their time, their energy, their work, their whole lives, to God—loving him with heart and mind and strength, understanding that whatever we do, we are to do to the glory of God.” Thus, the wall between the sacred and the secular is torn down. 44

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“Worship,” according to Carson, becomes not a “desacralization of all space and all time and all food as with a sacralization of all space and all time and all food: what God has declared holy let no one declare unholy.” The whole life of a Holy Spirit-filled Christian is sacred and is therefore worship. It follows then that all activities in the life of a Spiritfilled Christian are sacred and therefore are acts of worship. This premise is built upon the fundamental command of God in Deuteronomy 6:4-5: “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God is one Lord: and thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.” This passage is a recognition of eternal truths that transcend all religions and cultures: 1. 2.

3. 4.

God’s will directs your worship. If you are to retain core values in a diverse society, beliefs and practices must be intentionally married to daily action. Intentional connection between beliefs and action informs the next generation. Worship is the way your values testify to a diverse society.

In Canaan’s confederation of city-states there would be conflicting values, urban confusion and temptation, seeming prosperity with no perceived convictions, and ubiquitous danger. God provided them wisdom on how to retain the covenant with God, continually decipher the fine line between necessity and preference, and how all actions impact future destiny. This covenant made by God with Israel called for a love that involves the heart, soul, and body. The Israelites could not afford to compartmentalize their lives into separate slots for the Sabbath and other days. Love for God could not be given in a weekly service alone or in a show of temporary physical manifestations. This love had to be shown as they lived and until they died. There was no separation, according to Jehovah’s covenant, of heart, soul, and might. Everything


was given to Jehovah in return for experiencing covenant. P.C. Craigie said, “In the modern world, a distinction may often be made between the religious and the secular … To Israel, such a distinction would be artificial, not because there was no distinction … but because all of life was under the dominion of God, the Lord of Covenant” (The New International Commentary on the New Testament). The New Testament view of Scripture does not override this view of relationship, but is a fulfillment of God’s original intent: an offer of relationship with humanity unencumbered by the stench of sin. This demands allegiance of our complete being. The New Testament church understands that God reveals Himself in multiple ways but in singular purpose: restoration. Through experiencing salvation the church becomes a celebration of the reign of Christ. Worship is when the church celebrates the redemptive work of Calvary in every activity. All of life is an act of worship. You and I reside in an environment like the Israelites had in Canaan: promise and peril resides in the same zip code. Cloistering into small communities around a Tabernacle in the middle of the camp was God’s temporary solution for the children of Israel when they were in the desert, but it wasn’t the permanent model God proposed in Canaan. This cultural sequestration was not a possibility for a people conquering and inhabiting new land, only those trying to survive in a desert. Furthermore, the desert experience proved to be an inadequate discipleship tool for the next generation. The same is true for us today. Living life as worship is the modus operandi of a people who are conquering new lands while participating in true discipleship. The way to live in a diffused culture is to make our hearts the temple of God and carry His presence into all we do. This view of worship is incredibly important in an increasingly secular society that distrusts religious institutions and religious leaders. Living all of life as worship opens the door to invite others to participate in the community of faith because they can relate to the story and cannot deny what they see in front of them. The model I’m proposing is to put every action into one of the following three categories:

Service

Profess

Commune

925-1000 word article INCLUDING THE BIO. Ask yourself, “Is this action serving, professing, or building communion between God, believers, and the world? Am I doing this as unto the Lord?” This journey of reflection will redirect your entire life into a missional lifestyle. Practical suggestions on living all of your life as worship: Church programming must return to “sending” over against “hoarding.” If the church remains a program-driven and consumer-driven experience, it will receive the fruits of all consumer-driven institutions: It will ebb and flow through trends, then die. The only sustainable solution is to use local church vision, celebrations, traditions, and experiences to teach, inspire, console, and equip all to continue their worship through the entirety of their life. Church activity should be a springboard to send people into their mission, not make people’s mission to come to the church building. Traditions are important and should be utilized correctly. Understand that traditions are for the purpose of training the unlearned, reminding the confused, and inspiring the faithful. But they are not the central purpose of existence; they serve the main purpose and are connected to context, purpose, and time. God’s call and Word are eternal. Positional leadership in the church is for the sole purpose of equipping, but ministry is for everyone. This does not demean the value or purpose of pastoral ministry, the necessity of the preacher of the Word, or the necessity of service to a local church community. But these roles and callings are for a specific purpose and require a specific skill set. All of life as worship says that all are called to minister to the world through their life. A photo caption could go here, if The world is counting on us. If we needed. cannotCan connect our piety be changed to white to our daily practices, an unbelieving world and cannot its placedcomprehend over a dark image. Just depesnds the design. truths. They have not had our experience. They do notonknow our community. They see only how we make decisions and are left to ponder how each decision connects to the extreme commitments we profess to make to some religious institution. So, as for my house and me, everything we do will remain an act of worship. People are counting on me. Nathaniel Binion spends his days as a musician, his nights as a writer, his weekends as a teacher and preacher. He attends The Church Today, a church plant in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Barron Longstreth is the pastor. Nathaniel and Regina have enjoyed being married for fourteen years.

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LAUNCH YOUR MINISTRY BY SYLVIA CLEMONS

The Value of Youth et me ask you. How do you view the youth in your local congregation? What are your expectations of them? As a parent, leader, or pastor, how intentionally involved are you in helping them develop into godly young men and women committed to living faithfully for Jesus Christ? Too often in today’s culture of prolonged adolescence, youth are regarded with a “wait and see how they turn out” mentality. We anticipate puberty will bring a rebellious, difficult, unstable period. Even in Christian homes, we can also expect it to include disinterest in the things of God. One of the wisest men on earth didn’t think that’s the way it should be. Solomon directed many proverbs to “my son” and “young man.” It’s clear he had high expectations that young people not only could be the object of instruction, but they were fully capable of learning and attaining wisdom and discernment (e.g., see Proverbs 1:7-9; 2:1-3; 5:1-2). Neither the approach of “wait and see” nor “anticipate rebellion and disinterest” is biblical. The Bible is full of examples of young people used to help fulfill God’s plan and purpose in many circumstances. Joshua had been a servant to Moses from a young age (Numbers 11:28). The training Joshua received from Moses’ years of mentoring allowed him to become a mighty leader of Israel. Josiah was only eight when he became king of Judah (II King 22:1). At sixteen he turned his heart toward God and initiated a revival that reformed the whole nation (II Chronicles 34:3-7). David was a youth of fifteen to seventeen when he did something that even Saul’s entire seasoned army refused to do. He took on Goliath’s challenge and easily defeated the giant in the name of the Lord (I Samuel 17). In New Testament Jewish culture, when twelve was the typical age for betrothals, the betrothed virgin Mary is thought to have been only thirteen or fourteen when Jesus was born.

The twelve disciples? Tradition indicates they were probably all in their mid to late teens when the Rabbi Jesus of Nazareth called them to be His disciples. Customarily, Jewish males started studying the Torah (Genesis through Deuteronomy) at age five until ten or eleven. If they showed promise, they were allowed to continue study through Malachi until fourteen or fifteen. After that, they either were selected by a rabbi to be his disciple and continue studying or apprenticed to a trade. More recently, Jonathan Edwards was in his early twenties when he created such a stir with his preaching in the 1700s. In the 1800s, Charles Haddon Spurgeon became a pastor at age sixteen and by twenty was pastoring the largest church in England. And Evan Roberts was only thirteen in the early 1900s when he began praying for the revival that overtook all of Wales. In our own Apostolic history, young men and women have played a vital role in the furtherance of the gospel. Kenneth Haney was called at age twelve and licensed at seventeen; Cleveland Becton felt his call and entered the ministry at seventeen; James Kilgore was only twelve when he received his call; and J.T. Pugh, called at age sixteen, was pastoring by eighteen. Janet Trout, called at thirteen, was licensed at seventeen, and immediately left as a missionary to Jamaica. Those are just a few of the many Godcalled, Apostolic young men and women from seventeen to twenty-five years old who received their licenses to preach and helped spread this wonderful message of truth. It is upon the foundation of their dedication and sacrifice that we continue to build today in order to yield the greatest harvest ever seen. So, let me ask you another question. What can you do intentionally and purposefully to help ensure that our wonderful Apostolic children and youth are nurtured, mentored, encouraged, and affirmed to carry on the torch of truth? As I listened to reports flowing back from the 2013 North American Youth Congress and heard the excited, anointed testimonies of those who attended,

I knew the Apostolic future would be in good hands. Now it is up to those of us within the local church body to nurture the fire that was ignited, to fan the flames and make sure it does not sputter out and die. We must help it spread to every young person by creating an atmosphere where the infectious and transformative power of the Holy Ghost can work in each of them. Parents, encourage your children in the ways and Word of the Lord; expose them to the house of God every chance you get; let them hear you pray at home and at church; let them see you worship and honor God. Demonstrate how to respect and support your pastor as you work together to reach your city with truth. Leaders, take every opportunity to encourage and affirm the young people in your congregation. Let them know you believe in them and their future. Assure them God has a plan for their lives. Set an example they can see and aspire to. Pastors, your role of shepherd in teaching, mentoring and training the next generation is crucial. Launch Your Ministry has many resources available to help you do it with intention and with excellence. Check out launchyourministry.com for information, video training materials, and other resources. Help position your young people to hear the call of God on their lives, answer that call, become licensed in the United Pentecostal Church International, and carry this vital message of truth to the waiting harvest. Sylvia Clemons is an ordained minister with the UPCI and a licensed counselor on staff at Hope Center Church in San Antonio, Texas.

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Letters to the Editor What a great issue the August Pentecostal Herald was! The article, “Steal No More” hit home with me. It exposes the inconsistencies of our moral judgments that we sometimes overlook. Stealing—no matter in what context—is still stealing. David Bernard’s “Why Did Jesus Pray?” further anchored my Oneness faith. I was greatly moved by Scott Grissom’s article about special needs and Nancy Norris’s article “Little Things Count.” These articles opened my eyes to the fact that those who need special care should receive it. I also thoroughly enjoyed Eugene Wilson’s article about discipleship. I am thankful for his insight. The Pentecostal Herald never fails to bless and teach me. Thanks to you and your staff for putting together such a great publication. —Robert Moyer

Coming Next Month:

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[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

Freedom from Homosexuality NELLO POZZOBON

ooking back over my life as far back as I can recall, I always thought I was sexually attracted to other males. Of course, at that young age I had no understanding of the feelings I was experiencing or what they were really all about. I had been a “mistake” from the moment I was conceived. My parents did get married but the marriage ended in divorce shortly after my birth. Not only did I not have a father in my life, there would be no other male role models in the years to follow. All I remember is that I had such a strong desire to be held and to be close to another male. In the years that followed, the real reasons for those feelings would be twisted and distorted by the enemy and by my flesh. They became the base for the subtle lie of homosexuality that was being laid in my young life. Eventually I would accept the lies as the truth. Event after event would be twisted and distorted, leading to yet another lie. Satan truly is the great deceiver. My mom and I started attending a UPCI church when I was four years old and I began to learn all about Jesus. When the church doors were open, we were there. I loved attending Sunday school and learning how to be a “busy bee” for Jesus. I also remember the hard wooden pews and the seemingly never-ending sermons. Back in those days, children did not sleep during church. Life was good and I didn’t have a care in the world. When I was ten years old there was a major split in our church. 44

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Half of the members left, and the other half stayed. I was in the half that left. It’s as though a switch in my life was turned off and everything that was, was no more. No more church. No more Sunday school. No more Jesus. During those first ten years two defining events took place that would forever shape and change the course of my life. First was the planting of God’s Word deep in my heart. Jesus said, “Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free” (John 8:32). Second, was the increasing awareness that there was something very different about myself and that I was becoming more and more sexually attracted to other guys. Without church, the doors to things of the world were now wide open in my young life. Without the godly direction I so badly needed, I began more and more to choose the things my flesh desired. I started doing things and trying things that I had never done before. I started hearing new words such as gay, queer, and faggot. I knew that in some way they related to me. Although I did not understand what was going on with my thoughts and feelings, I instinctively knew it was bad and I began feeling shame and fear over who I knew I was becoming. By the time I had graduated from high school and entered college I was actively involved in homosexuality. Alcohol was fast becoming my best friend. After finishing two years of college I enlisted in the military and spent the next six years traveling the

AUGUST 2013

I would like to show my support for Nello Pozzobon’s article (“Freedom from Homosexuality”) in the August issue of the Pentecostal Herald. I am thankful that this article was allowed to be in this magazine. So many Apostolics need to read this article. Many families are facing this situation in their families right now. —Mary Blackburn

7/9/13 1:49 PM

Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, brosser@upci.org, or Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road • Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299. Letters may be edited for style, grammar, punctuation, or length.

The General Superintendent’s conference message, “In the Name of Jesus”.


SUNDAY SCHOOL BY STEVE CANNON

VAILABL E OA I LS

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k nd this boo e m m o c e r “I highly help a child o t g in t n a w to anyone d children n a t a e r g is know God for God!” s g in h t t a e nard can do gr Connie Ber

FORMAT

Heroes Just Like You!

Barbara Westberg

Heroes Just Like You tells the childhood stories of contemporary heroes of our faith such as Allan Oggs, Benjamin Urshan, and Carrie Eastridge. With stories of children battling tremendous odds such as bullying, the loss of parents, and physical disabilities, this book illustrates the power of God to help us overcome our limitations and become whomever God calls us to be. 25328 25509

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aniel and Lacey Autrey live in Belleville, Florida. They serve on the pastoral staff of Souls Harbor First Pentecostal Church. Daniel is the Sunday School secretary of the Florida District. The Autreys conduct children’s and family revivals. In a service with this young couple, you can expect everything from games to action songs to all kinds of crazy costumes. It’s their goal to see children grow up in love with Jesus and that every family be on fire for God and a blessing to their local church. To contact the Autrey’s, you can call 352.303.6675 or email at danielw7@yahoo.com. NOVEMBER 2013

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

God Does All Things Well J A C K A . TA N N E R

he multiple positions and voids that Jesus fills may seem to be in conflict. Actually, they blend together in harmony. Jesus was the Lamb, the one who offered the sacrifice, and the High Priest. These positions harmonize to make our redemption possible. Men and women of talent can usually only do one thing to perfection at one time. To accomplish several tasks at the same time is often to compromise the attention needed to perform all things well. To understand Jesus only in His power is to discount His compassion. To separate God’s love from His actions is to alienate His ultimate purpose. Looking at one facet without seeing the overall plan is to walk in confusion. For centuries theologians have looked at only one element of His plan without seeing the whole. The deity of Jesus cannot be fully understood by viewing only one Scripture. The harmony of the Old Testament prophecies with the fulfillment as recorded in the Gospels and the Epistles gives us a more complete picture. Jesus was both human and God. He is both the Son of God and the Everlasting Father. To separate one position from the other is to become confused about who Jesus is. It would seem in the human mind that since Jesus did not have an earthly father He could not fit the mold of being human. To accept that Jesus is the Everlasting Father and discount that He was also the Son of God when both are true is to deny both.

A Christian by action and not just by title will seek for the full truth. People see only as humans with a limited vision that alienates them from a higher realm. Because it is difficult for humans to see God beyond their own limited knowledge many place limitations on God. One office of God does not interfere with the importance of another. Jesus is more than a son and a father; He is the creator of all things. His Spirit cannot be contained in only one vessel, such as God manifest in the flesh. This is evidenced by the fact that millions have received the Holy Ghost. Faith bridges the gap between divinity and human understanding. The foolishness of trying to force God into a box to give Him characteristics or limited powers such as men experience would govern His actions and take away His deity. Did God need a son? Isaiah said, “Unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given” (Isaiah 9:6). God did not need a son, it was us who needed a Redeemer, and the way He chose was to become a human sacrifice. The scribes and Pharisees were right. “Who can forgive sins, but God alone” (Luke 5:21)? Only the One who has been transgressed can forgive the transgressor. If another God forgave the sins against the first God, would our sins be forgiven? Jack A. Tanner has pastored for over fifty years. He has written over thirty-five books and started several churches.

A Christian by action and not just by title will seek for the full truth. People see only as humans with a limited vision that alienates them from a higher realm. Because it is difficult for humans to see God beyond their own limited knowledge many place limitations on God. 50

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g the n i r u o p ‘new t a u o d s e i e h n t ly we ays of e r d u y l S r a … e y l e s.” er th g n a e n e i p l d r l a a u e c o r 46 e nd ere “I r a w , nuar y 19 s a s J e r , u e ld g a p r e a n lH tal p our to , Pentecosta s e l h u T , o n s Pentecos o r rspo on ou ’ e .T. Withe r i f W – f o touch

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LOANS for CHURCHES Starting January 2013 the United Pentecostal Church Loan Fund is now making loans up to $500,000 directly to churches, agencies and organizations affiliated with The United Pentecostal Church International. Larger loans are also available through our primary lending partner America’s Christian Credit Union. Loans will be to finance the acquisition of properties, refinancing of existing loans on real property or secured by real property, and provide construction funding for expansion or renovation of ministry related facilities, remodeling, repair and maintenance of existing facilities and refinancing of existing debt.

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Pentecostal Herald November 2013