Issuu on Google+

861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 1

TWO LOST DISCIPLINES •

2012 iStockphoto: © Mike Kiev

RDD: RELATIONSHIP DEFICIT DISORDER

• THANKSGIVING


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 2

Start a Christian School Watch the children of your congregation grow in their knowledge of Jesus Christ while receiving a Biblically based education. Join the thousands of Christian schools that are using the A.C.E. program in over 140 countries as we continue to reach the world for Christ . . . one child at a time. Visit www.aceministries.com or call 1-866-882-3538 today.

Where the Scriptures Remain Paramount

And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children. Deuteronomy 6:6, 7a


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 3

E D ITO RIAL

THE POWER OF UNSPOKEN PRAYER BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

T

he three fold purpose of Jesus’ first recorded miracle was to manifest Himself, inspire faith in His disciples’ hearts, and avert a social embarrassment for a bride and groom. (See John 2:1-11.) One take-away from this story is that nothing in our lives is too inconsequential for God’s attentive care. He cares about our jobs, our transportation, our feelings, our longings, our fears, our hopes, our hang-ups, our dreams. Peter said, “Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you” (I Peter 5:7). The notion that when Mary said, “They have no wine,” she was suggesting that Jesus and the disciples make a quick exit and thus break up the wedding so the bridal couple could save face is doubtful. John Calvin said Mary indirectly asked Jesus to do something about the social embarrassment at the wedding in Cana of Galilee. An explicit request would have openly asked Jesus to miraculously produce more wine, but Mary did not explicitly ask Jesus to do anything about the wine. Is implicit prayer less fervent or legitimate than explicit prayer? Is it possible that an unspoken longing is just as powerful as a plainly articulated prayer? Are silent desires as effective as prayer marathons? Can it be that God interprets our deepest longings, longings that have never found a voice?

Paul said, “The Spirit … helpeth our infirmities: for we know not what we should pray for as we ought: but the Spirit itself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered” (Romans 8:26). Hannah “spake in her heart; only her lips moved, but her voice was not heard” (I Samuel 1:13). The psalmist said, “LORD, thou hast heard the desire of the humble” (Psalm 10:17). God hears our desires, and sometimes the heart’s desires exceed the ability of the mouth to express them. When Mary said to Jesus, “They have no wine,” Jesus said, “Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet come.” But by faith she read between the lines of what sounded like a refusal and believed for a better answer to her implied prayer. Just because you think you hear a no does not mean that no is the final answer, so press for a yes. Some expositors believe that when Jesus said, “Mine hour is not yet come” He was referring to the hour of His passion. I am convinced He was talking about a time closer at hand. One writer said, “Not until the wine was totally exhausted would His ‘hour’ have arrived.” God’s “hour” is often when human hope is exhausted. When Jesus said, “Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet come,” Mary seemingly shrugged off what may have

sounded like a refusal, if not a rebuke, and said to the servants, “Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.” Was that presumption, or was it faith? I believe that nothing less than faith would have caused Mary to say in effect, “I know He said no, but I detect a yes in His no.” Mary’s faith silently yet loudly announced, “Get ready for a miracle.” Though there is no reliable record that Jesus had ever done anything miraculous, Mary’s pondering spirit sensed that He was about to do something spectacular. With faith that defied prudence, she said to the servants, “Whatsoever he saith unto you, do it.” That’s when Jesus turned to the servants and said, “Fill the waterpots with water.” Mary’s faith had read between the lines and found a yes that changed the course of that day. The governor of the feast said, “Thou hast kept the good wine until now.” Perhaps for someone reading these words the best is yet to come. Read between the lines of the denials and delays and fears and doubts and find your yes. God is a Yes God. (See II Corinthians 1:20.) PH Simeon Young Sr. is editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

Is implicit prayer less fervent or legitimate than explicit prayer? MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

3


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 4

THIS M O N TH’S THE M E CONTENTS

Jun e 201 1

PRAYER MAY 2012

9

Two Lost Disciplines JOHN CARROLL

12 RDD: Relational Deficit Disorder COLLEEN CLABAUGH

18 But If Not … Can God Tell Us No? J.R. ENSEY

22 Thanksgiving JONATHAN MULLINGS

26 Does Your Church Have a Heating Plant? BROOKE PAMER

30 Who Will Take the Challenge? WILLIAM L. SCISCOE

34 A Supernatural God in a Natural World FLO SHAW

36 With Prayer and Supplication THOMAS SUEY

PENTECOSTAL LIFE 8

2012 Camp Meeting Dates

38 Celebrating the Role of Associate Pastor NATHAN REEVER

42 Thanks, Mom DANIEL J. KOREN

46 Compassion LEE JACKSON

4

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 5

COLUMNS 3

Editorial SIMEON YOUNG SR.

7

The General Superintendent Speaks DAVID K. BERNARD

15 My Hope Radio TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

17 Book Review VANCE BOWMAN

21 Worldline BRUCE A. HOWELL

29 Faith & Culture EUGENE WILSON

41 Teacher of the Month 50 Health DR. CLAY JACKSON

51 Multicultural Ministries SERGIO VITANZA

FUNDAMENTAL DOCTRINE The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

THE ONE TRUE GOD We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

5


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 6

PENTECOSTAL HERALD / MAY 2012 EDITOR Simeon Young Sr. PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Rebecca Miller PROOFREADER Patrica Bollmann The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2012 by United Pentecostal Church International. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com Single Subscriptions (USA) $25.00 Single Subscriptions (Canada) $35.00 Single Subscriptions (Foreign) $44.00 Bundle Subscriptions (USA) $ 1.75 for 6 or more copies; $2.25 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Canada) $ 2.50 for 6 or more copies; $3.00 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Foreign) $ 3.50 for 6 or more copies; $4.00 each for 2-5 copies An international publication published monthly. VOL. 88, NO. 5. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional offices. Official publication of the UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL Our Vision: The Pentecostal Herald in every Pentecostal home Our Mission: To publish an Apostolic magazine that strengthens the hands of Apostolic pastors, encourages and challenges Apostolic believers, and reaches beyond the doors of Apostolic churches Disclaimer: The Pentecostal Herald (or UPCI) assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of claims of advertisers or for the quality of their service or products. HOW TO REACH US: Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299, Telephone: 1.314.837.7300 Extension 411 Email: bmiller@upci.org, main@upci.org. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com

We Want to Hear from You

USPS 427-240

Letters to the Editor

United Pentecostal Church International

Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or to the Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299.

GENERAL OFFICIALS GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney* GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Jerry Jones* DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell* DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton L. Coon Sr.* EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston GENERAL SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR Steve L. Cannon GENERAL YOUTH DIRECTOR Shay Mann SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Dan Batchelor

Customer Care

GENERAL PRESBYTERS Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony,, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton L. Coon Sr., Floyd E. Covill, Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Alonzo Dummitt, David Elms, Daniel Fleming, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, J. Mark Jordan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Ronnie Mullings, Arthur Naylor, Gordon Parrish, John E. Putnam, David A. Robinson, D.R. Russo, William J. Singleton, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, Melvin Thacker, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, H.E. Wheatly, Steve Willeford, C. Patton Williams, Richard A. Wittmeier, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

Send subscription and renewal requests and inquiries to pentecostalherald.com or email Becky Miller at bmiller@upci.org.

Advertising Go to pentecostalherald.com and follow the prompts.

GENERAL EXECUTIVE PRESBYTERS Clifford Barnett* David T. Elms* Rick Keyes* David MacDonald* Anthony Mangun* Bryan Parkey* Stephen Willeford* C. Patton Williams* Raymond Woodward* HONORARY PRESBYTERS J.R. Blackshear, Ernest Breithaupt, W.L. Clayton, B.S. Cole, Daniel Garlitz, Arless Glass, John Grant, Tommy Hudson, James Kelley, Carrol D. Kennedy, Carl Lagow, Roger Lewis, R.J. McIntyre, John D. Mean, James Merrick, Paul Price, Paul Reynolds, J.M. Russell, Harry Scism, Scotty Teets, T.F. Tenney, B.J. Thomas, Wayne Trout, G.L. Vittitow, Ted Wagner, David O. Walters, R.D. Whalen, Jesse Williams, Jack Yonts * Member of the Executive Board EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

6

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012

ASSISTANT EDITOR Lee Ann Alexander


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 7

THE G ENERAL SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS

PRAYER IN TIME OF SUFFERING DAVID K. BERNARD

G

od often intervenes miraculously in our lives. Sometimes, however, He allows us to experience a period of trial, suffering, or sickness. In these times, we rely upon His grace to sustain and deliver us. For instance, the Bible teaches us to pray for healing and gives us a promise of healing (James 5:14-16). Yet some New Testament ministers suffered from sickness without receiving immediate healing. (See Philippians 2:25-27; I Timothy 5:23; II Timothy 4:20.) These examples demonstrate that Christians sometimes become sick. We still have mortal bodies and live in a fallen world, so we are not immune from the trials of life. Sickness is not a defeat but an opportunity for healing. Whether we receive instant or gradual healing, we give God the glory. If we suffer for a time before recovery, then we learn patience, trust, and other lessons from God. If we die in faith, as every believer will one day (until the Rapture), we receive complete deliverance in Heaven. Our faith must rest in God Himself, not in a theology of instantaneous deliverance or healing. Sometimes God does not answer our prayers as we desire or expect; nevertheless we trust in Him. Job affirmed, “Though he slay me, yet will I trust in

him” (Job 13:15). God is not the author of sickness and hardship— human sin brought them into the world—but sometimes He allows us to experience them. We should not become discouraged when trials come but seek the will of God in them (James 1:2-4). God does not prevent all trials but always provides grace to sustain and deliver us in time of trial (I Corinthians 10:13). When King Herod arrested two apostles, one (Peter) received miraculous deliverance while the other (James) was beheaded. The same church prayed for both. We cannot say either the church or James lacked faith; both men lived and died in faith and in God’s will. When Paul was arrested, he was not miraculously delivered like Peter. He did not become bitter against God, nor did he resign himself to his “fate.” He endured patiently, prayed for victory, appealed for release, and continued working for God. Ultimately Paul was executed, but in the meantime he witnessed to various leaders, including the emperor, and wrote letters that are now part of Scripture. God’s purpose in his trial was greater than Paul could realize at the time; he simply had to live by faith. Paul also battled “a thorn in the flesh,” which was a “messenger of

Satan to buffet me.” Some think it involved a physical problem; in any case it was opposition from Satan and not God. Three times Paul prayed for deliverance, but God did not answer as he wished. Instead God said, “My grace is sufficient for thee: for my strength is made perfect in weakness” (II Corinthians 12:7-9). Faith is not only manifested in miraculous deliverance; faith can be equally seen in patient endurance. Hebrews 11 lists many heroes of faith: some received miracles through faith while others died in faith without receiving a miracle. All obtained God’s commendation and serve as role models for us. The three young Hebrews expected miraculous deliverance, “but if not” they were still committed to serving God (Daniel 3:17-18). We should pray for healing and deliverance. When we pray in faith and live in faith, we will regularly experience God’s miraculous power. Most of all, we will realize that God does not always answer as we think but works all things together for our good (Romans 8:28). PH David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International.

We should pray for healing and deliverance. When we pray in faith and live in faith, we will regularly experience God’s miraculous power. MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

7


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 8

2012 CAMP MEETING DATES

8

DISTRICT

DATE

LOCATION

SPEAKER(S)

Alabama Alaska-Yukon

June 19-22 June 26-29

Carlton Coon, Doug Klinedinst, and Wayne Huntley Raymond Woodward and Scott Graham

Arkansas

July 10-13

Atlantic

June 27-July 1

Central Canadian Colorado

July 2-6 June 13-16

Montgomery, Alabama Alaska District Campground Sterling, Alaska Arkansas District Campground Redfield, Arkansas Capital Community Church Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada Morris, Manitoba, Canada Douglas County Fairgrounds Castle Rock, Colorado

Connecticut Florida

August 12-17 July 11-13

Idaho Iowa

July 18-20 July 25-27

Illinois

July 16-20

Indiana

July 11-13

Kansas Kentucky

June 20-22 June 18-22

Louisiana

July 3-6

Maine Maryland/DC Michigan

June 24-29 July 17-19 June 19-22

Minnesota

June 18-24

Mississippi

July 10-13

Missouri

July 17-20

New Hampshire/Vermont

July 1-6

New Jersey Metro New York

August 22-24 July 10-14

Newfoundland/Labrador

August 1-5

North Carolina Nova Scotia

June 13-15 July 2-8

Ohio

July 23-27

Oklahoma

July 23-27

Ontario

July 4-8

Oregon Pennsylvania

July 25-27 July 15-20

Quebec Rocky Mountain South Carolina South Dakota

July 18-20 July 30-August 2 July 3-6 June 4-7

Tennessee Texas

July 11-13 June 4-8

Texico

July 17-20

Virginia

July 24-27

Washington

July 18-20

West Virginia

July 9-12

Western Wisconsin

July 30-August 3 July 1-6

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

Florida District Campground Ocala, Florida Nampa, Idaho Veterans Auditorium Des Moines, Iowa Illinois District Campground Wapella, Illinois Indiana Campground Fortville, Indiana Wichita, Kansas Kentucky District Campground Summersvile, Kentucky Louisiana District Campground Tioga, Louisiana Old Town, Maine To be announced William R. Starr Camp/Conference Center Marshall, Michigan Camp Galilee Cottage Grove, Minnesota Mississippi District Campground Raymond, Mississippi The Sanctuary Hazelwood, Missouri Lyndon State College Lyndonville, Vermont Robert’s Wesleyan College Rochester, New York Bishop Falls, Newfoundland, Canada Raleigh, North Carolina Miller Lake Camp Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Ohio District Campground Millersport, Ohio Oklahoma District Campground Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Huycks Bay Campground and Conference Center Salem, Oregon Roxbury Holiness Camp Roxbury, Pennsylvania Montreal, Quebec, Canada Batesburg Nazarene Campground Cedar Canyon Camp Rapid City, South Dakota Jackson, Tennessee Texas District Evangelism Center Lufkin, Texas Texico District Campground Amarillo, Texas Augusta Conference Center Verona, Virginia Lynnwood Convention Center Lynnwood, Washington Rippling Waters Campground Ripley, West Virginia Santa Maria, California Wisconsin District Campground Shawano, Wisconsin

/

MAY

2012

Paul Mooney, Stan Gleason, and Scott Graham Robert Henson and Joel Urshan To be announced and Paul Mooney Terry Shock and Brian Kinsey Raymond Woodward and Sam Emory Jerry Jones and Jerry Dean Marrell Cornwell David Bernard and Ronnie Mullings David Bernard and Paul Mooney Carlton Coon, Robbie Mitchell, and Stan Gleason Kevin Cox Bill Davis and Brian Kinsey David Bernard, Jeff Arnold, Anthony Mangun, John Hopkins, Jack Cunningham David Bernard, Steve Cole, Jerry Jones, and Rick Stoops Bruce Howell T.F. Tenney, Stan Gleason, and Paul Mooney Ken Gurley and Scott Graham Darrell Johns, Ken Gurley, and Wayne Huntley Doug Klinedinst and Wayne Huntley District presbyters and Jay R. Stirnemann Arthur Naylor and Clifton LeJeune Kenneth Mendenhall and Tracy Noel Travis Miller and Rick Stoops Gordon Mallory and Jerry Wayne Dillon James Littles Jr. and Travis Miller Jerry Dean and Ken Gurley Harold Hoffman, James Booker, and Greg Godwin Raymond Woodward and Wayne Huntley Joe Ellis and Paul Mooney Ron Libby and Jerry Wayne Dillon Travis Miller and Sam Emory Ken Gurley and Mark Morgan Tom Trimble and Douglas White John Grant and Nathan Scoggins David Bernard and Scott Graham Terry Pugh and Jerry Jones Greg Godwin Jerry Jones and Anthony Mangun Terry Black Calvin Jean Darrell Johns and Paul Mooney Daniel Segraves and Jerry Jones


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 9

[

P R A Y E R

]

TWO LOST

DISCIPLINES JOHN CARROLL

There are some not-so-positive ramifications that have come along with technology. As a result of the proliferation of devices and gadgets that fill our lives, we have lost some precious things. Two valuable disciplines that are all but lost among many in my generation are solitude and silence.

O

ur lives have been profoundly impacted by many emerging technologies. In my own short life I have seen telecommunication go from party lines to wireless. I am

thankful for the many advances and conveniences that have improved our quality of life and made it easier to stay in touch with those we love. While the price of most things has increased, it costs less to talk long distance now than

MAY

2012

/

it has ever been. However, there are some not-sopositive ramifications that have come along with technology. As a result of the proliferation of devices and gadgets that fill our lives, we have lost some precious things.

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

9


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 10

Two valuable disciplines that are all but lost among many in my generation are solitude and silence. Unfortunately, and possibly because of the ease of remaining connected with our friends, it seems that we have developed an aversion to both. We have our cell phones with us constantly, either hooked to our belt, in our pocket, or in our hand. We used to have record racks, tape racks, and CD racks taking up space in our living rooms. Now we have iPods that fit in a shirt pocket and are capable of holding thousands of songs to help us avoid being without noise to fill our minds. There is a constant stream of noise and clamor and voices that many find difficult to do without. And while no one of these things is inherently wrong, they can be a distraction and prevent us from spending time alone listening for the only voice that really matters. It is impossible to hear the voice of God if we are not willing to embrace times of solitude and silence. God will not compete with a constant cacophonous clamor to communicate with us. There are times when we must slip away and go into the presence of God without a clock or any other agenda other than fellowship with Him. When we look at the life of Jesus, we see that solitary prayer was a priority for Him. Mark said, “He healed many that were sick of divers diseases, and cast out many devils; and suffered not the devils to speak, because they knew him. And in the morning, rising up a great while before day, he went out, and departed into a solitary place, and there prayed” (Mark 1:34-35). I have found in my own life that there is no substitute for time alone with Jesus. And following His example, it seems that the quiet of the early morning hours is the best time for me to have uninterrupted quality time in prayer. I once heard an elder say, “If I get God first thing in the morning, I’ll have Him all day long.” Jesus wants us to be alone with Him. People of

prayer aren’t always the most socially prominent. There are times God won’t share you with anyone. The hand of God will often produce a loneliness. Jeremiah said, “I sat not in the assembly of the mockers, nor rejoiced; I sat alone because of thy hand: for thou hast filled me with indignation” (Jeremiah 15:17). God’s hand will often cause you to separate yourself from people and things that hinder or interfere with your fellowship with Him. One reason some of us don't have any more desire for fellowship with God than we do is because the ease and convenience of communication has given us the ability to have our fellowship needs fulfilled by our human relationships, leaving us satisfied with the companionship we find in our friends and loved ones. God will never call us to neglect our spouses and children, but there will be times when He wants us to reserve time for Him and Him alone. He wants us to tune out every other voice that could distract us and listen only for His still, small voice. Jesus said, “Watch ye therefore, and pray always, that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass, and to stand before the Son of man. And in the day time he was teaching in the temple; and at night he went out, and abode in the mount that is called the mount of Olives. And all the people came early in the morning to him in the temple, for to hear him” (Luke 21:36-38). It is my sincere prayer that we learn to cultivate and love silence and solitude—two lost disciplines of my generation. PH John Carroll pastors Calvary Apostolic Church in Skiatook, Oklahoma.

God will never call us to neglect our spouses and children, but there will be times when He wants us to reserve time for Him and Him alone. He wants us to tune out every other voice that could distract us and listen only for His still, small voice. 10

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 11

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

22212",-'/0'#$1",3%/",%45/",#'*4"5 22216$5*$("7*'068&04794531",3%",%:;;1:<=1>;;>%/",%",-$,453


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 12

2012 iStockphoto: © Duncan Walker

12

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 13

[

P R A Y E R

]

RDD RELATIONSHIP DEFICIT DISORDER

COLLEEN CLABAUGH

Technology in itself is not bad, but it can never replace God. It can never replace fellowship with each other. It can never replace prayer.

T

hey are known as Generation Z. They are creative and collaborative. They are smart. They know more about the world due to the Internet than many of us knew by the time we were adults. They are concerned about their environment. They are true multitaskers. They brand life and what’s popular with a simple click of a “Like” button. They have never known life without technology. They thrive on user-generated content and self-publishing. They live for speed and instant access and gratification. Their resource for problem solving is asking, “Is there an app for that?” The generation between 1994 and 2004 are true digital natives. From the time they were toddlers they were exposed to digital media in the form of games, videos, computers, and cell phones. They have their own form

of shorthand known as “texting” and “instant messaging.” Children in grade school can fix computer problems that baffle many of the older generation. Everything is digital, online, fast, fun, and accessible whenever they want it. They have countless friends on Facebook—friends they barely know at all. In the church and home I call it RDD (Relationship Deficit Disorder). The current generation has found its identity in a digital world where emotions are expressed through combinations of keyboard strokes and thumbs up or down instead of a hug, time spent together, or a real conversation. Gamers find relationships with other online gamers instead of in backyards or playgrounds. In many cases these gamers will never meet, yet they will spend as much as fifty hours a week interacting in an imaginary world.

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

13


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 14

Many of us previous to Generation Y or Z find this imaginary world frivolous and silly. To Generation Z it is very much real and it’s all they have ever known. The information they consume is all in bite-sized pieces. They cannot focus long on time-consuming tasks. If they cannot find the answer quickly, they would rather ask someone to give them help than to spend time trying to work it out. It’s no wonder that when it comes to their relationship with Jesus Christ they suffer RDD. Jesus doesn’t update Facebook. Jesus doesn’t play the latest video games. Jesus doesn’t text message. Jesus doesn’t have His own YouTube channel. Jesus doesn’t exist in their imaginary world. If the majority of their world is online, then where can they find Him? How will they get to know Him? How will they “Like” Him? How will they communicate? The answer to the dilemma is not in getting “Plugged In” but getting “Unplugged.” It’s getting our children back to the world of reality where smiles are on faces and hugs are given with two arms. It’s in having real conversations at a real dinner table. It’s having devotions in the home where parents and children talk about real problems instead of the latest gadget. It’s in training children to pray and worship a real God, in real time. Many will agree with these statements but the question remains, “Who is going to pull the plug?” Parents cannot expect children to unplug themselves from what they see as their world. The modern child feels she has the right to her digital world and is offended when someone steps in to pull her out of her reality. Parents feel helpless because “all the other kids are doing it.” They themselves are often caught up in their own version of the same world. Babysitters have become computer screens and game systems and quality time is now recorded in the form of status updates. If parents, guardians, or mentors do not pull the digital plug at times, then we are, in effect, leaving children to spiritually parent themselves. Children cannot teach themselves things they don’t know; yet they are always learning. Where is their source coming from? Friends? Videos? Hollywood? YouTube? Role-playing games? Games can’t teach a child to build a friendship with a real person who has real problems. Digital entertainment can’t fix matters of the heart. The day we live in is saturated with technology and there’s no way around it. In the beginning God created

the world. We weren’t happy with that so we have created a digital world that is nothing more than humankind’s attempt at being our own solution. Now we have passed that world onto our children. Technology in itself is not bad, but it can never replace God. It can never replace fellowship with each other. It can never replace prayer. When mankind attempts to fix everything ourselves we become our own god, building another Tower of Babel. There’s an app for that—if not, we will create one. The solution is found at the source of power. You must unplug your home from the digital world and plug into the real source of power, Jesus Christ. Relationship Deficit Disorder can be medicated only with prayer and time with God and each other. As parents we must train our children to pray in a real world with real problems. We must train them as to what is real and what is not. We must train them to find answers on their knees instead of on the Internet. We must train them how to talk to God and how to hear Him speaking to us. Our children can’t train themselves. If the world our children are growing up in now is mostly digital and imaginary, then what kind of world will they leave for their children? Who will pray when war arises? Who will pray when famine comes? Who will pray when disaster strikes? Who will pray for our nation? Will they know how to pray at all? When needs arise and the question is asked, “Is there an app for that?” the answer should be, “No; but there is a God!” Get unplugged. Train your child to pray. PH Colleen Clabaugh does volunteer work for World Network of Prayer and attends New Life Center where she leads the weekly Kids Prayer Force. Garry Tracy is the pastor.

If the world our children are growing up in now is mostly digital and imaginary, then what kind of world will they leave for their children? 14

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 15

M Y HO PE RADIO

INTERVIEW WITH BRANDON JONES TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Tell us a little about your family. I have wonderful parents. I am the youngest of three kids. I have two older sisters. So I guess I was the spoiled baby of the family. LOL. I have two wonderful nephews who never let life get dull. They are awesome. We are all in the church. My dad and one of my brothers-in-law are ministers. My brother-in-law is a pastor. We love getting together as a family and spending time with each other. Holidays are very important to us. We always try to see each other as much as possible and are all very close. What is your favorite Scripture? Jeremiah 29:11: “I know the the thoughts that I think toward you, saith the Lord, thoughts of peace, and not of evil, to give you an expected end.” What is your music background? I have been singing from the time I can remember. I was probably four or five when I sang in church for the first time. As I was growing up, my parents were a huge influence on my singing. They always encouraged me to follow my dreams. In my teen years I worked under a music director in my home church, Burton Gaar. He always pushed me to do better and greater things. However, most of my musical influences and shaping came when I went to Indiana Bible College. Lin-

del Anderson, the Dean of Music at IBC, taught me many things not only about music technique but about music “ministry” and how to take what we learned in the classroom and apply it to the church. He always pushed us to stretch ourselves. Another huge influence on my singing was my voice instructor, LeAnna Grissom. She took what raw talent I already had and revolutionized the way I sang. I am grateful to her for teaching me proper singing technique and for encouraging me to stretch my limits. I will be singing many years to come because of her. Any loves, other than music? I love spending all the time I can with my family. I lived away from them for nine years and now that God allowed me to move back close to them, I take advantage of it.

be married with a couple of kids and enjoying a successful music career. Where can we listen, purchase, and connect with you? I have a few videos on YouTube. One of my projects is available on iTunes. You can purchase my music through the Pentecostal Publishing House. You can connect with me on Facebook (www.facebook.com/hbrandonjones) or follow me on Twitter HBrandonJones. Who do you want to send a “shout out” to? My family, friends, mentors, and everyone who has influenced my life and ministry. PH Read Brandon’s complete interview at www.myhoperadio.com Tiffini Countaway is the producer of MyHopeRadio.com

What is the best advice you have ever been given? I believe the best advice I have ever been given was given to me by Lindel Anderson. He said, “Skill opens the door for the anointing.” That encouraged me to always give my best effort to furthering my talents that God has given me. God deserves our best. Ten years from now you will be … Ten years from now I pray that I will

I believe the best advice I have ever been given was given to me by Lindel Anderson. He said, “Skill opens the door for the anointing.” MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

15


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:24 PM Page 16

63(-(718.)9:)(;7<=-7(.+37+,)*.2)7>?7+/.--2+7'()*(+,-*./7-,)4-7@,07A),;7.)97/,B(#

! W NE

Classic Pentecostal Praises Vol. III

ÜjÁßMaßË#Ö~†ÍË͝Ë™ÝËVË Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë #aË0‰”jË-j‰~‰™ËVËÖÄÍË Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë ?ˉÍ͐jË8†‰jËVË0†‰ÄËÄË Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Like Heaven to Me VË0†jÁjËÄË+ÝjÁË Ë Ë Ë Ë ‰™Ë͆jË aËVË Ë Ë Ë Ë 8™ajÁw֐Ë8ÁaÄË Ë Ë wˉwjËVË0†jË Ë Ë Ë Ë 2™WÖajaË ?ßËVË Ë Ë Ë 0†jÁj¾ÄË?ËÁj?ÍË ?ßË Ë Ë Ë Ë

”‰™~ËV˝ĆÖ?Ë Ë Ë Ë Fought the Battle of jÁ‰W†ËVːÁßË͝ˉÄË Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë !?”jËVË™~jÄË8?ÍW†‰™~˝ÜjÁË Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë jËVËj?™‰™~˝™Ë͆jË ÜjÁ?Ä͉™~ËÁ”ÄËVË0†‰ÄË8ÁaËÄË!ÍË Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë ß˝”jËVË Ö™ÍË Ë Ë Ë Ë :ÖÁË jÄĉ™~ÄËVË#†^Ë?¬¬ßË ?ßËVË8‰Ë0†jÁjË jË™ßË.Í?ÁÄˉ™Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë ßË ÁÝ™ËVË Ë Ë Ë .†?Ë8jË?͆jÁË?ÍË͆jË-‰ÜjÁËVËjÄÖÄ˝™Ë͆jË Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë ?‰™Ë‰™jËVË.Í?™aËÖ¬ËwÁËjÄÖÄËVË Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë 0†jÁjË.†?Ë jË.†ÝjÁÄ˝wË jÄĉ™~ Ë Ë Ë Ë Ë 24474 CD $9.99

'()*(+,-*./'01/2-32)4#+,5 ' ()*(+,-*./'01/2-32)4#+,5

Classic Pentecostal Songs Vol. I 23737 CD $9.99

Classic Pentecostal Hymns Vol. II 23739 CD $9.99

!""#!$%#&""& ! ""#!$%#&""&


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 17

BO O K REVIEW

THE CIRCLE MAKER BY MARK BATTERSON VANCE BOWMAN

O

ne of the ways I judge a book is by looking back through its pages when I have finished reading it. If I discover that my journey through the book can be traced by multiple markings on the pages and that paragraphs are underlined and that notes are written in the margins, I know the book has impacted me. Mark Batterson’s latest book, The Circle Maker, was one of those books for me. The Circle Maker is a book about prayer. Although it is written about the subject of prayer, it has a central figure, Honi the Circle Maker. Honi is the legendary first-century BC Jewish holy man who drew a circle in the sand and prayed there until God answered by sending rain to end a time of terrible drought. Batterson uses the incredible story of Honi as a launching pad to take the reader into the spacious stratosphere of prayer. The Circle Maker will challenge you to take your prayer life to the next level. This is what the author has to say about praying through: “Praying through is all about intensity. It’s not quantitative; it’s qualitative. Drawing prayer circles involves more than words; it’s gutwrenching groans and heartbreaking tears. Praying through doesn’t just bend God’s ear; it touches the heart of your heavenly Father. …

When was the last time you found yourself flat on your face before the Almighty? When was the last time you cut off your circulation kneeling before the Lord? When was the last time you pulled an all-nighter in prayer?” This is not a “name it and claim it” book. It encourages the reader to elevate his prayer life. Batterson employs many personal examples throughout the book, citing his own experiences and those of the church he pastors, National Community Church in Washington DC. He and his church have seen God do miraculous things, big things, in answer to big prayers. One of the great messages of The Circle Maker is that we should ask God for big things. The people of God in Scripture prayed audacious prayers. They prayed prayers that opened prison doors, raised the dead, and stopped the rain. And they prayed prayers that brought the rains again. Big prayers move a big God! This book will inspire you to pray like you have never prayed before. Batterson encourages you to work like it depends on you and pray like it depends on God. Batterson deals with disappointments and dreams in prayer, as well as praying early and praying late, praying long and praying persistently. As I read The Circle Maker, I

was challenged in every area of my prayer life to dig deeper and climb higher. I believe this book will challenge you too. If you are interested in boosting your prayer life, or if you simply want to know more about prayer, or if you want to read testimonies of prayers that have been answered, read The Circle Maker. If you are a preacher/teacher you will find many excellent illustrations for sermons or lessons on the subject of prayer in this fantastic book. The Circle Maker is published by Zondervan and is available from pentecostalpublishing.com. I encourage you to purchase a copy of The Circle Maker and start drawing circles and praying big prayers. Mark Batterson has authored other books including: In A Pit With A Lion On A Snowy Day. PH Vance Bowman is the pastor of the United Pentecostal Church in Shawnee, Oklahoma.

I encourage you to download or purchase a copy of The Circle Maker and start drawing circles and praying big prayers.

David K. Bernard is the General Superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International.

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

17


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 18

[

P R A Y E R

]

BUT IF NOT... CAN GOD TELL US NO? J.R. ENSEY

Many church pews are empty today because the former occupants did not have a biblical worldview concerning faith, God, suffering, and death. When the Bible is interpreted by circumstances, men are apt to lose their faith. Human experience is to be interpreted by the Bible rather than the Bible being interpreted by human experience.

S

hadrach was the first to speak: “O king Nebuchadnezzar, we are not hesitant to respond to your threat. If the fiery furnace is the only alternative to bowing to your image, then open it up and toss us in!” “That’s right!” cried Meshach. “Get it on!” echoed Abed-

nego. Shadrach continued: “Our God is able to deliver us from the fire, but if not, we are quite willing to die for

18

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

our faith.” Those three Hebrews in Babylon were ready for God to say no should their prayer. That pronouncement left the king with no option. The bellows blew hard and the furnace was heated. And truly they were not delivered from the furnace but were thrown into the fire. However, God chose to shield them from the horror of being burned alive. They weren’t kept from the fire but were kept in and through the fire. (Read the story in Daniel 3.)

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 19

“But if not …” has been the stance of millions of believers in this Christian era when they were in need of deliverance from trouble or danger, as well as in the matter of divine healing. We would prefer to have God do our bidding in those cases but He refuses to surrender His sovereignty. And that’s a good thing. We are abject failures at knowing what is best for us. Did Paul pray when he was shipwrecked and spent a day and night in the sea? Or when he was hungry, cold, and without proper clothing (II Corinthians 11:23-27)? It is likely, but evidently there was no immediate answer, or none at all. Did Paul pray when he was afflicted by the “thorn in the flesh” (II Corinthians 12:7)? Definitely, three times at least. Did he and other Christians pray for Epaphroditus during the early days of his sickness (Philippians 2:25-27)? Did he not pray for Trophimus before leaving him sick at Miletum (II Timothy 4:20)? Paul prayed but he was also prepared for God’s no. “But God doesn’t want people to be sick!” you say. He doesn’t want them to be sinners, either, but billions are. Our human wills and lusts pulled us away from His grace and into many problems that have afflicted the human family. One day, redemption of all that was lost in the Garden of Eden will be fully accomplished and sickness and sin will no longer be part of our lives. (See Romans 8:23.) God does answer our prayers, but according to what He knows our real needs to be. Should God’s character be measured by what He allows to happen to the earth and to the human family living on it? Many do. Consider Ted Turner, the atheistic founder of CNN. He is a man of great wealth and a bitter spirit. He claims to have once believed in God but says he lost his faith after his sister Mary Jane died of a painful disease. In an interview with the New York Times on April 16, 2001, he said, “I was taught that God was love and God was powerful. I couldn’t understand how someone so innocent should be made or allowed to suffer so.” Many church pews are empty today because the former occupants did not have a biblical worldview concerning faith, God, suffering, and death. When the Bible is interpreted by circumstances, men are apt to lose their faith. Human experience is to be interpreted by the Bible rather than the Bible being interpreted by human experience. The fields of education and science feature the atheistic, evolutionary theories of Charles Darwin, in large part because of Darwin’s loss of faith when his daughter died. Ken Ham, in his book How Could a Loving God …?, explains that Darwin had been raised in church and continued to attend in adulthood. He and his wife had a daughter named Annie who became ill and ultimately

passed away. It was said that any vestige of belief in God left Charles when his daughter died. Annie’s cruel death destroyed his belief in a moral and just universe. Later he would say that this period was the final death nail for the coffin of his Christianity. Charles took his stand as an unbeliever and set out to explain the origin of life without God. Such events can torment the soul and cause even the staunchest believers to question God and the Bible. Other examples could be cited of personal friends whose faith, either in God or the ministry, was irreparably damaged by unfulfilled prophecies prompted by a flawed understanding of divine healing. God cannot be coerced to fulfill our every wish. If we insisted on getting everything we want—from material prosperity to healing of every ache and pain—would we not eventually wallow in monumental selfishness? Would God become a mere errand boy, or a divine ATM machine? If we’ve got Him figured out and reduced to certain laws or formulas, He has ceased to be God. We ourselves would be God. He has then become our puppet. Let God be sovereign. Let Him be God! God should be able to tell us no when the circumstances call for it. If God can’t tell us no, we can’t call Him Lord. It is not really prayer if we cannot deal with no. Prayer is more than telling God what you think He should do. Is it really prayer if we cannot accept His answer? We must remember that it is only because we cannot generate the desired result on our own that we pray in the first place. If the power to perform what we wanted resided in us, we would never have to appeal to Him. God must have appreciated the approach to faith taken by Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego. Or was their faith really a genuine trust in the righteousness, judgment, and wisdom of God? When faith doesn’t deliver us, trust keeps us. God allowed the three Hebrews to become a testimony to many subsequent generations. Certainly the king and his court were impressed by a “but if not” kind of faith. God may use our testimony of faithfulness in the face of tragedy or pain to challenge or sustain others. David said, “Oh how great is thy goodness, which thou hast laid up for them that fear thee; which thou hast wrought for them that trust in thee before the sons of men!” (Psalm 31:19). PH J.R. Ensey is the associate pastor of Living Way Church in Conroe, Texas, and the president of Advance Ministries and the Institute of Soteric Counseling.

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

19


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 20


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 21

W O R L DLINE

LADIES MINISTRIES TO THE RESCUE BRUCE A. HOWELL

A

fatigued father sits down to a meager meal in a humble hut. He glances at his four children and then to his wife now showing signs of another addition on the way. With a growing family and a shrinking salary, he ponders, “How will I ever be able to answer God’s calling and attend the Bible school?” There is hope with Ladies Ministries coming to the rescue. A faithful pastor rushes into his little community church and hurriedly prepares for morning worship. He feels ill-equipped to feed his flock. He picks up his Bible and reads, “Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth” (II Timothy 2:15). He thinks, How I wish … I would love to study. We have a Bible school. It is far away. How would I be able travel there and still attend to my congregation? There is hope with Ladies Ministries coming to the rescue. A visionary young man approaches his father. “Dad, I feel a call into ministry. I want to give myself to it. I need to go to Bible school.” The father furiously retorts, “Bible school? Ministry? What type of income does a pauper pastor produce? Your mother and I trained you so that you would be able to get a profitable profession to take care of us in our

advancing age. If you plan to go to Bible school, get out. We will not support you in your folly.” The boy walks slowly away, tears streaming down his face, but the call in his heart remains. How will he go to Bible school without the support of his parents? There is hope with Ladies Ministries coming to the rescue. An obedient, godly lady kneels at a crude altar with her dress dirtied from the mud floor. She has knelt here dozens of times before. Bible words ring in her ears and resound in her heart, “Go ye therefore, and teach all nations …” (Matthew 28:19). She knows God has a plan for her but how will it unfold? Her heart’s desire is to attend the Bible school. How will she be able to go? There is hope with Ladies Ministries coming to the rescue. Because Ladies Ministries comes to the rescue our Bible schools overseas continue to experience rapid growth. Annually, financial support from the Ladies Ministries serves as a catalyst to help us achieve extraordinary growth in our overseas Bible schools as reflected in the following figures: • 223 Bible schools • 4,773 Bible school students • 1,722 Bible school graduates • 36,377 seminar students • 1,605 correspondence students • 2,208,947 constituents

Each time you sacrifice to give to the Ladies Ministries foreign student support program, your giving empowers a weary father, a faithful pastor, a visionary young man, and a godly young lady to fulfill their calling. This is easily achieved by sponsoring someone in an overseas Bible school or training program in any one of 195 nations. “How shall they hear without a preacher? And how shall they preach, except they be sent?” (Romans 10:14-15). How shall they study, except they be sponsored? There is hope with Ladies Ministries to the rescue. I encourage everyone to get involved in sponsoring students through the Ladies Ministries global student support program. It takes so little to do so much. Paul said, “The things that thou hast heard of me among many witnesses, the same commit thou to faithful men, who shall be able to teach others also” (II Timothy 2:2). Make an investment in passing on the truth to the next generation. Assist the Ladies Ministries in their untiring efforts in coming to the rescue. PH Bruce A. Howell is the general director of Global Missions. He avidly advocates that training is the most important thing we do. It helps bring revival. It helps establish revival. It helps sustain revival.

I encourage everyone and anyone to get involved in sponsoring students through the Ladies Ministries global student support program. MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

21


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 22

2012 iStockphoto: © artpipi

22

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 23

[

P R A Y E R

]

THANKSGIVING JONATHAN MULLINGS

Y

ou’ve likely witnessed it at a birthday party or under the tree on Christmas morning. The child opening the dreaded “soft box.” You know, the one when you shake it and mash it, you can tell what’s inside. It’s the dreaded practical gift: clothing. It’s interesting to watch a six-year-old open the box (already knowing what lies in wait) and then try to feign surprise and excitement over a new pair of jeans and a sweater. “Oooh, thank you soooo much!” He half-heartedly moans while receiving the laser-like glare of his mother who says, “You better not embarrass me and act ungrateful!” Of course, there comes a day when most of us learn to appreciate the “soft box” because we know the practical gift is usually more needful and useful than the temporary excitement of the hard-box gift. We learn to appreciate the important and practical gifts even though they may not always be the most exciting. Gratitude is a peculiar attitude, especially in prayer. Most of us are familiar with the words of the psalmist who said, “Enter into His gates with thanksgiving and … be thankful unto him and bless his name” (Psalm 100:4). We tend, however, to embrace and model these scriptural directives based on circumstances. As a pastor, I can generally tell how a person’s week has gone by the level of their praise on Sunday. To be quite honest, on occasion the members of our congregation can probably tell what kind of a week I have had by the level of my praise. We tend to unwittingly embrace the attitude of gratitude only when we have been the beneficiaries of the hard-box gifts from God. You know the ones: a new job, a promotion, an exciting vacation, our child achieving a big accomplishment, a friend doing something special for us, or getting a clean bill of health from the doctor. I’m all

for hard-box gifts from God. They are exciting and often dramatic. They leave us with an overwhelming sense of gratitude. Entering God’s gates with thanksgiving and blessing His name during such times is usually effortless. Or at least it should be if we have a pulse and claim to be a follower of Christ. There are, on the other hand, other verses regarding thanksgiving that are not so easy to embrace. Most of us struggle when trying to obey them. One verse in particular is, “In every thing give thanks: for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning you” (I Thessalonians 5:18). For many years I struggled with how to obey this verse. How do we give thanks “in every thing?” When your spouse is stricken with cancer, how do you give thanks in that? When you lose your job, how and even why should you give thanks? Why when you lose your home to foreclosure or natural disaster, does God want you to give thanks? Forgive me for saying it, but that sounds a bit ridiculous. According to Paul, however, it’s the will of God in Christ Jesus concerning us! So, being an obedient child of God, I tried for many years to give thanks to God for all the bad things that came my way. Then one day while reading this verse, I had a revelation that helped me. It all came down to one little word—the word in. For many years I had read, “In everything give thanks” but interpreted it as meaning that I was to give thanks for everything. For the first time I realized Paul was not saying that it is God’s will for us to parade around as a hypocrite giving thanks for all the bad and hurtful things we encounter in life. On the contrary, God’s will is that we give thanks in the midst of everything we encounter in life. For instance, when we lose our job, instead of focusing on the negative aspect of what we have lost, we

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

23


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 24

should look for the positive aspect of what we still have and give thanks. So, in spite of losing our job, we should be thankful we have unemployment benefits. “Well,” you may say, “what if my unemployment benefits run out?” Then, give thanks if your spouse has a job. And if she doesn’t and you’re losing your house and have to downsize and rent or move in with someone else, then give thanks that you have a roof over your head. Give thanks for your family or friends who are in your life and likely helping you through your hard time. In all of life’s circumstances there are soft-box gifts God has given us for which we should be grateful. Even in the direst of situations when we may have lost a loved one to tragic death, there is still cause for thanks. We can be grateful for the years we had with him. We can give thanks for the memories and special times. Of course, we will (and should) go through a season of mourning. That is natural and healthy. But even in our mourning we can be grateful to God for the other good things in our lives. In each of our lives, God has given us things that are practical soft-box gifts—friends, family, church, and, most important, eternal life. So, even when faced

with the direst of circumstances where our own lives may be in jeopardy, we can still have an attitude of gratitude because we know in whom we have placed our trust. We have eternal life in Him and in the midst of the valley of the shadow of death we can give thanks for eternal life. So, the next time you encounter something that would be unnatural to give God thanks for, why don’t you look around for something you can give thanks in. Soft-box gifts are all around us and are ready to be opened. In the end, we can be grateful for the greatest soft-box gift of all time: our redemption. PH Jonathan Mullings is the pastor of Truth Tabernacle in Bakersfield, California. He is the Western District director of The New Generation, a project to equip and empower young ministers.


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 25


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 26

2012 iStockphoto: © Mike Kiev

26

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 27

[

P R A Y E R

]

DOES YOUR CHURCH HAVE A HEATING PLANT? B R O O K E

P A M E R

They were taken through the church door and down a stairway. Their guide quietly opened the door and whispered, “This is our heating plant.” There in the room the students saw seven hundred people bowed in prayer seeking for God to bless the service that was about to take place in the auditorium above. Softly closing the door behind him, the gentleman then turned and introduced himself as none other than Charles Spurgeon.

I

t was a muggy Sunday in July when several London university students decided to attend Metropolitan Tabernacle to hear the famed C.H. Spurgeon preach. They arrived early and were waiting outside for the doors to open when a gentleman greeted them and offered to give them a tour. He was particularly eager to show them the heating plant of the church, and as they did not want to offend him, they agreed to be led in that direction. They were taken through the church door and down a stairway. Their guide quietly opened the door and whispered, “This is our heating plant.” There in the room the students saw seven hundred people bowed

in prayer seeking for God to bless the service that was about to take place in the auditorium above. Softly closing the door behind him, the gentleman then turned and introduced himself as none other than Charles Spurgeon. God said, “If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face … then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin” (II Chronicles 7:14). He continued in verse 15 and said this is the prayer to which “my eyes shall be open, and mine ears attent to the prayer made that in this place.” As gifted of a communicator as Charles Spurgeon undoubtedly was, he understood that a well-crafted sermon or

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

27


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 28

even a perfectly placed song is not what causes God to move on our behalf. God’s ear is tuned to the voices of people united in purposeful prayer. Corporate prayer—a uniting body of people praying with one purpose—moves God. We need look no further than the Bible’s first book to discover a narrative that confirms this truth. In Genesis 11 the whole earth was conversing with one language. Taking advantage of their ability to communicate, the people agreed together to build a city and a tower. In verse 6 the Lord said, “Behold, the people is one … and now nothing will be restrained from them, which they have imagined to do.” In the next verse God decided to “go down, and there confound their language.” God came to where they were. It was their unity of purpose that literally moved God. What could the church accomplish if we would grasp this powerful concept? They didn’t bicker. They didn’t focus on what they lacked. They weren’t sidetracked by opposition, offense, or opinion. Imagine what God would do in us, through us, for us if we could achieve this level of unity when we approached His throne in prayer. Fred Hartley wrote in his book, Everything by Prayer, that “the early church didn’t have a prayer meeting; the early church was the prayer meeting.” The Book of Acts reads like a survey on the success of corporate prayer. The root of the upper room experience is revealed in Acts 1:14 when all the people gathered “continued with one accord in prayer.” Jesus had told the disciples to wait in Jerusalem for the promise of the Father. He told them they would receive power that would come through the Holy Spirit. There had been no previous infilling of God’s Spirit. Those who gathered in the upper room did not know exactly what they were waiting for. They couldn’t be certain of how this experience they were tarrying for was going to be manifested. The important component was not the knowledge of what God was going to do, or even what they wanted Him to do. God poured out His Spirit, the ultimate gift, on a united body of praying people. In the twelfth chapter of Acts Peter was flanked by soldiers in King Herod’s prison. At first his situation looked dire. A rotating squadron of sixteen soldiers surrounded him. His chance of escape seemed non-existent. Herod had a plan to bring Peter before the crowd of bloodthirsty Jews who had already killed James. There was little doubt they would rejoice in his demise. Just when it seemed that hope for Peter was unwarranted, “prayer was made with-

out ceasing of the church unto God for him” (verse 5). The church gathered together and went into a season of focused prayer on Peter’s behalf. God responded by sending an angel who woke Peter up and led him right out the front gate of the prison. Again we have a body of people who were asking God to move on their behalf, but were not sure what form the answer was going to take. When Peter showed up at the door, the people paused their prayer long enough to declare that it was Peter’s angel. They could believe that an angel showed up at their door, but they couldn’t wrap their minds around a liberated Peter knocking on their door. God is “able to do exceeding, abundantly above all that we ask or think,” but the way that He designed for us to access that power and possibility is through prayer (Ephesians 3:20). We don’t have to tell God how to meet our needs. We just have to bind together in faith believing and He will respond in ways our human minds can’t even imagine. The outpouring of the Holy Spirit was a response to the corporate prayer of one hundred and twenty people. Peter’s miraculous escape from prison was in response to the church gathering together to pray. When God executed a jailbreak in Acts 16, it was because two people had a prayer meeting. Paul and Silas prayed and God responded by causing an earthquake that shook the prison foundation and opened all the doors. Jesus said, “Where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them” (Matthew 18:20). Publilius Syrus, a Roman author in the first century BC, wrote, “Where there is unity, there is always victory.” Whether we are two or two hundred, when we unite in purposeful prayer the Bible indicates that God will move toward us and work for us. Does your church have a heating plant? Are your prayer rooms filled with precious believers joined in corporate prayer? Let us follow the example left by the New Testament church and bind together in effectual, fervent prayer, knowing that God will work on our behalf. PH Brooke Pamer serves in ministry at the Apostolic Church in Barberton, Ohio. She embraces her identity as a book nerd. She feels blessed to be married to Paul and is the mom of Sullivan.

The outpouring of the Holy Spirit was a response to the corporate prayer of one hundred and twenty people. 28

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 29

F AITH & CULTURE

REST AND RENEWAL EUGENE WILSON

H

ave you ever considered the thought that there are times in which eating and sleeping are more important than fasting and praying? According to Scripture, this is correct. Consider Elijah. Immediately after the showdown on Mount Carmel in which he slaughtered four hundred and fifty false prophets of Baal, Elijah heard that Jezebel wanted to kill him. So he fled to the wilderness, crawled up under a broom tree, and prayed for God to take his life. I Kings 19 helps us understand Elijah’s problem. His body was tired. He was emotionally drained. He was under enormous pressure. Given three nights of good sleep, it is doubtful that Jezebel’s actions would have bothered him as much. But he was tired and no longer thinking clearly. Instead of standing his ground, he ran. What was God’s response to Elijah’s actions? It wasn’t a prayer meeting. It was food and sleep. The lack of rest is having a negative impact on many in ministry. According to research conducted by Barna, Focus on the Family, and Maranatha Life, fifteen hundred ministers leave the ministry each month, and one of the reasons is because of ministry burnout. Eighty percent of pastors’ spouses feel their spouse is overworked. Eighty

percent wish their spouse would choose another profession. Unfortunately, pastors who desire to cut back may not do so due to people’s expectations. Research says that pastors who work fewer than fifty hours a week are thirty-five percent more likely to be terminated. Unless something changes, the future of the church will be negatively affected by the lack of rest and renewal among its leaders and members. According to research, 80 percent of seminary and Bible school graduates who enter the ministry will leave the ministry within the first five years, and the lack of rest and renewal might have something to do with it. A recent survey conducted among Bible college students revealed that over 50 percent often feel overwhelmed by all they need to do; nearly 60 percent do not take a day off from work and studies; and almost 60 percent said they seldom, if ever, hear anyone in leadership talk about the need to participate in a Sabbath rest. Rest is an essential element in our accomplishing what God wants us to do. Jesus only had three and a half years to complete His ministry, and yet He set aside time to rest. He called His disciples to rest. (See Mark 6:31.) Jesus did not heal all. He did not minister to all. He did

not visit all. And He did not teach all. This understanding causes me to ask, “Why do some of us think we can outdo Jesus?” Somewhat like tithing, our participation in a Sabbath rest is a statement of faith. In spite of all that still needs to be done, God will make up the difference. Our participation in a Sabbath rest is a reminder of our dependency upon God. When we fail to participate in a Sabbath rest, we are saying that we trust our own strength in dealing with the daily grind. Consequently, we run the risk of being governed by the flesh in all areas of life. If you find yourself overly involved in ministry, make plans to participate in God’s plan for rest and renewal. And if you are a church member, encourage your pastor and church leaders to take time off for rest and renewal. Support them in taking a family vacation. God’s plan for rest and renewal is a plan for us all. PH Eugene Wilson serves on the pastoral staff at The Pentecostal Church in Memphis, Tennessee. Terry Black is the pastor.

If you find yourself overly involved in ministry, make plans to participate in God’s plan for rest and renewal. MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

29


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 30

2012 iStockphoto: © Dereje Belachew

30

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 31

[

P R A Y E R

]

PRAYER—WHO WILL TAKE THE

CHALLENGE? WILLIAM L. SCISCOE Do we realize what an integral part of our spiritual life prayer really is? How can we make it on a daily basis without prayer? What would we do if we couldn’t take our sick babies and place them in the arms of a loving and caring God, being confident that whatever He did would be all right?

P

rayer. Oops, did I lose you when I began this article with the word prayer? It seems that prayer has become a byword or maybe even a buzzword. How easy it is to say the same words when it comes time to address our Savior, Healer, and Friend. There are two world powers, the sword and the Spirit. Napoleon said, “The spirit has always vanquished the sword.” Recently, I attended a funeral of a prayer warrior. She had been a member of our church for years. I would call this devoted saint and ask her to help me with a need because I couldn’t think clearly how I should pray. Almost without fail after asking her to pray the answer would come to me. How does one get to know the Lord on this level? She enjoyed being in the presence of her God. Her prayers got God’s attention. She connected with the Spirit world and would spend hours in His presence. Do we realize what an integral part of our spiritual life prayer really is? How can we make it on a daily basis without prayer? What would we do if we

couldn’t take our sick babies and place them in the arms of a loving and caring God, being confident that whatever He did would be all right? When the doctors have said, “there is nothing more we can do,” we can turn to God in prayer. There are times when prayer is not easy. Several years ago I was the victim of a severe stroke. I would wake up tormented, so much so that I would get up in the middle of the night and try to pray. It was difficult because I could not think correctly. The adversary would remind me of things I had done wrong—things I thought were under the blood. It was as though the devil and God were both speaking to me. The Lord would say to me that He is faithful and that His blood is efficacious. Often I would repeatedly repent over the same things, yet there would be no peace because the accuser was there to do his work. Once while sitting in T.W. Barnes’ office I rehearsed the scenario to him. He arose from his chair and came and placed his hand on my head and said, “When it’s under the blood, God will not bring it up again; that is the devil bringing it up to you.” He prayed and peace came.

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

31


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 32

Is there any place we can go but to the inner sanctum of prayer when we have sinned and failed God? No wonder David cried out, “I am in a great strait: let us fall now into the hand of the LORD; for his mercies are great: and let me not fall into the hand of man” (II Samuel 24:14). It is in prayer that we find the strength to get up after we have disappointed God and ourselves. The psalmist said, “Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer, nor his mercy from me” (Psalm 66:20). How many people struggle with wrongdoings but do not trust the mercies of God when they need to fall into His righteous hands? God will speak to us when we linger in His presence. A man hired an artist to paint a picture of the homestead where he grew up. The old place meant much to this man, and a new road was being planned to pass through it. He wanted to preserve the memory of the homestead the best he could. The time came for the artist to begin his work, but all he did was sit in a chair and view the property. After a few days of this routine

32

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

there was still no progress seen on the canvas. The man, eager to see the finished product, came to visit the artist again. Seeing no progress he abruptly approached the artist inquiring why nothing was done. The artist answered, “I want to do the best I can for you so I must allow my mind to absorb every detail before it can be put on the canvas. I must bring perspective to the landscape, color scheme, and many other details. The scene must be correct in my mind for it to be correct on the canvas.” Perhaps that story helps waiting on the Lord for more than an hour make more sense. The psalmist said, “Wait on the LORD: be of good courage, and he shall strengthen thine heart: wait, I say, on the LORD” (Psalm 27:14). Will you take the challenge? PH William L. Sciscoe is the pastor of The Church Triumphant in Columbus, Ohio. He is also the presbyter of Section Five of the Ohio District.

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 33

R E ACHING FUTURE GENERATIONS

“These two little girls climbed up in this chair in our foyer and enjoyed the Pentecostal Herald together. The photo wasn't posed. The girl on the left is Aubry Thompson. The one on the right is Chloe Bruce. Chloe is the niece of missionary Steve Willoughby.” Doug Ellingsworth Finley Pentecostal Church Finley, Tennessee To subscribe go to pentecostalherald.com.


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 34

[

P R A Y E R

]

A SUPERNATURAL

GOD IN A NATURAL WORLD FLO SHAW

34

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/20/12 9:43 AM Page 35

O

ur human reasoning may sometimes minimize the work of God. If we always think in the natural, though, how can we ever enter into the supernatural? The supernatural is defined as a reality above and beyond the visible, observable universe; so the only way we can perceive spiritual things is through the eyes of faith. Natural entities exist in the physical space/time continuum—things we can comprehend with our senses, things we can often influence, things that are limited to and governed by the laws the nature. But the natural world was formed by a supernatural God who since the beginning has impacted the natural world. When the supernatural penetrates into the physical world, the result is observable supernatural phenomena. Satan is the god of this world who blinds “the minds of them which believe not, lest the light of the glorious gospel of Christ … should shine unto them” (II Corinthians 4:4). The evil supernatural world influences unbelievers, limiting their perception and senses to the pain, suffering, sickness, death, poverty, disappointments, and strife that fills our natural world. Only the holy, supernatural God can command the light to shine out of darkness to “give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ” (II Corinthians 4:6). Paul instructed believers to “look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal” (II Corinthians 4:18). This is an important key to moving into the supernatural realm where the Spirit of God operates. (See Hebrews 11:1-6.) Paul prayed, “That the eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the … exceeding greatness of his power to us-ward who believe” (Ephesians 1:18-19). Elisha asked God to open the eyes of his servant to see into the spiritual realm. (See II Kings 6:16-17). Phenomenal reports of answered prayers and of prayer events indicate there is a great revival of prayer and a display of the supernatural occurring all around the world. Kathy Crossley, regional prayer coordinator for South America, said, “In the past year Ecuador held strategic prayer conferences at their campgrounds with four thousand prayer warriors gathering for united prayer, utilizing a prayer plan with all churches participating. In the first year, prayer was made eight hours a day for 335 days. Pastors and churches came in buses, cars, public transportation, and vans to bombard the spiritual world with prayer! Over 130 days re-

MAY

ceived the Holy Ghost as the power of God fell on these meetings. In a prayer meeting in Manaus three thousand convened at the Jerusalem Center for a day of prayer. People gathered from across the city. We are excited about what God is doing through the concerted prayers of His people in South America!” A revival of prayer has broken out in the Wisconsin District, where the theme this year is “Availing Much through Intercessory Prayer!” Eric Carlson of Living Word Apostolic Church in New Berlin, Wisconsin, pastored by David Meyer, reported notable miracles as a result of prayer. Eric Carlson said, “God is moving in a powerful way. Pastor Meyer has led a concerted effort to elevate prayer at the church. We have consistently held prayer meetings every Monday evening, Wednesday morning, Thursday morning, Friday night, and pre-service Sunday. It’s gotten to the point where the praise reports outweigh the prayer requests.” A few praise reports include: one lady was healed from stage four cancer, as confirmed by an MRI; a lady’s cancerous mass disappeared; a man was healed of heroin addiction; a couple was blessed with a baby; another couple received jobs and a house; doors opened for ministry in New Berlin public schools; a man fell off a three-story roof, hit his head on a beam, and punctured his lungs, but miraculously survived and recovered. Besides these, many more miracles have transpired. Churches worldwide have united in prayer and many praise reports of miracles and the supernatural were shared at the conclusion of the WNOP thirty days of prayer, with the theme “United Prayer” (“UP”). Summons to Sacrifice, with the theme “Experience the Supernatural,” will convene at the St. Louis Renaissance Hotel on June 7-9, 2012. A children’s and youth Summons to Sacrifice also will be held. For more information go to wnop.org. Our God is a supernatural God in a natural world. PH Flo Shaw serves as the international coordinator of World Network of Prayer.

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

35


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 36

[

P R A Y E R

]

WITH PRAYER AND

SUPPLICATION THOMAS SUEY

Our supreme model of prayer and supplication is none other than Christ Himself. We are given a window into Christ’s prayer life in Hebrews 5:7: “Who in the days of his flesh, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared.”

W

e are often asked, “What is supplication?” Supplication in the Scriptures invariably describes a certain type of prayer. Sixty times the Scriptures refer to supplication: fifty-three times in the Old Testament and seven times in the New Testament. More often than not, the word prayer is found in conjunction with supplication. There are no less than thirty-one Bible verses in which the words prayer (or pray) and supplication are used in conjunction. We can conclude that all supplication is prayer, but not all prayer is supplication. When we pray, we may

36

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

eventually move into supplication. We ourselves determine whether we will move into the realm of spiritual supplication, according to our degree of desperation. Paul said, “Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God” (Philippians 4:6). So what is the difference between prayer and supplication? In prayer, there may be no request made but only praise, thanksgiving, and extolling of the marvelous attributes of God. Unlike in prayer, where this is not necessarily so, there is always a request in supplication or petition. In this type of

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 37

prayer, one asks for or desires something from God or petitions Him. In Ephesians 6:18, we again find the word supplication. Paul said, “Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints.” Paul concluded this letter by encouraging us to pray by using all forms of prayer such as intercession, travail, making our requests known, thanksgiving, praise, praying in tongues, and supplications. In other words, we are to take advantage of the entire range of prayer modes available to Spirit-filled believers, including supplications. There are basically two factors that help us identify supplication. One is our physical posture while the other is our attitude. The postures of supplication to the Lord include bowing down to God, lifting the hands, and kneeling in God’s presence. However, supplication assumes more than a physical posture. Supplication must be accompanied by humility, begging, earnest desperation, dependency, and a stark absence of self-reliance. While all of these attributes may not be simultaneously present, a combination of them will be if we are truly in the state of supplication. Basically, supplication is the prayerful act of long-term earnest petitioning unto the Lord. Our supreme model of prayer and supplication is none other than Christ Himself. We are given a window into Christ’s prayer life in Hebrews 5:7: “Who in the days of his flesh, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared.” Strong crying and tears were characteristic of the Lord’s prayer life as He presented Himself in total abandonment unto the only One who could save Him. The widow in Luke 18 is a New Testament model of supplication because she learned to cry out to the judge, the sole authority who had power to grant her the request she most desired. By referring to a widow, Jesus was showing us our true position of dependency upon Him—weak, defenseless, and without political or societal influence. She may have had no money or political influence, but she could cry out. She was relentless and refused to be denied. It appears that this woman was vocal, tenacious, bold, resolute, even brash, borderline rude, and annoying. Nothing was able to stop her from crying out

to and even pestering the judge until he granted her a legal order of protection. Those who have entered into supplications place no time limits on God because their petitions are intense, relentless, and protracted. The modern church may well have forgotten that we are in this battle for the long haul. Tentative soldiers don’t win wars. Anyone with a peace-time attitude during war usually loses. It is inevitable that God will step in and the power of God will be manifested. One thing the enemy fears is that we will continue to cry out in supplications. He is sure that we will compromise our prayer life and back off from standing before the throne of God, crying day and night. Before Paul encouraged us to enter into supplications he said, “Put on the whole armor God.” Warning: don’t enter the combat zone of prayer and supplication until you are in full armor, prepared to resist the onslaught of Hell. We must continue to cry out to the Judge of the earth. “Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right?” (Genesis 18:25). Prayers will be answered. Will you continue to cry out before the throne of God? “Shall not God avenge his own elect, which cry day and night unto him, though he bear long with them?” (Luke 18:7). If you close your mouth in silence, the enemy wins. The choice is yours. While the widow in Luke 18 was more vocal, bold, and brash in her supplications, Hannah in I Samuel 1 was quiet and private, yet deeply intense in her supplication. The Word of God said Hannah “spake in her heart; only her lips moved, but her voice was not heard: therefore Eli thought she had been drunken” (I Samuel 1:13). There was a stark contrast between these two women, yet both received what they had requested. Both understood and practiced the art of supplication. Supplication is long term, aggressive, persistent, and bold. Why else would Jesus have told us to keep on asking, to keep on seeking, and to keep on knocking? You will someday hold your answer in your hands as Hannah held her baby boy. Eli was so spiritually dull that he could not identify supplication. He accused Hannah of being drunk. Even so, Hannah’s supplication was answered. PH Thomas Suey is the pastor of Christ Tabernacle Church in Herrick, Illinois.

Supplication is long term, aggressive, persistent, and bold. MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

37


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 38

2012 IiStockphoto: © Sean Locke

38

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 39

[

P E N T E C O S T A L

L I F E

]

CELEBRATING THE ROLE OF ASSOCIATE

PASTOR NATHAN REEVER

The Bible does not specifically mention the designation of associate pastor. However, it does fit in the category of pastors and teachers in Ephesians 4:11 as one of God’s gifts to the church. Even though most of today’s local churches have one senior or lead pastor, there are functions of pastoral ministry found in the person of an associate pastor. Though at times it seems to be insignificant, the role is both a viable and valuable ministry.

A

aron. Jonathan. Gehazi. Andrew. Barnabas. By themselves these Bible characters may not be so well known. When you join them with Moses, David, Elisha, Peter, and Paul, respectively, they become more recognizable. Although largely known as associates of other more well-known people of Scripture,

they made significant contributions for the furtherance of the kingdom of God. In 1984, my pastor asked me to join him as his assistant. My decision may have been an easy one because at that time I had been the youth pastor for three and one half years and held two major positions within our Christian school. Giving up three jobs for one seemed to be an offer I couldn’t refuse. In any

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

39


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 40

various church ministries such as youth, Christian education, music, outreach, or building and grounds upkeep to coordination of special events, fundraising, construction projects, or maintenance of membership rolls, office schedules, and yearly church calendars. As there are no set criteria, the duties are wide-ranging and depend on the circumstances of each assembly.

case, I answered yes in the will of God. I counted it an honor to serve from then until 1994, and still do after returning in 2000 to serve the same pastor and church until the present. The Bible does not specifically mention the designation of associate pastor. However, it does fit in the category of pastors and teachers in Ephesians 4:11 as one of God’s gifts to the church. Even though most of today’s local churches have one senior or lead pastor, there are functions of pastoral ministry found in the person of an associate pastor. Though at times it seems to be insignificant, the role is both a viable and valuable ministry. Once a congregation reaches a certain size the pastor becomes even more aware of his or her need for assistance. One recourse of finding it is to enlist the aid of an associate in ministry. When searching for someone to provide ministerial support the character traits listed in Scripture for those who serve the church (see I Timothy 3:1-13 and Titus 1:7-9) should be taken into account and any physical or academic qualifications that are required to do the job. The method of appointment and actual responsibilities of this person vary from church to church depending on its pastor and the needs of the church, but here are a few areas that are typical.

Pastoral Care Pastoral care is an area of service likely reserved for associates who have proven themselves over time to be trustworthy. Depending on a person’s skill set, a senior pastor may delegate areas of pastoral care to his associate. These could include hospital visitation, pre-marital or other family or individual counseling, comforting the bereaved, and directing benevolent care to the less fortunate. By learning his pastor’s approach in ministry to people, an associate can relate to church members and non-members in a similar manner as his pastor and, as a result, extend the effectiveness of his pastor. Of course, the success of a church’s overall ministry as directed by the lead pastor is also enhanced when the associate pastor serves in ways that are unique to his or her gifts and personality.

Administration Assistance with administration is one area of need for many pastors. In I Corinthians 12:28, there is a ministry that is simply called “helps.” The purpose of it is to provide relief or support. Through exercising this gift an associate pastor can lighten the load of his pastor by handling the day-to-day details of church management. These details range from oversight of

Preaching Preaching in the local church he oversees is the primary responsibility of the pastor, but there are occasions when he will deem it helpful or even wise to invite his associate to preach. Again, this normally happens after confidence is gained and respect is earned over a period of time. It is true that the associate’s calling to preach comes from God, and he must in the end answer to Him; but in those times when an associate pastor fills the pulpit, he should bear in

Pastors and congregations would do well to provide a place for an associate pastor when possible. Though not a perfect analogy, associate pastors can be used by God in a similar way He used Joseph to help Pharaoh prepare for the future—in good times and bad. By adding an associate pastor to the church staff, a pastor can be assisted in implementing God’s purpose for the local assembly he or she shepherds and can ease the daily demands of caring for a growing church.

40

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 41

mind he is preaching by request and must be in harmony with his pastor’s authority and vision for the church. Usually, the role of an associate is filled by someone who is called to ministry by the Lord and ultimately will branch out into his own vocation as a pastor, missionary, or evangelist. In that instance, the time spent as an associate provides training for future involvement. Yet, it is also possible that a person will be called to a more or less lifelong ministry of serving on a leadership team and never become the primary leader of a congregation. This may be at one church or several churches during the years of his or her service. In either situation, it is important to realize that an associate pastor has a God-given ministry and is not a “second-class citizen” of the church pastoral team. Pastors and congregations would do well to provide a place for an associate pastor when possible. Though not a perfect analogy, associate pastors can be used by God in a similar way He used Joseph to help Pharaoh prepare for the future—in good times and bad. By adding an associate pastor to the church staff, a pastor can be assisted in implementing God’s purpose for the local assembly he or she shepherds and can ease the daily demands of caring for a growing church. At the risk of being self-serving, I close with a tip of the hat to all associate pastors. It is said that Leonard Bernstein, the American composer and conductor, was once asked which instrument is the most difficult to play in an orchestra. He answered, “Second violin. It’s hard to find someone who wants to play second violin and do so with the same enthusiasm as that of a first violinist.” Associate pastors may rest assured that their efforts are meaningful, worthwhile, and contribute to the whole of the church’s mission. As they serve with joy, integrity, and ethical conduct, they will in due course be esteemed “very highly in love for their work’s sake” (I Thessalonians 5:13) by their pastor, the church members, and most of all, the Head of the church—Jesus Christ.

TEACHER OF THE MON TH

MICHAEL MILBY

Michael Milby teaches ages fourteen to eighteen at the First United Pentecostal Church in Columbia, Tennessee, pastored by Telford Tharp. He is certified to teach through the General Sunday School Division’s Teacher Certification program.

He started teaching when he started giving home Bible studies and teaching in the church school chapel. He uses the Word Aflame Publications Sunday school literature. He employs games, icebreakers, and activities to keep the students actively involved in classroom participation. He also encourages the youth to participate by teaching portions of the lesson from time to time.

Nathan Reever is serving in his twenty-fifth year on the pastoral staff at the Apostolic Pentecostal Church in St. Louis, Missouri. Stephen Willeford is the pastor.

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

41


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 42

2012 IiStockphoto: © Courtney Weittenhiller

42

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 43

[

P E N T E C O S T A L

L I F E

]

THANKS, MOM DANIEL J. KOREN

Thank you for raising us to love church. We never saw it as something we had to do. It was the highlight of the week. Watching dirty, sinful people change into the likeness of Christ was as exciting as when we watched that butterfly unfold from its chrysalis. You involved us in ministry and introduced us to the greatest people on earth. When God opened doors for you to share your gifts with the world, you took us along and we felt necessary.

Y

ou could have done so many things other than just raise kids. I remember seeing your many talents you used to teach, entertain, and disciple us. You could have put any of your skills and interests ahead of us and left us to raise ourselves, but you first helped us flourish. I did not see how tough that was then, but I do now.

MAY

The highlight of each day was watching for Dad to come home. You loved him and we just found it normal to do the same. Thank you for staying together. If you had to work through things in your marriage, thank you for doing it where we did not see. We never felt like our home could split up; it was never discussed. That happened only to other people. Thanks for making life so safe. It was a big, colorful

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

43


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 44

adventure. We did not live in fear of the future or hide in the shadows of the unknown. You spared us from the gagging oppression of peer pressure. You gave us freedom to take risks, let us know God was bigger than circumstances, and propelled us to do more than survive. I remember having Pentecost at home. From the night you prayed with me until I spoke in tongues in my bed to the prayer meetings we would have at the couch in the living room to the Bible studies you and Dad would have with new people downstairs. We grew up on missionary stories and thought we had the best this world could offer when a preacher came to our house for dinner. Thank you for raising us to love church. We never saw it as something we had to do. It was the highlight of the week. Watching dirty, sinful people change into the likeness of Christ was as exciting as when we watched that butterfly unfold from its chrysalis. You

involved us in ministry and introduced us to the greatest people on earth. When God opened doors for you to share your gifts with the world, you took us along and we felt necessary. If I could do my childhood over, I would pick you more flowers, color you more pictures, and bring home more stray puppies. I would still ride my bike like a wild horse and race a hundred toy cars across the front porch. However, I think I would make you take more time to pursue your calling. Or maybe you did. PH Daniel J. Koren, a minister and writer, is the proud son of Roger and Cheryl Koren. Find more of Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s writing at danieljkoren.com.

If I could do my childhood over, I would pick you more flowers, color you more pictures, and bring home more stray puppies.

Join the Celebration! Apostolic Bible Institute is celebrating 75 years of training ministers of the gospel. We invite you to join us in commemorating the longest continuously operating Oneness Bible school in the history of the United Pentecostal Church International.

ABI

June 1-3, 2012 TH

2012

1937

Friday - Drama Saturday - All Alumni and Friend Reunion Banquet Sunday - Graduation Commencement Speaker: Rev. Lee Stoneking

Make your reser vations today! Contact info: www.apostolic.org apostolicbibleinstitute@gmail.com 651.739.7686

RSARY E V I ANN

44

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 45

The Prayer Life of Royal Denver Gibson ELIZABETH SAVANT ………………………………………………………………………………….......................…… Horace and I used to clean the … church in foot. Of course, Brother Gibson anointed Beaumont [Texas]. We noticed two worn her with oil and prayed for her. You could spots in the carpet on the platform in front literally see the angry, red pattern begin of Brother Gibson’s chair. We could never to fade. By the afternoon, the burn had figure out why they were worn more than completely disappeared. the rest of the carpet. One day Horace ............................................

went by the church to talk with Brother Gibson and … discovered the answer to the

puzzlement. This was Brother Gibson’s This was excerpted from the book titled prayer spot. His consistent kneeling liter- Royal Denver Gibson, a Twentieth Century ally wore holes in the carpet. … One time Apostle, written by Denver Gibson’s at Wednesday morning prayer meeting in daughter, Nara Wenrich. Vesta Layne Manthe … church our daughter, a toddler, gun is Nara’s sister. To purchase the book, stepped barefoot on the grate of the floor go to www.imprbooks.com. furnace, which was very hot. It burned a grid pattern into the bottom of her tiny

MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

45


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 46

[

P E N T E C O S T A L

L I F E

]

COMPASSION LEE JACKSON

The term “agony of the leaves” is used by tea brewers to describe the unfurling of the tealeaf during the steeping process. The hot water produces such wonderful flavors. The experience of suffering could easily be called the agony of the believer and be used to describe the unfurling of our hearts that gives us the ability to have compassion.

G

od is a God of balance. Some days we rejoice and other days we weep. To rejoice with those who rejoice is a pleasant thing; it is often marked with smiles and laughter. To weep with those who weep is another story altogether; it is often marked with pain and tears. Paul said, “Rejoice with them that do rejoice, and weep with them that weep” (Romans 12:15). Barnes Notes says, “All who are afflicted know how much it diminishes their sorrow to see others sympathizing with them … how sad would be a suffering world if there were none who regarded our grief with interest or with tears!” Three words come to my mind when I think about weeping over someone else’s troubles: empathy, sympathy, and compassion. Empathy is the ability to share in another’s emotions or feelings. According to Webster’s Dictionary, having sympathy is entering into another person’s mental state, feelings, and emotions and expe-

46

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

riencing it with them. Compassion is a feeling of sorrow for the suffering or trouble of another accompanied by an urge to help. Jesus did not just empathize or sympathize with those He saw and loved; He was moved with compassion and healed them. The example He gave of the good Samaritan was concluded with the instructions to “go, and do thou likewise” (Luke 10:37). People need someone to come alongside to help them in their bruised state—to do so is one of the highest places of service in the Kingdom. I have seen great miracles. I have prayed for many people who were instantly healed or delivered from different ailments. I have seen angels and have been privileged to experience the depths of God’s Spirit. When I consider the many rich experiences in my ministry, however, the greatest blessing always came from the times when I was weeping with those who wept. God has called each of us to a place of compassion so that we might furnish the needs of the broken and bruised. This high calling is often ignored because the

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 47

road from where you are now to that place of compassion is paved with tears, anguish, and pain. The term “agony of the leaves” is used by tea brewers to describe the unfurling of the tealeaf during the steeping process. The hot water produces such wonderful flavors. To weep with them who weep we must suffer trials and tests of our own. The experience of suffering could easily be called the agony of the believer and be used to describe the unfurling of our hearts that gives us the ability to have compassion. I have had the sad experience of losing my sister to the hands of an assassin. I know how much I appreciated the love and concern I received from others during this tragic time in my life. The suffering was more mental than physical and I needed the help of my pastor to understand the power of the shed blood of Jesus Christ. I pleaded the blood over my mind to receive the peace of God, and God gave me peace. My suffering provided the environment for either the growth of great compassion or great bitterness and despair. I chose compassion. Isaiah 61:1-3 is a call of hope that can pierce even the darkest moment and awaken the good-hearted from the most apathetic state of slumber. “The spirit of the Lord GOD is upon me; because the LORD hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound ... to comfort all that mourn; to appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the LORD, that he might be glorified.” Embedded within these verses is a message for at least three groups of people: Those who have chosen compassion and can weep with them who weep; those who are hurt by the heartaches of life and refuse their

claim to revenge, bitterness, and retribution; those who are weeping. Those who have chosen compassion have found God to be balanced and sovereign. Because you have opened yourself to experiencing the hurts and tears of others, God has also granted you understanding of how to rejoice with them who rejoice. Perhaps those who feel hurt by life, by people, and maybe even by God have felt this way for a long time. Your pain is no longer debilitating, but it has morphed into indifference. You have made it through the darkest part of the suffering, but you have failed to notice your progress. You have not clearly seen the fingerprints of God in your situation, and because of that you are unable to share your testimony of God’s goodness with others who are in similar situations. What feels like a dead end is really a crossroad. You may not have chosen the pain, but you are the only one who can choose how you respond to the pain. Those who are weeping can find comfort in the Spirit of God during your time of daily devotion. Have confidence that “God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and [that] there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain” (Revelation 21:4). Somewhere there is another soul weeping with them who weep. They have been where you are and can testify of God’s faithfulness. Be strong in the Lord for he is “full of compassion, and gracious, longsuffering, and plenteous in mercy and truth” (Psalm 86:15). PH Lee Jackson is the pastor of the Wood River United Pentecostal Church, Wood River, Illinois. He has been an adjunct instructor at Gateway College of Evangelism for nineteen years. He is known as a mentor and safe haven to many developing ministers.

First Things First ………………………………………………………...................................................

The men who have done the most for God in this world have been early on their knees. He who fritters away the early morning, its opportunity and freshness, in other pursuits than seeking God will make poor headway seeking Him the rest of the day. If God is not first in our thoughts and efforts in the morning, He will be in the last place the remainder of the day. —E.M. Bounds MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

47


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 48

Too Busy Not to Pray ………………………………………………………………………...…….…

If there is one final piece of wisdom I have gleaned from God over the years regarding activating the miracle of prayer in our lives, it is this: just pray. I can write about prayer, you can read about prayer and you can even lend this book to a friend to show that you are encouraging others to pray. But sooner or later you have to fall to your knees and just plain pray. Then, and only then, will you begin to operate in the vein of God’s miracle-working ways. As you build the discipline of stillness into your life, you will find these quiet moments in God’s presence becoming incredibly precious to you. Excerpts from Bill Hybel’s book Too Busy Not to Pray


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 49


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 50

HE AL TH

THE YO-YO DR. CLAY JACKSON

Q: I know from past columns that you’re not a fan of rapid weight loss. Are there medical concerns that factor into your position? A: From experience I’ve learned that rapid weight loss (let’s arbitrarily define that as five pounds per month) rarely is sustained. Lately though, research has shown that rapid or substantial weight loss is opposed by the body at a fundamental level. Q: What do you mean? A: For an excellent summary (with commentary) in a lay publication, I would direct our readers to an article written by T Parker-Hope (“The Fat Trap”) December 28, 2011, in the Wall Street Journal. I’ll try to hit some of the highlights. For years, I’ve heard from patients who were trying to lose weight that their metabolism was working against them. Q: Were you skeptical? A: Honestly, yes. I basically viewed weight loss (or gain) as caloric economics. Take in more calories than you spend, you gain weight; spend more than you take in, you lose. Q: But recent research has changed your mind? A: It has. It appears that when we lose a significant amount (>10 percent of our body weight), our bodies engage a variety of mechanisms to “push back” to the old “set point” of weight.

Q: Are the changes metabolic? A: Some of them are. For instance, hormonal changes occur that increase appetite. A group of researchers in Australia1 found that one year after losing weight, the body’s levels of ghrelin (often called the “hunger hormone”) were 20 percent higher, causing those who lost weight to feel hungrier. Q: What else? A: Levels of peptide YY, a hormone that suppresses hunger, were low. In addition, a hormone called “leptin,” which is secreted from fat cells, was low. This hormone suppresses hunger and increases metabolism. Q: What’s the upshot of these changes? A: It appears that patients who lose weight stay hungrier and have a slower metabolism. Q: Are there other studies that corroborate the Australian findings? A: Yes. Some researchers have found that after weight loss, muscle tissue converts to a more efficient form.

Q: You’re about to talk about brain scans again, aren’t you? A: Yes. For patients who have lost >10 percent of their body weight, viewing pictures of high-calorie foods is a different neurobiologic experience. Their brains show strong activation in the reward center (the nucleus accumbens) and low activation in the self-control center (the pre-frontal cortex). Q: Can we continue next time? A: Sure. It’s an important topic; let’s do that. Mark P Sumithran, et al. N Engl J Med 2011; 365:1597-1604

1

Note: The contents of this article are intended to convey information and should not be interpreted as medical advice. PH Dr. Clay Jackson practices in Memphis, Tennessee. He attends The Pentecostal Church in Memphis. Terry Black is the pastor.

Q: Is that a good thing? A: It is not. Because the muscles are more efficient, they burn fewer calories during exercise, making it harder to maintain weight loss. Not only our bodies change with weight loss; even our minds change.

It appears that when we lose a significant amount (>10 percent of our body weight), our bodies engage a variety of mechanisms to “push back” to the old “set point” of weight. 50

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

/

MAY

2012


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 51

M U L TICULTURAL MINISTRIES

INTRODUCING JESUS SERGIO VITANZA

O

n the National Public Radio site an interesting headline caught my eye: “U.S. Hispanics Leaving Catholic Church for Evangelical Churches.” The article reported that many Hispanics in the United States are leaving the Catholic church and flocking to Pentecostal churches. Why? In their countries of origin, their families had forbidden these immigrants to step outside the rigid Catholic traditions held in place for generations. Upon arriving in the US, however, they discovered the freedom of choice. The article cited the Pew Research Center’s finding that most Catholics leave the church because of a desire for a less formal and regimented form of worship. To these seekers, the authoritarian worship formula of the Catholic system is a poor substitute for the liberating spiritual expression through music and praise in Pentecostal churches. They crave freedom from condemnation and the joy of worshiping a personal Savior. How can we take part in this Hispanic revival? The answer is not complicated: we must introduce Jesus. The boundaries of culture, language, and lifestyle take a back seat to our mandate. This world is ready for the gospel of Jesus. They are yearning for it. We are not the saviors of the world, but we have a mandate to introduce the One who is. However, the thought of reaching out to someone of a differ-

ent nationality, language group, or culture may feel daunting and even impossible. I have identified three things that will enable anyone to introduce Jesus: testifying, teaching, and training. Testifying: Testifying is merely the act of providing evidence for, being a witness of, and demonstrating what we are talking about. Our changed life is evidence of the life-changing power of Jesus. We do not have to mimic the world to draw people out of the world. A Holy Ghost filled example attracts individuals who are sick of the perversion and evilness of this life and who desire something different. God said through Isaiah, “Ye are even my witnesses. Is there a God beside me? yea, there is no God; I know not any”(Isaiah 44:8). We know the one true and living God. His name is Jesus. Teaching. Plato wrote, “Knowledge is the food of the soul.” Sir Francis Bacon said, “Knowledge is power.” Teaching Bible studies is an incredible way to introduce Jesus to others. People want to know more about the gospel, and once they know, they can make educated decisions about serving Him. Paul said, “The servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient” (II Timothy 2:24). Teaching is a calling all of us must answer. We cannot allow ourselves to be intimidated by

people who can quote entire books of the Bible by memory. The Bible does not say we are “apt to teach” only if we hold a degree in theological studies. We must teach so they will know! Bible studies such as “Into His Marvelous Light,” “Life Studies,” “Exploring God’s Word,” and “Search for Truth” are currently available in Spanish and English and can be taught concurrently. Training: Training is putting what you know into practice. The psalmist said, “Taste and see that the Lord is good” (Psalm 34:8). Jesus trained the Twelve, and He also sent the seventy, two-by-two. When those who are seeking God see people practicing what is preached, it is a drawing card for them. We must constantly be preparing and training to help others know more about Jesus. Hispanics are the largest growing segment of the population in the United States today. We cannot ignore their desire for truth. The harvest is ready. There is no need to wait another day for the fruit to ripen. Introduce Jesus to someone today! PH Sergio Vitanza serves as the national director of Spanish Evangelism Ministries in the UPCI. He is the pastor of Primera Iglesia Pentecostal Unida in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Hispanics are the largest growing faction of the population in the United States today. We cannot ignore their desire for truth. MAY

2012

/

PENTECOSTAL

HERALD

51


861405_Layout 1 3/19/12 2:25 PM Page 52


05Pentecostal Herald May 2012