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FAMILY The Importance of the Family Unit • Single Parenting • What’s a Parent to Do? • Grandparenting Communication Between Husband and Wife • Lessons I Didn’t Want to Learn

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EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

On Pleasing God he Book of Ecclesiastes is somewhat similar to a log or diary of Solomon’s experiences, ideas, and reflections of his colorful life. Some expositors believe Solomon wrote the Book of Ecclesiastes in his old age when he looked back with regret over his checkered past. Solomon’s great wealth allowed him to indulge in a lifestyle beyond the reach of the average person, then and now. I get the impression that there were few restraints to check Solomon in his pursuit of pleasurable experiences. If it felt good, Solomon did it. If it looked good, he obtained it. If it tasted good, he ate it. We may think that we would feel fulfilled and satisfied if we could walk in Solomon’s shoes. If that is the case, we need to realize that by his own testimony Solomon was bored and cynical and sad. But how could those three words describe a man who was surrounded by court jesters who made him laugh and attendants who anticipated and catered to his every whim? How could a man so distinguished for his wisdom be so pessimistic about “life under the sun”? What was the cause of his boredom? His melancholy? His sadness? His sense of emptiness? His fatalistic outlook on life? His pessimism? The answers to those questions lie in the fact that there is something noticeably missing from Solomon’s diary of his seemingly full life. We will search in vain for the slightest hint of prayer or praise or worship in the Book of Ecclesiastes. Solomon’s record of his life is not unlike a lip-parching desert without the thirst-quenching relief of an oasis. Never once in this book does Solomon write of him praying or praising or worshiping God. Perhaps the reason for this glaring absence is the reason Solomon’s crowded and cluttered life was so void of joy. Prayer and praise and worship please God. John said, “Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honour and power: for thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and were created” (Revelation 4:11). We will never experience a true sense

of fulfillment until and unless we please our Creator with our lips and our lives. A life destitute of prayer, praise, and worship is spiritually dull and empty. Without them wisdom is wasted. Without them all toil is tedious. Wealth without worship is worthless. We must never allow ourselves to believe we are too smart, too busy, or too affluent to live in a manner that pleases God. The lives of David and Solomon are a study in contrasts. David, the man after God’s heart, in his struggle to defeat his enemies and build his kingdom, was almost always praising God—even during his difficult days. In fact, many of his psalms streamed straight from his struggles. On the other hand, Solomon, living in wealth and luxury, wrote a book whose prominent strain was pessimism. Overall, David’s life pleased God, and Solomon by contrast failed so miserably that he probably died a miserable man. Life is a journey, and on the journey of life it is never too late to start living in a manner that pleases God who created us for His pleasure. No life is so meaningless that it cannot find its ultimate purpose in pleasing God. No career is so full that it cannot find time for prayer, praise, and worship. In a U.S. News & World Report (1/20/89) article titled “Time Well Spent,” the author (name unavailable) quoted a poll by Priority Management, Inc. revealing how much time the average person will spend in a lifetime on the following: • Sitting at stoplights: 6 months • Opening junk mail: 8 months • Looking for misplaced objects: 1 year • Unsuccessfully returning phone calls: 2 years • Waiting in line: 5 years My own recent online search further revealed that American adults watch television five times more than they read and that the amount of time eighteen- to sixty-fouryear-olds spend per day on the following is as follows:

• 461 minutes sleeping • 211 minutes working • 121 minutes watching television • 101 minutes doing housework • 78 minutes traveling • 69 minutes eating • 48 minutes socializing • 31 minutes in recreation • 28 minutes caring for children • 28 minutes dressing • 25 minutes washing and grooming • 24 minutes reading • 24 minutes conversing • 9 minutes thinking or relaxing Many years ago I read that the average person of seventy has spent • 3 years in education • 8 years in amusement • 6 years eating • 7 years playing • 11 years working • 24 years sleeping • 5½ years washing and dressing • 6 years walking • 3 years talking • 3 years reading • 6 months worshiping God The psalmist said, “Teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom” (Psalm 90:12). Paul said, “See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, redeeming the time, because the days are evil” (Ephesians 5:15-16). How foolish to live our lives without taking time to pray, praise, and worship. Isn’t it about time to take time to do what we were created to do—please God? Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

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Fundamental Doctrine The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

JUNE 2014 PENTECOSTAL HERALD EDITOR Simeon Young Sr. EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston ASSOCIATE EDITOR P. Daniel Buford PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain CREATIVE DIRECTOR Abraham LaVoi DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings GRAPHIC DESIGN Abraham LaVoi, Dennis Fiorini EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Brooke Rosser COPY EDITOR Patrica Bollmann

VOL. 90, NO. 5.

The One True God We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes, and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2014 UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL.

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To publish a Pentecostal magazine that strengthens the hands of Pentecostal pastors, encourages and challenges Pentecostal believers, and reaches beyond the doors of Pentecostal churches

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UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL

GENERAL OFFICIALS

GENERAL EXECUTIVE PRESBYTERS

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney* GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Jerry Jones* DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell* DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton L. Coon Sr.* EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston GENERAL SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR Steve L. Cannon GENERAL YOUTH DIRECTOR Michael Ensey SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Dan Batchelor

Gary Gleason* Aaron Soto* Kevin Borders* Kevin Cox* Daniel Garlitz* Marty Johnson* Bernard Elms* Brent Coltharp* Raymond Woodward*

GENERAL PRESBYTERS

J.R. Blackshear, Ernest Breithaupt, W.L. Clayton, B.S. Cole, Daniel Garlitz, Arless Glass, John Grant, Tommy Hudson, David Johnson, James Kelley, Carrol D. Kennedy, Carl Lagow, Roger Lewis, R.J. McIntyre, John D. Mean, James Merrick, Ronnie Mullings, Paul Price, Paul Reynolds, David Robinson, J.M. Russell, Harry Scism, Scotty Teets, T.F. Tenney, B.J. Thomas, Wayne Trout, G.L. Vittitow, Ted Wagner, David O. Walters, R.D. Whalen, Jesse Williams, Jack Yonts * Member of the Executive Board

Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton L. Coon Sr., Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Daniel Fleming, Jesus B. Fortaleza, Edward Goddard, Scott Graham, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, Wayne Huntley, Darrell Johns, J. Mark Jordan, Ron Lichtle, Arnold MacLauchlan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Mark Morgan, Arthur Naylor, Trevor Neil, Gordon Parrish, Kevin Prince, John E. Putnam, Stephen P. Spite, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, C. Patton Williams, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

HONORARY PRESBYTERS

Scan the QR code on your mobile device to visit pentecostalherald.com.

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[ FA M I LY ] Columns 3 | Editorial

Simeon Young Sr.

7 | The General Superintendent Speaks

David K. Bernard

13 | My Hope Radio

Tiffini Countaway

17 | Faith & Culture

Eugene Wilson

8 The Importance

of the Family Unit

G. Keith and Janice Sjöstrand

11 Hidden Treasure

Lyn St. John

14 What’s a Parent to Do?

Rod and Nan Pamer

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18 Communication between

Husband and Wife Mitchell Bland

38 18

20 Single Parenting

Jill Fierge

29 | Worldline

24 Grandparenting

33 | New Start

30 Not a Broken Cookie

37 | Multicultural Ministries

34 When One Part of Your Brain

Bruce A. Howell

Thomas Crutchfield

Saundra Hanscom

43 | Apostolic Man

J.B. Sims

40 | Teacher of the Month

Steve L. Cannon

50 | Campmeeting Schedule

Pentecostal Life 28 | I Sit Still in the House Melissa Thomas

Wayne Huntley Sr. Peggy Readout

Hijacks the Other Martyn Ballestero Sr.

38 Lessons I Didn’t Want to Learn Anonymous

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44 The Tupelo Children’s Mansion

Family

Brooke Rosser

The Legendary 46 |  W.E. Gamblin

Gregory and Dana Willis

48 | The Three Necessities

David A. Huston

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The Bible you have been waiting for ...

IS FINALLY HERE! pentecostalpublishing.com/ASB

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THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS BY DAVID K. BERNARD

The Increasing Diversity of the Church ur world is becoming more connected, and our nation is becoming more diverse. The United Pentecostal Church International (UPCI) is committed to reaching and involving people of every ethnicity and race. For some, diversity has become a method to promote personal agendas; for some it is a tool to dismantle traditional values. Some seek to create artificial diversity through quotas and political correctness. Nevertheless, diversity is a positive goal when it means providing increased opportunity and participation for everyone. It is God’s will for the church on earth to encompass the ethnic and racial diversity of society. (See Galatians 3:28; Colossians 3:11.) The church in Heaven will consist of those who have been redeemed by the blood of Jesus Christ “out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation” (Revelation 5:9). Together they will worship the one God around the divine throne as one people. The Book of Acts recounts how the apostolic church grew by overcoming social, cultural, and ethnic barriers. Jesus commissioned His disciples to become His witnesses in Jerusalem (home city), Judea (home province), Samaria (neighboring province, people of different ethnicity), and to the end of the earth (Acts 1:8). The church progressively expanded from Palestinian Jews to Hellenistic Jews, Samaritans, and ultimately Gentiles of various nations, ethnicities, and races. (See Acts 6, 8, 10, 15.) Consequently, the New Testament church encompassed Middle Easterners, Africans, Asians, and Europeans, and this diversity was reflected in its leadership. (See Acts 13:1; 14:20-27; 16:9-12; 19:10.) It gave prominent roles to people who had low status in ancient society including women, youth, foreigners, the poor, and even slaves. The church today should emulate this example of inclusion by being diverse at all levels of participation. It should promote integration while opposing prejudice, discrimination, and segregation. Moreover, it needs to focus evangelistic efforts on people of every language, ethnicity, and race. Local

churches should actively welcome people of every background. In addition, the church as a whole must be intentional about making disciples of every people group in every locale. It needs strategies for reaching minority groups within each nation such as ministering in various languages; promoting cross-cultural missions; developing leaders from within minority groups; and planting churches in ethnic neighborhoods, towns, and regions. In other words, the church needs to reach people where they live, not only geographically but culturally, socially, and linguistically. In Global Missions the UPCI has long followed this dual strategy of inclusion and targeted outreach. Consequently, the UPCI has believers in 203 nations and territories, and the vast majority of its total constituency is nonwhite. It has multicultural, multiracial churches in large cities around the world. In the US and Canada the UPCI has traditionally reflected the majority culture with the majority of its constituency being Caucasian and Anglo-American. However, in recognition of the diversity of the first-century church, the diversity of the early twentiethcentury Pentecostal movement, and the increasing diversity of modern society, in the past forty years the UPCI has become more intentional about reaching every race and culture in North America. Consequently, over the years the UPCI of the US and Canada has established several important ministries that focus on the evangelism of minority groups. These ministries have made significant progress and are led by representatives of the various ethnicities. Spanish Evangelism ministry reports over 700 Spanish-speaking ministers and about 350 Spanish-language congregations. Building the Bridge ministry develops strategies for cross-cultural ministry, urban ministry, and particularly evangelism into the African-American community. Its leaders estimate that the UPCI has about five hundred Black ministers and 250 Black pastors. Multicultural Ministries coordinates outreach to eighteen language and ethnic groups, encompassing 186 ministers and 195 works. Based on these statistics, about

1,400 ministers are from minority groups, or 15 percent of the total, and about 800 churches are ministering primarily to ethnic minorities, or 18 percent of the total. In addition, most UPCI churches have significant involvement by ethnic minorities, especially larger churches, growing churches, and churches in urban areas. This involvement is an estimated 10 to 15 percent of constituency. In sum, an estimated 25 to 30 percent of UPCI constituency in the US and Canada is nonwhite. This diversity is increasingly reflected in leadership. For example, according to a 2012 survey of the fifty-five districts in the US and Canada, thirty-one had minorities as department heads and thirty-nine had minorities in some leadership position. Of these, eleven had African-American or Black board members; five had Asian, Pacific Island, or Native American board members; and five had Hispanic board members. The Board of General Presbyters (General Board), which is the governing body under the General Conference, has African-American or Black, Hispanic, and Asian members. Recently, the first person of Filipino descent was elected to the General Board. The work of the organization is conducted by eight general divisions (major ministries), and each of them has minority representation on its general committee or board. For several divisions such as Youth, Sunday School, and North American Missions, the participation is 20 percent or more. Significantly, these leaders were not chosen on the basis of ethnicity, but they have risen through the ranks and have been elected by their peers based on involvement, qualifications, and abilities. Much progress has been made, but more work needs to be done. It is God’s will for us to reach every language and ethnic group—not only around the world but also in our own nation. David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International.

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[ FA M I LY ]

The Importance of the Family Unit G. KEITH AND JANICE SJÖSTRAND

od’s first family consisted of Him, Adam, and Eve. After the Fall, the Lord saved Noah and his family from the great flood. After Noah, God called out Abram and his family. From one family came a tribe, and from one tribe came a nation. God’s covenant with that nation included the Ten Commandments, the fifth of which had to do with family: “Honour thy father and thy mother” (Exodus 20:12). From a nation of family came a Savior, a Son, sent to redeem the family: “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given” (Isaiah 9:6), so that the gift of His Spirit might be delivered within families near and far (Acts 2:39), and that we might all become the family of God. John said, “Beloved, now are we the sons of God” (I John 3:2). The outpouring of the Spirit was promised to all flesh, including members within the family: “It shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams” (Acts 2:17). The Bible is full of the language of family. In the Old Testament, the role of father included protecting his daughter from rash vows, naming his children, pronouncing blessings over them, instructing them in the ways of wisdom, and rehearsing for them repeatedly how God had delivered them from slavery. Families were to worship together, celebrate together, and work, eat, and live together. A heritage was passed from generation to generation, and anything lost could be redeemed at Jubilee. God declared the firstborn male of every family holy, redeemable only by sacrifice. He further stated that He made man and woman one flesh that “he might seek a godly seed” (Malachi 2:15). His last word of promise in the Old Testament delivers the importance with which He views the family: “Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and dreadful day of the Lord: and he shall turn the heart of the fathers to the children, and the heart of the children to their fathers, lest I come and smite the earth with a curse” (Malachi 4:5-6). The Old Testament ends with a promise to a broken family; the New Testament begins with its fulfillment.

The New Testament begins with the story of a family: Zacharias and Elisabeth, and Mary and Joseph. The forerunner and the Messiah were cousins: one born to a priest, the other to a carpenter. Jesus was born into a family, lived in a family, and modeled appropriate behavior as a son in a family. He openly submitted Himself to Joseph, His father in the flesh, and God, His Father in the Spirit, and found grace and favor with everyone. God spoke His fatherly blessing verbally, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased” (Matthew 3:17).

The New Testament begins with the story of a family: Zacharias and Elisabeth, and Mary and Joseph. The forerunner and the Messiah were cousins: one born to a priest, the other to a carpenter. Jesus was born into a family, and modeled appropriate behavior as a son in a family. Jesus modeled the same loving behavior in His blessing of the children whose mothers brought them to Him. And He repeatedly demonstrated compassion for parents and their children: Jairus and his dead daughter; the woman of Sychar and her vexed daughter; the widowed woman and her dead son; and a desperate father and his possessed son. Jesus loved His mother and, while He was dying at Calvary, delivered her into the safekeeping of John. He loved Mary Magdalene and sent her to His disciples after His resurrection. Jesus claimed as His own family those who did the will of the Father in Heaven (Matthew 12:50) and pronounced His Father as our Father (Matthew 20:17), before He ascended. Jesus loved people like family. JUNE 2014

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Not only did Jesus, who was single, identify with family, but Paul, also single, did so as well. Paul referred to Timothy as his son in the gospel and reminded him that his faith was first in his grandmother Lois and his mother Eunice. As his father in the gospel, Paul admonished Timothy to treat older men and women as fathers and mothers, and younger men and women as brothers and sisters (I Timothy 5:1-2). Before he died, Paul charged Timothy to remember all he had been taught and who had taught him. Paul transferred his legacy to Timothy as his son in the gospel. Paul and Timothy were family. Although Paul charged the whole church at Thessalonica “as a father doth his children,” (I Thessalonians 2:11), it was his letter to the Ephesians where he emphasized the importance of the family. Paul identified God as our Father and us as His children (Ephesians 1:2, 5). The key to this amazing relationship between Heaven and earth is the love of God. Paul prayed that we would all know it intimately: “That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith; that ye, being rooted and grounded in love, may be able to comprehend with all saints what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height; and to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God” (Ephesians 3:17-19). The love of Christ is the key to the fullness of God and Paul’s revelation to the Ephesian church. The Ephesian church was a family. Paul revealed the seven facets of the church in his letter to the Ephesians, and in the middle of the seven is the family: an assembly or government (1:22); a body (1:23); a masterpiece (2:10); a family (2:19); a building that becomes a temple (2:21); a bride (5:25); and an army of soldiers (6:11). The family is in the middle of the seven dimensions of the church as “the household of God” (2:19). What makes the picture of the family distinct from all the others is that it is born of love. A man leaves his mother and father, cleaves to his wife, they become one flesh, and their children are born as a result of their love for one another. Everyone is connected to the other in love. The church as family is capable of operating in any one of the dimensions Paul identified because it is built on love for God and one another. In Ephesians the church family is commanded to imitate God as dear children, avoid certain behaviors completely, embrace others wholeheartedly, and submit to one another in the fear of God. Wives are to submit themselves to their husbands as if they were doing so to the Lord, and husbands are to love their wives as Christ loved the church and gave Himself for it (Ephesians 5). Children are to obey their parents and honor their father and mother (Ephesians 6).

All these admonitions are to be practiced in the families that attend the church, and the church that attends the families. We are a family of families, and we all belong to the family of God. We may come from families connected by blood and natural birth, but we become part of a larger family connected by His blood and spiritual birth. God wants to save us by families, and then deliver our families to the family of the church. Whether or not we are related by blood is immaterial; we are related by the blood of Jesus. The fact that we are not biologically connected is what makes the New Testament concept of family so compelling. Jesus has invited all of us to be a part of His family. Men learn to become fathers, women learn to become wives, children learn to honor and respect their parents and elders, and young men learn to treat young women with respect. The world watches and knows we are Jesus’ disciples by the love we have for one another. We are individual families who have become the corporate family of God. Amazingly, Jesus admonished in the Book of Revelation the same Ephesian church that Paul wrote to. They had mastered the work of the church but had lost the love that drives it. Once again He modeled fatherly correction in His admonition: “I know thy works, and thy labour, and thy patience, and how thou canst not bear them which are evil: and thou hast tried them which say they are apostles, and are not, and hast found them liars: and hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name’s sake hast laboured, and hast not fainted. Nevertheless I have somewhat against thee, because thou hast left thy first love” (Revelation 2:2-4). The key to the family unit is love, and the key to love is a relationship with God. No facet of the church can operate without the love of God. And the love of God is manifested in the family. Society recognizes the importance of the family, even while it erodes what it means to be a family. We as families are called to reveal the mystery of God’s family on earth in our relationships with one another in our homes and churches. Whether we come singly or in a family, we are all part of the family of God.

G. Keith and Janice Sjöstrand have been married thirty-six years. They have two daughters, a son-in-law, and one granddaughter. They live in Newark, Ohio, where they pastor the family of Christian Apostolic Church, celebrating one hundred years of Apostolic heritage.

Fashioned The 100 Year Anniversary Commemorative Issue for Purpose of the Pentecostal Herald is truly a collector’s

Mothers edition. Including historical articles, photographs, Memorial timelines, and biographies, this is an issue you will cherish for years to come. 2014 To order, visit www.pentecostalherald.com.

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[ FA M I LY ]

Hidden Treasure LY N S T. J O H N

here is treasure hidden everywhere you look. You may not see it because it is small, but it is a treasure we all have in common. It is children. Now try to think of the children in your life, in your neighborhood, and at church. How many of those children have a strong and personal relationship with Jesus? There are examples in the Bible of children who were a treasure and instrumental in the spiritual direction of their generation. The first child’s story begins in I Kings 13:1-2 (NKJV): Behold, a man of God went from Judah to Bethel by the word of the Lord, and Jeroboam stood by the altar to burn incense. Then he cried out against the altar by the word of the Lord, and said, “O altar, altar! Thus says the Lord: ‘Behold, a child, Josiah by name, shall be born to the house of David; and on you he shall sacrifice the priests of the high places who burn incense on you, and men’s bones shall be burned on you.’” This prophecy was written and lost hundreds of years before Josiah was born. He was born into an extremely dysfunctional family and was exposed to many things a child should not be exposed to. His life changed at the age of eight when he became king. Surely the men of his father’s court thought they would be able to manipulate this young king to do their bidding. Little did they know God had other plans. With little spiritual training

young Josiah decided the Israelites needed to turn their hearts back to the one true God and began tearing down altars and idols in the land. He restored Israel to a right standing with God and reinstated the festivals and worship. II Kings 23:25 (NKJV) states: “Now before him there was no king like him, who turned to the Lord with all his heart, with all his soul, and with all his might, according to all the Law of Moses; nor after him did any arise like him.” The second child is Esther. In this story a king was looking for a new wife—a treasure to show off. Esther had been orphaned as a child, but she was raised by her uncle who taught her about God. When the decree went out, Esther’s uncle told her to follow the king’s decree and to listen to those in authority over her during her time at the palace. Esther went through months of training and beauty treatments before her appointment with the king. When she met the king she was the treasure he had been looking for. When a decree came out to kill the Jewish people, Esther was in the right place at the right time. She was willing to intercede for her people, stating, “If I perish, I perish” (Esther 4:16). She spent time in prayer and fasting and asked the king to rescind the decree. Because of the treasure the king had found in her he granted the request. She was able to save her people. The last example includes a group of children. Moses knew that all children were treasures. When Pharaoh asked who would be going into the desert on a three-day journey to sacrifice to the Lord, Moses said all of the men, women, and children. Pharaoh also knew the treasure in children because he refused to let the JUNE 2014

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little ones go. Once the Israelites had escaped to the wilderness, Moses sent twelve spies to the Promised Land. When they came back with the report, ten said they could not conquer this land, but two said they could. The people became fearful at the bad report and rebelled against God. Moses interceded for the people and God gave His answer in Numbers 14:26-38. The only people who were still going to experience the Promised Land were the “little ones”—the children. What would have happened if Moses had not recognized the treasure in children? Each of these stories can easily represent a child with whom you have contact. Maybe it is the child who is part of the bus ministry and who has a horrible home life but still yearns for things that are good and true. Maybe it is the child who was orphaned or abandoned but raised by someone in the church. She has learned to respect God and be obedient. Perhaps it is the child who has been raised in church by godly parents who believe that no matter what the situation is, God is in control. Where your treasure is there will your heart be also. What is your heart for the children in your life? They need guidance, mentors, and people to believe they can be a part of ministry. Are you ready to help equip the next Josiah, Esther, Joshua, or Caleb? Lyn St. John attends New Life Center in Bridgeton, Missouri. Garry Tracy is the pastor. Lyn is currently enrolled in a psychology program and intends to receive a graduate degree in Clinical Child Psychology.

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MY HOPE RADIO BY TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Evelyn Marshbu

Two Artists … Two Minutes Describe your spiritual journey. My twelve. I was afraid so my dad said if I would family started attending a UPC church when I was five. At the age of seven I was baptized in Jesus’ name, and at eight I received the Holy Ghost. Kenny and I married in February 1980, and together we worked with the youth department, taught home Bible studies, and anything else we could do. In 1983, Kenny received his local minister’s license and we evangelized from 1985 to 1990. In April 1990 he became the pastor of Landmark UPC in Lexington, North Carolina.

What is your favorite verse of Scripture in the Bible? Philippians 4:8: “Finally,

Tell us a little about your family. My brethren, whatsoever things are true, what-

Della Mae Kennedy

husband is Kenneth Marshburn of Landmark UPC in Lexington, North Carolina. We have been married thirty-one years and have two sons. Carson is twenty-two years old and is our senior youth pastor. He is married to Amanda and they have a six-month-old son named Cooper. Cody is twenty years old. He works with the music, singing and playing guitar and bass.

Tell us a little about your family. My husband, Eddy, and I have been full-time missionaries for over fifteen years and are currently working in New Caledonia, a group of French islands in the South Pacific. We have a wonderful teenage daughter, Cherish, who has been raised in foreign missions. Describe your spiritual journey. I grew up in a Pentecostal home and was always active in the church, even as a young person. My parents pastored and also started three home missions churches, so there was

soever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” What is your music background? My favorite artist was Andre Crouch—I still love the old songs he wrote. I also like Nancy Grandquist, Reba Rambo, and many others. I started singing specials in church at the age of always plenty of work to be done and music to be made. I graduated from UPBI in Canada, now known as Northeast Christian College, and later began working under AIM in the African region with my husband. After several years on AIM, we went on to be full time in missions.

What is your favorite verse of Scripture in the Bible? One of my favorite

Scripture verses speaks of the commitment of the Lord toward His people. Joshua 23:14: “Ye know in all your hearts and in all your souls, that not one thing hath failed of all the good things which the Lord your God spake concerning you; all are come to pass unto you, and not one thing hath failed thereof.” What is your music background? I started singing in church with my sister at about four years old, and later with a friend when I was around nine or ten. During my teen years, my friends and I would often spend hours at the church playing and singing just for fun.

What is one of your favorite songs to sing? Why is it your favorite? I tend to prefer songs of a simplistic nature and played

sing twelve times he would buy me an accordion. Well, I did sing twelve times and after that I just kept singing. And years later I did get that accordion.

What is one of your favorite songs to sing? Why is it your favorite?

“The Warrior Is a Child”—It explains where I receive my strength. Even though people may not see me, God can. Do you write your own songs? I have written only one. When my husband was battling cancer and I needed strength I would sit at my piano at home and sing. One day I just started singing, “Jesus, Just Hold My Hand.” And He did.

Who do you want to send a shout-out to? To the wonderful saints at Landmark

UPC in Lexington, North Carolina. I love you; you’re the BEST!

Where can we listen, purchase, and connect with you? You can listen on the

contemporary station on myhoperadio.com, purchase my CD on pentecostalpublishing. com, and connect on Facebook. in minor keys. I sing in French as well as in English. One of my favorite songs to sing in both languages is “More Love, More Power.” Do you write your own songs? I do write songs. I usually start with just two or three lines that I mull over in my head for a few days—sometimes much longer. These first lines are usually the heart of the message within the song. The best time for me to find a song is while praying.

Who do you want to send a shoutout to? To the friends we have made during our travels in North America and in many other areas of the world. Thanks for every kind word and deed and may the Lord safely keep you under the shadow of His wings.

Where can we listen, purchase, and connect with you? You can listen on

myhoperadio.com, purchase my CD on pentecostalpublishing.com, and connect on Facebook by searching “Kennedy’s in New Caledonia.”

Tiffini Countaway is the producer of MyHopeRadio.com.

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[ FA M I LY ]

What’s a Parent to Do? R O D A N D N A N PA M E R

Texas teenage boy recently killed four people in a drunken driving accident. His defense lawyers argued that his wealthy parents never taught him right from wrong. The sixteen-year-old was facing twenty years behind bars for the horrific June 2013 wreck. Instead, he walked out of a Fort Worth courtroom with ten years’ probation. The legal defense team said he needed counseling, not a prison sentence, and proposed sending him to a lavish Southern California treatment facility. State District Judge Jean Boyd’s decision to let the teen walk outraged the victims’ families. The fatal crash occurred when the youth, drunk on alcohol and Valium, lost control of his speeding pickup and smashed into a broken-down car. The driver of the stranded car was killed instantly, along with three good Samaritans who had stopped to help the driver, including a youth pastor and two neighbors. A witness for the defense testified that the teen was the troubled product of a broken home. He got whatever he wanted from his wealthy parents and didn’t understand consequences. The attorneys called the teen a victim of “affluenza,” a rich-kid syndrome that led him to believe money solved everything. This sad story is a worst-case scenario of modern parenting. For many people, parenting has become a lost art. After fifty years of misinformation, guiding children into responsible adulthood has vanished from the collective memory. What was once completely natural, is now lost to many parents. Two unfortunate results have happened from Dr. Spock’s philosophy on parenting put forth in his book Dr. Spock’s Baby and Child Care (1946): •

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We have parents that make no effort to mold their children. Kids do as they please, and the parents do their own thing. The lives of kids and parents are in two different orbits. This has often taken place where the family unit has dissolved.

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Parents who become slaves to their children. From as early as one year, the children are in charge. The parents orbit around the children, as John Rosemond has shown in his books on parenting. The parents are disciplined, not the kids. In both situations, parents don’t understand their role in the family unit: to train the children to grow up to be responsible adults. The kids are in charge of their own lives. Without training, the children often become undisciplined, directionless individuals who have a warped worldview. This is a serious situation because children are rarely capable of making right decisions to guide their lives. Having no maturity, they choose the path of least resistance. Also, because they do not understand consequences, kids want immediate gratification. Last, selfishness becomes the motivating force in a child’s decisions, which always results in a bad choice. Those who decided to reject the teaching of the Bible probably had no idea of the ramifications concerning children. But our generation has seen the results: 1. Kids are growing into adulthood completely undisciplined and immature. 2. The children have not been taught to respect their parents or authority. 3. Many young adults seem incapable of building a life. What should parents do? How should the church deal with the problem? The only solution is to return to the Bible because it is the manual given to us by the “Manufacturer.” In order to save ourselves from this “untoward generation,” we must get back to the Word of God. •

Three Parenting Principles from the Bible

Train Them. Solomon said, “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it” (Proverbs 22:6). This wisdom from the Book of Proverbs asserts that Mom and Dad take charge and train the kids to become responsible human beings. Training is a lifestyle—a mindset that never stops throughout the eighteen years the children are growing up. Thankfully, Deuteronomy 6 makes training a doable task for parents. We train them throughout the day. Parenting is relatively easy when parents get a picture in their minds of what they want their

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children to become. Then in every situation the kids are encouraged and disciplined to become that picture. Very early Mom and Dad need to determine what aspects of life they want to develop in their children. Priorities will have to be established. Whatever characteristics are chosen to be the most important, the child will have to be trained in those areas. While there are many areas that need training, one of the most needful areas is respect. When parents don’t take charge, even the smallest toddler develops an attitude of disrespect. This kind of situation takes the child into adulthood thinking that no one knows as much as they do. He or she refuses instructions from anyone in authority. This often results in chaos. Parents must not be afraid to require respect from their children. There may be resistance, but ultimately kids are more well adjusted when they are trained to respect their parents. Protect Them. The infant Moses was in great danger. As a helpless infant, Moses had no control over events in his life. But he had godly parents. Jochebed and Amram understood their role in protecting this innocent child. We have witnessed a strange assault on innocent children— abortion, infanticide, and child molestation. Perhaps we are on the brink of one of our children doing great things as Moses did. Whatever the reason, our children are at risk and we must protect them. Peter said, “Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour” (I Peter 5:8). Peter’s warning to the church is also a warning to every parent concerning children. There has always been evil and lust. But with modern technology, social media, and a corrupt entertainment industry, we have to greatly increase our vigilance. We must know at all times what our kids are seeing. We have to monitor and restrict their time on modern technology. These devices can never be designated babysitters—they are totally amoral, having no sense of right and wrong. Whoever babysits our kids becomes the pattern our kids will follow. In every setting of their lives—school, church, clubs, friends, and every electronic device—we must be vigilantly watching and protecting. Pray for them. Throughout the Gospels, there were parents who came to Jesus with the needs of their children. Jesus was always responsive. Whether it was a child throwing himself into a fire, or a child having a deadly fever, Jesus listened and made a way. That is a clear indicator to all parents that God will hear you when you ask Him to help your kids. This was illustrated beautifully with Hannah and her child, Samuel. Hannah said, “For this child I prayed; and the Lord hath

given me my petition which I asked of him” (I Samuel 1:27). Hannah prayed Samuel into existence, and Hannah’s prayer set his feet in a certain direction, toward the kingdom of God. “Therefore also I have lent him to the Lord; as long as he liveth he shall be lent to the Lord. And he worshipped the Lord there” (I Samuel 1:28). “And all Israel from Dan even to Beersheba knew that Samuel was established to be a prophet of the Lord. And the Lord appeared again in Shiloh: for the Lord revealed himself to Samuel in Shiloh by the word of the Lord” (I Samuel 3: 20-21). Many great men and women have changed the world because of the prayers of parents. Our culture has left little time in our daily schedule for prayer. But it is necessary. Maybe one day it will be as they leave for school, and the next day it will be by their bedside while they are asleep. Every chance you get, pray for them. Just as Hannah’s prayer opened a channel to God for Samuel, our prayers will do the same for our children. In this most difficult era when the family unit is dissolving, Christians must resist the culture and stand on the truth God has given us. That includes the truth about parenting. On a personal note: All three of our children are grown and are serving the Lord. We can’t say exactly what we did right in parenting. But one overarching principle reigned: We loved God with all our hearts and we unapologetically required our kids to do the same. If we served God by mowing the church grass, so did our kids. If we prayed at the altar with sinners, our kids were there too. Alyson, Paul, and Rose learned from us to always put God first. We trained them, we protected them, and we prayed for them. We fully understand that parenting is unique to every family and no formula works for everyone. However, all of us can keep our feet firmly planted on the Word of God, love God with all our hearts, and require of our kids what God requires of us. That will be a good foundation for parenting in the twenty-first century. Rod and Nan Pamer serve in the role of bishop of the Apostolic Church in Barberton, Ohio, where they have worked for forty years. For parents looking for options to better protect your children when searching the web, we recommend Qustodio. You can find more information about Qustodio at www.qustodio.com.

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FAITH & CULTURE BY EUGENE WILSON

The Greatness of a Pawn hess is one of the most popular games in the world. Two players, each beginning with sixteen pieces of six kinds, move chess pieces according to fixed rules across a chessboard in an attempt to checkmate the opponent’s king. The sixteen pieces of six kinds consist of one king, one queen, two bishops, two knights, two rooks, and eight pawns. Each of the different kinds represents a value, the most valuable being the king. When the king is unable to move, the game is over. The queen is the next most valuable piece. However, the game can still be played even after a queen has been captured. The value of the bishops, knights, and rooks is fairly equal and mostly determined by the game situation. The pawns are the least valuable chess pieces. Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines pawn as “one that can be used to further the purposes of another.” In the game of chess, this is precisely the role a pawn fulfills. Pawns are expendable, and are often sacrificed for a more valuable piece.

risma and leadership ability. And yet Christ described Himself as that of the former. (See Matthew 11:29.) Seldom, if ever, will you hear gentleness and humility expressed as commendable traits, especially for leaders. But according to Scripture these are the traits we are supposed to exhibit. In Philippians 2:3-4 Paul said, “Let nothing be done through strife or vainglory; but in lowliness of mind let each esteem others better than themselves. Look not every man on his own things, but every man also on the things of others.” Being kind and humble are things we should aspire to become. Instead, we often want power so we can command and control. We do not want to be a pawn.

Am I Willing to Be a Pawn?

As a child I used to like to sing “I’m in the Lord’s Army.” I particularly enjoyed shouting the line, “Yes, sir.” However, as an adult there have been times in which the words “Yes, sir” did not come so easily from my lips, especially when it involved my being used to further the purposes of another. Like Naaman, in II Kings 5:1-19, there is a willingness to be called upon to do great things. But what about things that do not lead to greatness? What about things that cause others to think less of me? Am I willing to decrease? Am I willing to be used to further the purposes of another? Am I willing to be a pawn?

The Role of a Pawn

Most people have little interest in fulfilling the role of a pawn. Most people are interested in self-preservation, not in sacrifice; in getting ahead, not in taking a backseat; in being served, not in serving. Consequently, gentleness and humility are less desirable traits in comparison to cha-

Called to Be a Pawn

James and John asked Jesus, “Grant us that we may sit, one on Your right hand and the other on Your left, in Your glory” (Mark 10:37, NKJV). When the other disciples heard about their request they were greatly displeased. “And Jesus called them to him and said to them, ‘You know that those who are considered rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones exercise authority over them. Yet it shall not be so among you; but whoever desires to become great among you shall be your servant’” (Mark 10:42-43, NKJV). As Christians—leaders in the marketplace, in the home, and in the church—we

must act as servants, not as lords. We must put off desires for importance and put on kindness, humbleness of mind, and meekness. (See Colossians 3:12.) Instead of desiring to be the one who is served, we must serve. We must seek to live counterculture to our world. We must not think of ourselves as being superior to others. We must not act in ways that display attitudes of smugness and haughtiness. We must not allow pride to arise within our hearts. When such things exist, contention will arise. Instead, we are to be “clothed with humility” (I Peter 5:5). In his commentary concerning this verse, Matthew Henry says, “Humility is the great preserver of peace and order in all Christian churches and societies, consequently pride is the great disturber of them, and the cause of most dissensions and breaches in the church.” Humility and gentleness help maintain the unity of the Spirit. Paul said in Ephesians 4:1-3 (NKJV), “I, therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you to walk worthy of the calling with which you were called, with all lowliness and gentleness, with longsuffering, bearing with one another in love, endeavoring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.” When lowliness and gentleness are absent, maintaining the unity of the Spirit is virtually impossible. We must not allow insecurities, inferiority complexes, egos, and personality differences to cause us to react in ways contrary to that of a pawn. Our chief desire must not be to impress others. Jesus taught His disciples that greatness does not come from where one sits at the table. Those who serve are the greatest. (See Mark 10:42-43.) Greatness is not based on position or title or one’s possessions. Greatness does not come to those who seek self-promotion; greatness comes to those who are willing to be a pawn. Eugene Wilson is an ordained minister, leadership consultant, and coach specializing in church leadership. He and his wife Kerri have two children.

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[ FA M I LY ]

Communication between Husband and Wife MITCHELL BLAND

y husband never talks to me,” the wife sniffles. The husband retorts, “My wife never quits talking.” The counselor pulls out one word

and says, “Never?” You see, all too often the problem is not the frequency (or infrequency) of actual air movement over vocal cords. The problem is communication. What is being communicated sometimes is not what is being spoken. It is important that we realize we are communicating something any time we are awake and with someone. Let’s say a person walks up to me and says, “You are stupid.” Well, there is not a lot of guesswork. By taking the words at face value and in their simplest form, that person thinks I am stupid. But if someone goes on and on about how much he/she respects me then throws a pie in my face, the action has created a problem with the words. Nonverbal communication is very powerful. In fact, some believe it to be exponentially more powerful than its verbal counterpart. To paraphrase Ralph Waldo Emerson: “What you do speaks so loudly I can’t hear what you are saying.” Throw into this mix the entire male/female ways of communicating and you can quickly see trouble brewing. The problem is not communication per se because that is happening far more often than you realize. The problem is the interpretation of the communication. When my son was a toddler, we had a bedtime ritual for him. He would take his bath, put on his pajamas, have a bedtime snack, and then we would tuck him in bed. In our kitchen, there was a particular cabinet that had a lot of different types of snacks he enjoyed. Most of the time the ritual was carried out without a hitch. However, there were those times when he was being just a touch on the grouchy side, which, as many parents know, can easily pull you just a touch on the grouchy side also. 18

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One of these grouchy evenings, I opened the cabinet and said, “What do you want for a snack?” My four-year-old son proceeded to randomly point and mumble something. I looked at him and asked, “What did you say? What do you want for a snack?” Again, the half-point and incoherent, whiney mumble. After about the third time of this, my son was able to pull me over to just a little on the grouchy side. I firmly said, “I don’t speak weasel; you have one last chance to use your words.” That snapped him out of it and he helpfully pulled out the snack he desired. No, I did not deserve any trophies for parenting that night, but I did solve the problem. I said something to him that I have said so often in counseling sessions or marriage seminars: Use. Your. Words. Language is a beautiful gift, but far too often we don’t use it correctly or to our advantage. Using words and actions that match takes a lot of the guesswork out of what we are trying to communicate. Imagine this little exercise: You walk into your house and someone you work with is seated on your couch. You say, “Oh, hello! You startled me. Do you need something?” Your coworker continues to look straight ahead as if oblivious to your presence. What are the thoughts running through your mind? No doubt those thoughts will be affected by how you generally view this person, how close you are to this person, or past exchanges with this person. Notice in our little exercise, the coworker has not said a word, but he or she is unconsciously communicating volumes of information. The real problem is every bit of the information you think this person is communicating may be inaccurate. The only way you will truly know what is going on is if he or she says something in a manner you can understand. In this scenario, communication is taking place, but that communication is ineffective. That is why both components of speech and action are necessary. Let’s look back at the house. It is now a husband on the couch. This time, the husband is not sitting silently but instead is reading the

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paper aloud to his wife. Or perhaps he is reciting the Gettysburg Address. It wouldn’t matter because with this type of communication, the complaint would still be, “My husband never talks to me.” The wife’s desire for an emotional bond with her husband is not being fulfilled merely because his vocal cords are vibrating. He is simply not communicating in a language that she understands or desires. One day my sister asked me if my wife and I wanted to meet her at a local restaurant after church. I wanted to check with my wife, so my simple, to-the-point question was, “Janelle, do you want to go out to eat with my sister after church?” In my male brain, that question requires a yes or no answer. However, my wife does not have a male brain. Her response went something like this: “Skyler still has some homework to finish and he needs to get in bed at a decent time because of school tomorrow.” Talking took place. Words were exchanged. I knew the meaning of every word she used. My problem was I didn’t ask, “Can you tell me what the plans are for our son tonight?” Something somewhere was lost in the translation. The conversation continued. I, with what I am certain was a kind and earnest look on my face, said, “I have no idea what you are talking about.” In my male mind, I simply needed a yes or no. In her female mind, she was processing tremendous amounts of information verbally to come up with a more logical and grounded answer. Her response? “I don’t care.” This threw my mind into a tailspin. Was it the “I don’t care” meaning she really didn’t care? Was it the “I don’t care” meaning she had already given her answer and I didn’t get it? Was it the “I don’t care” that means she really does care? Was it the “I don’t care” that says, “You are asking as a formality, but I can tell you already have your mind made up, so it really doesn’t matter what I answer”? Or

was it another form of “I don’t care” that I wasn’t clued into at the moment? After reading this little scenario, you can see that up to this point proper communication had not taken place. We had exchanged words, we were in close physical proximity, body language could easily be read, no one was upset or hostile, but we were not on the same page. The English language was being exchanged between two individuals, but we were not effectively communicating. All of the assumptions and all of the confusion took place in a matter of moments over a relatively simple question. The way this little exchange was resolved is the same way every other exchange between husband and wife has to be resolved. That is by using words, tone, and body language that are not threatening, condescending, or argumentative. When both individuals are truly seeking to understand what the other is saying, communication is so much easier. And it is so much more effective. There is enough misinformation and miscommunication that we deal with every day of our lives. The last place this needs to happen is between a husband and wife. Do not use assumptions, nonverbal cues, pride, misinterpretations, or past misunderstandings as excuses for not having proper communication. Yes, it does take some work. Yes, it does take willingness on the part of each individual to want to understand. Yes, it is possible. And yes, it is the right thing to do. Don’t just talk. Work to effectively communicate. Mitchell Bland is the happy husband of Janelle and proud dad of Skyler. When not busy with his duties as the executive pastor of The Sanctuary in Hazelwood, Missouri, Mitchell and his favorite ally, Janelle, enjoy ministering at marriage seminars across the country. JUNE 2014

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[ FA M I LY ]

JILL FIERGE

Single

Parenting f you are a single parent, chances are you often feel overwhelmed, inadequate, and guilty. You are not alone. One 2011 study estimated that over 14 million parents in the United States are raising their children alone. To make matters worse, around 31 percent of custodial mothers and 16 percent of custodial fathers have incomes below poverty. According to the Single Parent Success Foundation, 63 percent of suicides nationwide, 75 percent of children in chemical dependency hospitals, and more than half of all youths incarcerated in the United States are from single-parent families.

These sobering facts can be disheartening to the mother or father raising a child alone due to separation, divorce, or death of a spouse. However, the single parent does not have to go it alone. These statistics can be overcome. In fact, when the single parent co-parents with God, she can effectively raise emotionally healthy, godly adults. While every family is unique, the following list contains some time-tested guidelines for all.

some exercise and sleep, he is not only ensuring he has something left to give his children; he is also setting a good example for them. Author Laura Petherbridge notes, “If the custodial parent is emotionally healthy, spiritually stable, and walks closely with God, the children can grow up to be really wonderful, secure kids.” In Matthew 11:28 Jesus encouraged us, “Come unto me, all ye  that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” That means you, single parent.

Take time for yourself. Typically, single parents are so concerned with their children that they tend to neglect themselves. Consequently, the parent may become worn out physically, drained emotionally, and empty spiritually. As a result, the individual has nothing left to give his children. Preparing healthy foods takes too much energy. Finding time to exercise consistently can also be a challenge. Since the single parent may be working full time outside the home, while trying to maintain responsibilities at home, personal devotion times are often compromised. Therefore, the single parent feels worn out from trying to keep it all together. When the parent makes time for personal devotions, takes time for an occasional night out with friends and gets

Don’t let harmful emotions overtake you. Regardless of the reason the single parent is alone, she may deal with feelings of anger and bitterness at the absent parent and even at God. James 3:11 cautions us, “Doth a fountain send forth at the same place sweet water and bitter?” In spite of the fact none of us wish our children to grow up bitter and angry, too often we model those characteristics ourselves. They will manifest in our tone, word choice, sarcasm, or general disdain. It is likely our children are dealing with their own hurts and anger, so comments such as, “We would have enough money if your dad hadn’t left,” or “You wouldn’t have to do all these chores if your mom were here,” leave a child feeling hopeless. “If

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If you have recently become a single parent, it is important to keep your home as stable as possible. Children need consistency. Their lives may have just been upended, but as much as possible, keep things the same. Keep regular bedtimes, family traditions, and discipline. Resist the temptation to change everything. dad can’t shake his anger, what hope do I have of getting over this?” In highly volatile situations like abandonment or divorce, it may seem easy to lash out verbally against the other parent. However, this is incredibly hurtful to the child. Your child is part of the absent parent. He may look like or have mannerisms of the other parent. When angry statements are made concerning the character of the parent who is gone, the child may begin to internalize these hurts, questioning whether your feelings extend to him. The emotions a single parent feels toward the other parent may seem justified, but they are not righteous. A helpful exercise is to take all the anger, pain, bitterness, and confusion to Jesus. Ask Him to take those feelings and replace them with fruit of the Spirit. This request for exchange needs to be a daily prayer. God can and will help. I Peter 5:7 reminds us of this daily exercise: “Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you.” Be honest with your children. Guilt is frequently an overwhelming emotion many single parents fight. To compensate we may buy things for our children we can’t afford, allow privileges too early, or allow ourselves to be manipulated. Money is usually very tight in singleparent homes. Without casting blame, parents should be honest with their children about this. Your child may have been used to a certain standard of living, and the situation may be drastically changed now. However, this is an exceptional opportunity to teach money management and greater appreciation of what they have. Furthermore, we can illustrate a priceless lesson by allowing our children to see us continue to be faithful in tithes and offerings, even in difficult times. As a single parent there may be days when feelings of loneliness or worry are crushing. Be truthful with your kids. On those days you are down, it is OK to tell your kids, “Mommy is having a rough day today. I am going to go talk to Jesus for a while. I will be OK because He always helps me. Just give me a few minutes and then we will have supper.” By admitting these feelings while assuring your kids things are going to be OK, you show them how to handle overwhelming emotions. Psalm 61:2 instructs us, “When my heart is overwhelmed: lead me to the rock.” Ask for and receive help. Pride can get in the way of this, and single parents often cannot afford to allow that to happen. We have a responsibility to do what we can for our families, and sometimes that requires us to ask for help. Both I Timothy 5 and James 1 give clear instruction for care of broken families in need. The church has a mandate to help. Most church families are more than willing if they know there is a need. God equips His family with many giftings and talents to help one another. It is important, as single parents, that we not be reluctant to utilize this valuable resource. Equally important is notifying your children when the church has helped. This cultivates a love for the church as well as a clear example to the children of how the body of Christ works. Finally, use the opportunity to model 22

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giving back. If the single parent has benefited from the church’s benevolence fund, be quick to give back to this fund for the next person in need. We can show our children how to give as well as receive. Be consistent. If you have recently become a single parent, it is important to keep your home as stable as possible. Children need consistency. Their lives may have just been upended, but as much as possible, keep things the same. Keep regular bedtimes, family traditions, and discipline. Resist the temptation to change everything. If a particular family tradition cannot be continued, replace it with another. Due to the uncertainty many children face during a change in family dynamics, intentional consistency can bring a sense of calm to their turbulent world. Be available. One of the greatest gifts you can give your child is a listening ear. Let them talk when they are ready. Be available on their time. My sons like to talk late at night, so this is when I am available. Be cautious of saying, “Can this wait until later?” Resist the urge to offer solutions; just let them talk. Often all they need is to be heard. Have fun. Don’t let your home become a place to be avoided. Allow joy in. Be spontaneous. Single parenting can be very rewarding. Focus on the positive aspects of the unique opportunity afforded to bond with your child. If the single parent has more than one child, in the busyness of life it may be challenging to take time for each one. But the rewards of making time are abundant. I have four children, so each Monday night I take a different child out to eat. It may only be fast food, but they know for that time period it is just “me and Mom.” It is my time to connect and be sure they are doing OK. It is an effective way to be sure no one is getting overlooked. Psalm 139:1 reminds us, “O Lord, thou hast searched me, and known me.” Contrary to popular belief, children raised in single-parent homes can be healthy and happy Christians. Make church attendance a foregone conclusion, and make sure all of you are involved in ministries of the church. Pray together. Make time for family devotions. Cultivate a happy home. As a single parent, you have been given a one-of-a-kind opportunity to positively influence the next generation. Do not dread, but seize this opportunity. God is a ready help to each single parent as they tackle this difficult yet rewarding job. Then shall “the widow’s heart … sing for joy” (Job 29:13) as she experiences “no greater joy than to hear that my children walk in truth” (III John 4). Jill Fierge has found being a single mother to Drake, Brock, Jessamy, and Stormy to be a most challenging but rewarding life. She is grateful that she and her kids are a family at The Sanctuary of Hazelwood, Missouri. Tim Dugas and Scott Graham are the pastors.

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[ FA M I LY ]

W AY N E H U N T L E Y S R .

Grandparenting Grandparenting is grand because it is a marvelous second chance granted by God to correct mistakes and to do a better job of being what you perhaps could not or did not do as parents. hildren’s children are the crown of old men” (Proverbs 17:6). A well-known comedian once said the marked difference in discipline his parents executed with him and his children was relative to the thought that “Grandparents are old people just trying to get into Heaven.” Another grandparent was asked, “What’s it like to be a grandparent?” His response was, “Wow, they bring those little angels over on Friday and you take those devils home on Monday!” I am sure it would go without being said they definitely were not talking about my grandchildren or yours. Before I begin my thoughts on the marvelous privilege, honor, and joy of grandparenting, let me give honor to those grandparents who, due to life’s contradictions and circumstantial necessities, are serving as primary caregivers and are parenting their grandchildren. You are heroes in my eyes. May God grant you health and strength as you fulfill a most-needed role. When the exciting news came that we would be grandparents, my wife began to shop and stock our house with every possible thing a baby could need. It was as though we were the excited, expecting young couple. She said, “I want in our house everything the baby will need so all the parents have to do is drop the baby off.” There are also special toys they are not allowed to take home; they must stay at our house. Not to mention a swimming pool that I never get into unless the grandkids ask me. All the toys and attractions have method to their madness. They serve as enticements for the grandkids to want to come to our house. 24

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We were especially blessed to become grandparents relatively young. My male ego struggled with being so young and being called papaw, poppy, or pops. We came up with titles that really described the relationship I wanted with my grandkids. I became “Grandbuddy,” and my wife became “Grammommy.” The really rewarding part was in their early childhood the grandchildren could not say Grandbuddy, so for a while I was thrilled to be called just “Buddy.” My grandchildren are blessed with the best grandparents God could ever give a child in the persons of their dad’s mom and dad, Martyn and Marcia Ballestero. They give our grandchildren a rich, regal, Apostolic heritage of impeccable integrity. It is often questioned how and why grandparents have such affection and gushing admiration for their grandchildren. I think my wife answers that by responding, “It is because they are twice yours. When you see them, you not only see the grandchild, you see your child also.” Grandparenting is grand because it is your incredibly high interest return on your investment in your children. Grandparenting is grand because it is a marvelous second chance granted by God to correct mistakes and to do a better job of being what you perhaps could not or did not do as parents. Grandparenting is grand because it is not the highly pressurized position parenting presents, but serves only as a support and positive influence to both the parents and the grandchildren. In the past couple of years we have celebrated Grandparents Day on the designated Sunday with special promotions and various activities to honor grandparents. To my delight, it has been heralded by the people of The Temple of Pentecost as one of the most enjoyed and appreciated events of our calendar year. Not to mention the undeniable response by grandparents to attend when asked by their grandchildren.

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My grand goal in grandparenting is: 1.

To be the best friend to my grandchildren. Someone they know is always on their side and in their corner. Someone they can talk to who will understand and encourage. From the time our grandchildren began to speak I have tried to instill in them a proper self-respect by asking them, “What kind of boy, or what kind of girl are you?” Their programmed response is always to be “special.” We are careful to emphasize not “better” or “superior”; just “special.” 2. To be their greatest fan. To make a dedicated effort to attend whatever they are involved in, such as Bible quiz tournaments, music recitals, church dramas, or school related involvements. I want to be there to cheer, clap, hug, or just smile as they achieve what is important to them. I want to make memories. 3. To be their financier. There is a time in life when our needs should no longer be our priority, but our greatest joy is to give our grandkids what they need. And yes, a lot of what I guess they just want.

My grand challenge in grandparenting:

To be an unavoidable, inescapable, positive example and influence in their lives for God, His kingdom, and His cause. I can accomplish this in three ways: 1. By being their intercessor in prayer. My patented prayer that I feel God gave me to pray over my grandkids is this: “God grant my grandkids gifts, talents, expertise, and abilities that will honor Heaven and horrify Hell! I cover them with the blood of Jesus and discharge angels to protect their bodies, minds, and souls from Hell’s predators. I pronounce blessings, anointing, and divine favor upon them.”

2.

3.

By being interested. I have learned the key to influencing people is not to be an interesting person but to be an interested person. Who or what should we be more interested in than our grandchildren? Be an invested person. Children spell love T-I-M-E!

I totally understand I cannot put them into the kingdom of God or the ministry. My challenge is like those in Acts 3 who brought the lame man daily to the gate of the Temple, clearly knowing that nothing short of a miracle would get him in. I must get them as close as is humanly possible and trust God for the miracle. The Bible tells a sorrowful story of a king who died, and when he died he was undesired. One interpretation of that verse reads, “And when he died no one cried.” I want to so influence my grandchildren and be in their lives and hearts so much that when I die they will cry. Who would have ever imagined that since we had only one child that our daughter and son-in-law would bless us with five of the best grandchildren in the world? They are Huntley, Christyana, Christian, Caison, and Gentson Ballestero. Thank you, Jesus, for giving to me and my wife the great gift of grandparenting. Grandparenting is truly grand! Wayne Huntley Sr. is the pastor of Temple of Pentecost Raleigh, in Raleigh, North Carolina and also serves as North Carolina District superintendent. He is the husband of Patsy, the father of Christy, and the grandbuddy to five wonderful grandchildren.

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z

United Pentecostal Church International General Conference 2014

A VANCE KINGD M St. Louis, Missouri America’s Center Tuesday, September 30 - Friday, October 3, 2014

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Tuesday, September 30, 2014 6:30 pm - 7:00 pm

WNOP Prayer Service

General Conference Service — Speakers: Brent Coltharp &

7:00 pm

Michael Easter

Wednesday, October 1, 2014 9:00 am - 2:00 pm

Business Meeting

6:30 pm - 6:43 pm

Lighthouse Ranch for Boys

10:00 am - 12:00 pm 6:46 pm - 7:00 pm 7:00 pm

Ladies Breakfast

WNOP Prayer Service

Global Missions Service — Speaker: Anthony Mangun

Thursday, October 2, 2014 9:00 am - 11:50 am

11:00 am - 11:50 am

12:00 pm - 2:00 pm 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm 6:30 pm - 6:43 pm 6:45 pm - 7:00 pm 7:00 pm

Seminars

Closed Ministers Session

General Sunday School Division Service — Speaker: Scott Graham Seminars

Tupelo Children’s Mansion WNOP Prayer Service

North American Missions Service — Speaker: Derald Weber

Friday, October 3, 2014 9:00 am - 11:50 am

9:00 am - 11:50 am

11:00 am - 11:50 am

12:00 pm - 2:00 pm 6:00 pm - 6:45 pm 6:45 pm - 7:00 pm 7:00 pm

Seminars

Ladies In Action

Men’s Ministry Service — Speaker: Tim Gaddy

General Youth Division Service — Speaker: Anthony Bailey Memorial Service

WNOP Prayer Service

General Superintendent’s Message — David K. Bernard

Register at

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

I Sit Still in the House MELISSA THOMAS

artha, as soon as she heard that Jesus was coming, went and met him: but Mary sat still in the house” (John 11:20). Martha and Mary had buried their brother, Lazarus. They had called on Jesus to come and heal him while he was sick, but Jesus had not come. Now Lazarus was dead and the sisters were in mourning. By the time Jesus arrived, it had been four days since they had placed their beloved brother in the tomb. Martha went out to meet her Lord, but not Mary! Mary sat still in the house. I can see her in my mind’s eye: arms crossed, sitting in a chair, looking out the window, a scowl on her face. I can hear the thoughts running through her head: Well, thanks for coming, Jesus, but You are too late. I’m so glad You could work us into Your busy schedule, but Lazarus is dead and there’s nothing You can do now. I can feel the hurt in her heart—the feeling of betrayal, distrust, the unbelievable sorrow and pain. This was not the way it was supposed to be. This is not how the story should have ended. Mary sat still in the house. When I look at this Mary in my mind’s eye, I am startled that she looks just like me, right down to the tightly pursed lips and angry eyes. This was not the ending I signed up for. This was not the story I wanted written of my life. I had called out to Jesus long before the problem was unsolvable. I had given Him plenty of time to get to where I was and fix what I needed fixed. But He didn’t come, and now it was too late. Now there was nothing He could do. I sit and pout ‘cause I didn’t get my way. I sit still in the house. I let my feelings of betrayal and hurt rush over me again and again. I sit still in the house, and I pout. While Mary was sitting in the house, Jesus called for her. He sent Martha back to get her. He opened up the door for her to come 28

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to Him. He didn’t push Himself into her life by going into the house to get her, but He made sure she knew He was waiting for her to come out. He knew she was hurt. He knew she felt betrayed. So He called for her and then waited for her to come. He was not going to Lazarus’s grave without her. He was not going to let her miss out on her miracle. He called for her and then He waited. He does the same with me. He knows I am pouting. He knows how I feel. So He calls for me and then He waits. He waits to see if I will be like Mary and swallow my pride; if I will come to Him and fall down at His feet; if I will stop pouting and start walking; if I will leave my rocking chair of doubt and come out of the house. He waits to see which I love more: my shattered dreams or Him. Which do I want more, the things I cannot have, or Him?

Jesus waits to see if I will be like Mary and swallow my pride; if I will come to Him and fall down at His feet; if I will stop pouting and start walking. When I choose Him, He walks with me to the grave where I have buried my dreams, my hopes, and my love. And He calls forth life. No, perhaps not the life I wanted or planned, but a life that will prove to be the best for me, a life in which I can be used in the Kingdom. I can no longer sit still in the house. My miracle is coming. The grave is bursting with new life, and Jesus is waiting. Melissa Thomas is a devoted wife to her husband of nineteen years. She is a stay-at-home, homeschooling mother to their three amazing children.They live in Winter Garden, Florida, and attend the Pentecostals of Apopka. Michael Williams is the pastor.

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WORLDLINE BY BRUCE A. HOWELL

News from Around the World AMIBIA: We thank God for a great conference where 160 were in attendance. Fifteen were filled with the Holy Ghost and four were baptized in Jesus’ name. Brother and Sister Grosbach came from South Africa and ministered in a great way. The theme for the conference was “A Joshua Generation.” The future of the church will need men and women to carry this truth into the next generation. —Keith and Beth Ikerd DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: Bible school is in session. Our directors report 117 students in our main campus and the extensions. We are excited to have as teachers this term, our parents, Lloyd and Nancy Shirley. They are teaching in the Santo Domingo Bible school, as well as preaching and teaching in the local churches. What a joy to have them with us. We are putting their many years of experience to work while they are here. —Steve and Kari Shirley GHANA: Throughout the nation a total of 261 received the baptism of the Holy Spirit and 484 were baptized in Jesus’ name. Twenty of those baptized and fifteen of those filled with the Holy Spirit were in a struggling church in the upper east region. I am thrilled with this breakthrough. It was also a joy to watch Ghana MKs, Allanah and Stephen Sisco, be baptized in Jesus’ name for the remission of their sins. I rejoice and celebrate their obedience to God’s Word. —Colleen Carter POLAND: Before the walls of Jericho fell, the children of Israel marched around them. Crazy as it may have seemed, it worked. We have been marching. An average of three times a week we have been walking throughout the city, claiming it and the souls of the people. It seemed as if nothing was happening, but our God is an on-time God. Since our last letter we have had seven first-time visitors. We have made many contacts. Several of our contacts are showing interest for Bible studies. It is excit-

ing to see what God is doing. Thank you for marching with us. We cannot fight alone— your prayers of support have been felt. —Jim and Latitia Robertson PAKISTAN: In September, Allan Shalm traveled to Pakistan along with Global Missions Director Bruce Howell, Regional Director Lynden Shalm, and fellow missionary Curtis Scott. Despite some very serious attacks against the church in recent months, the UPC of Pakistan continues to grow. There are now over 3,200 churches and preaching points in that nation, and over 162,000 constituents. To God be the glory for the things He has done! —Allan and Georgene Shalm

up such fine men to help in the Bible school. God knows we need more laborers, for the fields are white and ready for harvest. The church in Papua New Guinea is moving forward and Bible school is one of the main contributing factors. —Richard and Andrea Carver GHANA: National Council 2013 was blessed with a wonderful presence of unity. We thank God for the leadership of the past executives and also for the newly elected officials for the upcoming four years. God has been faithful to the UPCI of Ghana. Congratulations to the newly elected superintendent, D.Y.N. Arko and newly elected assistant superintendent, Joseph Asare. —Nick and Pam Sisco

We just completed a deputation with less than twelve months of travel. This has been our best deputation. God opened many doors and connected us with some of the greatest churches and people in our fellowship. EUROPE/MIDDLE EAST: Youth and leaders from Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, and Turkey participated in a Youth on Mission trip. They ministered on the street, in a house-church meeting, and at the Higher conference. Missionary Jared Staten reports that over thirty received the Holy Ghost, many were healed, and many dozens of new visitors attended Living Word for the first time in Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia. —Michael and Dianna Tuttle PAPUA NEW GUINEA: Our Bible school has seen thirty-eight new students enrolled in August 2013. We have a wonderful group of people who are hungry for the Word of God. Great things are happening and we now have four new national teachers. These men were from the previous graduating class. We praise God for raising

DEPUTATION: We just completed a miracle deputation with less than twelve months of real travel. This has been our best deputation. God opened many doors and connected us with some of the greatest churches and people in our fellowship. Jesus finalized the miracle by fully subscribing us at the 2013 General Conference, during the Global Missions service. We are grateful for all our new partners and for our current faithful partners. To God be all the glory! —David and Anglea Doan Bruce A. Howell is the general director of the Global Missions Division of the United Pentecostal Church International.

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[ FA M I LY ]

Not a Broken Cookie PEGGY READOUT

was forty-four years old when the Lord drastically revised my life and world vision. With a daughter in college and two sons in high school, one a senior and the other a sophomore, my husband and I had just begun to realize that in a few short years there would be a shift in our family dynamics. We would soon be facing an “empty nest.” The Lord, however, had other plans. My husband and I were on our way to India for a three-week missions trip, when I suddenly became so ill that I had to return home. A trip to the hospital revealed that my illness was due to an unsuspected and unexpected pregnancy. The geneticist and medical technician pointed out the cystic hygroma and the other indicators of genetic abnormalities that were showing in the sonogram image of the new life I was carrying in my womb. Since the results of the sonogram indicated that my son would have severe intellectual and physical disabilities, it was strongly recommended that the pregnancy be terminated. To this day, I clearly remember the fear and the anguish that flooded my mind. What kind of future would my baby face? I was familiar with society’s reaction to those who do not measure up to its standards of normalcy. Would my child be facing a life full of rejection, loneliness, bullying, of being left out and made fun of? However, the Lord gently restored peace to my heart and mind by reminding me that all life comes from Him and has a purpose. “Your hands have made me and fashioned me” (Psalm 119:73, NKJV). “I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the Lord, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope” (Jeremiah 29:11, NKJV). Upon my husband’s return from India, we had a family meeting with our three older children and my daughter’s fiancé. Weeping, we shared with them the dire medical prognosis of the soon-to-be newest member of our family. As our children gathered around us to share our tears and offer us comfort, our daughter spoke to us: “Don’t worry, Mom and Dad. He will always have all of us to care for him. After all, he is our brother.” It was in this response of unconditional love that I was shown the heart of God. “We have known and believed the 30

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love that God has for us. God is love, and he who abides in love abides in God, and God in him” (I John 4:16, NKJV). “Above all things have fervent love for one another, for ‘love will cover a multitude of sins’” (I Peter 4:8, NKJV). Several months later, the doctor placed in my arms a precious baby boy with Down syndrome. To the medical staff, he may not have looked like a treasure, but in the eyes of his family, he surely did! With pride and thanksgiving, we named our baby Thomas. At the beginning of the pregnancy we had faced much fear and doubt, but when he arrived we were able to say without hesitation that Jesus is “my Lord and my God.” This was the beginning of many wonderful life-changing lessons the Lord would teach us through this precious treasure. I wonder how many times in our churches the role of the special needs individual has been glossed over as a tragedy in God’s providence and only “able-bodied” and “able-minded” individuals are thought to have a role in the kingdom of God. Several years before my son’s birth, a song had been written with the purpose of providing encouragement to those children with special needs. One of the verses describes a cookie that had a little piece broken off of it on its way from the cookie pan. The verse ends with the affirmation that it can taste just as good as a regular cookie can. Little did I realize how deeply this song had affected my perception of those with special needs, until the Lord stopped me in my tracks and told me in no uncertain terms that viewing my son—or anyone else with disabilities—as a broken cookie was deeply of-

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fensive to Him. He explained to me that this song may represent mankind’s view of those with disabilities, but it does not describe His view. “The Lord does not see as man sees; for man looks at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart” (I Samuel 16:7, NKJV). He reminded me that He had made my son, and He does all things well. In viewing my son as a “broken cookie” I was considering only the temporal body. I was overlooking who my son really is. Then the Lord offered me His view of my son—one of the inner man in which there are no disabilities. The outward, temporal disabilities were only tools the Lord Jesus Christ was using to form my son into His image. Paul said, “He said unto me, My grace is sufficient for thee; for my strength is made perfect in weakness. Most gladly therefore will I rather glory in my infirmities, that the power of Christ may rest upon me” (II Corinthians 12:9). Paul also said, “God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; and base things of the world, and things which are despised, hath God chosen, yea, and things which are not, to bring to nought things that are: that no flesh should glory in his presence. But of him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption: that, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let him glory in the Lord” (I Corinthians 1:27-31). The hope of parents who have children with disabilities is that their children will be accepted for who they really are—the unique creation of a loving God who has given them a special role to play in His kingdom. It is the hope of parents who have children with disabilities that their children be given respectful acknowledgement of their abilities and potential rather than biased assumptions based on their disabilities. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, emotional, behavioral, and neurological disabilities in children are becoming more prevalent than physical impairments. More than a fifth of US households with children have at least one child with special needs. The Maternal and Child Health Bureau, a part of the Health Resources and Services Administration of the US Department of Health and

Human Services, estimates approximately 10.2 million children in the United States have special health care needs. This is 15 percent of all children in the United States. According to pastors.com, about 90 percent of special needs families are unchurched. A survey revealed that the main obstacle families with special-needs children face is a lack of acceptance in churches. Some special- needs families indicated that they skipped church because it was too difficult

The hope of parents who have children with disabilities is that their children will be accepted for who they really are—the unique creation of a loving God who has given them a special role to play in His kingdom. to attend—they couldn’t go as a family, and their churches were unequipped or unprepared to welcome them. Other families did not attend church because they had no help or supervision for their children. The majority of the miracles Jesus performed in the Gospels helped those with special needs. As His followers, we have been given the opportunity to do the same. Not only have we been given the opportunity to minister to children with special needs, but also to their families. Our local church ministered to special needs children and their families long before my son arrived. The loving acceptance of special needs children by the majority of our church family and their inclusion in Sunday school and youth activities has not only blessed these precious children and their families, it has also provided essential lessons in compassion, patience, understanding, and acceptance to the entire church family. It can be daunting to think about providing appropriate ministry to those with special needs in a church setting. Although it might mean adapting building structures, changing room arrangement, buying proper equipment and supplies, and certainly adopting new teaching methods, the results are well worth it. There are many resources available online, at educational facilities, and in libraries to facilitate opening and operating a ministry to special needs families. Yet it is important to keep in mind that there is no way to structure a program that will meet every special need, nor can a local church be totally prepared for every person who attends. Each person is unique, and each person’s needs are unique. However, as long as we accept and love everyone who enters His house, the Lord Jesus Christ will provide all the help we need. Peggy Readout is an ordained minister with the United Pentecostal Church International. She currently serves the UPCI Ladies Ministries Connections as Women In Touch Communiqué editor. Her husband, Clifford Readout Jr., pastors The Apostolic Church of Enfield, in Enfield, Connecticut. She is also a mother of four and grandmother of seven. All her children are serving the Lord and assisting them in their local church.

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NEW START BY THOMAS CRUTCHFIELD

The Extended Impact of Church Planting North America’s missionaries have a multiplier effect on Kingdom growth. These men and women: • Establish a church in an area with a need, • Win the lost, • Reproduce their call and passion in those they win, • See their sons in the gospel become people mightily used of God. This testimony of Thomas Crutchfield regarding the impact of a church plant can be repeated many times over. Thank God for church planters who are used of God in many ways. —Carlton L. Coon Sr. od spoke to my heart and said, “Build a sanctuary.” I looked at Hinesville’s congregation made up of children, teenagers, and a few adults and asked God, “How can this group build a church?” That day God promised He would pay for the building from outside our congregation. The intersecting stories of how North American Missions has benefited Hinesville tells of the goodness and grace of God. The church in Hinesville, Georgia planted. The church was planted by Missionary Billy Wilson. The town is near a military base. One of the converts in 1978 was Daniel Berry, who was serving at that base. A missionary multiplied. After conversion, Daniel Berry felt his own call to ministry and specifically to be a church planter. His mission field was to be his hometown of Birmingham, Alabama. In time, the Berry family established a church in the suburbs of Birmingham. The man won by a church planter is now a church planter.

North American missionaries greatly used of God. After we built the new sanctuary in Hinesville, Daniel Berry came to visit. The church planter began to preach about God’s response to those faithful to give. As he preached he asked, “How much do you owe on this building?” I responded, “$185,000.” Daniel Berry said, “$185,000 is a drop in the bucket for God.” The church planter prophesied that God would pay off the building in one year. The God factor: God would fulfill the prophecy, retiring the debt with money from a Muslim donor from the Middle East. Donald, new convert (no actual names are used here), was present that day. His job soon took him to the Middle East. After he arrived, a local named Abdul asked Donald to help find his son whom he knew to be in harm’s way. Donald told Abdul, “I cannot help you.” Abdul pressed Donald for help. Donald said, “I cannot help you, but I can pray for you.” Abdul replied, “Allah has failed me.

Allah has turned his back.” Donald told Abdul, “I don’t know anything about Allah, but I know Jesus. Jesus will not fail you.” The two men prayed with Donald, calling on the name of Jesus for Abdul. Months later, Abdul returned to tell Donald how he had been at his wit’s end. There was still no news from his son. Finally, Abdul prayed to Jesus as he and Donald had done a few days before. Abdul said, “I prayed in the name of Jesus.” Two days after Abdul prayed there was a knock at his door. It was his son, Fiaz. Fiaz shared his story. He had been accused of murder and sentenced to die. In 2008, Fiaz was taken from his cell and lined up to be executed. At that point, Abdul interrupted, “Donald, that is the day you and I prayed.” On that day there was some equipment failure and the executions were stopped. Fiaz went back to his cell where he stayed for several months. It was during this time that Abdul became frustrated and prayed to Donald’s Jesus. Fiaz was eventually called before a judge, found not guilty, released, and returned home. Meanwhile, in Hinesville, eleven months had passed since Donald Berry prophesied the church would be paid off. One day, Abdul asked Donald if he could give Donald a significant amount of money. Donald said he could not accept it. Abdul replied, “Well I want to bless your church.” In a few days, Abdul sent a $275,000 check to the church in Hinesville, Georgia. The check arrived at the church two days before the end of the year. Thomas Crutchfield pastors in Hinesville, Georgia. He did not plant the church in Hinesville, but expresses multiple benefits that came from the church in Hinesville being planted.

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[ FA M I LY ]

When One Part of Your Brain Hijacks the Other MARTYN BALLESTERO SR.

uite a few years ago I was told about a new book, and curiosity made me want to read it. The problem was, I was a little short of cash and not sure I wanted to spend what I had on a book instead of eat lunch. I stopped by our local Barnes & Noble bookstore and asked if they had the book Emotional Intelligence in stock. They did, so I looked at it a few minutes and then found a chair and began to scan the pages for a while longer. I read about fourteen pages, then laid the book down and began to ponder on what I had just learned. I’ve never forgotten. The premise put forward was that we all have two brains, a brain that thinks and a brain that feels. Our life may be at peace and functioning well, but turmoil, pain, and great consequences come to us when one of our brains hijacks the other. Author Daniel Goleman explains it by describing murders and murderers.

The Brain That Thinks

The brain that thinks can get out of balance and push all emotions and normal feelings aside. It will then ignore every soft and tender thought the person ever had. • The murderer feels his mind is superior and he won’t get caught. • He refuses to think about regrets and the pain he will cause. • He devises ways to lure, entrap, and murder his victims. Society uses the term “cold-blooded, premeditated murder, with malice aforethought.” Serial killers must plan, 34

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calculate, and orchestrate their dastardly deeds while ignoring every emotion that would stop them. Their brain that thinks hijacks the brain that feels. Society is happy to lock that person behind bars for the rest of his or her life. He or she experiences no remorse.

The Brain That Feels

The brain that feels can become so overwrought with painful emotion that it takes matters into its own hands and does what it believes is an appropriate action. A loving wife may find her husband in the arms of another woman, and her brain that feels immediately hijacks the brain that thinks. • She is not worried about consequences. • She has no time to worry about the law. • She thinks only about the hurt she feels. We call it a crime of passion. It is a spur-of-the-moment action. Nothing is preplanned. Sometimes juries tend to be a bit understanding and even lenient in such cases.

When a Husband Is Unfaithful to His Wife

The part of his brain that thinks has to ignore and hijack the brain that feels. Unfaithfulness is not a spur-of-the-moment action. The brain that thinks hijacks the brain that feels, and the unfaithful husband convinces himself he is no longer in love with his wife. He says he doesn’t love her anymore and hasn’t for some time; he lets her know about it to prepare her for what’s to come. He finds illogical fault with her to justify himself. She is devastated and angry, and rightly so. The children quickly notice changes in Daddy’s behavior and they become defensive of their mother and afraid of this man they once loved. Think about all the emotional, logical, and spiritual stop signs and roadblocks an unfaithful husband must pass before he arrives at where he thinks he wants to go:

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• Permitting thoughts about another woman to have access into the mind • Letting those thoughts become lustful and pleasurable • Creating a moment where the two of them can meet and talk • Making plans to meet again • Making plans to leave and divorce his wife • Ignoring the fact that he has no biblical right to leave his wife • Sending text messages • Sending emails • Making cell phone calls • Deleting those messages and emails • Meeting secretly • Touching her for the first time • Kissing her for the first time • Booking a motel room

See how many stop sign he has to ignore? See how many roadblocks he must circumvent? It’s premeditated. It’s planned. The brain that thinks has hijacked the brain that once felt love for his wife and family. Nothing about unfaithfulness is accidental. It’s planned. It’s thought out. The brain that feels for God, family, and the future has been hijacked. It makes no difference if the unfaithfulness is emotional or actual; it’s sinful and it’s wrong. “Ye have heard that it was said by them of old time, Thou shalt not commit adultery: but I say unto you, That whosoever looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart” (Matthew 5:27-28). When his brain that thinks hijacked his brain that feels … • He had to ignore the hurt and pain in his wife’s eyes, words, JUNE 2014

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and heart. • He had to ignore the consequences for his actions. • He had to ignore the damage he was doing to his home and his children. • He had to push aside the loss of his standing with God. • He had to ignore the loss of his participation in God’s kingdom. • He had to be willing to place his eternal salvation in jeopardy. • He had arrived at a place that blocked out how much he was throwing away. • He had a new infatuation, and he couldn’t think about anything else but her—not even her husband or her children. He must be proud of the fact that he is a thinker and has a high IQ. In his own mind, he is smarter than the others who are crying. He refuses to let any emotional connection with his own wife and children stop him from achieving his goals. They have only become baggage and now he wants to be free from them. Although he knows the following passages in Proverbs, he ignores them. Proverbs 6:23-35—The commandment is a lamp; and the law is light; and reproofs of instruction are the way of life: to keep thee from the evil woman, from the flattery of the tongue of a strange woman. Lust not after her beauty in thine heart; neither let her take thee with her eyelids. For by means of a whorish woman a man is brought to a piece of bread: and the adulteress will hunt for the precious life. Can a man take fire in his bosom, and his clothes not be burned? Can one go upon hot coals, and his feet not be burned? So he that goeth in to his neighbour’s wife; whosoever toucheth her shall not be innocent. Men do not despise a thief, if he steal to satisfy his soul when he is hungry; but if he be found, he shall restore sevenfold; he shall give all the substance of his house. But whoso committeth adultery with a woman lacketh understanding: he that doeth it destroyeth his own soul. A wound and dishonour shall he get; and his reproach shall not be wiped away. For jealousy is the rage of a man: therefore he will not spare in the day of vengeance. He will not regard any ransom; neither will he rest content, though thou givest many gifts. Proverbs 7:27—Her house is the way to hell, going down to the chambers of death. When a husband becomes unfaithful, he is not the only one with a problem. His selfish thinking and actions immobilize those around him who love him. His marriage is paralyzed and may never be re-

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stored. His children will never respect him for the way he selfishly walked out on them and their mother. Later, in moments of reflection, he is prone to think he is the only one who needs counseling and help. That thinking is either naïve, stupid, or stubborn. AA and Al-Anon include both the addict and their family in the process. What one person has done now becomes a problem for all those who once loved him. Where does one turn for guidance and help with improper thinking? There is not much hope for restoration to a once-godly marriage, if God and His Word are left out of the equation. Restoration is of the Lord. Psalm 16:7—I will bless the Lord, who hath given me counsel: my reins also instruct me in the night seasons. If one of your brains has hijacked the other, God will bring release and restoration to your mind, if you will turn to Him. He will deliver you. If there is to be any hope of restoration in a marriage and a walk with God, it is up to the individual to do the following: • Choose to repent to God, your wife, and your pastor. • Choose to let God’s Word and God’s man guide you into complete restoration. • Choose to love your wife with all your heart. • Choose to reassure her. • Choose to be careful about your thoughts, feelings, and interaction with the opposite sex. • Choose to clear yourself from further suspicion. • Choose to connect with your wife, family, and God like you never have before. • Choose to live for God and not throw your soul away. May God guide your thoughts, your actions, and your motives every day and keep you from all evil and iniquity. May your heart tenderly guide you in the night seasons. Now go do the right thing! Martyn Ballestero Sr. has served thirty years in pastoral ministry and over twenty years as a full-time evangelist. He and his wife, Marcia, currently reside in Albion, Michigan. Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Martyn Ballestero’s blog (http://martynballestero.com/2014/03/19/when-one-part-ofyour-brain-hijacks-the-other/). It is slightly modified for use in the Pentecostal Herald and used with his permission.

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MULTICULTURAL MINISTRIES BY SAUNDRA HANSCOM

One Website Connecting the Word to the World esus gave the church a model, in that during His ministry He intentionally crossed cultural barriers to demonstrate how we can reach out to people of every nation, culture, and ethnicity. He gave a commandment, “Go ye therefore, and teach all nations …” (Matthew 28:19), and a promise, “Ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth” (Acts 1:8). “Go” is not a big word, but it’s easily misunderstood and seemingly difficult to obey. The “go” in Jesus’ command does not say how far one should go. It may indicate far away to foreign lands but it also means to go to our cities, communities, and neighborhoods. As born again believers fulfilling the Great Commission, to go is our duty. You won’t have to go far—in fact, to be a missionary today will not require a passport, visa, air ticket, a move overseas, or the need to learn a new language. Many of the same people we have sent missionaries overseas to reach now reside in North America. It’s not inaccurate to state that the whole world has now come to North America, since there are 354 languages spoken daily in North America. We must recognize that today’s migration of people is God’s plan for end-time revival. The global world is visible locally in our schools, businesses, malls, convenience stores, and restaurants. We might keep them at arm’s length and ignore them with numerous excuses: they speak a foreign language; they look strange; they dress differently. They are not invisible no matter how unusual they appear; they are eternal souls that Jesus died for. Don’t just repeat Jesus’ prayer—“Pray that the Lord of the harvest will send forth laborers”—be one! How do we start and where do we begin? A good place to start is with a smile.

“Everyone smiles in the same language.” A smile is a nonverbal, worldwide expression that everyone understands. Make eye contact and share a smile with people who look different, wear strange clothes, and speak in broken English or a different language. Introduce yourself and be friendly. Find out where they were born and what language they speak. Connect to the global world with a smile. You can build one-on-one cross-cultural friendships. You can be a missionary right here in North America. You don’t have to go to China to reach Chinese for Christ. Multicultural Ministries provides a website (www.globaltracts.com) that offers resources to enable everyone to effectively witness and reach the global world in North America. This website has fifty-eight language files containing more than 750 tracts, doctrinal books, Bible studies, and videos. You will also find some of David K. Bernard’s books that have been translated into many languages. For example, this website contains the “Truth Series” tracts in English and in many other languages. Exploring God’s Word home Bible study is also available in Thai, Russian, Farsi, Laotian, and Deaf sign languages. A pastor in the St. Louis area said a Korean man came to his church needing prayer and counsel. The pastor soon realized there was a language barrier and remembered that on the global tracts website God’s Word was available in many languages. He located Exploring God’s Word in Korean and used this resource to teach the whole family in their own language. The French version of Exploring God’s Word is a video presentation and is valuable for reaching the native Frenchspeaking population of North America as well as many immigrants from Africa and Haiti who speak French. These resources can serve a dual purpose in teaching someone both the Bible and the English language at the same time. These resources are easy to use. Print out a tract or short Bible study and share it

with the global person you have smiled at. You may then have the opportunity to explain the Word of God to them. All tracts, Bible studies, books, and videos are approved by the United Pentecostal Church and are free and downloadable. This website was initially developed as a resource tool for our North American church in this ever-growing global community. The IT department at World Evangelism Center that services the website presented me with some shocking and exciting statistics in a 36-page report. There have been more than 100,000 hits on this site each month for many months from nations all over the world. David K. Bernard’s book The Oneness of God translated in Arabic has been the most researched file. A lady from Poland read the tract on “Baptism in Jesus’ Name” in Polish from this website and contacted us to ask where she could be baptized in Jesus’ name in Poland. This report confirms that we are effectively presenting the Word to the whole world. Technology has advanced so fast in the last few years that the digital world is making this information accessible. The website www.globaltracts.com is advancing the Word of God to places and countries that are closed to the gospel. “Think Locally – Act Globally” may be a catch phrase we also can use. The global tracts website is our golden opportunity to do just that. Saundra Hanscom is the wife of Don Hanscom, the Multicultural Ministries director. She assists her husband in the administration of Multicultural Ministries and also ministers alongside him as he ministers to the many cultural groups residing in North America.

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[ FA M I LY ]

Lessons I Didn’t Want to Learn ANONYMOUS

’ve known for several months that I would be writing this article. I knew it was to address the topic of raising teenagers. I thought of catchy introductions and moving illustrations. I thought of funny stories that would be entertaining. That’s my wheelhouse. I like catchy, funny, and entertaining. Then one week before the deadline I was brought up short when I realized that what I have to say isn’t funny at all. I need to tell you about the lessons I didn’t want to learn. At the point this story begins, things were snug and secure in my world. Our oldest daughter had just graduated from high school the week before—it was a Christian school, as a matter of fact. She had received honors that day, and I couldn’t have been more proud. My husband and I and our four children were healthy, happy, and blessed. But the Friday morning after graduation my world was changed forever. On that beautiful spring morning I learned that my daughter had been living a secret life of sin for some time. I still remember going into a state of shock after hearing the news. Soon the inevitable questions came raining down on me: “Where did we go wrong?” and “How could we have been so blind to the signs?” were just two of the litany of questions that played over and over in my head. Soon other emotions came to call: anger that she had made such a foolish choice, embarrassment that she would put our family in such a situation, and determination to keep her from ruining her life. You need to understand that we did everything “right,” but I’m not so foolish to believe that we were perfect parents. Not a chance of that. However, we did all the things that gave me a sense of security in knowing that we were bringing our children up in the right way. I was a stay-at-home mom. I played with my kids and spent time with them. I read to them every night and rocked them to sleep. We had family dinners. My husband and I had a good marriage. Things were peaceful at our house. We were in church every time the doors were open. We attended camps and conferences. My husband was a pastor and my daughter was a fifth-generation Apostolic. I remember thinking in those days that this was seed we hadn’t sown. These weren’t wild oats my husband and I were reaping. We had both done our best to remain faithful and on fire during our teenage years. But as it turned out, life didn’t happen as I had planned. The lessons came without mercy, and I was an unwilling student. I didn’t want to learn from the psych ward social worker that my daughter 38

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took a dangerous amount of pills because teenagers often think they are invincible. I didn’t want to learn that policemen can be compassionate—the one who stopped our daughter early one Sunday morning waited by the side of the road for over an hour for us to come and pick her up. He did that rather than arrest her for driving under the influence of alcohol. He figured she was a good kid and he didn’t want to ruin her record. I didn’t want to learn how gut-wrenching it is to watch your child walk up a dirt path to a rundown house where the water pipes froze during the winter. She chose to live there with her boyfriend and his family after they had been evicted from their apartment. I could spend pages telling this story. The pain and disappointment became unbearable—at times I felt as though it sucked the very life out of me. From the beginning I had been embarrassed and concerned about what our fellow pastors and our congregation would think of us. Not surprisingly, things became tense in our home. I didn’t understand how our daughter could have lied to and disrespected us so much. So in an effort to try to fix something I had obviously missed, I let her know on several occasions that I was displeased with her choices. I couldn’t run the risk of her thinking I condoned her lifestyle. As her mom, I had always fixed things and made them right again. In my mind, this was no different. Somehow I had to fix this terrible mistake. After all, it was my job to stand firm against her ungodly lifestyle. Wasn’t it? However, several stressful months later, a new line of thought began weaving its way into my head. I realized that this shouldn’t be about my embarrassment, anger, or disappointment. This should be about doing my best to be the parent she needed me to be. Maybe it was my job to just love her. She had tried to tell me she knew I disapproved of her choices, and she didn’t need me reiterating it over and over. At the time that just seemed like her way of telling me to leave her alone. But as my perspec-

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tive began to change, so did the meaning of those words. My course was settled during a casual conversation I had with a woman in our church. She began relating some of her past—bad choices, ungodly lifestyle, even her involvement in an abusive relationship. She spoke of how her mom was ready to come down hard on her, but her dad in loving wisdom said, “I will not do anything to build walls our daughter will have to tear down when she decides to come back to the Lord.”

From that night on I changed my tactics. I decided to make the pathway back to church clear for my daughter. I would do everything in my power to see that her journey back was as easy as possible.

I know as parents we spend years teaching our kids to love God with all their heart. When they are little we set boundaries and offer consequences for poor behavior and bad choices. In short, we have the power to force them to make the right choices. However, the challenging part comes when you no longer have the power to control them. We did try to get her attention by removing much of

Fashioned for

our financial support. But she had her own job and was able to meet her expenses. We did evaluate what had the potential of affecting her for a lifetime (college, health care, and so forth) and continued to provide those things. As far as I’m concerned, launching teenage children into adulthood has been the most challenging phase of parenthood. I have had to learn that sometimes, even when you have given your best effort, your teenager might decide to make the wrong choice. I have had to learn that despite many interventions to try to reverse the path of your teenager, sometimes all you can do is love, pray, and wait. Those too are lessons I didn’t want to learn. So now you may be waiting for the happy ending to the story. Well, it hasn’t happened completely yet, but there has been great progress. As I revisit some of the things we experienced, I realize how terrible it really was and how much she has changed. My daughter and I have a wonderful relationship again. I firmly believe her attitude has changed in response to the change in my attitude. It has been a long journey and there is still much ground to regain. But, just like the father in Luke 15, I think I see her coming, even though she’s still a great way off. Note from the author: I have asked to remain anonymous because of the personal information I have shared. In keeping with my intention to love my daughter back to the Lord, I would not want to cause her embarrassment.

SUNDAY SCHOOL BY STEVE CANNON

“Now He who has prepared us for this very thing is God, who also has given us the Spirit as a guarantee” (II Corinthians 5:5, NKJV).

Deborah Irwin Deborah Irwin has been teaching Sunday school for over thirty years. She is an outstanding teacher because she makes every student feel special. Her love for children is an example to everyone. She takes the time to ensure each student has an awesome experience in her class. Former students contact her continually, thanking her for a specific word she spoke into their life.  She is a favorite at Trumann First Pentecostal Church in Trumann, Arkansas. Murry Ray is the pastor.

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APOSTOLIC MAN BY J.B. SIMS

Two Men and Their Amazing Journey Home his is the tale of two men with very diverse and troubled pasts, running headlong into a destructive future. One is a disillusioned, frustrated, and somewhat angry backslider from Alabama; the other is a Georgia boy running from God and the many responsibilities of life. One was raised in an Apostolic home with a great heritage behind him. The other was raised in a family born and bred to make moonshine and misery. These two men, unknown to each other, received an invitation to make a trip to Guatemala and help build a home for orphaned children. At first the backslider was hesitant to respond to the call. He suspiciously wondered what this was all about and what could they possibly want from him. Meanwhile, the Georgia boy, who had moved to Alabama several years earlier but had been attending church only since August 2013, was also pondering the situation. He too was somewhat hesitant for fear he would not be able to raise the money needed to make such a trip. Finally, after several sleepless and troublesome nights, the backslider called with his reluctant consent. The Georgia boy also agreed to give it his best shot. Secretly, both were apprehensive and wondered how they could possibly fit into this group of men from different churches across the state. There were pastors in the group, church leaders, and board members. How could they possibly fit into such a team? It’s amazing how we can take different paths but still end up where God plans. Both of these men found themselves in another country several hundred miles away from home, looking at the plans for this great orphanage project. Meanwhile, silently and perhaps even unbeknownst to them, God had already begun working on them. Both men were skilled in construction, one in steel and the other in wood. As they joined forces to build this house, they also found a commonality in their interests and

even in their troubled pasts. It did not take them long to realize they were partners and brothers together in this great endeavor; and while they worked with their hands, God worked on their hearts. One day as they returned from a long day’s work, they heard the sound of music being played. It was one of the little girls from the mission house playing the piano. One of the men from the group decided to investigate and she invited him to join in, so he sat down and began to play a song he had written. Suddenly, the Spirit of God fell in that mission house. It began with tears running down the cheeks of grown men, and then prayers began to go up and the Holy Spirit began to heal old hurts and mend broken minds. Standing near the wall, the Georgia boy was praying with all his heart. At the fireplace hearth, with his head bowed and tears streaming down his face, sat the backslider. I was in awe as I entered the room where prayer was going forth and tears were flowing. From the recesses of the kitchen the cook had also begun to pray and the cries of heartfelt, soul-stirring prayer began to fill the mission house where we were staying. Each day at the mission began with devotion on the rooftop at 6:30 am and every day a little more of the hardness was breaking away from the backslider. Every day the men grew a little more comfortable with the rest of the team and began to feel as though they were brothers and partners together with them. In spite of the fact that they weren’t preachers or even church leaders, they realized they were all working together with one common goal. The ten days in Guatemala passed quickly as the men busied themselves with the task at hand. The vision they saw when they arrived had now become their vision. The hesitancy they both had at first had vanished and in its place was a burning desire

to not only return to Guatemala but to see the dream of an orphanage house become a reality. Six days after returning home, the Alabama District of the UPCI hosted the statewide men’s conference. The backslider prayed through that night. The Georgia boy stood behind the pulpit and delivered a stirring testimony about God sending someone into the field and bringing him out. Men’s ministry in Alabama is about building homes for children in foreign lands. It is about building churches in our own backyard. It is about helping fan the revival fires across this great nation. But most important, it is about the common, average, everyday, hardworking men from all walks of life becoming involved in something bigger than themselves and allowing God to bless their hands and heart just as He did for Bezaleel when he built the Ark of the Covenant. It is about men not only finding a place to serve, but also realizing they can make a difference in their world. It is about men saying, “Here I am, Lord, send me.” It is about men coming alongside their pastor and saying, “Pastor, I understand what you’re trying to do and I want you to know that you can count on me.” J.B. Sims is the senior pastor of Faith Tabernacle UPC in Foley, Alabama. He is also the director of Apostolic Man for the state of Alabama. He has been married to Jo Ann Sims for thirty-five years.

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[ FA M I LY ]

The Tupelo Children’s Mansion Family BROOKE ROSSER

’Charley’s. In my family it is a Sunday tradition. Almost every week we head out from Sunday morning service to our usual table of twenty-something. From the moment I walk in the restaurant there are things on which I can depend. These things make us family. You see, when the door swings open, my uncle is going to say, “Hello darlin’,” just before giving me the biggest bear hug you can imagine. In another corner my other uncle will probably be play fighting with one of my little cousins, and you better believe that my aunt has just been worried sick about the whole family the entire time they were driving to the restaurant. When we sit down to order lunch, my sweet momma and all her sisters will more than likely be solving the problems of the world. And almost every single time my adorable grandmother orders her steak we can count mere seconds until we hear the giggle as she anticipates the teasing she is about to endure because it is yet again undercooked. Back to the kitchen it goes! These people are more than just a group I eat lunch with on Sunday afternoon. They are my support system. When one of us is hurt, we’re all hurt and when one of us is happy, we’re all happy. They are the people who care enough to tell me when I’m wrong and stand up for me when I’m right. They pray for me and love me unconditionally. I am a very blessed lady. While I was so fortunate to grow up with so many amazing people in my life, there are many who do not enjoy this same comfort. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services’ AFCARS Report, 397,122 children are currently in foster care throughout the United States. For Stephen and Erma Judd and the rest of the Tupelo Children’s Mansion staff, these children are their mission field. Tupelo Children’s Mansion exists to offer hope through the love of Jesus Christ to orphaned or disadvantaged children. By providing for their physical, spiritual, emotional, social, and educational needs and contributing to their health, security, and happiness they are able to equip the children who stay at TCM to lead productive, godly lives. Matthew 18:5 says, “Whoso shall receive one such little child in 44

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my name receiveth me.” Every day the Tupelo Children’s Mansion staff does exactly this. Through the love and encouragement they give, they are able to become the family these children desperately need. Former TCM resident, Teresa Tomlinson-Hall recently shared this testimony about what Tupelo Children’s Mansion has meant to her: January 7 was my adoption birthday! If it had not been for Tupelo Children’s Mansion, my life would have taken a much different path. The TCM president, Rev. Stephen Drury, took a chance and accepted two placement applications for my sister and me. While we were not perfect, we were molded by several great sets of house parents. I went from a child who was scared and insecure to a young lady with self-confidence. The hurt that scarred my heart eventually subsided. I was in a safe and secure environment that allowed me to attend church, play with dolls, and be a regular kid without the stress of my past. My last house parents, Robert and Annette Tomlinson, decided to become my forever parents. I can never express my full appreciation for all they did. Rev. Marvin Walker, who was the president at that time, stood by my new family as we walked down the adoption pathway. The current president and his wife, Rev. and Mrs. Stephen Judd, have always been there for our family. They were present even as I began my marriage, the most recent chapter of my life. To say that TCM changed the course of my life is almost an understatement. I would like to say thank you to all who made a difference in my life through TCM. You truly were a blessing to me. For Teresa and so many others, Tupelo Children’s Mansion has made all the difference. Erma Judd, wife of Tupelo Children’s Mansion president, says, “We simply believe that every child should have a chance! As former President Bush has stated, ‘No child should be left behind.’ Despite the abuse, the neglect, the hurt, and all the painful memories, I know that God can mend their broken lives and use them in an incredible way for His kingdom.” Psalm 68:5-6 (NKJV) states, “A father of the fatherless, a defender of widows, is God in His holy habitation. God sets the solitary in families; He brings out those who are bound into prosperity.” As the Tupelo Children’s Mansion staff continues to follow after Christ, they look forward to seeing God’s plan unfold in the lives of many children to come. With the prayer and support of the body of Christ, the pos-

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sibilities are endless for the Tupelo Children’s Mansion family! This May, three TCM residents celebrate a major milestone in their lives—they become high school graduates. Among them is eighteen-year-old Lance, who has a lot of reasons to celebrate. If you would like to help Tupelo Children’s Mansion invest in the lives of children like Lance, consider becoming a Mansion Kid Sponsor. When you sponsor a child, you will receive a sponsor packet with a picture and details about him or her. Once a quarter, you will also receive an updated letter and a new picture. This will help you stay in touch about the progress your sponsored child is making. You can also help TCM by donating the following:

Personal Care Items

Personal care items are always needed at TCM. Often, Sunday school classes and ladies’ groups make a special project of sending personal care items.

Lance

Residence Hall Needs

An outgoing young man with an optimistic outlook on life, Lance has overcome many obstacles, including losing both of his parents in one year. When Lance arrived at the Mansion, he was angry with God and frustrated with life. With God’s help and loving caregivers, Lance is doing fantastic. Although he did not have an Apostolic background, since coming to the Mansion he has been baptized and received the Holy Spirit. He is growing in his newfound faith, and trusts that God has a plan for his future to be used of God. Lance loves church and enjoys being on the youth sign team. The TCM Education and Assistance Committee has approved Lance for financial assistance over the next two years, as he transitions into adulthood. He will be entering our STEP program toward independent living and is finalizing his plans for college and further education. We are pleased with all that God is doing in Lance’s life. Please help us to continue to pray for his future.

Academy Needs

Various items are always needed in our residence halls, which house the children. If you or your church would like to help meet any of these needs, it would be greatly appreciated. This is a great way to support the Mansion kids! The academy can always use your help in providing schoolrelated items. From pens and pencils, to computers and desks, the Mansion kids and staff appreciate your support of this branch of ministry.

Physical Plant Needs

The physical plant is responsible for remodeling and the upkeep of the buildings. Lawn care and vehicle maintenance are also major responsibilities of this department. Product and equipment supporting any of these areas is appreciated. The Tupelo Children’s Mansion celebrated its sixtieth anniversary this year. Scan to this QR code to read a celebratory article featured in their local paper.

http://djournal.com/news/loving-home-tupelo-childrens-mansion-marks-60th-anniversary/. Brooke Rosser is the proud sponsor of Tupelo Children’s Mansion resident, Jaciee. Brooke is the editorial assistant for the Pentecostal Herald and a member of the Division of Publications staff. She currently serves as the director of Guest Care for the Sanctuary UPC, where Scott Graham and Timothy Dugas are the pastors.

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

The Legendary

W.E. Gamblin GREGORY AND DANA WILLIS

.E. Gamblin was born in Neshoba County, Mississippi, July 29, 1912, to Henry P. and Annie Rosa (Fryery) Gamblin. He and his older sister, Zula, completed the family. Earl was a very shy little boy, but as he grew older he became bold and mischievous, teasing the girls at school. He really enjoyed pulling their pigtails and dipping them in the ink well on his desk. Little did Earl know that his teasing would lead to marriage and a lifetime partnership with one of those young girls with the ink-stained hair. Her name was Maude Alma Pope. As a young teenager, his family had no church background. Remarkably, there was no Bible in their home. In 1929 a new religion was introduced to their small community. Fiery evangelists and zealous singers came preaching a doctrine never before heard there. The LeFleurs and Charles Smith were among the first of these pioneers to hold meetings in old buildings, churches, and brush arbors in the South. Many in the community began to receive the Holy Ghost— some in small cottage prayer meetings. Among them was Maude Alma Pope, the future Alma Gamblin. The Gamblin family visited one of those old-time meetings, and as the preacher began his hell-fire-and-brimstone message, the elder Gamblin just sat and stared. The minister pointed his finger at the Gamblins and told them in no uncertain terms what they must do to be saved. The entire family was nervous as they looked on, because they knew Henry was no stranger to violence. But the oneGod, Apostolic message pricked the heart of the Gamblins, and God gloriously filled all of them with the Holy Ghost in January of 1930. Accepting the beautiful Jesus Name message and being baptized in that name changed their lives forever. So began the legacy of W.E. 46

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Gamblin, the Mississippi firebrand. Everyone knew young Earl’s favorite pastime was playing basketball, but few people knew he had another favorite—Lucky Strike cigarettes. Earl turned in his basketball uniform the morning after receiving the Holy Ghost and God miraculously delivered him from cigarettes. Everyone was amazed at the change in his life. While attending church together, a courtship soon began between Alma Pope and Earl Gamblin. Under a full Mississippi moon he proposed, and they were married January 15, 1931. Little did they know that their partnership would change the lives of countless thousands and inspire generations to accept the one-God message. It wasn’t long before Earl felt a call to ministry and began preaching the truth God had revealed to him and his family. Alma gave up her profession as a schoolteacher, and the Gamblins began to evangelize and preach the Jesus Name message. For twenty-two years their ministry took them across the United States. In the early years of their ministry they teamed up with D.L. Welch and his wife. The two couples traveled from city to city, setting up a huge tent, singing, and playing guitars, pianos, and tambourines. D.L. Welch would preach one night and Earl Gamblin the next. Many people received the Holy Ghost. Large crowds would gather for baptismal services in creeks, ponds, and rivers—whatever body of water was accessible to them. The devil fought them every step of the way. Their tents cut down, tomatoes and eggs thrown at them, sheriffs called to close them down, and violent threats made by sinners became the norm. But usually those same sinners ended up getting the Holy Ghost under the tent they had tried to destroy. After nearly seven years of marriage their first child, Phillip Donald Gamblin, was born. A couple of years later their second child, Priscilla Ann, came along to complete their home.  Earl was known far and wide as the Mississippi Fire Brand. He helped establish many churches, including works in Montgomery, Alabama; Jena, Louisiana; and Kosciusko, Mississippi. Around 1950, Earl set his sights on Jackson, Mississippi. The church started

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with fewer than a dozen people and over time grew into the great work we know today. In 1963, Earl resigned the church in Jackson, leaving it in the capable hands of T.L. Craft. Earl then became the pastor of the First United Pentecostal Church of Orange, Texas. There he continued to preach and teach the doctrine he loved so much. In 1976 a beautiful new building was erected at 3406 Edgar Brown Drive in Orange. On October 22, 1989, Alma was promoted to her eternal reward. Pastor Gamblin leaned on God through this very difficult time and continued to preach the one-God message with more passion than ever before, never wavering from the truth instilled in him decades earlier. In May 1990, W.E. Gamblin retired as pastor of the church in Orange. He continued to travel and preach the Word of God until the age of eighty-eight—seventy years in the ministry. He changed very little over the years. He never wavered; he was consistent in character; he was a true Christian gentleman. His passion for preaching,

whether it be in tent meetings, revivals, youth camps, district conferences, camp meetings, or general conferences, touched thousands of lives. On July 10, 2005, the Lord called him home. Our loss was Heaven’s gain when the Mississippi Fire Brand was promoted to his eternal reward in glory. Nathaniel A. Urshan referred to W.E. Gamblin as “a kingly man seeking the Kingdom.” He will forever be remembered as an evangelist, the Mississippi Fire-Brand, a caring pastor, and minister of the gospel—a king among men. If that old tent could talk, it may just say: “One God, one faith, one baptism, one W.E. Gamblin.” Gregory and Dana Willis attend the First UPC of Orange, Texas. Both were baptized in Jesus’ name and filled with the Holy Ghost under W.E. Gamblin’s pastorate.

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

The Three

Necessities DAV I D A . H U S TO N

hen He said to them, ‘Thus it is written, and thus it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead the third day, and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in His name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem’” (Luke 24:46-47, NKJV). Appearing to His disciples after His resurrection, Jesus told them three things were necessary. This statement indicates that these three things were not optional. They were, in fact, indispensable. From God’s perspective they absolutely had to happen. What then were these three necessities and why were they essential? The first necessary thing was “for the Christ to suffer.” This was necessary because all of mankind needed someone to be the sacrifice for their sins. From the moment sin entered the world, God had required a blood sacrifice. Even before Adam and Eve had exited the Garden of Eden, God killed an animal to provide the first sinners with a covering. Not long after, God rejected the sacrifice of their son Cain because it had no blood in it. As the Old Testament progresses, we can read of Noah, Abraham, Moses, David, and many others offering up animal sacrifices for their sins. Why was the shedding of blood so important to God? Because “the life of the flesh is in the blood.” He therefore said, “I have given it to you upon the altar to make atonement for your souls” (Leviticus 17:11, NKJV). The Israelites understood that “without shedding of blood [there] is no remission” (Hebrews 9:22). The word translated remission can also mean “forgiveness.” This means the answer to mankind’s predicament is found only in the blood. It is by blood that the sins of man are forgiven. But in the end, it was “not possible that the blood of bulls and goats could take away sins” (Hebrews 10:4, NKJV). The only thing 48

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these slain animals accomplished was to remind the people of the serious consequences of their sins and point them ahead to the One who was to come. This is why, once He had come, it was necessary that He suffer. As Jesus said at the Last Supper, “This is my blood of the new covenant, which is shed for many for the remission [forgiveness] of sins” (Matthew 26:28, NKJV). What the blood of animals could never do, the blood of the Son of God accomplished—fully and freely. The second necessary thing was that the Christ would “rise from the dead on the third day.” This was necessary because if He had remained dead and buried, He would have been unavailable to bring His forgiveness to man. The world needed more than a crucified Savior; it needed one who was alive! The Bible says Jesus Christ was “delivered up because of our offenses, and was raised because of our justification” (Romans 4:25, NKJV). The term justification means to be acquitted of a crime, to be declared “not guilty.” This was God’s purpose in coming in the flesh. He knew that man had no capacity to free himself from the penalty of his sins, so He became the perfect sacrifice, humiliating Himself on the Cross, then rising again on the third day so He could stand and pronounce sinful man “not guilty.” But the historical fact of His death and resurrection do not in and of themselves make forgiveness and salvation available to mankind. One more thing was necessary. The third necessary thing was that “repentance and remission (forgiveness) of sins should be preached in His name to all nations.” It was the suffering and resurrection of Christ that made forgiveness available. But as long as His provision remained unknown it benefitted no one. This is why just before His ascension, Jesus instructed His disciples to “go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature” (Mark 16:15, NKJV). The gospel is the message of the death of Christ for our sins, His burial, and His resurrection on the third day (I Corinthians 15:1-4). Hearing that this had happened and

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believing it are essential prerequisites to receiving forgiveness. This is why Jesus went on to say, “He who believes and is baptized will be saved; but he who does not believe will be condemned.” To fail to believe the gospel is to reject God’s gift of forgiveness and remain condemned for your sins. The only hope any of us have is to believe. But believing is not just accepting the truth about what Christ has done; it also demands that we respond to it. Jesus stated quite plainly that the necessary response was to be baptized. Before His ascension, Jesus taught the necessity of baptism to His disciples. We know this because a short time later, when Peter was asked what to do to be saved, he said, “Repent, and let every one of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit” (Acts 2:38, NKJV). Here we see a merger of what Jesus said in Luke 24 with what He said in Mark 16. By putting these two passages together,

we see that Jesus instructed His disciples to go into all the world and preach the gospel, which included preaching repentance and remission of sins through baptism in the name of Jesus Christ. After the three necessary things had been faithfully delivered by Peter, the Bible records the marvelous response: “Then those who gladly received his word were baptized; and that day about three thousand souls were added to them” (Acts 2:41, NKJV). Only the three necessary things could have produced this dynamic result. David A. Huston serves on the leadership team of Carlisle Christian Fellowship in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He and his wife, Barbara, enjoy spending time with their ten grandchildren.

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2014 Camp Meeting Dates June June 16-20 June 16-22 June 17-20 June 18-20 June 18-20 June 23-27 June 24-27 June 25-27 June 25-29 June 29-July 4

Texas District Minnesota District Kentucky District Kansas District North Carolina District Maine District Alaska-Yukon District SoCal District Atlantic District Louisiana District

Raymond Woodward, Anthony Mangun, and Jimmy Toney David K. Bernard and Paul Mooney Kevin Cox Steve Cole, Tom Foster, and Rick Stoops Lee Stoneking and Jack Cunningham Ken Gurley Raymond Woodward, Jerry Jones, David K. Bernard, and Cortt Chavis

July July 1-4 July 2-6 July 7-11 July 8-11 July 8-11 July 8-11 July 9-11 July 13-18 July 14-18 July 16-18 July 16-18 July 16-18 July 16-18 July 16-18 July 16-18 July 21-25 July 22-26 July 28-Aug. 1 July 29-Aug.1

Georgia District Ontario District Central Canadian Indiana District Arkansas District Mississippi District Florida District Pennsylvania District Illinois District Missouri District Washington District RI/ Mass District Tennessee District Idaho District Virginia District Oklahoma District Oregon District Ohio District Michigan District

David K. Bernard and Sam Emory Raymond Woodward and Wayne Huntley Adam Shaw and Douglas Klinedinst Anthony Mangun, Aaron Soto, and Tom Foster Bruce Howell, Wayne Huntley, and T. F. Tenney Raymond Woodward and Jerry Dean Raymond Woodward and Jerry Dean Ronnie Mullings and Mark Morgan Brian Kinsey James Littles and Jerry Jones Stan Gleason and Aaron Bounds Gordon Mallory Ron Libby and Sam Emory Daniel Segraves, Jerry Dean and Anthony Mangun Stan Gleason and John Putnam Tim Gaddy, J. Mark Jordan, Doug Klinedinst, and Gary Trzcinski

August August 4-7 August 5-8 August 12-15 August 13-15

Rocky Mountain District West Virginia District Canadian Plains Mark Fogarty and Wayne Huntley Connecticut District Scott Graham

To submit your camp meeting dates to be featured in the July issue of the Pentecostal Herald email Brooke Rosser at brosser@upci.org. 50

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