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 he Power T of Youth 24 Apostolic Christian Schools: 8

Alive and Well or Nearly Extinct?

38 T  he Value of a

Bible College Education

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EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

In the Day of Adversity, Consider NOTE: I make a good-faith effort to give credit and cite sources. As I prepared this article for publication, it occurred to me that some of the material might not be original with me. Unfortunately, I cannot specifically recall if anything in this article was in a book or magazine I read. The article expresses my personal experiences and feelings and is consistent with my writing style. ’ve often been asked, “Why is this happening to me?” And I’ve also asked myself, “Why is this happening to me?” Why did my godly mother die of cancer when she and my dad were starting a church in Winslow, Arizona? Why was the young evangelist, David Willoughby, killed many years ago in an airplane accident when he had such a promising future? Why did Joseph have to languish for years in an Egyptian dungeon? Why did Job have to endure the series of trials we read about in the book that bears his name? When we face adversity the question is often, “Why?” Esther received the news that she and her people were to be annihilated. She sent a servant to inquire of her uncle Mordecai and wanted “to know what it was, and why it was” (Esther 4:5). Even Jesus cried out from the Cross, “My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me?” What am I to say when God doesn’t protect one of His people? Or when God doesn’t answer all my prayers? Or when a committed Christian isn’t any safer than one who is not committed? Four Things I Have Learned Not to Do 1. I’ve learned from study and experience that God’s character does not depend on my ability to understand or defend Him. God’s ways are always right even when I can’t understand or explain them. God said, “My thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways… as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts” (Isaiah 55:8-9).

2. I’ve learned not to bluff my way through the hard questions by resorting to pious platitudes. People in adversity are neither impressed nor edified by clever answers. 3. I’ve learned not to try to explain the situation. Faith, not understanding the situation, brings peace. 4. I’ve learned not to try to comfort with a torrent of words. I have found that acknowledging my own inability to understand is more helpful than acting like an expert who thinks he knows it all. Three Things I Have Learned to Do 1. I have learned to actively listen to people. When I allow people to put their feelings into words and hear themselves talk, they are often able to solve their own problems. 2. I have learned to pray with people. Often the pain is so deep that only God can help. Prayer paves the way for God to work. 3. I have learned to weep with people. The mother of a little girl died. After the funeral, the girl came back to school and was crying. When the mother of one of the girl’s classmates asked her daughter, “And what did you do when your friend was crying?” she said, “I just laid my head down on my desk and cried with her.” Paul said, “Rejoice with them that … rejoice, and weep with them that weep” (Romans 12:15). Six Things to Consider in Times of Adversity The Word of God says, “In the day of prosperity be joyful, but in the day of adversity consider: God also hath set the one over against the other, to the end that man should find nothing after him” (Ecclesiastes 7:14). 1. Consider that our sovereign God in His wisdom has juxtaposed the day of prosperity with the day of adversity for contrasting effect. 2. Consider that we have a worm’s eye view of life. Seldom do we have a bird’s eye view of anything. We must conclude that God knows something we don’t know and

He’s not always willing to tell us. Job did not know what was going on behind the scenes. We should be thankful that we don’t know everything about our lives that God knows. 3. Consider that nothing adverse can happen beyond God’s power to use the adversity for His glory and our good. God used the tragedy of the Cross and made it central to our faith. Paul said, “We know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28). 4. Consider that faith and trust do not require understanding. Even in the natural world we believe many things we don’t understand. Scientists do not understand how a bumblebee is able to fly, but still they believe. If we understood everything we would not need to exercise faith. We don’t understand how the worlds were framed by the Word of God, but still we believe. (See Hebrews 11:3.) We should learn to accept mystery. 5. Consider that God is good even when He doesn’t seem good. He is so good, in fact, that He is willing to look bad to be good and to do good. God sends the rain and the sun on the just and the unjust. That’s how good God is. 6. Consider that God is faithful even when we are not. God cannot lie. He cannot deny Himself. He cannot fail. God’s faithfulness does not depend upon my faithfulness. And because of God’s faithfulness, my faith still holds fast. In the day of prosperity I will rejoice. And by God’s help and grace, in the day of adversity I will consider. Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

MAY 2013

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PENTECOSTAL HERALD | MAY 2013 Fundamental Doctrine

EDITOR

Simeon Young Sr.

The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

The One True God

PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain CREATIVE DIRECTOR Abraham LaVoi DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laura Merchant ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Lanae Leaman PROOFREADER Patrica Bollmann The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2012 by United Pentecostal Church International. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com Single Subscriptions (USA) $25.00 Single Subscriptions (Canada) $35.00 Single Subscriptions (Foreign) $44.00 Bundle Subscriptions (USA) $ 1.75 for 6 or more copies; $2.25 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Canada) $ 2.50 for 6 or more copies; $3.00 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Foreign) $ 3.50 for 6 or more copies; $4.00 each for 2-5 copies

We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

An international publication published monthly. VOL. 89, NO. 5. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional offices. Official publication of the UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL

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Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, lleaman@upci.org, or to: Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299.

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney* GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Jerry Jones* DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell* DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton L. Coon Sr.* EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston GENERAL SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR Steve L. Cannon GENERAL YOUTH DIRECTOR Shay Mann SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Dan Batchelor

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EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

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ASSISTANT EDITOR

Lee Ann Alexander

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[EDUCATION] 8

11

The Power of Youth Robert L. Rodenbush

Woman Recognized for Nearly 30 Years of Children’s Ministry Erin Wisdom, St. Joseph News-Press

Columns 14

3 | Editorial

18

Bible Colleges Are God’s Opportunity Pam Resong

20

David K. Bernard

13 | My Hope Radio

Tiffini Countaway

Wanda Fielder

Kerri Wilson

46 | Trust Your Instruments Lance Wilkins

Anthony Braswell

23 | Book Review

Homeschooling Advocacy

Apostolic Christian Schools: Alive and Well or Nearly Extinct?

Eugene Wilson

30

Vance Bowman

29 | Worldline Bruce A. Howell

Pentecostal Life 12 | The Lesson from the Pool

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17 | Faith & Culture

Raymond Crownover

Simeon Young Sr.

7 | The General Superintendent Speaks

Helping Others See the Real

48 | Navigating the Winds of Change: A Tribute to Bishop J.T. Pugh

The Whole Gospel to the Whole World by the Whole Church through Apostolic Education Bobbi Morehead

Joshua Niño

33 | New Start Greg Marshall

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36 | Letters to the Editor 37 | Multicultural Ministries

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Steve Cannon

51 | Launch Your Ministry

Tyler Walea

Andrew Reece

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Bible College: An Atmosphere of Undersanding Ron Wofford

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The Value of Bible College M.V. Calhoun

On the cover: Kindergarten class at New Life Christian School, Bridgeton, MO; Photographed by Laura Merchant

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Jonathan K. Greer

The Value of a Bible College Education

Dieudonné and Jolie Kahozi

41 | Sunday School

Shout It out Mr. Shaepe

MAY 2013

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THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS BY DAVID K. BERNARD

The Priesthood of Believers n the New Testament church, everyone is a priest before God. Through Jesus Christ, our high priest, we can approach God directly and confidently to pray for ourselves and others. In the Old Testament, the average person had limited access to God. People came to the Tabernacle or Temple with their sacrifices and presented them to the priests. Only the priests and Levites could enter the Holy Place, and only the high priest could enter the Most Holy Place. While various leaders were anointed and empowered by the Holy Spirit, they did not have the permanent indwelling of the Spirit as we have in the church age. The baptism of the Holy Spirit is a new experience under the new covenant; through this gift God’s abiding presence and power become available to every believer. (See John 7:39; 16:7; Acts 1:4-8.) For this reason, even the least believer today has greater privileges than John the Baptist, who was equal to the greatest of prophets under the old covenant (Luke 7:28). The Book of Hebrews teaches that Jesus is both our high priest and our sacrifice. Because of His death, burial, and resurrection, each believer can have a personal relationship with God in the power of the Spirit. There is only one mediator between God and humans, the man Christ Jesus (I Timothy 2:5). “Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” (Hebrews 4:14-16). Addressing the New Testament church, the Bible says, “You also, as living stones, are being built up a spiritual house, a holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ” (I Peter 2:5, NKJV). It further states, “You

As priests, we offer praise directly to God, we pray directly to God in the name of Jesus (by the blood of Jesus), and we confess our sins directly to God as needed. are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, His own special people, that you may proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light” (I Peter 2:9, NKJV). Jesus Christ has made us “kings and priests” unto God (Revelation 1:6; 5:10). In Christ’s millennial kingdom, we will be His priests and we will reign with Him (Revelation 20:6). As priests, we offer praise directly to God, we pray directly to God in the name of Jesus (by the blood of Jesus), and we confess our sins directly to God as needed. We can intercede and worship on our own behalf. “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (I John 1:9). “Is any among you afflicted? let him pray. Is any merry? let him sing psalms” (James 5:13). At the same time, we can intercede on behalf of others. “Is any sick among you? let him call for the elders of the church; and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord: and the prayer of faith shall save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up; and if he have committed sins, they shall be forgiven him. Confess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. The effectual fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much” (James 5:14-16). Confession to others does not replace confession to God but provides guidance, accountability, and support from trustworthy leaders and prayer partners. Sometimes people compare the priests of the Old Testament to pastors and preachers in the New Testament. But the proper comparison is between Old Testament priests and New Testament believers.

All of God’s people are called to be saints— separated from the world and dedicated to God’s service (I Corinthians 1:2). All of us are to present our bodies as a living sacrifice (Romans 12:1). All of us are to “offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips giving thanks to his name” (Hebrews 13:15). As discussed in a previous article, the biblical view of ministry became distorted in the Middle Ages. The medieval church made a sharp distinction between “priests” and “laity.” Ordinary people did not read the Bible, confess their sins directly to God, or become involved in the ministry of the church. Instead, they depended upon the priests for these things. The Protestant Reformation caused a significant change, as Martin Luther began to proclaim the priesthood of all believers and the necessity of a personal relationship with God. It is important to recapture this biblical teaching today. All believers are to consecrate themselves to God. All believers are to worship joyfully and sacrificially. All believers are to become intercessory prayer warriors for themselves, their family, their church, and the lost around them. All believers are to involve themselves in the ministry (service) of the church. As the people of God, we are individually and collectively the temple in which God dwells. We are also the priests who minister in the temple. When we understand our identity in Christ, we will indeed come boldly to the throne of grace. David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International. MAY 2013

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[EDUCATION]

The Power of Youth ROBERT L. RODENBUSH

outh is a precious fleeting commodity. Being young is a glorious time of ignorance, impulse, and impressionability. People of age understand that there is great power in the shaping of the young, and thus the battle begins—the battle for the heart, souls, and minds of this present generation. The opportunity to be shapers of opinion, architects of ideas, and molders of the future is an intoxicating proposition understood by many including teachers, politicians, preachers, and entertainers. People grapple for the chance to wield their influence on the young because in this wielding is power. Consider the remarks of entertainer Lady Gaga: “I aspire to try to be a teacher to my young fans who feel just like I felt when I was younger. I just felt like a freak. I guess what I’m trying to say is I’m trying to liberate them, I want to free them of their fears and make them feel that they can make their own space in the world.” She comprehends it. She understands that her power comes not merely from her musical talent or her ability to put on a great show, but from her position of “teacher” or “influencer.” Jonah Goldberg, in his book The Tyranny of Clichés, dedicates a chapter titled “Youth” to this discussion, describing America’s “fetishization” and exploitation of the young. He states, “It’s about power. If you can convince young people to see the world a certain way—or convince them to use a certain kind of toothpaste—you can hold on to them for the rest of their lives. So marketers, political and generic, condescend to young people telling them how smart and discerning they are when what they really mean is closer to the opposite: they are impressionable.” So the battle rages. Competing forces are in conflict for the young to perpetuate their specific cause or beliefs. This battle is not inherently evil. In fact, the church must war in this fight as well, because the victors will determine whose ideas and beliefs will survive and whose will become unsustainable. Goldberg said, “Any movement or ideology that fails to attract new generations of adherents will, by definition, die out.” 8

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God will always have His church, but whether North America’s Apostolics will capture the hearts and minds of enough young people to maintain end-time revival on this continent remains to be seen. There is no better tool to help sustain and grow our movement than our Apostolic Bible colleges. Bible colleges that maintain their dedication to training young men and women for service to the Kingdom are crucial to the perpetuation of the movement—our Bible colleges are an established framework for training the trainers. Our movement has benefited greatly from the work of our Bible colleges and we cannot dismiss the role they have played in the training of Apostolic leaders. Many of the great leaders in our organization— missionaries, pastors, music ministers, and Christian educators—are Bible college alumni. Yet it will take concerted effort to continue this great work. Our UPCI-endorsed Bible colleges in North America have better facilities than ever before. They have faculties with PhD scholars, great teachers, and anointed preachers. Despite these advances, the reality is that every year many of our North American students who choose Bible college face fierce opposition. Gone are the days in which pursuing the ministry is viewed as a noble calling; the secular, anti-Christian culture has so denigrated the clergy that it attracts fewer and fewer young people into its ranks. Mainstream Apostolics are not immune, and we have been scrambling as a movement to reverse the downward trend in young ministers pursuing ministerial credentials. Perhaps it is the fear of not being able to make “good money” or not getting a “real education.” But the majority of Apostolic young people are discouraged from going to Bible college. We watch from afar as Bible school students in foreign fields are willing to sleep on dirt floors and suffer financial, physical, and political adversity in order to receive training to reach their world. The task for our foreign missionaries is daunting—there are more students than

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2012 New Life Christian School high school graduating class, courtesy of New Life Christian School, Bridgeton, Missouri.

Our movement has benefited greatly from the work of our Bible colleges and we cannot dismiss the role they have played in the training of Apostolic leaders. the modest facilities can support. Yet for some in North America, Bible college has become passé—an iconic reminder of our blue-collar heritage from which we have “bettered” ourselves. So we surrender our young to secular academia, a minefield of liberal ideology designed to challenge all Judeo-Christian morality, and hope for the best. In an article titled “What You’re Paying for Your Child to Learn at College,” Dennis Prager says, “Most American parents and/or their child or children are going into debt in order to support an institution that for four years, during the most impressionable years of a person’s life, instills values that are the opposite of those of the parents. And that is intentional.” Young people who are shockingly biblically illiterate are sent off to secular colleges and universities barely able to articulate core doctrines, and they are expected to survive the assault of professors and administrators on Christian values. We must ask ourselves, is this always the best way to keep our youth grounded in the faith? We are in the last days. If we plan to be a part of the great end-time revival and if

we really want the next generation to maintain their Apostolic identity, we cannot be guilty of discouraging young people from answering their call to ministry or from fulfilling their desire to become more grounded in Apostolic doctrine. We are forced to make our decisions based upon the fact that this is the generation “upon whom the ends of the world are come” (I Corinthians 10:11) not our hope of financial security. Jesus’ admonished His disciples, “Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink” (Matthew 6:25). An education in a secular field is no longer a guarantee of prosperity or success. The secular educational paradigm is in great shift. The New York Times reported in an article titled “Many with New College Degree Find the Job Market Humbling” that after nearly a year only 56 percent of the college grads of the class of 2010 had found jobs. Of the college grads in the last two years who have landed jobs only half of the positions even require a degree at all. America’s student loan debt has now surpassed credit card debt and is close to reaching the one trillion dollar mark. MAY 2013

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Our government is encouraging students to saddle themselves with increasing educational debt and cannot guarantee they will have economic opportunity to pay down the debt once the education is completed. Why not allow God to direct the lives of our young people? An education in a secular field, even from the most prestigious of educational institutions, is no longer a guarantee of financial security. In his book, The Crisis of Zionism, Peter Beinart attempts to explain why he believes young American Jews will not take up the cause of Israel in the same way their forefathers did. While I disagree with his politics on the issue, he makes a great point. He states, “It is difficult to teach Jewish students to defend the Jewish state when they have not been taught to care much about Judaism itself.” Apostolics are in a similar crisis. We cannot expect our young people to defend the faith and to remain steadfast in the apostles’ doctrine if we have not taught them to love God and be willing to commit their lives to His service—whatever the service or sacrifice or whatever the perceived lost opportunity may be. Are we not promised a hundredfold return in this life on any sacrifice of supposed secular success given up to enter His service? (See Mark 10:28-30.)

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Why are young people important? Why should our movement invest in Bible colleges designed to train Apostolic ministers? Why? Because training Apostolic laborers ready to do the work of end-time revival is the only hope to sustain this great message in the generations to come. Yes, this influence is powerful. We cannot be fearful to ask this generation to take up their cross. Their youth will not last forever. What is young today is old tomorrow. It is a short window. A passing opportunity. And whatever grips their heart will determine their destiny. At Indiana Bible College we want to grip their heart with a passion for Christ, a love of the Oneness Apostolic message, and a fervor to reach a lost and dying world. Robert L. Rodenbush holds a Bachelor of Science in Economics, a Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and an LLM in taxation. An ordained minister, he serves as executive vice president of Indiana Bible College and associate pastor of Calvary Tabernacle in Indianapolis, Indiana. Paul D. Mooney is the pastor. Rob and his wife, Jaye, have been married fourteen years. They have two children, Micki Evangeline and Robert Mooney.

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[EDUCATION]

Woman Recognized for Nearly 30 Years of Children’s Ministry ERIN WISDOM

ST. JOSEPH NEWS-PRESS

arsha Mignery didn’t set out to dedicate nearly 30 years to children’s ministry. In fact, she didn’t feel particularly drawn to it in the first place. But what began as filling a need in 1984 has become much more for her since then. “At first I did it because they needed somebody, but I was scared to death,” says Ms. Mignery, who belongs to The Pentecostals of St. Joseph and recently was recognized by the Pentecostal Herald, the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church, as its teacher of the month. “And then I never ever stopped. I don’t know when it happened, but I loved it.” Ms. Mignery has immersed herself in this volunteer ministry in the midst of raising five children and always working full time, as well. Yet these other commitments haven’t kept her from organizing all kinds of activities and outreaches for kids, including a Wednesday night church service and weekly Sunday school classes. She also oversees Kid Zone, a monthly activity at the church or in the community that sometimes focuses on service and other times is just for fun. She notes that she’s seen kids change as the world has changed —most notably, by developing shorter attention spans—and she’s changed her approaches accordingly. In addition, with her church moving from the North End to a new location at 1202 Felix St. in Downtown St. Joseph about a year ago, she’s seen her focus change slightly, as well. “I’m especially burdened for kids in the Downtown area,” she says. “We have a ton of neighborhood kids come in.” One way she aims to keep them coming is by changing the look of her church’s children’s space every three months. She also searches the Internet for ministry ideas and doesn’t shy away from ones that are labor-intensive—including a number of building projects she’s

tackled with her husband, Ray. Together, they’ve built spaceships, a Noah’s ark, a Goliath, a giant whale, and even a train they pulled around the church’s parking lot with a golf cart during a block party last summer. “I don’t know what it is about riding in a little train, but even the adults like it,” Ms. Mignery notes. Of course, at the root of all this fun is a serious intent. “The world now, it’s a horrible place to grow up for kids,” she says. “I just want them to know that there is a better life.” Ms. Mignery adds that in her time leading children’s ministry, she’s worked with several hundred children and is still in touch with some. Among these is Brandon King, who is now in his 20s and describes Ms. Mignery as “somebody who’s always looking for ways to make the Bible exciting for kids.” “Her ministry with kids shaped who I am today,” adds Mr. King, who is now a licensed Pentecostal minister. “She’s got a passion for the word of God and a passion for children, and her ministry has definitely influenced both mine and others’ decision to follow God to the best of our ability.” Sheila Davis, Ms. Mignery’s sister and another Sunday school teacher at The Pentecostals of St. Joseph, also makes note of Ms. Mignery’s care for children. “She has a compassion for lost kids,” Ms. Davis says, adding that both she and Ms. Mignery feel that “if we get Jesus in these kids when they’re small and teach them right from wrong, they’ll always carry it with them.” And even after so many have grown up and move on, Ms. Mignery feels she carries them with her, as well. “It’s been half my life ... but I don’t forget a one of them,” she says. “I look at pictures and continue to pray for them. I just love them all.”

This story first appeared in St. Joseph Press in St. Joseph, Missouri. It is published here by permission.

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[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

The Lesson from the Pool WANDA FIELDER

t is always interesting to observe the earth from an airplane window. I frequently choose a window seat when flying so I can enjoy that privilege. I am always amazed at the perfectly outlined yards, the winding streets, row upon row of houses, and a myriad of other sights when returning to my Chicago point of departure. On one particular flight something else caught my attention as we circled in a holding pattern over the magnificent city of Chicago. Beautiful turquoise water from a backyard swimming pool stood out among the drab buildings. While viewing the loveliness of the water in this particular pool, I began to search for other pools and was astounded by the variety of colors that went from light blue to turquoise, and from murky green to a nasty shade of brown. They were all in the same neighborhood and received the same rainfall and sunshine. Yet they looked entirely different from my window in the plane. Why the difference? The difference had to do with how each pool was maintained. The view from thousands of feet in the sky can be quite revealing when all is sprawled out with no distractions. I noticed when looking directly down from the sky it is difficult to determine the difference in height of tall buildings or trees or vehicles. Everything seems to be on one level. When standing on the ground a towering tree full of leaves might block the view of the house beside it, but looking down from above it is all in full view. In my mind’s eye, I see God looking down at us from Heaven 12

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much in the same way I was watching from the aircraft window. How does God view our lives as He watches from His heavenly throne? Does He see beauty or does He see ugliness? Satan has a way of turning a person’s life into something dark and ugly. However, God can restore polluted waters. All things can become new in Him. When we still had small children at home, we had a backyard swimming pool. I remember the time required to maintain the pool. Clear, sparkling blue water could quickly become discolored and even disgusting from the lack of care. It is no different with our lives; if we do not take the time to maintain our walk with the Lord we become stagnant, stale, and polluted. Spending time with Jesus daily will keep us fresh, lovely, and attractive in our spirits and cause us to be effective witnesses. But of even greater significance is how God perceives us. Daily prayer and regular Bible reading and study will bring vibrant color to our lives, making us beautiful in God’s eyes. Wanda Fielder is the founder and editor of the website and newsletter Tealightful Inspirations. She serves as connections director for the UPCI Ladies Ministries. She is married to James Fielder. The Fielders have pastored in Portage, Indiana, for the past thirty-three years. Wanda is the happy mother of Brent and Bryan and grandmother to Maddi and Lincoln. 

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MY HOPE RADIO BY TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Three Minutes With Nicole White

ell us a little about your family. I am the youngest of three children. I have one brother and one sister. I married Cedric White on August 1, 2009. We have two wonderful children: Micah, eight, and Abrielle, two. We live in the beautiful city of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Describe your spiritual journey. I grew up in the United Pentecostal Church. I was baptized and received the Holy Ghost during a children’s service on Pentecost Sunday at my home church, World Harvest Ministries (then named World of Evangelism), under Pastor W.L. Clayton in Charleston, South Carolina. I was six years old when I received the Holy Ghost and was baptized in Jesus’ name. What is your music background? I grew up in a very musical family. My father is a singer/songwriter who owns his own music studio (NTM Productions) and also the former music director at our home church in Charleston, and my mother sang in the choir. My brother, my sister, and I grew up singing along with tapes of the Winans, Vanessa Bell Armstrong, and other gospel artists. Our parents always encouraged us to exercise and perfect our musical gift, and they also let us know that without Jesus Christ in our lives there was no reason to sing. I joined the junior youth choir at age six, then the youth choir at twelve, and then the adult mass choir at age sixteen. My brother also started Harvest Fire, a small traveling youth ensemble that I had the privilege to be a part of throughout my teen years. I also had the great pleasure of becoming the junior youth choir director in my early twenties. I was also honored to be accepted as the music director at The Pentecostals of Georgetown UPC in July 2007, where I served one year under Pastor Donel White (now my father-in-law). In 2009, I went back to school at Coastal Carolina in Myrtle Beach to study music. I recorded my album Higher: Don’t

No matter how many people I touch with my ministry, if my children and husband lack my love, attention, and prayers, I have neglected my number one ministry. Give Up in my father’s studio. The project was engineered by my father, Neal Mellix, and produced by my brother, Nathan Mellix (who is the current music director at the Pentecostals of Georgetown). Today I am part of a wonderful, growing praise team at the First United Pentecostal Church of Conway in Conway, South Carolina, under the direction of Pastor Ben Cooke. What is one of your musical dreams or goals you would like to see come to pass? I actually never had dreams to be up on a stage, or to make an album, or to even be accepted onto an Internet radio station, but God has made a way for those things to happen. I guess I would say that my dream is that hearts and lives would be transformed, not just by my music, but by the power of the Holy Ghost others feel when they listen to my music and, most important, when they look into my life. My dream is to be an example of a true worshiper and servant of the most high God, Jesus Christ! What is the best advice you have ever been given? It’s hard to say what the best bit of advice has been because I’ve had so many influential people in my life. The best advice in a bad situation came from my former youth pastor’s wife, Monica Louis. I was going through a very trying time, dealing with a situation that I had gotten myself into as a teen, and she simply looked at me and said, “You can do better!” That short statement changed my life forever and from that point on, I never settled for less than everything God wanted for me. The best musical advice came from my father, who always

told me to “sing in a forward motion,” and “take the listeners on a journey.” He said, “It’s not about the quantity of runs and riffs, but about the quality of the voice. Never sing anything that you don’t feel!” The best spiritual advice came from my former pastor’s wife, Rose Clayton. She would always tell me to drag my flesh into the prayer room even when I didn’t feel like it because one day, when my strength is almost gone, I will be able to draw from those prayers that have been stored up. What is your greatest passion and why? My greatest passion is seeing the hand of God in my family. No matter how many people I touch with my ministry, if my children and husband lack my love, attention, and prayers, I have neglected my number one ministry, which is my family. Where can we listen, purchase, and connect with you? You can listen to, purchase, and stay connected to my music along with other Apostolic artists on our record label at www. boc-music.com. My music is also on myhoperadio.com, pentecostalpublishing.com, iTunes, and YouTube. I am also on Facebook as Nicole White (fan page) and Twitter @nicmusic85. Tiffini Countaway is the producer of MyHopeRadio.com.

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[EDUCATION]

Helping Others See the Real RAYMOND CROWNOVER

ven with 20/20 vision, the eye cannot see. It can only take in and focus light on the retina, triggering an electrochemical response in the optic nerve. This response is carried to the brain and interpreted by the mind. The mind gives meaning to the otherwise meaningless light. To be useful, the meaning assigned by the mind must align with the reality producing the light. This applies equally as well to concepts (the products of thought) and to precepts (the products of perception). Just as the eyes cannot see without a mind, we cannot believe, understand, think, or know without a worldview. All of us have a worldview, even if we are unaware of it. A worldview is the set of preconceptions, expectations, ideas, and beliefs that make it possible to interpret and interact with the world around us. Without a worldview our perception of the world would be chaotic and meaningless. However, worldviews also have the power to cause us to “see” things that are not actually there and to miss things we ought to be seeing. Christianity is an experience and a passion, but it is first of all a consistent system of beliefs about reality. It is a set of truth claims to which the mind and heart must give assent. Thus Christianity is a worldview. However, it is not simply one more worldview in a long list of equals. It is the only systematic worldview that is fully consistent with reality. To disagree with the foundational claims of Christianity is to lose connection with the Real. We do not want to accept a worldview because it is called Christian; rather we want to carefully craft a worldview that is an accurate and orderly reflection of the really Real—we want to become Christian. For the most part, our worldview operates at the subconscious level; and many people are quite happy leaving 14

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it there. The vast majority of those living in western society seldom examine their worldview to determine if it is consistent, systematic, and trustworthy. Their worldview is frequently an uneven conglomeration of rules and opinions gathered from past experiences and from trusted people. Thus, a worldview is more frequently caught than taught. However, in an increasingly secularized society Christians cannot stumble through the buffet line of ideas picking up beliefs because they are appetizing, popular, or were produced by a celebrity “idea chef.” Christians are constantly being asked to accommodate non-Christian and even anti-Christian concepts into our worldviews. These ideas destroy consistency, weaken structural integrity, and introduce absurdities. Once this process reaches a critical stage we are required to either reject our Christianity or live in a fantasy world with contradictions and impossibilities on every hand. Some Christians accept this latter alternative and call it “faith.” To them, faith is unreasonable, contradictory to experience, and true anyway. Quite the reverse, Christian faith is eminently reasonable and the only safe guide to interpreting experience. For example, it does not require a suspension of reason to believe in miraculous healings. As has been demonstrated by many cogent arguments, it is quite reasonable to accept that God created the universe ex nihilo by fiat. If we accept this premise, then how is it unreasonable to also accept that He is able to perform any act He desires, even if such act appears to contradict the physical laws of His creation? Of course, if miracles were common our worldview would interpret them as natural law (such as the “natural” healing abilities God placed in our bodies and the medical procedures He allowed humans to develop with their minds). Most humans are surrounded by miracles of healing they fail to see because their worldview is ill equipped to perceive and interpret them correctly. Perhaps the confused Christian would counter that it is not God’s ability to do the miraculous that is unreasonable, but His desire to do so on behalf of the believer. The

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central belief of Christianity is that Christ died for us, taking upon Himself the guilt and penalty of our sins. How then can a Christian ever argue that it is unreasonable to assume God would provide any good thing, even if that thing requires apparent violation of natural law? A confused worldview might argue that daily experiences of evil, the suffering of fellow believers, and a life of personal travail and loss prove that God often withholds good things from His children. However, the problem is not with the experiences, but with the worldview that interprets these experiences. It is incompetent in recognizing ultimate good arising from temporary suffering and conversely, ultimate evil arising from apparent blessings. It is slow to understand that the only wise God, who knows the end from the beginning, is far more capable of judging what is best for us at any given moment than are we. Given that a consistent, systematic Christian worldview is essential to correctly experiencing and interpreting reality, and further given that even Christians often have a haphazard, inconsistent worldview, it is obvious that we need guidance and instruction in constructing our worldviews. Thankfully, nearly all educational activities in which the church engages are aimed at influencing, developing, and strengthening a Christian worldview. Observant readers have no doubt seen that teaching a Christian worldview is also known as making disciples. Many experts believe that the development of a consistent, systematic worldview is nearly impossible before the early thirties because younger people do not have sufficient experiences, maturity, or cognitive development. Even if this is true it does not mean that children or youth cannot benefit from teaching that will help them while in the process of developing and testing their worldview, nor does it suggest that people later in life do not need help to further refine and systematize even a well-structured worldview. Teaching a Christian worldview is essentially different than transmitting Christian doctrine or lifestyle, although it would include such transmission. The factual content and value structure of a worldview are only two elements of an all-encompassing system. As a result, teaching a Christian worldview often requires first that the learner is led to examine the structure of his or her worldview through the discussion of Bible stories, religious and secular literature, and current events. The discussion should be directed so that it leads the students to see beyond the obvious surface details through an age-appropriate examination of the presuppositions, concepts, and beliefs of the characters. Self-examination of the student’s current worldview should come naturally and non-threateningly from an attempt to discover the worldview of the characters. Another important step in teaching a Christian worldview is exposing the inconsistencies found in the current worldview and replacing them with systematic concepts in closer alignment to Reality. In groups this is usually done through non-confrontational discussion and lecture. Depending upon the openness of the student this may also be accomplished by loving confrontation, but if the student seems either embarrassed or intractable it becomes much more likely that change will occur only from habitual one-on-one or small group fellowship mixed with genuine openness and affection on the part of the teacher. Once the current worldview has been determined and obvious inconsistencies have been exposed and replaced, the teacher is ready to diagnose what key elements of the Christian worldview are missing and supply those elements through a combination of telling, sharing, and providing. Telling occurs as the teacher speaks the truth to the student. Sharing occurs as the teacher lives the truth 16

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Telling occurs as the teacher speaks the truth to the student. Sharing occurs as the teacher lives the truth in front of the student. Providing occurs as the teacher makes resources such as books, audo and video files, and competent role models available to the students. in front of the student. Providing occurs as the teacher makes resources such as books, audio and video files, and competent role models available to the students. It is important to remember that a worldview is not just informational. The teacher should not only live the truth before the student, but explain why certain life choices were made as opposed to others. Worldviews are so powerful that students are likely to hear and see the teacher behaving exactly as they already behave and assume the teacher’s concepts are the same as their own unless the teacher specifically enumerates the differences. Learning a Christian worldview has not occurred unless the student can consistently apply it in real-world situations. Therefore, the next step is to seek or provide opportunities to provide constructive feedback after observing the student making Christian decisions, living a Christian life, and helping others develop a Christian worldview. While simulated or contrived settings may assist in getting to that point, they can never take the place of actually living Christianity in the world with the guidance of a mentor. While these elements of teaching a Christian worldview have been listed as discreet, ordered steps, they usually occur to some degree simultaneously and as interconnected events. They form a cycle of worldview development that repeats throughout one’s lifetime. Teaching a Christian worldview does not happen easily or quickly. It requires a lifelong commitment by the teacher and the student and empowerment by the Holy Spirit. Raymond Crownover is professor of Higher Education and director of the Center for Assessment and Strategic Planning at Urshan College and Urshan Graduate School of Theology. He is associate pastor of The Cross UPC of Troy, Missouri under Pastor James Crawford. Dr. Crownover has been teaching college students about worldviews for thirty years and may one day actually get it right.

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FAITH & CULTURE BY EUGENE WILSON

Are We a Culture of Liars? here has been much news in recent years concerning professional athletes and the illegal use of performance-enhancing drugs. Some athletes, such as baseball’s Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, continue to maintain their innocence in spite of reports suggesting otherwise. Nonetheless, their denial of doping does not mean they are guiltless. Cyclist Lance Armstrong, winner of the Tour de France with a record of seven consecutive times, denied he used performance-enhancing drugs even after he was found guilty and his titles had been revoked. Recently, however, Armstrong came clean and admitted to doping. Still, according to the experts, he may have lied in his confession in claiming he had stopped doping at an earlier date than he actually did. What is it with all of the lying? Typically, North Americans place great value on honesty. It is repeatedly among the top five characteristics we desire in a leader, friend, or mate, and yet we continue to lie. Liars can be found in all sectors of life. Politicians lie. Business leaders lie. Used car salesmen lie. Students lie. Which leaves me asking the question—are we becoming a culture of liars? A Culture of Lying According to psychologist Robert Feldman, author of The Liar in Your Life, the average person tells at least three lies in the first ten minutes of a conversation. Feldman says, “There’s always been a lot of lying. But I do think we’re seeing a kind of cultural shift where we’re lying more, it’s easier to lie, and in some ways it’s almost more acceptable.” Jessica Bennett of Newsweek, in a review of Robert Feldman’s book, said, “Feldman argues, the more lies we tell, even if they’re little white lies, the more deceptive we and society become.” Bennett goes on to say, “We are a culture of liars, to put it bluntly, with deceit so deeply ingrained in our psyches that we hardly even notice

“When people practice deception, it is simply easier to lie, in turn making it harder to differentiate from the truth.” —Miami Herald we’re engaging in it.” We say things like “It is so great to meet you” and “I love the outfit you are wearing” and don’t mean it. Such behavior, however innocent it may seem, helps to develop our ability to lie. According to research conducted by Zhejiana Normal University in China and Northwestern University, lying “becomes more automatic upon training.” An editorial in the Miami Herald titled “The Culture of Lying” states, “When people practice deception, it is simply easier to lie, in turn making it harder to differentiate from the truth.” We are becoming a culture of liars and increasingly so. Why Do People Lie? Our motive for lying is selfish-oriented. We lie because we want to be liked, respected, or to succeed. Bennett states, “Research has linked socially successful people to those who are good liars. Students who succeed academically get picked for the best colleges, despite the fact that, as one recent Duke University study found, as many as 90 percent of high-schoolers admit to cheating. Even lying adolescents are more popular among their peers.” Liars often get what they want. Bennett says, “They avoid punishment, and they win others’ affection. Liars make themselves sound smart and savvy, they attain power over those of us who believe them, and they often use their lies to rise up in the professional world. Many liars have fun doing it. And many more take pride in getting away with it.” Embellishing As Christians, we must not only refrain from lying, we must also refrain from embellishing things. Many people

think that embellishing is not lying. That is simply not true. Michael Hyatt, former CEO of Thomas Nelson, recently wrote a blog concerning our living in a transparent world. He stated that we now have at our access the ability to check any fact almost instantaneously. Hyatt suggests that leaders, speakers, and authors be especially careful when sharing statistics. He says, “If you exaggerate the facts, you will be found out. And the results can be embarrassing—or worse.” Hyatt tells of how an agent contacted him claiming that his client was “the most popular Christian blogger on the internet.” Hyatt immediately went to Comete.com, entered the blog address, and discovered in less than thirty seconds that the agent’s claim was bogus. In fact, the client’s traffic was unimpressive. Hyatt states, “People are not going to get away with embellishing the facts much longer. It’s just too easy to validate the claims.” Hyatt asks, “So how do you survive in this brave new world of total transparency?” He answers, “Tell the truth.” “Commit to total transparency.” “Understate the facts.” Hyatt goes on to say, “Don’t inflate the numbers. If you say that you have 10,000 unique [blog] visitors a month, and the person double-checking your claim discovers that you actually have 10,970, your credibility goes up. The opposite is also true.” Some people, like Lance Armstrong, are willing to lie for instant rewards. However, Ananias and Sapphira’s death serves as a reminder that lying is never worth the final price (Acts 5:1-11). Eugene Wilson lives in Olive Branch, Mississippi. MAY 2013

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[EDUCATION]

PAM RESONG

Bible Colleges are God’s Opportunity “There shall be with thee for all manner of workmanship every willing skilful man, for any manner of service” (I Chronicles 28:21). smiled. It was happening again. I was in a group of women who did not know each other. Everyone was taking a turn, telling how many children or grandchildren she had. I chuckled. The enumeration had gotten to me. “I have twenty-four daughters, and they all look like their Father,” I said. Heads turned. Eyes grew large. It was very quiet. “I’m a dorm supervisor at a Bible college.” Shoulders slumped as air was expelled. “Really? What is that like?” “I have only two girls and I can’t keep up with them.” “What does Bible college do?” I always enjoy opportunities to tell of God’s ability to transform willing vessels into ministers, missionaries, Sunday school teachers, evangelists, and all other types of workers for His kingdom. These vessels come with varying degrees of knowledge, polish, and talent. Still, they are all willing to see what God has for them. I always thank God for the privilege of touching the lives of His chosen people. What a blessing and honor to help in the preparation of workers for the ministry! It is rewarding to see people “try 18

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their wings” in various areas, seeing if they can learn and succeed, even in arenas new to them. It is also a chance to start over with a clean slate—a time to attempt things without anyone judging or saying, “You can’t do this” or “We already have someone” or “We’ve tried that before.” Of course, godly counsel prevails, but Bible college is a time to see where a person can go in God. It also is a time to step up in leadership in some area of talent. I remember a young woman named Jessie. At the beginning of each semester there are always new students who need assistance in setting up housekeeping in the dorm. One of the freshmen, Vivian, bought a bookcase and her parents asked if it could be assembled. The next day I laid my tools on the carpet of Vivian’s room while she was out. After a few minutes, Jessie appeared at my elbow. I smiled up at her. “May I help?” she asked. “Sure,” I responded. She began separating the pieces. Another young lady stepped to the doorway with a question. I excused myself to assist her. When I returned after a short time, the bookcase was standing in the center of the room. “Hope you don’t mind,” Jessie said. She was somewhat nervous. I ran my hand over the smooth joining of

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boards and eyed the flush fasteners. “Not at all. Good job. You do good work.” Jessie relaxed and smiled back. “Thanks,” she said. “They never let me do this at home.” I stared at her. “Really? You have talent.” Jessie frowned. “My dad always does the handiwork at home. He never lets me help when I ask. I love to do this kind of work.” I touched her arm. “Hey, you can help me anytime. There is lots to do here.” She beamed. “Just let me know.” I passed on her name and ability to the puppet tour director, the late Ann Hackler. “That’s great!” Ann enthused. “I can always use someone with mechanical ability on my puppet team. There’s always something with props or the stage.” Jessie turned out to be a fabulous puppeteer too. This story can be repeated over and over. Bible college is the land of new beginnings. People who have never sung in their home church are part of praise teams. Rookie Sunday school teachers and assistants are welcomed. New speakers share their messages. All kinds of opportunities are open to Bible college students. A person simply needs to be willing to try. Encouragement and assistance abound. New ideas for ministries are welcomed. Who knows

what talents are hidden simply for lack of opportunity? God can use these talents, especially as students gain confidence, expertise, and guidance. There is a need for Pentecostal young people (and those not so young) to see what God has for them. There are no limits in Him. He knows what He has given us. If we are willing to try and to give our all, He will bless our efforts. How proud we are of the students who become so much more in the Lord by the time they graduate! They almost all have tried various avenues of life and learning and discovered many of their strengths. We teachers and staff marvel at God’s transformation of their lives. After four years they are ready to take their places wherever God has called them. Our movement needs them. Our world needs them. God needs them. Bible colleges present opportunities for students. Bible colleges are also opportun nd His “willing skilful men and women, for any manner of service.” Pam Resong is an alumnus of Apostolic Bible Institute, St. Paul, Minnesota (class of 1988). She currently is a full-time instructor and dorm supervisor at Apostolic Bible Institute. MAY 2013

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[EDUCATION]

Homeschooling Advocacy KERRI WILSON

s a licensed teacher with a master’s degree, I believe one’s education is important. Likewise, my husband, who has his doctoral degree, is an advocate for education. While not our primary focus, we both have made education an important part of our family values and have encouraged our children to strive for academic excellence. Both of our children have maintained successful progress with consistent exceptional grades over the course of their academic history. Thus, it is from this perspective that I address the topic of homeschooling. People homeschool for various reasons. Many choose to homeschool because of personal convictions, lifestyles that conflict with public schooling, or because they feel the public school forum available to them is not adequate or safe. Some choose to educate their children at home because of influencers around them, while others homeschool because of the challenges their children face due to learning disabilities. One may homeschool for only part of their child’s educational time period, yet another may homeschool their children from preschool until they graduate from high school. Many homeschoolers have had public school experience and many have not been exposed to the public forum at all. But regardless of one’s reason for, time period for, or worldview of homeschooling, it can be a positive experience if entered into with preparedness and the right mindset. While our daughter has felt content with her public school education throughout her educational history, our son, on the other hand, has asked to be homeschooled since about the fifth grade. But despite his requests, we have found our local public school system to be a safe and qualified forum for his educational needs; therefore, we refrained from homeschooling him until recently. Because of a transitional time that suddenly arrived in our family, we felt it necessary to homeschool both of our children to provide educational consistency. During this time of uncertainty, we have found homeschooling to be a positive, productive, safe, and flexible blessing for our lives. 20

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While many states require homeschooling to be operated under an umbrella source, some states allow families to homeschool independently. Two of my friends with whom I have recently spoken confirmed these facts. One friend has homeschooled her children for about eleven years through a local Christian school and homeschool network. Another friend began homeschooling for the first time this year independently, but she plans to begin next year under an umbrella forum. We have had the privilege to homeschool through an out-of-state Christian school. All of our material and accountability have been set up through their system, school district, and state. We have not felt isolated like I had originally feared. Instead, this setup has helped us obtain the needed support for ensuring we reach the necessary goals for our children to continue to complete their education successfully. I recently asked our sixteen-year-old son, who is academically gifted and has exceptional college entrance exam scores, to share his thoughts on homeschooling. He attested to homeschooling as being a positive experience for him. It has provided consistency to his life and has eliminated the boredom he had previously experienced in the public school classroom. He has felt more freedom to learn at a faster pace and has enjoyed a flexible schedule that has worked well with our transition demands and the extracurricular activities in which he enjoys participating. Additionally, he enjoys the fact that he has not been required to complete homework after a full day of learning, nor has he had to worry about remembering to bring things home from or return them to school. The only challenge he has faced is motivation to get back on schedule after long breaks, which is the same challenge he faced when he was enrolled in public school. Our daughter has had a somewhat different transition into

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homeschooling. At first, she was unhappy with our new situation and expressed frustration with feeling isolated from her school friends. Additionally, she felt a lack of confidence with the requirements of her newfound learning independence. However, her dissatisfaction did not last long. After a couple of weeks she realized she was able to continue to stay connected with her friends through youth activities at church. She also felt relieved as she realized her ability to be more independent in her learning allowed her to slow down or speed up her learning process as needed. Recent conversations with other homeschool parents revealed the positive benefits they have experienced through homeschooling their children. One parent was thankful for the enhanced opportunity she has been afforded through homeschooling to instill strong Christian values into her children. She felt homeschooling had helped better prepare her children for defending their beliefs when confronted with conflicting worldviews. Another parent explained how her family was less hurried and had more time to spend together with family Bible reading and personal devotions. Her son, who has had academic issues in the past due to his Autism Spectrum Disorder, now engages in family communication and conversation. Her

perspective is that homeschooling has not only changed her son but has also changed her into a less stressed mother. With regard to socialization, we have not had the negative experiences many feel have the potential to become an issue with homeschooling. There may be some situations where these concerns are legitimate; however, we have been blessed to have access to a church youth group’s activities. Our children have been able to consistently engage in social events with their friends at church, during their free time after school, and on weekends, as well as opportunities for travel and meeting up with their friends from other areas of the country. Additionally, our son has also been able to continue his involvement in musical activities he has previously enjoyed. Likewise, other homeschool parents I’ve spoken with expressed socialization to be a nonissue due to their active involvement in their local church, sports activities, clubs, and field trips. We had some concerns about our curriculum options at first, but we have found the curriculum we chose to be comparable to the public school requirements. Our children have experienced fewer distractions; their grades have been consistently better; and they have felt challenged without being overwhelmed. During times MAY 2013

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We have had an overall positive experience regarding public education, thus we feel the benefits our children have experienced from their educational foundation have contributed to their homeschooling success. of struggle they have had easy access to everything needed to help them overcome their difficulties. A positive difference one parent I spoke with found to be between the public school curriculum and the homeschool curriculum she uses was with the sciences. While it does teach all the major philosophical theories taught in the public school system, her science curriculum is Creation based and gives the scientific explanations from a Christian perspective. The parent of the Autistic Spectrum student found her homeschool curriculum to be a little more challenging but less stressful for her son. She explained, however, that his issues have never been with the curriculum but were born out of his need for one-on-one instruction. When asked about time management issues, one parent explained how she felt that while they had more time available, they accomplished more in less time. Her son is not an independent learner, but she has found him to be more compliant and consistent with completing his tasks in a timely manner. She also felt her high expectations have helped him stay focused on getting things completed. We have been pleasantly surprised by our experience. It has not been difficult for our children to manage their time wisely. My husband and I have witnessed growth in the development of our children’s time management skills because they are motivated to complete their work in a timely manner so they can enjoy their free time. They have spent time each day planning their day before beginning their schoolwork, and they have proven to be successful with consistently sticking to their plans. We feel homeschooling has been able to successfully meet our children’s educational requirements. Because we operate under the umbrella of a Christian school, we have been able to ensure a completion plan of what is necessary for our daughter to reach her yearly goals and for our son to graduate after next year. Additionally, our son has been offered access to college prep and advanced placement courses, so he will ultimately be able to apply some of his credits to his college plan. He has said he feels more prepared for college

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through homeschooling because he has learned to become a more independent learner and has developed confidence as a better time manager. His recent college entrance exam scores came in higher this year than last year’s. One homeschool parent also felt her children’s academic needs were being met. She felt her curriculum allowed her to focus on the things that matter most. Another parent explained how she now has the power to understand her child’s learning style and was thankful for the new freedom to choose a curriculum that would enhance his learning style. We have found another positive of homeschooling to be in our children’s confidence levels. Other parents have had this same positive experience as well. One has consistently received feedback praising her children’s ability to express themselves in a respectful and dignified manner. Another felt her son’s confidence has grown because he can now stop and take the time to ask questions about things he doesn’t understand without the fear of embarrassment or ridicule. Because he feels less stressed, his grades have improved, so his disposition has changed. He has become happier, less angry, less defensive, spontaneously helpful, and less stingy with his personal time. Regarding public education, we have had an overall positive experience; thus, we feel the benefits our children have reaped from their educational foundation have greatly contributed to their homeschooling success. For some, the choice to homeschool is born out of personal conviction. But many of us are compelled to homeschool because of life circumstances. Regardless of the reason for choosing to homeschool, homeschooling can be a positive and rewarding option with a little patience and the right perspective. Kerrie Wilson lives in Olive Branch, Mississippi, with her husband, Eugene, and their two children, Kade and Jaelyn.

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BOOK REVIEW BY VANCE BOWMAN

Generation Text By Dr. Michael Osit

arenting is a challenge. Being a parent has always been difficult. The first set of parents produced a worshiper and a murderer. The events that unfold in the Book of Genesis took place thousands of years before the advent of modern technologies. Adam and Eve didn’t have to consider cell phones, smart phones, desktops, laptops, iPods, and electronic tablets. There were no text messages, emails, instant messages, or phone calls to distract their children. Neither did they have to fear the constant, ever-accessible Internet. There were no decisions to make about television or movies. There was no grappling over whether to allow their children to play sports. The first parents never had to decide whether or not to allow their children to spend the night at a friend’s house. Yet in the absence of present-day devices and outside influences, one might conclude that they were a parenting success story when it came to Abel and a miserable failure when it came to Cain. While it may not be wise to compare today’s parents to Adam and Eve, it does offer us a study in contrast. Twentyfirst-century parents do have to consider a plethora of technological advances when planning their parenting. Modern culture has produced a generation of access and excess, especially when it comes to technology. The question of how to cope with the overload of entertainment options and the constant bombardment of media messages that offer almost anything at the touch of a button challenge the best of parents today. Christian parents have a decided advantage over their non-believing counterparts. The guidance given to godly moms and dads in the Bible and through God-ordained ministry is a blessing that provides wisdom the world does not possess. Still, navigating the murky waters of parenting these days is a most difficult proposition. Recently a friend recommended Generation Text, a book written by Dr. Michael Osit. Generation Text is an excellent book

sense of entitlement, and weak social skills.” In the chapter dedicated to identity formation, he writes, “The way in which you conduct your own life serves as a powerful model for your kids. It would be prudent to closely examine how you may be contributing to their views of materialism, respect or disrespect for others, treatment of feelings and bodies, and other values that comprise self-worth and identity.” Dr. Osit does not make any references to Christianity in Generation Text—he approaches the subject of parenting today’s children strictly from a clinical point of view. He uses real life examples from his counseling practice to give the reader various family and relationship dilemmas and the solutions he offered to his patients. Chapter titles include: written to assist parents as they traverse the minefield of parenting. The subtitle of the book is Raising Well-Adjusted Kids in an Age of Instant Everything. Dr. Osit, a licensed clinical psychologist with three decades of experience, brings a good understanding of the perils associated with raising children in today’s technologically advanced culture. He offers practical insight to parents who wrestle with how to rear children in a society that demands immediate gratification. Two of the key terms in Generation Text are access and excess. Access to so much information and the instant availability of products has created a culture of excess. Also according to Dr. Osit, children today, because of social websites and the ability to communicate through technology, struggle to fit in within certain social settings. Osit writes, “The strong need for social acceptance, intensified by kids’ ability to ‘one-up’ their peers, means that the issue of excess is particularly acute. The cumulative effects of our children’s access to the world through technological advances, and the excess of ‘things’ and privileges offered to them, can pose a significant deterrent in raising healthy kids. Kids … run the risk of developing a distorted self-image, a poor work ethic, a

• The World at Their Feet-and Fingertips: Unfazed and Unimpressed • I Want It Now! Immediate Gratificaton • Starting Early: The Generation Text Child • The Access and Excess Teen • Walking the Tightrope: Balancing Wants and Needs •H  ow to Make Technology Work for You All God-fearing parents desire to do their best to raise their children in the fear and admonition of the Lord. Modern technology and culture have made this prospect increasingly difficult. Coupled with the Word of God, books like Generation Text can be of great assistance to parents bringing up children in the access and excess generation. If you are a parent, one who instructs parents, or an aspiring parent, Generation Text is a book well worth your time. Vance Bowman serves as the pastor of the United Pentecostal Church in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

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[EDUCATION]

ANTHONY BRASWELL

Apostolic Christian Schools: Alive and Well or Nearly Extinct?

s the principal of a Christian school and a board member of the UPCI Division of Education Association of Christian Teachers and Schools (ACTS), I have had questions posed concerning the current health and climate of our Apostolic Christian schools. Much discussion among Apostolic educators in recent years has been related to what can be done to unite us in a way that will provide the necessary support system to help our schools not only to stay alive but also to thrive. Beginning in the early 1970s and continuing through the 1980s, there was an explosive growth of Christian schools in almost every conservative religious sector of our country, including Apostolic Pentecostals. Much of the growth was fueled by Supreme Court decisions restricting prayer and Bible reading in public schools. As parents began to examine the content of textbooks and became more aware of the humanistic values taught, they started looking for alternative methods to educate their children. This quick growth reached a peak in the early 1990s, then leveled off and started to decline, especially in many smaller church schools. Apostolics were not exempt from those trends. As time passed, even though the laws remained the same, the initial outcry seemed to dwindle to the degree of acceptance. Many seemed resigned to the fact that God and His Word wouldn’t be an accepted part of the public education culture. Perhaps that acceptance, mixed with the challenges of operating a long-term quality Christian school, attributed to this decline. Are Apostolic schools alive and well or nearly extinct? It’s a fair question. While there are no immediate numbers available, I believe we can safely say there are still a number 24

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of quality Apostolic Christian schools in operation. Schools like Calvary Christian School in Indianapolis, Indiana, operating since 1946 as a ministry of their church, are growing and thriving today. At New Life Christian School this year we are experiencing our second highest enrollment year since our inception. The overall number of Apostolic schools may be lower, but the word “extinct” is not a part of their vocabulary. In our local church I am honored to have the privilege to minister in this unique capacity. Our local church started a Christian school in those boom years, 1974 to be exact. Our school was started for valid reasons and with visionaries at the helm. Through the years we have had to reexamine, reevaluate, and reorganize, but the reason we started the ministry remains constant. New Life Christian School was started because of the absence of God and His Word in the local public schools. We covet the things that separate us from the schools around us, even some of the so-called Christian schools. We continue because many families still desire and mirror these values: values such as open prayer in school, God’s Word in the curriculum, and qualified Apostolic teachers presenting a godly example. These values combine to provide every student at every level a godly worldview on a daily basis. The Advantages of Having a Christian School in the Local Church  Distinct ministry. First and foremost, it is a ministry provided on a daily basis. Morning Bible devotions, Bible memorization, and chapel services provide distinct Apostolic experiences on a daily basis. Undergirding our children with the Word of God serves as the most important reason we exist. While we at NLCS serve a community made up of many different faiths, ethnicities, and core beliefs, we are privileged and entrusted to impart biblical truths into children’s lives seven hours a day, five days a week, 176 days a year. Apostolic teachers can also fulfill their life ministry calling in our schools. What a ministry opportunity!

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Photo of first-grade class taught by Janelle Bland at New Life Chrsitian School, Bridgeton, Missouri.

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Community service and attention. Our churches try countless ways to introduce themselves to their community through service projects, advertisements, and the like. What better way than Christian education through a school and preschool to connect with the local community? The involvements of your special events such as Christmas programs, marriage seminars, financial seminars, and so forth now instantly have a naturally connected larger audience. These events can be held in a familiar environment to make a family ministry connection. Training and evangelism. The face of our Apostolic schools has changed in many assemblies. The school not only is used to train and empower our Apostolic students, but we also see a harvest field waiting for us. There was a time that our Apostolic schools were made up of almost entirely Apostolic students. That is no longer the case in many of our schools. We have many families drawn to the educational quality and so we see many different faiths enrolled in our schools, even the unchurched. As we develop relationships with these families, the evangelistic opportunities increase. Provide quality education. We are increasingly seeing the high quality of our Apostolic school students impact our world. We see the positive results of a quality Christian education in standardized testing and college entrance exams every year. Our schools can proudly say we produce the “cream of the crop.” Financial blessing to the local church. Yes, a Christian education ministry can be a financial blessing to the local congregation. Though this ministry should never be started for this reason alone, it can give back in measurable ways every year if carefully managed. To accomplish this we cannot allow a second-rate mindset. Tuition should be charged and should be comparable to other private schools in the area. Church membership can provide significant discounts or scholarships. It requires constant attention and hard work, as all successful ministries and businesses do. These advantages easily outweigh the negatives that will show themselves from time to time. Do we not expect opposition when doing God’s will? You can always expect adversity in anything that involves imparting God into the life of a child. Just as we recognize the importance of “training up a child,” so does the enemy of our faith. If you are considering this worthwhile ministry there are some important points to consider. 1. Have a good “feeder” system. Successful schools need a good “feeder” program. Start an early childhood program first. A quality preschool program can provide your school with students. Parents who feel comfortable with your educational program are more likely to continue at the Kindergarten level. Also, since most preschool programs charge tuition, there is less financial adjustment if families continue into your private Kindergarten program. 2. Don’t try to do it all at once. Despite pressure from those who might want a grade level you do not offer yet, start with just a Kindergarten program and let it grow naturally each year. It affords you the time and opportunity to grow a quality program. The administrator or principal may also serve a dual teaching role in the early years.

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3. Let the pastor “pastor.” Rather than put more pressure on the pastor of the church by trying to run a school and pastor at the same time, do your best to have an administrator who runs the educational department as soon as possible. 4. Hire qualified teachers. If you want a quality school, it starts with quality teachers. Simple enough, right? Work out a budget that will allow you to compensate according to your ministry income. Avoid using volunteers for classroom teachers. All of our schools should have set standards in place that require an adequate educational background with minimal standards of college education equivalent to those in the public sector. Graduates from Apostolic colleges are a great place to begin. Provide in-service and curriculum training for continued education. 5. Use a Bible-based curriculum. Use only curriculums that were developed from a biblical and godly worldview. Christian schools that use the same curriculum as other public and private schools are missing a key component to a truly effective Christian school. 6. Take advantage of your advantages. Small schools have automatic advantages over their larger counterparts. Smaller teacher/student ratios, better overall environment due to better control, a personal administrative approach, to name just a few. Technology in the classroom lends itself to easier implementation at the smaller school level. Christian curriculums have more individualized technology methods than ever before. 7. Test your product. Use standardized testing to insure you are putting out a great product, then shout it from the rooftops! Prepare your graduates for college entrance exams such as the ACT or the SAT then use their high scores to secure scholarships. 8. Join a larger body for support. As an Apostolic school you can receive support and affirmation through a membership with ACTS (Association of Christian Teachers and Schools), a part of the United Pentecostal Church International’s Division of Education. Events such as the ACTS Student Leadership Convention will give opportunity for your students to connect and compete with other Christian school students. “Apt to Teach” is a teacher-training event that is sponsored by ACTS for Christian school teachers and principals. If you are not currently a member, simply go to http://edu.upci. org/ for more information. If ever there were a need for Apostolic Christian schools, it is now! Galatians 6:9 (NIV) says, “Let us not become weary in doing good, for at the proper time we will reap a harvest if we do not give up.” This is our time to make a difference in our world. As Apostolic Christian educators we are confident that God has blessed us with the opportunity to minister to this generation, and there is no ministry greater than that in which a child is drawn nearer to their Creator. The ministry of the Apostolic Christian school is alive and well and doing just that. Anthony Braswell is the strategic planning and regional director for the Association of Christian Teachers and Schools (ACTS) and principal of New Life Christian School in Bridgeton, Missouri.

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COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE Due to overwhelming response to the January 2013 Pentecostal Herald celebrating the 100 year anniversary of the Jesus Name Message, the Pentecostal Herald will release a special commemorative issue this September. This keepsake issue will contain all the content from the original January issue plus additional content relating to the centennial celebration published in Pentecostal Heralds throughout 2013.

A Century of Revelation: G.T. Haywood and the Oneness Message The Phenomenal Growth of Oneness Pentecostalism The Spiritual Significance of Remembering

WWW.PENTECOSTALHERALD.COM January 2013 Herald.indd 1

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WORLDLINE BY BRUCE A. HOWELL

District Global Missions Directors his month I want to honor our district Global Missions directors and then leave you with some testimonies. I was moved by what I read in a monthly report some time ago from Jayson and Nellie Long, missionaries to Nicaragua, as he recounted their deputation travels. “Minnesota District. We never had the chance to meet Keith Leaman, but I will never forget the phone call I received from him. Though we were scheduled for Minnesota, we did not have a schedule, nor did we expect one because of Brother Leaman’s condition. When he called me, it was Saturday, three days before coming to his district. He sounded very upbeat and positive, and was apologetic for not calling me sooner. Then I realized why he was calling me, even though he was literally looking death in the face. He did this because to Keith Leaman, the cause of global missions is eternally important. He felt the weight of the business of the Kingdom, and he saw the eternal value in scheduling missionary families so they could be sent to the uttermost parts of the earth to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ. But first, the Kingdom! Like the Bible says of Enoch, I believe the same could be said of Keith Leaman: ‘He had this testimony, that he pleased God, and God took him.’” What a man! May God bless his legacy. The many of us who knew him surely miss him. The vast work of Global Missions around the world, from start to finish, is possible because of the support of churches and individuals in our fellowship. Global Missions district directors make the great majorJayson and Nellie Long ity of that support possible, and they are Global Missions heroes on the home front. Let me also share with you some testimonies I have read from our missionaries. Traveling among the North American districts with the help of our district directors, missionaries to Chile, Shane and Dena Hayes, reported the following personal testimony. “I was diagnosed with a broken hyoid bone in my throat. The (otolaryngologist) doctor stated that due to the severity of the break (the bones were completely separated) it would never heal without surgery. The broken piece was right Shane and Dena Hayes

against a nerve in my throat causing me severe pain. Today, I went to another otolaryngologist in Houston. During the examination he stopped and said, ‘Hmm, this is odd. The bones have fused back together, which is unheard of with this type of fracture and definitely in this short period of time!’ What the doctors could not do, the Great Physician did!” Do you need a prayer answered today? Here is a prayer request and then the result. Ken and Kay Burgess wrote: “Please remember us in prayer tomorrow as we hold our National Convention in San Salvador, El Salvador. Our guest speaker for this two-service event is Evangelist Mark Drost. We are anticipating 1,500 filled with the Holy Ghost, and many other signs and miracles. Please help us pray that the weather will remain lovely as it has the last few days, since this is an open-air stadium. Also pray that the months of prayer and fasting and preparation will produce fruit in a mighty outpouring of the Holy Ghost.” Later they wrote, “Thank you so much for your prayers, and the many kind responses! We are rejoicing in the glow of a wonderful victory. Twentytwo hundred were filled with the Holy Ghost; over 120 baptized; and 21,000 were in attendance. We are still receiving reports of miracles, healings, and other wonderful events of the day. To God be the glory!” Ken and Kay Burgess

Bruce A. Howell is the general director of Global Missions. Global Missions connects local churches and individuals to missionaries and church works around the world.

The vast work of Global Missions around the world, from start to finish, is possible because of the support of churches and individuals in our fellowship. Global Missions directors are heroes on the home front.

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[EDUCATION]

The Whole Gospel to the Whole W or Whole Church Through Apostolic E BOBBI MOREHEAD

Preservation … Preparation … Propagation. These three words captured my heart when I first visited Urshan Graduate School of Theology. I couldn’t stop thinking about how the words fit into the mission of the United Pentecostal Church International to take the whole gospel to the whole world by the whole church. Preservation As an ordained minister of the United Pentecostal Church, I deeply love our beautiful fellowship, which is grounded in our Apostolic distinction. Now I am blessed to serve as the vice president of Urshan Graduate School of Theology and Urshan College. My life’s work is shaped by this mission of preservation, preparation, and propagation. My calling is to help preserve our Apostolic faith by preparing people who will propagate this truth to future generations through education. It is through godly education that we preserve this message. It is through godly education that we prepare others to preach, teach, and protect this message. And it is through godly education that we propagate or reproduce this Apostolic message. Peter said, “The promise is unto you, and to your children, and to all that are afar off, even as many as the Lord our God shall call” (Acts 2:39.) I am keenly aware of the necessity of Apostolic education on a personal level because I am the highly favored mother of Rose Marie Morehead, our vibrant three-year-old miracle baby. The doctor’s report proclaimed that my husband, David, and I would never have children, but God’s report said otherwise. As a mother, my chief responsibility is to educate my baby girl concerning truth. This responsibility began at conception. When Rose was in the womb, I would sing my own version of “Jesus Loves Me.” I inserted her name: “Jesus loves Rosie this I know …” I quoted Acts 2:38 nightly to her and followed by singing, “I am a one God, Apostolic, tongue-talking, holy roller born-again, Heaven-bound believer in the liberating power of Jesus’ name …” At General Conference last fall I was delighted to see the book Wise and Silly: 3 Pigs and the Truth by Wilmer Rowland Jr. This 30

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powerful theology resource is for children of all ages. It takes a familiar story we all know and explains the importance of repentance, baptism in Jesus’ name, the infilling of the Holy Ghost, and prayer as essential components to building a house strong enough to withstand the huffing and puffing of the big, bad wolf (Satan). By Rose’s request, we read this book daily and sometimes multiple times in one day. Rose can quote most of the book. She especially loves to exhort the last page where she preaches Acts 2:38: “Then Peter said unto them, Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.” Since finding this book, I have visited our publishing house book store to buy all available store copies to give as baby shower presents because I believe we must “train up a child in the way he [she] should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it” (Proverbs 22:6). I have also used this book to teach students at Urshan College in our education classes. I point out that children’s stories can be powerful tools. Any concept we wish to teach, regardless of the complexity, if truly understood by the teacher, can be boiled down to the content of a children’s book. I continually challenge my students to understand their knowledge at a deep enough level to explain it in a way that a child would understand. We must make it our priority to preserve this Apostolic message. Hosea 4:6 says, “My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge.” Education is necessary for preservation, but a misguided emphasis placed on secular education can be deadly. We constantly hear that education is the way out of poverty to a better lifestyle, especially in monetary terms. Secular education has been elevated above Christian education even by many Christians. This is a trick of the enemy that can lead to the destruction or decay of our message because secular education by definition is education free of religious rule and teachings. We must educate our babies at all stages of their lives. As a movement, we have embraced Christian education from kindergarten through twelfth grade as an alternative to public education. We have embraced our Bible

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Mitchell Bland teaches students at Urshan College in Florissant, Missouri.

W orld by the c Education

colleges as a training ground for ministry. We have even recently embraced our Apostolic seminary as a training ground to further prepare men and women for ministry and Oneness research. We must continue to preserve truth in the next generation through Apostolic education. Preparation “Preparation” refers to a set of actions that are taken as precautionary measures in the face of potential disasters. Establishing an undergraduate Christian college, Urshan College, is part of the United

Pentecostal Church’s set of actions in the face of potential disaster. When studies reveal that the majority of mainline Christians who enter secular college as Christians do not leave as Christians, we must recognize we are facing disaster. Even in the face of startling data, some Apostolics seem to be struggling with the idea of an Apostolic, Oneness, undergraduate Christian college. Yet Christian education does not expire at age eighteen. Actually, that is one of the most critical ages in a person’s development. Young adults spread their wings but are seriously in need of guidance by Apostolic educators and mentors. MAY 2013

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Propagation Through Apostolic education we not only defend against secular influence, but we pave the way for propagation, which means reproduction and other forms of multiplication or increase. We are instructed in the Word of God to win the lost. Through Apostolic education, both informally and formally, we produce people with a passion to reproduce. When I think of our responsibility to educate our body of believers I am reminded of the popular poem “The Bridge Builder” by Will Allen Dromgoole. The old man in the poem successfully crossed the deep and wide chasm yet he still took the time to build the bridge. When asked why, he replied, “This chasm that has been as naught to me to the fair-haired youth may a pitfall be.” I know what it is like to sit in a public, secular university and have every Apostolic distinctive I treasure challenged. By the grace of God I was able to graduate with my BA, MA, and PhD still embracing truth. As in the poem, I realize we must build a bridge. Many of us have already crossed over the secular education hurdle, but we must build a bridge for those who come after us who may otherwise stumble over this hurdle and not make it. I left successful public sector employment as a public school teacher, principal, superintendent and university professor because I want Rose Marie Morehead to have the opportunity to be educated at an Apostolic, Oneness, Jesus Name, Christian college so she can help us take the whole gospel to the whole world. All of our children need that same bridge. In this hour we must broaden our impact, not our message. The United Pentecostal Church International has ventured out to

embrace a new branch of missionary work here in the United States by owning and operating Urshan College, an undergraduate Apostolic Christian college. Our mission is to prepare Apostolics for servant-leadership in the church and the world. We know the only Bible many people will ever read is us. People are influenced by their colleagues—people who share life with them. As we prepare Apostolics to minister through the doors that will be opened by achieving a broader education we will broaden our influence and ultimately win souls—the sole mission of the United Pentecostal Church: The whole gospel to the whole world by the whole church. Urshan College and Urshan Graduate School of Theology covet your earnest prayers as we seek to educate (preserve), equip (prepare), and empower (propagate) people who will take the whole gospel to the whole world. To become a prayer partner of Urshan, please visit our websites at urshancolleg.org or ugst.edu. We would like to keep you updated because we belong to you. We are here to serve the body of Christ as a unique arm of the United Pentecostal Church International. What a beautiful way to celebrate the Jesus Name Centennial with the grand opening of the combined Urshan campus—Urshan College and Urshan Graduate School of Theology—preparing students to take the whole gospel to the whole world by the whole church through Apostolic education. Dr. Bobbi Morehead is an ordained minister and serves as the vice president of Urshan Graduate School of Theology and Urshan College. She is the mother of Rose Marie and the wife of David T. Morehead.

First 25 students enrolling for online courses will receive a 50% tuition discount for their first course

Online courses coming to Urshan College Fall 2013 Earn your degree in Christian Ministries or Organizational Leadership.

• Affordable • Apostolic • Access to the same great faculty For enrollment questions contact David Molina dmolina@urshancollege.org | 314-838-8858 ext. 2110 For distance learning questions contact Jennie Russell jrussell@urshancollege.org | 314-838-8858 ext. 7111

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NEW START BY GREG MARSHALL

It’s Not Dry Now! Like some of you are thinking about doing, I planted a church. It wasn’t easy. When they tell you, “Church planting is the hardest work you will ever love,” believe them! At first we couldn’t get adults to visit; our ministry to kids was nil; and spiritual warfare was weak. I was dry; the church plant here in Rogersville, Tennessee, was dry. But that is not the end of the story. The beginning of the end of my dry spell came at a men’s breakthrough service at The Pentecostals in Richmond, Virginia. The services were designed to allow men to dig deep and experience a cleansing from issues they had struggled with for years. I left that meeting feeling as though my life had been jump-started. I came home with a freshness that I had not previously felt. I have learned that church planters should not isolate themselves in times of difficulty.

Since we couldn’t get adults to attend our church services, we decided to fish for what was biting. You can get kids to come. We started a Wednesday night kid’s ministry by going to the most messed-up, drugged-up parents we could find and telling them we would take their kids off their hands for a few hours on Wednesday. Those parents gladly let us have their children. That first Wednesday night we broke what had been our record attendance of ten. The next Wednesday we had almost twenty. A few weeks later the first child received the Holy Ghost. Then the kids started bringing their friends. Our plan unfolded. When a child received the Holy Ghost we would seek to start a home Bible study with the family. Slowly, the parents we taught began coming to church. Five months after the first kid received the Holy Ghost we baptized our first

The beginning of the end of my dry spell came at a men’s breakthrough service at The Pentecostals in Richmond, Virginia. I left that meeting “jump-started.”

adult. In the first year of focusing on those who were ready to be reached, twenty-four received the Holy Ghost. In 2011, I attended Because of the Times. Vesta Mangun spoke on fasting. Back home, we took what she taught and began focusing on fasting. We discovered that in our church plant, after a three-day fast someone would receive the Holy Ghost within the next two weeks. In 2011, forty-one received the Holy Ghost. We still followed the pattern that was working: • • • •

Bring a child to church Child receives the Holy Ghost Have a home Bible study with the parent Baptize the kid in Jesus’ name with the parent present • Win the parent Want the rest of the story? All that sounds good, but despite many receiving the Holy Ghost we retained few. To improve retention, we adapted by training leaders and empowering them. I multiplied myself. We taught our people how to pray people through to the Holy Ghost, how to teach home Bible studies, and how to influence others. By developing leadership training, even as a very young church and continuing our plan of working with the kids, the attendance has grown from eight in 2009 to the mid-fifties. Young people are winning other young people and adults are doing the same. It is not dry around here these days— not the pastor or the church. If God is calling you to plant a church, He will help you find your target and hit it. Eventually our church plant has come to no longer look like a madhouse with a wild children’s ministry; now it at least looks like a church with a wild children’s ministry. Greg Marshall and his family are church planters in Rogersville, Tennessee.

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Shout It out, Mr. Schaepe JONATHAN K. GREER

or the last couple years Oneness Pentecostals have eagerly anticipated the centennial celebrations that commemorate their history. Now that the year has arrived, we can stop and reflect on the historical moments, miraculous revelations, and pivotal, irreplaceable men and women who were instrumental in the unfolding events that took place at the revival of Arroyo Seco, California, in 1913, and the years that followed. Yes, of course, everyone remembers the timely sermon preached so passionately on that April afternoon by R.E. McAlister concerning Jesus Name baptism. History has upheld the fame and impactful presence of Maria Woodworth-Etter, who was the “keynote” speaker for the camp meeting in which McAlister preached. And recalling the influence of men like Frank Ewart, G.T. Haywood, and Howard Goss is almost a requirement for salvation in the ranks of modern Oneness believers. Yet when I contemplate the lasting effects of that Southern California camp meeting, I cannot help but think about the impact that one man whom history has all but forgotten left on a camp meeting that would soon explode into a global movement. “Who is John Schaepe?” you ask. Well, to be honest, I don’t know. As David Reed points out in his book In Jesus’ Name, “Schaepe soon dropped out of sight,” and was not depended on for any formulation of the Oneness doctrine. What we do know is there was no other person during the Arroyo Seco camp meeting who caused more of a stir concerning Jesus Name baptism than he did. While Pentecostals are quick to herald McAlister for preaching his revolutionary sermon, Robin Johnston points out in Howard Goss: A Pentecostal Life that even he quickly dismissed the Acts 2:38 mandate as necessary when the crowd acted uncomfortable with his sermon, “insisting that just because the apostles baptized in Jesus’ name it was not wrong to baptize according to the Matthew 28:19 formula”. While it was McAlister’s declaration that initiated the ripple in the water, it was Schaepe who stirred it into a storm. While 34

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the rest of the crowd may have been settled by McAlister’s disclaimer that Matthew 28:19 was still acceptable in regard to baptism, Schaepe remained passionate about the issue. That night he did not sleep. Rather, he spent the whole night in prayer and study of the Word. Just before dawn the next morning, Schaepe ran through the camp shouting at the top of his lungs and proclaiming that he had been given a revelation of the oneness of God and baptism in Jesus’ name. He then commenced to share his revelations with all who came running out to see what the commotion was about. Harry Morse later wrote in the December 1943 issue of the Apostolic Herald, “After we listened to Brother Schaepe’s new ideas on water baptism in Jesus’ name and the Oneness of the Godhead, we agreed that we believed that he had something…. In the following months, God began to deal with Brother Ewart, Brother Haywood, and finally with me, and we came out on this line.” David Reed further states that the “Oneness tradition depends more upon Schaepe’s ‘revelation’ in the night than McAlister’s exegesis” because of the design of early Pentecost and its desire for experiences of revelation. For me as a young preacher of the gospel, the story of Schaepe is not so much impactful because of what he did, but rather because of who he was. In terms of prestige and fame Schaepe was a “nobody” before the camp meeting, and he continued to be a “nobody” after the camp meeting. He was not a big-time camp-meeting preacher, if he was a preacher at all. He didn’t have the bloodline of parents who pastored large churches, and he carried little, if any, influence at all. Yet he, because of his faith and willingness to be used, became a catalyst for the next significant restoration of apostolic truth. Too many times we in the church want to sit back and wait for someone “more important” to be used by God. We are afraid to move with the Spirit’s urge because “we don’t have the power of the pastor.” Yet we fail to realize that God doesn’t need a Ewart or a Haywood to create a revival. All He needs is one Schaepe. Revival is waiting. So, go ahead and shout it out, Mr. Schaepe … and let the riptides roll! Jonathan Greer is a minister at The Shreveport Pentecostals. He is a student at Urshan Graduate School of Theology. He and his wife and newborn baby currently reside in Saint Louis, Missouri, and Bossier City, Louisiana.

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Letters to the Editor I felt compelled to thank you for the wonderful work you are doing with the Pentecostal Herald. Recent editions have touched my heart, but none more so than the February 2013 issue. I am a newly married Army wife and Kevin Payne’s “Being Away” spoke to my fears about the inevitable separations my husband and I face. Mitchell Bland’s “Allies in the Home” gave me valuable insight into how my attitude and actions affect my home and husband. The title of Lind Krog’s article “God Setteth the Solitary in Families” is a line from my favorite Bible verse. As a single woman, I moved from Oklahoma to New York City all alone and found a circle of friends among other transplanted singles. When I read Linda’s Krog’s article I saw that it was written by a fellow American Sign Language interpreter, and that the article was about adoption, a subject close to my heart and embedded in my deepest dreams. Linda Kinderman’s “End-of-Life Decisions” offered comfort and reassurance—our family lost my grandfather this past summer. The February Pentecostal Herald spoke to issues God has been speaking to my heart about—a direction for my future and a calling on my life. I was touched, challenged, blessed, and awed at how God used this issue of the Pentecostal Herald to speak to me. Thank you for allowing God to direct the magazine. —Jessica Tanderup Thank you for the content and quality of the Pentecostal Herald. The issues and articles in 2013 are the best I have seen. The focus of the monthly issues and the content of the articles are a step above the past. The word “excellent” sums it up. —Brian Norman Thank you very much for the opportunity to read the Pentecostal Herald online and for the chance to continue to receive the magazine by post. It is a great joy, honour, and privilege to read “the magazine that challenges, inspires, and informs.” I have been reading the Pentecostal Herald since 1991. I visited the UPCI World Evangelism Center with the former editor, James Hall. Our guide was David Bernard. It was an unforgettable experience to see your headquarters in 1991. We were also shown several UPCI churches—Calvary Tabernacle in Indianapolis, Indiana, Life Tabernacle in Houston, Texas, and others. We saw much of the USA.

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The UPCI people we met were kind, caring, and generous to our small group, which included Pastor Shatrov Sr., his wife, Elvira, and me as interpreter. I still cherish the memory of our visit. Brothers and sisters, it was a blessing to get to know that you’re devoted to Christ. I used to serve as a interpreter for the Evangelical Christian Church in the Spirit of Apostles in Saint Petersburg, Russia, but now I am retired. —Tamara Kolobkova I am excited to be a subscriber of the Pentecostal Herald. Every issue has been amazing—inspiring, challenging, and motivating. I am especially grateful that the UPCI and the Pentecostal Herald are celebrating the Jesus’ Name Centennial in every issue. I am grateful that the Lord called me out of Catholicism four years ago and has given me the privilege to witness the celebration for the Jesus Name Centennial. I interested in learning all about the birth of the modern Pentecostal—especially the Oneness Pentecostal movement. Thanks to the Pentecostal Herald, I can do so. I enjoy every article because they are well written and are especially doctrinally sound. I also write to inquire about a paper copy of every issue of 2012. I began receiving the Pentecostal Herald in September of last year, but didn’t receive the November or December issues. I am aware that I have the option of reading any and all issues of the magazine online, but I prefer a paper copy. I also want my mother—whom God called to His truth four years ago and who is learning English—to be able to read and understand the Pentecostal Herald someday. I would not mind paying for a full subscription if I need to. The Pentecostal Herald is well worth it! I would like to give honor to all the employees, writers, graphic designers, editors, and the general superintendent for producing a high quality magazine for Oneness Pentecostals. It is an honor to receive the Pentecostal Herald. —Aldo Chávez

Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, lleaman@upci.org, or Pentecostlal Herald 8855 Dunn Road Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299. Letters may be edited for style, grammar, punctuation, or length.

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MULTICULTURAL MINISTRIES BY DIEUDONNÉ AND JOLIE KAHOZI

French Speaking People in North America Receive the Gospel

rench culture has been part of North America since the first French exploration of the New World under King François I in 1524. Today we still see traces of that French presence in the emblem of French Royalty (la fleur de lis) on the flags of many American states and Canadian provinces. The largest French-speaking population in the world is now in Africa, but North America is experiencing a similar transformation in its French population because of immigration. French is the third most commonly spoken language in the US (after English and Spanish) and in Canada is second only to English. Over twenty-eight million people in North America speak French. According to 2011 statistics, twenty million of these reside in the US and eight million in Canada. We are thankful for godly and visionary leadership. Even before this demographic transformation was obvious, the French Evangelism Ministry of the UPCI was launched in 1994 under the leadership of Daniel Scott Sr. with Ed Goddard as the first director. Since that time it has not been easy to advance French ministry, but over the last six years we have witnessed a tremendous revival among the French people. An increasing number of French immigrants are flocking to major cities of North America. The latest praise report comes from Lexington, Kentucky, where a group of about ninety people from the Congo enjoyed a French service under the leadership of Jimmy Toney. A great move of God is sweeping through the French people of North America, and it is especially evident in the Province of Quebec. A young lady in our church in Montreal had been seeking the Holy Ghost for almost a year. One day after a Bible study, she came to us in tears and asked, “Pastor, why am I not receiving the Holy Ghost? What is wrong with me?” I did not have an answer for her but just encouraged her to continue seeking to be filled with the Spirit.

Two weeks later after another Bible study we drove her home, and right there in front of her building as we prayed in the car she received the Holy Ghost with the evidence of speaking in tongues. My wife felt led to ask the young lady to spend a night in our home. She agreed, and after a time of fellowship we went to bed around midnight. Early the next morning we awoke to the sound of her speaking in tongues. She had spent the entire night talking in tongues and crying in travail. One lady at our church who had been a Jehovah’s Witness for twenty-five years agreed to have a Bible study because she was hungry for the truth. She later received the Holy Ghost with the evidence of speaking in tongues while on the phone with my wife. God is using our French youth in an extraordinary way. In February of this year, a group of twenty-four young people from Montreal were on their way to Gatineau for the first anniversary of the French church there (a daughter work of Stittsville, near Ottawa). While they worshiped their way through a snowstorm a young lady who had just arrived from Haiti one month earlier was filled with the Holy Spirit and baptized the following Sunday. Some of our young converts have been used in the gifts of the Spirit. Laborers are being trained in the kingdom of God. Increasing numbers of students are hungry to know more about Bible doctrines. Last semester, we had a record twenty-four students enrolled at Montreal’s French Purpose Institute campus. Many more are planning to register next semester. Ninety percent of the people we reach are international students who attend universities in Montreal. We teach Bible studies in three major universities and from these we have baptized over a hundred people in the last three years. These students who are receiving the truth show a great desire to reach their families in their countries of origin. As a result, we are making connections through Global

Missions. • Three people have been referred to two churches in France; we later received a report that after attending service in France they were filled with the Holy Ghost and baptized in Jesus’ name. • One contact has been made in Gabon, Africa. • So far, three of our young people (reached via campus Bible study) have been back to their countries to share the gospel. One of the great challenges for French ministry has been the lack of Apostolic materials in the French language, but we are making great strides in this area. We now have a large team of translators—the King’s Translators—who have translated more French materials during the last two years than in all of the past years combined. We currently have fourteen locations (three in the US and eleven in Canada) where the gospel is preached in French, but there is still a great work to be done. There are concentrations of French-speaking people in places such as Florida (primarily Haitians), Dallas (French and African immigrants), and in major cities such as New York, Boston, Atlanta, Toronto, and Moncton. Unfortunately we do not yet have French UPC churches there to reach them. You can partner with us and help expand revival among the French people of North America. For more information contact French Evangelism Ministry Coordinator Dieudonne Kahozi at dieudonnekahozi@ yahoo.com or contact the Multicultural Ministries director Don Hanscom at dhanscom@upci.org. Dieudonne Kahozi is the pastor of Eglise Pentecotiste Unie, a daughter work of Saint Laurent UPC, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, pastored by Paul Graham. He is also the national coordinator of French Evangelism Ministry under Multicultural Ministries, UPCI.

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[EDUCATION]

The Value of a Bible College Education ANDREW REECE

esus knew He had only three years to spread the gospel around the world. What did He do? He trained disciples. After three years of intense teaching and training, He released them into the world, and the world has never been the same. Our Bible colleges today are teaching, training, and sending. And our world is being impacted by qualified workers for the benefit of God’s kingdom. Everyone has a ministry and we should all be prepared to fulfill it. I grew up in a godly home with dedicated parents who feared God and loved His Word. I was eleven years old when I really began surrendering my life to be used in ministry. I spent my teen years preparing. I was educated at home and my senior year of high school was at a community college. Upon graduation, I made the life-changing choice to attend Apostolic Bible Institute in Saint Paul, Minnesota, and received a bachelor’s degree in Christian Ministries four years later. Twenty months after that I graduated with 38

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a master’s degree in organizational leadership from Northwestern College in Saint Paul. Of all the education I have received, Bible college has made the greatest impact on my life and has given me more opportunities than any other. For this I am grateful. When one seeks the kingdom of God before the things of this world, God will bless more abundantly than one can imagine. Individuals today are faced with the decision whether they should attend a secular college or a Bible college first. Jesus said, “Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you” (Matthew 6:33). I encourage anyone to give a minimum of two years to Bible college before they move on to secular college. During this time they will deepen their spiritual root system, strengthen their love for God, seek for God’s perfect plan, and prepare their heart for life, all with a minimum of secular, worldly influence. Just two years to seek His face for a life plan is very little investment in comparison to the benefit of a welllaid life path ordered by God Himself. I have heard people say, “I don’t feel called to Bible college.” I ask, “Do you feel called to secular college?” Bible college is not necessarily a calling; it is a decision just like any other educational decision. I believe everyone can benefit from attending a Bible col-

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Aerial view of Apostolic Bible Institute in Saint Paul, Minnesota.

lege. Some students are striving to perfect specific areas of ministry while others recognize their need for a stronger biblical foundation. Either way it is beneficial to the student and also for the Kingdom. Bible college education is a win-win opportunity. The following are some key benefits to a Bible college education. Bountiful reaping: Paul said, “Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap” (Galatians 6:7). This is a law of God. Those who want to experience great things in their lives must first invest time and energy into the things of God. Paul also said, “He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully” (II Corinthians 9:6). Jesus said, “Lift up your eyes, and look on the fields; for they are white already to harvest” (John 4:35). Bible college is a training center to most effectively reap a spiritual harvest. Doctrinal grounding: The doctrines of the oneness of God, Jesus Name baptism, tongues, and living a godly lifestyle are some of the most important things an individual can learn at Bible college. What good is a ministry if one does not have a clear understanding of the doctrine of the Bible? Being grounded brings self-confidence when sharing the gospel.

Godly environment: There is a nurturing environment at Bible college. Students are gently guided in their walk with God and are encouraged to minister to others without being harshly judged for novice efforts. It is a positive peer pressure creating a support structure to live godly lives and grow spiritually. Some of my favorite times were in chapel service or in the dorms working on homework when we would spontaneously have a powerful move of God. I compare Bible college to a camp meeting that never stops. This environment strongly encourages spiritual growth and maturity essential to a successful life of ministering to others. It is not only for the student who wishes to pursue a pulpit ministry, but for everyone. We are all ministers of Jesus. Anyone who loves God will benefit greatly from Bible college. Some students attend Bible college just to help develop a biblical worldview. They recognize the secular influence in their lives and wish to establish their adult years with a well-grounded biblical worldview. This nurturing environment allows for spiritual growth and the development of a biblical worldview. Great teachers: It is not like receiving a shot in the arm by attending a seminar, conference, or weekend training, but it is about having great teaching for several hours each day, day after day, week after week from a variety of effective ministers. It has a saturation MAY 2013

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effect on the heart. The students are able to have face-to-face interaction with teachers who have much valuable experience to share. The impact of lessons is amplified because of the relationships between teacher and student. Bible college offers concentrated learning from great leaders in Pentecost. Ministerial lifestyle development: The environment of Bible college serves to solidify godly habits and lifestyles. Students hear much teaching from a variety of ministers on proper ministerial ethics and character building. Having a daily relationship with our God is the most important relationship in our life. Emphasis on our daily relationship is part of the intricate plan for spiritual growth. Hands-on experience: Having hands-on opportunities is a powerful way to develop skills and build confidence. The same is true in our spiritual life. The daily chapel services are student led. Students receive experience in preaching, singing, leading service, leading worship, playing an instrument, reading Scripture, and so forth. The chapel services I attended as a student were some of the best church services I have ever attended. Networking: At Bible college students are able to meet and network with some of the finest pastors, preachers, teachers, district officials, and others. Even today after graduating from Bible college, I feel comfortable contacting many of the leaders who invested time in me while at college. It is a privilege to have such dedicated leaders who are willingly training this next generation for a variety of ministries.

Lifelong friendships: Friendships that are developed at Bible college are often strong, lifelong friendships. The experiences and spiritual growth that is experienced together creates the strong bond and support system that is there for life. Having a foundation of a solid support structure is vital. Affordable: The cost of Bible college is affordable. Graduating debt free is a real goal when individuals are willing to work their way through college. Many of us have accomplished just that. I admire our Bible colleges for keeping expenses down. Graduating debt free allows much more freedom for the student to move forward as God directs. Bible college is as credible as secular college: Colleges specialize in specific areas of expertise. Law schools produce lawyers, and medical schools produce doctors. Because Bible colleges are successful at their mission they are deemed as valuable and credible as other educational institutions. Every year Bible colleges are successfully producing many new ministers of the gospel. Andrew Reece is an alumnus of Apostolic Bible Institute in St Paul, Minnesota (class of 2010). He received his master’s degree from Northwestern College, St Paul, Minnesota (class of 2011). He currently is a full-time instructor at ABI, a volunteer chaplain at the Minnesota State Capitol, and a coordinator for the Apostolic Torch Conference.

Online Distance Learning Program • Fulfilled through online and short-term courses • Immediately applicable to ministry context • Direct and personal access to professors and fellow students For more information, contact: Rhonda Morley rmorley@ugst.edu 314-921-9290

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SUNDAY SCHOOL BY STEVE CANNON

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e held our first Spanish Bible Quiz Extravaganza Saturday, February 16, 2013, at Primera Iglesia Pentecostal Unida in San Antonio, Texas, where Dennis Chavez is the pastor. What a historical event for Spanish Bible quizzing! This was the largest gathering ever in the history of Spanish Bible quizzing. And to put an exclamation point on this event, a third-year Bible quizzer received the baptism of the Holy Ghost! Twenty teams from the Texas and South Texas districts participated. There are no losers in Bible quizzing—everyone wins by memorizing Scripture. The first place trophy was awarded to Athens team 1, pastored by Joseph Palacios 1 . The team from Tyler took the second place trophy 2 . The third place trophy went to Channelview Amisadai Team 1 pastored, by Octavio Villanueva 3 , with Channelview Amisadai Team 2 earning the fourth place trophy 4 .

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Travel to Great Stirrup Cay, Bahamas, Ocho Rios, Jamaica, Grand Cayman & Cozumel, Mexico with 2 full days at sea.

November 17-24, 2013

For more information, contact: Lana Farnell at lfarnell@upci.org MAY 2013 | PENTECOSTAL HERALD or 314-837-7300 ext. 421 May13Herald.indd 41

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[EDUCATION]

RON WOFFORD

Bible College: An Atmosphere of Understanding at·mos·phere (at’məs fir’) [noun] a pervading or surrounding influence or spirit; general mood or social environment.

hen we read the account of Creation in Genesis 1 and 2, we quickly realize that anything made on a given day needed what was created on the previous days in order to survive. Everything created on the third day needed everything from the first and second days. Everything created on the fourth day needed everything from the previous days. On the sixth day when God breathed life into the nostrils of the man He had created, the man needed everything from the first five creative days in order to live. What is the point? God created atmosphere where things could live and thrive. Before the man took his first breath, before a bird ever flew through the heavens or animals made their way across forest floors, and long before mountains and rivers were formed God’s intent was for mankind to have a relationship with Him. In that relationship He wanted people to understand what had been created and the purpose for which He had created it. God knew they needed the right atmosphere in order to find understanding and thus allow them to fulfill the ultimate purpose of God for their lives. We could say then that God created an atmosphere of understanding for mankind to dwell in. This atmosphere was critical for the growth, development, and survival of humanity. In this atmosphere humanity would embark upon four critical areas of understanding: (1) a realization of God—an understanding of who God really is and what His intent for mankind is; (2) self-discovery—looking internally to answer “Why am 42

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I here?” and “What is my purpose?”; (3) a discovery of others—an understanding of the people they would interact with; (4) a worldview—an understanding of the world around them. Not much has changed in this regard in the thousands of years since God first spoke the world into existence. The right atmosphere is still critical for understanding to occur. Without such understanding mankind is left to wander aimlessly and hopelessly through the complexities of life. One could even say that without the right atmosphere of understanding being created that ultimately the purpose of God for an individual will be missed. Sadly, many people never seek out the understandings that God intended for them to have in order to fulfill His purpose for their life. The Bible college experience is all about atmosphere. It is the creation of a place where understanding of God, self, fellowman, and worldview can be accomplished. Bible college creates an environment that allows one to dig deep into the rich resources of the Word of God and to experience spiritual happenings in an atmosphere that is conducive to growth in those areas. This type of education accomplishes so much more than just a classroom experience that imparts head knowledge only. It challenges the student to get beyond the mere facts of who God is and to explore the whys, the ways, and the wonders of God. It takes a concerted effort to adequately train and equip each generation of ministry. Thank God for churches and pastors that recognize the need to send forth laborers into the field. Those churches and pastors involved in such endeavors are to be highly commended and applauded. It is understood that a Bible college cannot accomplish its purpose without working together with pastors and churches of vision. Bible college is not intended to supplant the efforts of a local church but is meant to supplement those efforts. The Bible college setting takes the foundation that has been given to each student by their pastor, home church, and personal study and

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builds on that foundation. It is an environment where young people face the reality of who they are and what is their purpose in life. It is an atmosphere where they discover new depths of the Spirit previously unknown to many of them. Here they make lifelong friends who are embarking upon the same spiritual quest they are. The world becomes a mission field, which, when adequately prepared, they enter to fulfill His purpose for their life. While it is easy to mistakenly discount a Bible college education as not being the type of education that will allow one to have a marketable skill or earn a good living, we must not fail to recognize the significance of what does occur on a Bible college campus. This is an atmosphere that is created specifically for the God-called young person to become better equipped to enter the harvest field as quickly as possible with the skills necessary to be successful in whatever they are called to do. If we are not careful we will lose a good portion of an entire generation of potential ministry by not encouraging the Bible college process. We desperately need young men and women who have responded to the call of God to enter an atmosphere where they can be prepared. Every parent desires happiness, health, and success for their children. We all want them to have a correct view and understanding of what real success is. It is natural for parents to desire their son or daughter to succeed and not face the same struggles and hardships they faced. But more critical is for the parent to have a correct view and understanding of what success is and to communicate that view to their children. It is vital that our children know they are successful when they have accom-

plished the will and purpose of God for their life. The young person who vocalizes the desire to enter ministry and attend Bible college is merely responding to the encouragement to find God’s purpose that has been instilled in them by their parents and pastor over the years. Bible college provides the atmosphere for faith to grow, ministry to develop, and the world to be reached not only today, but tomorrow as well. It is a tragedy to watch young people who have a desire to attend Bible college be dissuaded from such an education because “It is not accredited” … “It does not give you a life skill” … ”You have nothing to fall back on.” Such thinking and admonishments remove an element of faith from the ministry that our forefathers wholeheartedly embraced. Padded crosses are not found in the ministry. Material gain and comfort are not to be the goal of the God-called minister. Rather, callous hands from standing behind the gospel plow, the satisfaction of seeing a life transformed, new churches being planted, and missionaries traveling to untouched fields are the rewards of a life that understands the Master’s invitation to “Follow Me.” Ron Wofford and his wife, Cindy, live in Lufkin, Texas, where he serves as the dean of theology at Texas Bible College. They travel throughout our fellowship ministering in leadership development, marriage seminars, and ministry training, as well as preaching and teaching.

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[EDUCATION]

The Value of Bible College M.V. CALHOUN

ince clarity is significant to understanding, let me begin by offering some qualifying remarks. First, I believe all Christians are meant to be ministers in the broadest sense of the word (II Corinthians 5:18). However, in this article I will use the term “ministry” to represent a particular position of service within the church. Second, I know there have been and are many successful ministers within the UPCI who have not attended a Bible college, and also have not received any formal post-secondary education. I honor those ministers. Having said that, everything we do in the kingdom of God must be supported by the Word of God. Our Lord traveled and trained twelve men as apostles so they would be equipped to evangelize their world and give the church instructions that would hold true throughout its existence on earth. Paul traveled extensively with a team of ministers, training them for the work of God. Toward the end of his life, when writing to a minister whom he called his son in the gospel, he exhorted him with these words: “The things that thou hast heard of me among many witnesses, the same commit thou to faithful men, who shall be able to teach others also” (II Timothy 2:2). The local church has a scriptural mandate to evangelize, and then to train those evangelized for Christian service and leadership. Paul said, “He gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; for the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ” (Ephesians 4:11-12). Though Bible colleges as we know them today are not found in the New Testament, the principle of training men and women for Christian service is found throughout the Bible. Up to this point we have not discovered or developed a more efficient way to train people for the ministry than through the Bible college system. A quick study of the church in North America demonstrates that the regions with strong Bible 44

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colleges also have the largest number of churches per capita. Bruce Howell, general director of Global Missions, and multiple missionaries report the same findings on foreign fields. The regions outside of North America that have experienced the greatest harvest are also the regions that have strong Bible colleges. While I’m not suggesting that missionaries in other regions have not worked as hard as their peers, it is evident that one man or one family can never accomplish what multiple laborers can. James Poitras, Global Missions director of education/AIM said that the Global Missions team has recognized the need for training is so essential that in every region within their oversight they are introducing every method available to train laborers for the harvest. There are 293 Bible college programs operating under the auspices of Global Missions. They understand the need for strong Bible colleges to the extent that they have developed the GATS program with the intent of having a strong Bible college program in every country under their jurisdiction. But it’s important that the North American church recognize that Bible college is just as significant to ministry efforts here as it is to Global Missions. Allow me to share some statistics from the Atlantic District of the UPCI. On our District board, nine of eleven have attended a Bible college. Of the department leaders and their committees, at least twenty-six have attended a Bible college. Among the Atlantic District ministry at large, at least ninety-five of the over one hundred-twenty credentialed ministers in the district have attended a Bible college. While space limitations do not allow me to address the history of the Bible college program in the Atlantic District, suffice to say that the impact of Northeast Christian College has been enormous. Over the many decades of Bible college education in the Atlantic District, men and women have left the classrooms of our campus to take this gospel to every corner of the globe. In the Ontario District, over eighty church leaders have attended Northeast Christian College. And that does not count the many who have attended other great Bible colleges. In the last six years alone over seventy men and women who have attended Northeast Christian College left our doors to take a leadership position within churches in the UPCI.

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When I entered pastoral ministry in 1985, I immediately initiated a leadership training program in that pastorate and have continued leadership and mentoring efforts throughout some twenty-eight years of ministry in various locations. I believe in the necessity of local church involvement in growing leaders. I also recognize the indispensible role of Bible colleges. Dr. S.C. Gipp, ThD, put it this way: “Bible colleges aren’t the enemies of the local church. They are helpers that prepare men/women to serve the Lord in a specialized way that is plainly difficult for many local churches to provide.” I asked a couple of former students who are now involved in ministry to share their perspective on the value of Bible college. The first, Crystal Wallace, a pastor’s wife from Jacksonville, North Carolina, said, “Bible school was a time where I began to take responsibility for my own relationship with God rather than riding along on my parents’ coattails.” Dan MacLeod, a North American missionary from Halifax, Nova Scotia, said, “The unique and unparalleled value of Bible college is the time of exclusive consecration to the things of God and the work of His kingdom.” Thanks to the effort of the Division of Education and the desire of the staffs of our North American Bible colleges to better equip

laborers for the harvest, a unity of purpose has come to the forefront. Together we will join with the pastors and leadership of our fellowship to train the next generation of men and women for ministry. I am convinced that any amount of time set aside to immerse one’s mind in the Word of God is not wasted. When a person chooses to set aside a particular time in his or her life to study the Bible, it should be recognized and applauded as an honorable decision. Paul said, “Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth” (II Timothy 2:15). Our world’s population has surpassed seven billion people. Every one of them is a soul for whom our Lord died, and most have never heard of Calvary. The Apostolic church needs to use every tool available to help men and women prepare for the momentous task in front of us. My prayer is that our organization would never discount any method or program that allows us to train men and women to labor for God both in the local church, and in the broader field of harvest. M.V. Calhoun serves as the president of Northeast Christian College in Fredericton, New Brunswick

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

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[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

Trust Your Instruments LANCE WILKINS

ne common definition of spatial disorientation is “the inability of a pilot or other air crew member to determine spatial attitude in relation to the surface of the earth; it occurs in conditions of restricted vision, and results from vestibular illusions.” The Federal Aviation Administration uses a slightly different and more simplistic definition. It states, “When a pilot does not know inflight where his or her body is in relation to the surface of the Earth, the pilot has spatial disorientation.” There are several types of spatial disorientation. The basic three types are recognized, unrecognized, and incapacitating. Without going into too much detail, they are as follows: (1) you know you have it and are trying to fix it; (2) you don’t know you have it; (3) you know you have it but feel completely helpless or don’t even know where to start fixing it. Regardless of which definition is used or which type of spatial disorientation a pilot has, they all have two major attributes: (1) an inability to distinguish what is true versus what is false (i.e., confusion); (2) The relationship to a common reference point (i.e., the Earth) is in question. I have personally experienced spatial disorientation numerous times. It is not fun. Take a little bad weather and mix in a glance down at a checklist or an instrument approach procedure and you have the recipe for an interesting day. If there is a latent sinus issue, cold, or seasonal allergy, you could be in for a serious case of vertigo as well. Thankfully for passengers, and those on the ground as well, pilots are trained for these situations and instruction usually kicks in. When it does, disaster is averted. When it doesn’t, lives are usually lost. 46

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In combating spatial disorientation a “seat of the pants” feeling combined with flight control inputs can sometimes alleviate or assuage the symptoms. This is only marginally effective. Some pilots try to shake their head rapidly to “reset the gyros” in their skull. This, however, can often make matters worse. Bottom line, there are a lot of techniques out there. Some may help. Others may hurt. The most effective way to combat spatial disorientation, however, is accomplished by simply trusting your instruments. While going through pilot training at any level, but especially instrument and bad weather flying, the instructors constantly emphasize (practically brainwash) you with the phrase “trust your instruments.” Although instruments and gauges fail, it is rare for several of them to fail at the same time. Therefore, developing a good crosscheck of all available sensors and gadgets alleviates most cases of spatial disorientation fairly quickly. This includes, but is not limited to, looking at and comparing the control and performance instruments and ensuring that they are all in concert. Only then can the pilot begin to redevelop “truth” in his mind and save himself and his aircraft. To some, I am sure that the plethora of spiritual parallels evident here are fairly obvious. Take a glance around and you can see all three types of spatial disorientation. Some are confused and know it and are trying to make their way back home. Others don’t realize they are confused. Finally, some know they are being pulled away from truth but cannot

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find a way to escape and return to truth. Regardless of the type of disorientation, the two major attributes remain. We live in a world where it is becoming increasingly more difficult to distinguish what is true versus what is false. Disorientation abounds. Jesus said, “There shall arise false Christs, and false prophets, and shall shew great signs and wonders; insomuch that, if it were possible, they shall deceive the very elect” (Matthew 24:24). The church is not immune to the deceptive forces in the world. In fact, the church is the prime target. If the enemy is able to shake the faith and the foundation of the church, to whom will the wanderers of this world look for an example of the righteousness, hope, and blessings of almighty God? That takes us to the second attribute. The church’s common reference point is the Word of God. There are no substitutes. Isaiah 40:8 states, “The grass withereth, the flower fadeth: but the Word of our God shall stand for ever.” The traditions of man are always temporary, but the Word of God is eternal. The faith that is developed over time by getting rooted and grounded on the principles of God’s Word is essential to overcoming disorientation. This faith is quite simply

built over time in prayer, regular church attendance, and reading the Bible. Eventually, it will create in the heart of a Christian a “common reference point” that is dependable and immovable. If you know someone who seems to be a little disoriented in life, share with them Proverbs 3:5-6: “Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths.” God is ready, willing, and able to come to our rescue in times of disorientation. He can clear up our confusion and help us find the straight and narrow way. All we really need to do is trust our instruments. Lance Wilkins is a member of First Pentecostal Church of Panama City pastored by Allen Crabtree. Lieutenant Colonel Wilkins is a squadron commander and USAF combat veteran with over three hundred combat hours. He has flown over twenty different types of aircraft including almost two-thousand hours in the F-15 Eagle.

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[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

JOSHUA NIÑO

Navigating the Winds of Change A Tribute to Bishop J.T. Pugh

nd he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; for the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ: till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ: that we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive; but speaking the truth in love, may grow up into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ: from whom the whole body fitly joined together and compacted by that which every joint supplieth, according to the effectual working in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in love” (Ephesians 4:11-16). First century Latin writer, Publilius Syrus, said, “Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm.” Well into the twenty-first century, we find ourselves oaring in turbulent waves of relative theories and adulterated doctrines. These are the days that Jude wrote about, exhorting the Apostolic church to earnestly contend for the faith. These are the days that the apostle Paul forewarned the body of Christ concerning man’s unwillingness to practice sound doctrine; the days when men would heap up for themselves teachers who would propagate unedifying theories hidden behind the curtain of Holy Scripture. These are the days when random, self-appointed men would freely take the helm of a sailing ship only in a calm sea. 48

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On the evening of August 3, 1492, the Genoese navigator Christopher Columbus departed the shores of Huelva in southwestern Spain with three ships on an uncharted voyage westward across the Atlantic. During the course of his voyage, Columbus engaged a number of violent storms and obstacles that might have prevented his entrance into the New World. Nevertheless, his efforts were successful and his Atlantic voyage made an astounding discovery of land in and around the sea. History records Columbus’s writing in regard to the possibility of converting to Christianity the indigenous people he encountered. His discoveries provided for the local colonization, strong wealth, and rise of Western civilization. Such was the voyage of Bishop Jesse Truman Pugh. A modernday apostle, his efforts provided for the successful planting of many new churches and also new district formations across the fellowship of the United Pentecostal Church International. His ministry paved the way for church planters and aspiring preachers in passionately and effectively propagating the Apostolic message to a lost and dying world. I am greatly privileged to have had a close, personal friendship with him for most of my life. He was Papa, and this is my tribute to the legacy of his monumental Apostolic ministry. In September 2006, J.T. Pugh delivered a clarion call to the General Conference of the United Pentecostal Church International. The theme of his message exhorted the absolute responsibility of the Apostolic church in proclaiming the saving gospel of Jesus Christ to every soul of every generation. He emphasized the importance of passing the anointed mantle of Apostolic ministry from one generation to the next, while remaining steadfast to the Apostolic doctrine. Passing such a heritage down to the next generation was the greatest gift that could both be given and received. An example of this passage was witnessed when Gerald Archie Mangun passed down the anointed mantle of Apostolic ministry to his son, Anthony Mangun

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of the Pentecostals of Alexandria, and from him to his son, Gentry Mangun. The generation that Papa and G.A. Mangun lived in and ministered to is no doubt different than that of the generation that Gentry and I live in and minister to. Nevertheless, the message has not changed; it is applicable and relevant to this present generation. J.T. Pugh was Apostolic in doctrine; his core faith stemmed from the doctrine that was given by the apostles in the first century Book of Acts church. He was a Pentecostal in experience; he obeyed the ordinances of Jesus Name baptism, spoke with other tongues, and exercised the gifts of the Spirit as described by Paul in I Corinthians 12. Moreover, he was a Christian in lifestyle. It was not enough to be an Apostolic in doctrine, or to be a Pentecostal in his personal experience, but it was equally important to him that he serve personally in both doctrine and in experience as a Christian. He often commented that “a preacher ought to be a Christian.” And as such, he reflected the fruit of the Spirit, which was evident in his manner of daily conversation as described by Paul in Galatians 5:22. What then would J.T. Pugh herald to the present and future generations of the Apostolic ministry? I believe his voice would sound this message: “To my fellow apostles: Take this Apostolic message to the cities and communities that have not yet heard our Apostolic message. To my fellow prophets: Speak forth the word of knowledge to those who have not yet obtained the hope of deliverance and of healing during the course of their perseverance. To my fellow evangelists: Preach the uncompromising Ap-

ostolic message to your lost and dying generation with the anointing of the Holy Spirit and with the baptism of fire. To my fellow pastors: Feed and protect the precious souls of your local assemblies with the God-ordained authority that has been bestowed upon you and under the unction of His Holy Spirit. And to my fellow teachers: Ensure that every precious soul won to our Lord Jesus Christ is correctly and soundly indoctrinated with the unadulterated truths of the Holy Scriptures that were given to the first century Book of Acts church, thus enabling each one to give a response for the hope of glory that lies within them, which is Christ Jesus our Lord.” This perhaps might be his last exhortation to us. Such a pattern of ministry would ensure the successful voyage of the Apostolic church to that “happy land of promise over in the great beyond.” Let the sails of your ship be woven by the pages of the Word of God, strong enough to withstand the blustery winds of life’s tempestuous seasons. Let your oars be timbered from your steadfast-

ness to sound doctrine, thus maintaining strength in the variant waters during the course of your voyage. Let the helm be made of the spokes of the doctrine of the apostles, thus steering you through the straight and narrow route. Let your tunic be sewn with the threads of love, thus revealing your identity as a disciple of the King to a lost and dying world. And most important, let the captain of your ship be Jesus, thus giving you the power to succeed as you take the helm of leadership through both calm and turbulent seas. This is how the Apostolic church will successfully move forward from generation to generation on the journey of life, navigating the winds of change. Joshua Niño grew up as a pupil and son of both the late J.T. Pugh and current pastor, Terry Pugh. Josh and his wife, Edith, serve as the young adults pastor at Calvary Church in San Antonio, Texas. David K. Caruthers is the pastor.

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LAUNCH YOUR MINISTRY BY TYLER WALEA

From Generation to Generation “The angel said unto him, Fear not, Zacharias, for thy prayer is heard; and thy wife Elizabeth shall bear thee a son, and thou shalt call his name John. And thou shalt have joy and gladness; and many shall rejoice at his birth” (Luke 1:13-14).

Launch Your Ministry believes that old men can dream dreams and young men can see visions at the same time.

n the silent years between Malachi and Matthew, Zacharias is serving in a nearly forgotten temple. He is a good and sincere man. He is clearly a devoted man. He is committed to his calling to tend an altar of incense in a difficult time, but he is unfulfilled. He is married to Elisabeth, and though they are faithful, they are now old and remain childless. The angel of the Lord appears to him and says, “God has heard your prayer for your future. You’ll have a son and he’ll be great in God’s sight. Earthly things won’t intoxicate him because he’ll be full of the Spirit. He’ll turn many people to God, and he’ll build a bridge across generations.” It’s the answer that any father praying for a son would long to hear. It’s also a powerful reminder that the fulfillment and gladness sought by spiritual fathers will ultimately come only with the birth of spiritual sons. There is no problem with Zacharias’s level of commitment. There is nothing wrong with his faithfulness. He is a man of healthy devotion to a calling within the kingdom of God. In spite of his devotion, however, there is one area of his life that remains empty. The work of God in his life, prior to this angelic visitation, begins and ends with him alone. The potential of one generation can never be totally fulfilled unless it produces and empowers another generation. It’s not enough for Zacharias to fulfill the motions of his personal calling. His work is incomplete until it reaches from one generation to another, until his son can turn the hearts of other fathers to their sons. There has never been a day more in need of the birth of promised sons. Our dying culture craves the declaration of a living

gospel. The angel’s promise to Zacharias of a son to reach a greater harvest is the answer to the same prayers of today’s faithful fathers. It’s not enough for faithfulness to passively await a hoped-for tomorrow; the hour demands that the Zachariases of every generation see the birth of a secure future. A great harvest with too few laborers demands that fathers begin to see sons arise. It’s not a foreign feeling for any generation to hope the next generation of ministry will be great in God’s sight. Any father would wish and hope for the best for his child, but there’s nothing that can replace the moment a father watches the first steps of a little one and realizes his hope has finally become a reality. Launch Your Ministry is committed to making a reality of those first steps of faith. At its core, LYM is a UPCI-sponsored website (www.launchyourministry.com) with training materials to empower the next generation of leaders within the local church. It is a resource focused on helping pastors identify, develop, and train the “sons in the gospel” that are already on the pew. However, if you speak with any of the Launch Your Ministry team, it won’t take long for you to hear someone say, “This is not a program!” As a repository of information, the content is unparalleled. The training materials represent decades of proven knowledge and leadership experience in the local church. It’s presented in a timely and engaging fashion, and the potential in these early stages seems limitless. Ultimately, though, the success of LYM is not about product development or website hits or sales or any of the standard metrics by which we measure modern success. Launch Your Ministry is about facilitating what naturally happens when the faithfulness and wisdom of a generation of

fathers meets the hunger of a generation of sons. LYM is about spiritual fathers seeing sons with their hands in the harvest. It’s a great hour for a revival of the sending of sons! Launch Your Ministry is built on the idea that God is visiting Zachariases and Elisabeths among us with a reminder that their promise is about to be born, and that the next generation will be caught up in the draft of another generation’s sacrifice. Tomorrow’s sons will be lifted to even higher heights by the wake of what has gone before them. The work that God has called His church to do is more than can be accomplished by one generation alone. Launch Your Ministry believes that old men can dream dreams and young men can see visions at the same time. It’s possible for a generation of faithful fathers to produce sons who are grounded in the same truth, built with stability on the same rock, and who will remain faithful to the service of the same altars. It’s our prayer that Launch Your Ministry could somehow be part of that generational heritage, that we could say with the angel of the Lord, “Do not be afraid, Zacharias, for your prayer is heard!” Take heart, Zacharias. Don’t worry, Elisabeth. It’s not ending with you. It’s beginning with you. Tyler Walea is associate pastor of First Church in Pearland, Texas.

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Pentecostal Herald May 2013