Page 1

A Century of Revelation: G.T. Haywood and the Oneness Message The Phenomenal Growth of Oneness Pentecostalism The Spiritual Significance of Remembering January 2013 Herald.indd 1

11/29/12 3:26 PM


January 2013 Herald.indd 2

11/29/12 3:26 PM


EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

Start the Year with a Stop List any people start each year with a start list. Their New Year’s resolutions are made with a firm determination to start doing something. But, as we all know, New Year’s resolutions have the reputation of not surviving very long for many, if not most, of us. When Jim Collins sits down each year to think about his annual resolutions, he remembers the 20-10 assignment that a professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business gave him. The 20-10 assignment goes like this: “Suppose you woke up tomorrow and received two phone calls. The first phone call tells you that you have inherited twenty million dollars, no strings attached. The second tells you that you have an incurable and terminal disease, and you have no more than ten years to live. What would you do differently, and, in particular, what would you stop doing?” Collins wrote in USA Today on December 30, 2003, that this 20-10 assignment became a turning point in his life, and that the “stop doing” list became a cornerstone of his annual New Year resolution. He said, “The start of the New Year is a perfect time to start a stop doing list and to make this the cornerstone of your New Year resolutions, be it for your company, your family or yourself.” Collins said that as he navigates the twists and turns of a chaotic world and takes inventory of his daily activities, he asks himself, “Am I on target? Do I need to adjust left, up, down, right?” He writes about “making your life a creative work of art,” and explains that “a great piece of art is composed not just of what is in the final piece, but equally important, what is not. It is the discipline to discard what does not fit—to cut out what might have already cost days or even years of effort—that distinguishes the truly exceptional artist and marks the ideal piece of work, be it a symphony, a novel, a painting, a company or, most important of all, a life.” Several years ago, Collins asked in an article in Harvard Business Review, “Isn’t

The purpose of my first editorial of 2013 is to challenge you to suppose you have only ten years to live. What would you stop doing? it frightening that the new version of Palm Pilot has space for 1500 items on its todo list?” He said, “Sadly, few of us have a ‘Stop Doing’ list. We should, because to take something away—to unplug it—can be as catalytic as adding something new.” The purpose of my first editorial of 2013 is to challenge you to suppose you have only ten years to live. What would you do differently? What would you discard? What habits would you cut out of your life? What attitudes would you cast away? What conversations would you stop having? Would your surfing the Internet change if you knew you had only ten years to live? Would you stop handling money the way you handle it now? What about your time, the most precious resource you have? Would your worship change? Would you change anything about your attendance in the house of God? Are there weights and besetting sins you would lay aside? Jesus said, “If thy right eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell. And if thy right hand offend thee, cut it off, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell” (Matthew 5:29-30). Jesus, of course, was not advocating body mutilation; He was teaching a timeless lesson about priorities. The right eye and the right hand here stand for things that are dear to us. Paul said, “I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection: lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway” (I Corinthians 9:27). It may be presumptuous of me, but I am going to give you an assignment for the

next twelve months.The assignment? Start a stop list. o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o

I will stop neglecting God’s Word. I will stop exaggerating. I will stop complaining. I will stop putting God second in my life. I will stop putting my job ahead of my family. I will stop criticizing and finding fault. I will stop wanting so much. I will stop worrying about things I cannot change. I will stop envying what other people have. I will stop obsessing about the economy. I will stop road rage. I will stop living life in such a rush. I will stop ____________________. I will stop ____________________. I will stop ____________________. I will stop ____________________.

Paul said, “The foundation of God standeth sure, having this seal, The Lord knoweth them that are his. And, let every one that nameth the name of Christ depart from iniquity” (II Timothy 2:19). The writer of Hebrews said, “Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us” (Hebrews 12:1). Stopping is sometimes just as important as starting. Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 3

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

3

11/29/12 3:26 PM


PENTECOSTAL HERALD | JANUARY 2013 Fundamental Doctrine

EDITOR

Simeon Young Sr.

The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

The One True God We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain CREATIVE DIRECTOR Abraham LaVoi DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laura Merchant EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Rebecca Miller PROOFREADER Patrica Bollmann The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2012 by United Pentecostal Church International. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com Single Subscriptions (USA) $25.00 Single Subscriptions (Canada) $35.00 Single Subscriptions (Foreign) $44.00 Bundle Subscriptions (USA) $ 1.75 for 6 or more copies; $2.25 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Canada) $ 2.50 for 6 or more copies; $3.00 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Foreign) $ 3.50 for 6 or more copies; $4.00 each for 2-5 copies An international publication published monthly. VOL. 89, NO. 1. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional offices. Official publication of the UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL

Our Vision:

The Pentecostal Herald in every Pentecostal home

Our Mission:

To publish a Pentecostal magazine that strengthens the hands of Pentecostal pastors, encourages and challenges Pentecostal believers, and reaches beyond the doors of Pentecostal churches

Disclaimer:

The Pentecostal Herald (or UPCI) assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of claims of advertisers or for the quality of their service or products.

We Want to Hear from You

HOW TO REACH US: Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299, Telephone: 1.314.837.7300 Extension 411 Email: bmiller@upci.org, main@upci.org. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com

USPS 427-240 United Pentecostal Church International

Letters to the Editor

GENERAL OFFICIALS

Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or to: Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299.

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney* GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Jerry Jones* DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell* DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton L. Coon Sr.* EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston GENERAL SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR Steve L. Cannon GENERAL YOUTH DIRECTOR Shay Mann SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Dan Batchelor

GENERAL PRESBYTERS

Customer Care Send subscription and renewal requests and inquiries to pentecostalherald.com or email Becky Miller at bmiller@upci.org.

Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton L. Coon Sr., Floyd E. Covill, Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Alonzo Dummitt, David Elms, Daniel Fleming, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, J. Mark Jordan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Ronnie Mullings, Arthur Naylor, Gordon Parrish, John E. Putnam, David A. Robinson, D.R. Russo, William J. Singleton, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, Melvin Thacker, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, H.E. Wheatly, Steve Willeford, C. Patton Williams, Richard A. Wittmeier, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

GENERAL EXECUTIVE PRESBYTERS

Advertising Go to pentecostalherald.com and follow the prompts. Follow us on Twitter

Clifford Barnett* Brent Coltharp* David T. Elms* Daniel Garlitz* Marty Johnson* Anthony Mangun* Bryan Parkey* Stephen Willeford* Raymond Woodward*

HONORARY PRESBYTERS

pentecostherald

J.R. Blackshear, Ernest Breithaupt, W.L. Clayton, B.S. Cole, Daniel Garlitz, Arless Glass, John Grant, Tommy Hudson, James Kelley, Carrol D. Kennedy, Carl Lagow, Roger Lewis, R.J. McIntyre, John D. Mean, James Merrick, Paul Price, Paul Reynolds, J.M. Russell, Harry Scism, Scotty Teets, T.F. Tenney, B.J. Thomas, Wayne Trout, G.L. Vittitow, Ted Wagner, David O. Walters, R.D. Whalen, Jesse Williams, Jack Yonts * Member of the Executive Board

EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

4

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 4

|

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Lee Ann Alexander

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


[2012 GENERAL CONFERENCE SERMON] 24

Columns

The Missing Factor

The United Pentecostal Church International is a great church, but we continually need to renew our first love. David K. Bernard

3 | Editorial

Simeon Young Sr.

Pentecostal Life

7 | The General Superintendent Speaks

David K. Bernard

11 | My Hope Radio

Tiffini Countaway

15 | Launch Your Ministry

14 | Bible Truth or Man’s Opinion? Chuck Welch

My Soul Cries Out for God’s Best: Letters from a Participant in the Arroyo Seco Camp Meeting 8

John Smelser

Mark Johnson

12

19 | Book Review

Vance Bowman

23 | Faith & Culture

Eugene Wilson

42 | God Saved My Daughter’s Life!

Andrew D. Urshan: An Eastern Voice—A Suffering Voice

48 | The Joel 2:28 Project

Matthew Shaw

34

Daniel L. Segraves

Mendy Olson

41 | Worldline Bruce A. Howell

44 | Letters to the Editor 45 | Sunday School

Dr. Clay Jackson

36

The Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism

38

The Phenomenal Growth of Oneness Pentecostalism

John Hargrove

46

The 1913 Arroyo Seco Camp Meeting and the Dawning of the New Issue Daniel L. Butler

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 5

April Pruett

Talmadge L. French

Steve Cannon

51 | Health

Cylinda Nickel

A Century of Revelation: G.T. Haywood and the Oneness Message

16

Carlton L. Coon Sr.

7 | Multicultural 3 Ministries

LaJoyce Martin

22 | Mist on the Windshield

The Spiritual Significance of Remembering Robin Johnston

33 | New Start

20 | Waiting for God Is Worth the Wait

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

5

11/29/12 3:26 PM


Introducing a new resource guaranteed to get your congregation thinking more biblically.

The BREAD One Year Bible from Word Aflame. You want everyone in your congregation to think biblically. The best way to accomplish this is to motivate them to read their Bible every day. The BREAD One Year Bible is a resource you can place in their hands to make daily Bible reading a reality. Divided into convenient dated readings, this softcover Bible provides a new way to follow the BREAD program and read the Bible through in one year. At only $6.99 each when purchased in a case of 24, every member of your church can participate!

• Daily reading to complete the Bible in one calendar year • Coordinated with the annual BREAD program • Passages from the Old and New Testaments for each day • Focused thoughts to begin each reading • King James Version • A certificate for recording your completion of reading the Bible • Detachable bookmarks

Start the new year with a whole-church Bible reading campaign with the BREAD One Year Bible. Find out more about the BREAD One Year Bible, watch an interview with Pastor Norman Paslay II, and order yours at www.wordaflamepress.com.

BreadBibleAd.indd January 2013 Herald.indd 1 6

11/20/12 11/29/12 11:03 3:26 PM AM


1:03 AM

THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS BY DAVID K. BERNARD

The Jesus Name Centennial n 2013 we celebrate one hundred years of the restoration of water baptism in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. We find examples of this practice throughout church history, but key events in the early twentieth century led to the greatest revival of this message since the third century. The Jesus Name message was renewed in the modern Pentecostal movement, which originated with a Bible school in Topeka, Kansas, in January 1901 led by Charles Parham and with the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California, from 1906 to 1908 led by William Seymour. Based on the examples in Acts, some early Pentecostals began to baptize in Jesus’ name, including Parham (1901), some in Los Angeles during the Azusa Street Revival (1907), and Andrew Urshan, a Persian immigrant in Chicago (1910). The practice did not yet have strong doctrinal significance, however. Two notable events led to the development of the Jesus Name message as a distinct movement: the Worldwide Camp Meeting in Arroyo Seco in April 1913 and the rebaptisms of Frank Ewart and Glenn Cook in April 1914. The Worldwide Apostolic Faith Camp Meeting was organized by R.J. Scott and George Studd and held at Arroyo Seco near Los Angeles, on a campground used by the Azusa Street Mission. The month-long meeting began on April 15, 1913, and perhaps two thousand people attended. The main speaker was Maria Woodworth-Etter, a well-known Pentecostal evangelist. Expectations were high, and 364 people received the Holy Spirit. Many miraculous healings occurred as Woodworth-Etter prayed “in the name of Jesus.” At a baptismal service Robert McAlister, a Canadian minister, explained that single immersion was the proper mode for baptism, not triple immersion. As proof he cited the baptismal accounts in Acts. The apostles baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ; they never baptized using the words

“Father, Son, and Holy Ghost,” as triple immersion requires. McAlister’s observation planted a seed in the minds of several people. A man named John Schaepe was so inspired that he spent the night in prayer. Early the next morning he began running through the camp shouting that he had received a revelation of the power of the name of Jesus. Quite a few campers were greatly stirred as Schaepe fervently explained his newfound understanding. Another man who was deeply impressed was Frank Ewart, originally from Australia, where he had been a Baptist bush missionary. In 1903 he immigrated to Canada, in 1908 he received the Holy Spirit in Portland, Oregon, and in 1912 he became pastor of a Pentecostal mission in Los Angeles founded by William Durham. Ewart had been studying the name and oneness of God for some time, so McAlister’s comments were especially intriguing to him. Ewart invited him to his home, where they discussed the theological implications of using the name of Jesus in water baptism. They concluded that when the apostles baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, they properly fulfilled Christ’s command to baptize in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost (Matthew 28:19). After the camp, Ewart began working in Los Angeles with McAlister and Glenn Cook, a noted evangelist who had been the full-time business manager of the Azusa Street Mission. These men continued to study the name of Jesus and the doctrine of God. After several months McAlister returned to Canada and shared their thinking with ministers there, particularly Franklin Small. At some point they also included in their discussions G.T. Haywood, a ministerial friend and a prominent African American pastor in Indianapolis. In November 1913 at a convention in Winnipeg, McAlister preached the first sermon on the name of Jesus in water baptism. Small had charge of the baptismal service and baptized thirty new converts in the name of Jesus Christ. These were the first Jesus

Name baptisms to result from the Arroyo Seco meeting. Back in Los Angeles, Ewart and Cook concluded that, following the apostolic pattern, water baptism should always take place with the invocation of the name of Jesus. They also concluded that Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are not three distinct persons but three manifestations of the one God, and Jesus is the revelation of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. The reason why there is such power when believers preach, pray, and baptize in Jesus’ name is that the fullness of the Godhead dwells in Jesus. To proclaim this message, Ewart and Cook pitched a tent and began meetings in Belvedere, California, just outside Los Angeles. On April 15, 1914, Ewart preached his first sermon on Acts 2:38. He proclaimed that the full message of salvation consists of repentance, water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost; and he associated Jesus Name baptism with the oneness of God in Christ. Then Ewart baptized Cook in the name of Jesus Christ, and Cook baptized Ewart. This action—the first rebaptisms in the name of Jesus Christ—decisively identified Oneness Pentecostalism as a distinct movement. As the Jesus Name message was preached, a great revival broke out in Los Angeles. Many were miraculously healed and many received the Holy Ghost in the waters of baptism. Soon the Jesus Name message began to spread around the world. David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International. This article has been adapted from David K. Bernard, A History of Christian Doctrine, Vol. 3. See this book for documentation.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 7

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

7

11/29/12 3:26 PM


My Soul Cries Out for God’s Best Letters from a Participant in the Arroyo Seco Camp Meeting JOHN SMELSER

eorge Farrow, best known as the songwriter who penned the Oneness classic, “It’s All in Him,” wrote a series of “love” letters to Lulu Brumwell, the young lady he would later marry. These letters are preserved in the archives of the Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism, which is housed at World Evangelism Center in Hazelwood, Missouri. The earliest letter in the collection was written on May 26, 1912, and the latest was dated May 19, 1915. The letters were composed in the Los Angeles area during the emergence of the Oneness movement. Although they were intended only for Lulu’s eyes, they provide a firsthand glimpse into the day-to-day life of a participant in the emerging Jesus Name movement. Unintentionally, they capture the ethos of this exciting chapter of our history, and as we reflect on the hundred-year anniversary of the Jesus Name movement, I trust they will call you to honor both the pioneers of the movement and message God revealed to them. George R. Farrow was born in 1885 near Gardner, Montana. At seven he was orphaned and shortly thereafter he was adopted. However, the adoption was quickly annulled when the townspeople threatened 8

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 8

|

to lynch the adoptive parents because they dreadfully mistreated George. At sixteen he turned his life over to Christ. Shortly after his conversion George returned to the Montana village where he had spent his early childhood to seek forgiveness from his adoptive parents for the hatred he had harbored for them. In his early adult years he migrated to Southern California seeking a physical healing. He was not only healed but soon he received the baptism of the Holy Ghost and as a result of his involvement in the camp meeting at Arroyo Seco, he received a revelation of the name of Jesus. The following are excerpts of letters he wrote to Lulu during this time period. They have been edited for grammar and punctuation. June 3, 1913: “I am sure that the Master is going to send me forth to labor in the whitened harvest field soon. I pray that He sends me to the most needy field in all the world. Be it far or near my soul cries out for God’s best. Oh how I praise Him for

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


George R. Farrow was born in 1885 near Gardner, Montana. At seven he was orphaned and shortly thereafter he was adopted. However, the adoption was quickly annulled when the townspeople threatened to lynch the adoptive parents because they dreadfully mistreated George.

Himself and for healing my body and for the wonderful baptism of the Holy Ghost. It has seemed to me many times in the past week that I never knew before what it really meant to worship God. My whole being has been going out to Him in praise and adoration that words cannot express.”  For a time, George lived at the Pisgah Gardens, founded by Dr. Finis Yoakum. Hoping to grow stronger, he stayed there and began ministering in the immediate area. November 9, 1913: “We have been very busy preparing for a camp meeting to be held here this week commencing Tuesday. We expect about two hundred people or more out from Los Angeles and are looking to the Lord for a time of great blessing. … I am going to have a handkerchief prayed over and send it to Brother and Sister Dunbar for Edith. I believe the Lord will heal her. One young man was healed of consumption while the Word was being preached last JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 9

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

9

11/29/12 3:26 PM


Sunday afternoon. There has not been hardly a week, since I came, that there has not been one or more healed.”  November 16, 1913: “This has been a week of rich blessings to my soul, a feast of fat things to us all here at the Gardens. Although we had three days of hard rain, it did not hinder the showers of spiritual blessings coming down upon our souls during the four days of camp meeting. There were about 250 outsiders here besides our usual family of 85 to 100. A missionary and his wife from Kansas were both here, and their presence was a great blessing to all. The Lord sent another blessed message in tongues through the sister. This was new and I expect strange to some extent to some present, for it seems that all classes of people from the highest to the lowest attend Dr. Yoakum’s meetings and love this work. He loves them all and treats them all alike.”  January 11, 1914: George wrote to Lulu, “I have been attending the Seventh Street Mission lately. That is the Mission where the finished work of Calvary was first preached and threshed out three or four years ago. The Lord is now wonderfully working there again and bringing forth another truth that is going to mean much to God’s saints when it is fully accepted as I am sure it will be. “Many of the saints here are seeing it and walking in the light. This truth is water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ as in Acts 2:38. It may seem to be very nonessential at first thought. I myself along with many others of God’s saints here thought so at first. But God has surely been blessing this truth and talking very definitely

to many about its importance. And we are coming to see that it is a part of the faith once delivered to the saints, and step by step the Lord is leading us back to that faith.  “He began with the mighty outpouring of the Spirit here nine years ago. Then came the finished work of Calvary, which was another long step in that direction, and which was almost universally accepted by Pentecostal people. I feel sure this truth (Jesus Name baptism) also is another step toward apostolic faith and power and that when it is fully received and understood, the Lord will wonderfully confirm it as he did when it was first delivered by Peter on the Day of Pentecost. “A week ago yesterday, I was baptized in the name of Jesus. The Lord’s mighty power came down and witnessed to it. Last night I went with some other brethren to Hermosa Beach, a town about twenty miles from here, where we have a mission. The Lord wonderfully blessed us.” Lulu continued to receive letters almost every week, which always ended with the words, “I am yours.” George moved back to the Portland area and he and Lulu were married on October 4, 1915. God continued to use him in a mighty way. He pastored a number of churches on the West Coast, was an outstanding Bible teacher, and ministered to many churches and conferences.   John Smelser is the director of the Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism.

Caribbean Cruise April 20-27, 2013 For more information, contact: Lana Farnell at lfarnell@upci.org or 314-837-7300 ext. 421

10

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

SinglesCruise Halfpage.indd January 2013 Ad Herald.indd 10 1

|

JANUARY 2013

11/19/12 11/29/12 10:32 3:26 AM PM


0:32 AM

MY HOPE RADIO BY TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Three Minutes with Nate Lawrence

ell us about your family. I am happily married to my wife, Stacy. We will celebrate sixteen years of marriage in September. We struggled for five years to have children until God blessed us to adopt our first child, Myrekel. For our son, Brennon, we received the call from New Beginnings on a Thursday and the following Tuesday we took him home from the hospital. God certainly performed a quick work. We received both children at birth; they are now five and four respectively. I encourage all couples struggling with childbearing to not give up hope. God will make a way for His will to be performed. What is your salvation story? I am a fifth-generation Pentecostal. My great grandpa and grandma, Herman and Aline Basore, helped start Calvary Tabernacle and were saved under G.T. Haywood. My grandpa and grandma, Howard and Virginia Jones, were instrumental in assisting Nathaniel A. Urshan, whom I was named after, prior to their pastoring several churches. My mother Bev Lawrence received the Holy Ghost in Calvary Christian School at the age of six. My story is different. With anticipation I prayed for the Holy Ghost but was baptized first at the age of ten years old in Bradenton, Florida. I then went to junior camp the next summer and determined I would not leave without the Holy Ghost. On Wednesday night of Junior Camp in Ocala, Florida, I received the wonderful gift of the Holy Ghost! What is your favorite Scripture in the Bible? Philippians 4:9: “Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do; and the God of peace shall be with you.” What is your musical background? My family has a long history of musicians. My great grandpa and his family played instruments and sang on Nathaniel

Urshan’s radio broadcast for several years. As a matter of fact, he sang a song at the Ohio District campground in 1958 the night before he passed away. My grandpa and his family (including my mother) played instruments and sang on the radio. They also played and sang in many churches throughout North America for several years. They were known as the Singing Jones Family. I began playing the drums at an early age while my mom played the organ. My father and mother (Joe and Bev Lawrence) continue to play instruments and sing. My sister (Michelle Graham) and brother (Chris) and their families all sing. Everyone in our family uses their talents for the Lord. Do you write your own songs? I don’t currently write my own music lyrics, just instrumentals. I do, however, bring new verses into existing songs to promote worship and to continue the worship flow. What specific themes do you cover in your songs? Praise and worship to God. What is the best musical advice you received from a mentor? Give your talent to God and use it for His glory. How would you encourage someone desiring to pursue music as ministry? I recently started a daughter work in

Bryan/College Station, Texas, in August 2011. Music has been instrumental (pun intended) in presenting the gospel in a nonoffensive way and in introducing society to our church. Anyone interested in pursuing music ministry should volunteer to play in every church service and special events. I took my saxophone around for years to church services, camp meetings, and conferences. Not only was I asked to play a few solos here and there, I also learned a lot from other musicians and was invited to record on numerous albums because of these relationships. I believe my sax playing is on more than twelve professional albums at this point. I recently gave every schoolteacher at my daughter’s elementary school a complimentary copy of my Christmas album for a Christmas gift from our church. I was told they played it in the halls soon after. Also, I am beginning to get out in our community and do live concerts to invite people to church. Any loves other than music? My wife and children. Without their love and support I would not be able to travel and share my music or entertain at the many banquets I am invited to participate in. I owe my wife and children a lot. I try to make it up to them by taking a vacation once a year. We are planning a cruise with my family to celebrate my parents’ fifty-year anniversary. Where can we listen, purchase, and connect with you? You can contact me to purchase albums via my church website, www.LifeLineSanctuary.com, www.pentecostalpublishing.com, or email me at LifeLineSanctuary@gmail. com. Tiffini Countaway is the producer of MyHopeRadio.com.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 11

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

11

11/29/12 3:26 PM


The Spiritual Significance of Remembering ROBIN JOHNSTON

he camp meeting committee didn’t appoint a camp historian. Their focus was more immediate. The organizers of the 1913 camp meeting held in Arroyo Seco, California, were trusting God for a move of the Spirit that would help repair the damage caused to the fledgling Pentecostal movement by William Durham’s strident proclamation of the “Finished Work” doctrine. They were trusting that a fresh encounter with God would go a long way in healing their wounds. Instead the events of the camp served as a catalyst for the next restoration of apostolic truth to the early Pentecostal movement. Almost as an aside, R.E. McAlister reminded those gathered at a baptismal service at the camp that everyone baptized in the Book of Acts was baptized in Jesus’ name. The doctrinal seed planted at the 1913 camp germinated for a year and then burst forth as the Jesus Name or Oneness movement. To help us remember this catalytic event, the General Board of the United Pentecostal Church International has recognized 2013 as the centennial of the Jesus Name movement. This board action is not just the routine procedures of a church organization; it is a recognition of the spiritual significance of remembering. So let’s remember. Our ability to remember is a bit challenged by the lack of written accounts of the events of the camp. Although the keynote speaker—not a term they would have used—Maria Woodsworth-Etter prophesied God would do a new thing at the camp meeting, no one thought to appoint a scribe to capture the moment. Perhaps a primary reason for this oversight was the participants’ eager expectation of the Lord’s soon— emphasis on “soon”—return. Or maybe it is the nature of many new movements; their focus is so future-oriented that a concern for recording the present seems unimportant. And as a result, we certainly do not have an official history of the proceedings of the camp. Other than a brief mention or two in periodicals like Word and Witness, over thirty years passed before one of the key participants in the camp, Frank 12

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 12

|

Ewart, recorded his memories of the events in book form. Instead the Arroyo Seco story was primarily transmitted orally through sermons and testimonies. If you close your eyes you can almost hear them. The preacher is reaching the climax of his sermon on water baptism and he tells the story of how God restored this truth to the church. Whether shared in church or over a cup of coffee, her testimony is filled with personal accounts of what God has done for her but she is careful to ground her experiences both in biblical narratives and events of the early twentieth century. They give credence to her personal story. This transmission of a spiritual story is a biblical idea. Even God participated in it. You might have thought that a bush engulfed in fire but not being consumed by that fire would have been enough. Or that His voice echoing from that same bush would have been adequate. But God, the I AM THAT I AM, felt it necessary to ground this encounter with Moses in His previous encounters with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. In fact God often introduced Himself as the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were not philosophical constructs or abstract ideas; they were historical figures with whom God had interacted. In Sinai God connected His encounter with Moses to His previous relationship with Moses’ forefathers. In doing so He connected the present with the past The New Testament continued this practice. Both Matthew and Luke record extensive genealogies of Jesus. We might be tempted to rush through these passages to get to the real story, but for some reason the Holy Spirit inspired these two gospel writers to include what some might consider trivia in their accounts of the life of Jesus. In reality it is an attempt to connect the present community of faith to

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


e

Remembering is not the wasteful practice of those who look back instead of looking forward. It is not the nostalgic lament of the better days behind us. It is the joyful telling of a story that reminds us of what God has done in the past. those who have come before and, perhaps more important to remind the present community of faith that just as God had helped their forefathers, He could help them. Think of how often this occurs in the Bible. The Passover, which became a central feast in the life of Israel, was about remembering God’s salvation of Israel from the death angel and, more important, of His deliverance of them from Egypt’s bondage. Joshua took time on the eve of his conquest of the Promised Land to build a memorial of stones he had taken from the Jordan River so the Israelites who came after him would be reminded that God had stopped the Jordan so His people could cross into the Promised Land. In the New Testament Jesus dined with His disciples just prior to the events of Calvary. We often call this the Last Supper. During the course of the meal He instructed the disciples to continue the practice after His departure. It was a way for them to remember Him. Paul’s letter to the Corinthian church indicates that this meal of remembrance was

part of their shared life of faith. It tied them back to a time when Jesus had walked the shores of Galilee and forward to the time when they would share the marriage supper of the Lamb. Remembering is not the wasteful practice of those who look back instead of looking forward. It is not the nostalgic lament of the better days behind us. Rather it is the joyful telling of a story that reminds us of what God has done in the past and in doing so inspires us to believe what He can do for us today. In this spirit of joyful remembering, I can think of no better way to celebrate the centennial of the Jesus Name movement than a brand new revival of His name. Robin Johnston is the editor in chief for the United Pentecostal Church International.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 13

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

13

11/29/12 3:26 PM


[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

Bible Truth or Man’s Opinion? CHUCK WELCH

omeone famously said, “A text without a context is only a pretext.” Paul warned that some would prefer to have their ears tickled with things not true rather than be presented with truth (II Timothy 4:3-4). The surgeon who hurts me emotionally by telling me that I have cancer and then hurts me physically by cutting it out of my body with a sharp scalpel is more my friend than one who will not tell me the truth. The wise man said, “Faithful are the wounds of a friend; but the kisses of an enemy are deceitful” (Proverbs 27:6). Truth can sometimes hurt us at first, but it is always better in the end than falsehood. Today, many have left the altar of truth to bow before the idols of men’s opinions. You and I will ultimately not be judged by anyone’s opinion; we will all be judged on the basis of the established truth of God’s Word. Paul warned the early church that if anyone preached any other gospel than what the apostles preached they would be accursed. He then asked two probing questions: “Do I now persuade men, or God? or do I seek to please men?” Then he went on to plainly say, “If I yet pleased men, I should not be the servant of Christ.” True preachers of the gospel will always desire to please God regardless of men’s opinions. We are admonished today to be tolerant. Please forgive my simple logic, but if my opinion or your opinion is wrong, being tolerant doesn’t make it OK. The psalmist cried to God, “With my whole heart have I sought thee: O let me not wander from thy commandments. Thy word have I hid in mine heart, that I might not sin against thee” (Psalm 119:10-11). 14

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 14

|

The Lord said to Joshua that the keeping of His Word was the path to real success. (See Joshua 1:8.) Jesus said, “If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed; and ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free” (John 8:31-32). Paul declared, “Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus” ( Philippians 2:5). The mindset of Christ was that of doing the will of God, of pleasing the Father. (See Luke 22:42; John 8:29; Matthew 7:21.) This is the basis of true faith. The Bible proclaims, “Without faith it is impossible to please him” (Hebrews 11:6). And true faith is predicated not on man’s opinion, but upon the Word of God: Paul said, “Faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God” (Romans 10:17). The Bible, by modernists’ standards, is intolerant. It proclaims that those who do not have a love of the truth will be deceived and will perish. (See II Thessalonians 2:10-12.) Jesus said those who do not believe and repent will perish. He also said that unless a person is born again of water and the Spirit he could not see or enter the kingdom of God (John 3:3-7,18; Luke 13:3,5). The Bible teaches that there’s only one Lord, one faith, one baptism (Ephesians 4:5). Jesus Christ is the only way to eternal life; there is no salvation outside of Him (John 14:6; Acts 4:12; I Timothy 2:4-5). That’s God’s opinion and I choose to agree with Him. Whose opinion will you base your life and destiny on? Remember, a true friend will tell you what you need to hear, not just what you want to hear. Chuck Welch serves as a presbyter in the Wisconsin District, as North Central Regional director of North American Missions, and as an instructor in Purpose Institute. He and his wife are working with Pastor Peter Fraser in De Pere, Wisconsin (Green Bay area). He enjoys spending time with his wife, his two daughters and their husbands, and his eight grandchildren.

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


LAUNCH YOUR MINISTRY BY MARK JOHNSON

Jesus Sat Down with His Disciples hroughout Jesus’ ministry, He made time for His followers. Matthew said, “When the even was come, he sat down with the twelve” (Matthew 26:20). Jesus sat down with His leaders and explained His teaching and uncovered truths for His disciples with whom He was leaving His church. Although Jesus spent much time with crowds, in the synagogues, in the marketplaces, in the streets, and in the hills and valleys, He also took time away from the press of the wants and the needs of the larger community. He did this to find solitude in prayer and to develop His disciples. The men He gathered around Him were the next generation leaders. Jesus knew it was necessary to hone and polish their thinking. He asked them questions so they would reveal to themselves and to others what they were thinking. Thus He could rub away their rough edges and guide and prepare them for the journey He knew they would face in the days ahead. Jesus Taught His Disciples “He sat down, and called the twelve, and saith unto them, If any man desire to be first, the same shall be last of all, and servant of all” (Mark 9:35). Jesus focused on the natural desires of men to succeed. He sought to channel His disciples’ desires into effective ministry. He sat down and poured Himself into them. He took extra time so they would understand the principles and could rightly apply them. He wanted His followers who would become leaders to know Him and what His kingdom was about. For pastors and church leaders, the adage seems to be true: “The squeaky wheel gets the grease.” Sometimes we minister to the loudest need instead of the most important need. We cannot allow ministering to the cry of the weak in the crowd or even to the broken from the congregation to eliminate or stagnate the training and building of laborers for the harvest field. God pours

Although Jesus spent much time with crowds, in the synagogues, in the marketplaces, in the streets, and the hills and valleys, He also took time to sit down with His disciples. much knowledge, grace, and understanding into our lives and we must pass it on. Jesus invested in men who would carry the gospel into the future. The crowds dispersed when pressures mounted, but His disciples’ commitment remained. Paul said, “If I am being poured out as a drink offering on the sacrifice and service of your faith, I am glad and rejoice with you all” (Philippians 2:17, NJKV). Oswald Chambers wrote in his famous book, My Utmost for His Highest, “Are you willing to sacrifice yourself for the work of another believer—to pour out your life sacrificially for the ministry and faith of others?” Schedule some time each week to invest in future leaders. Put it in your date book or iPhone calendar. Sit down with them and pour into them life principles for leaders. Pastor-Centric Training In order to facilitate this time of developing leadership, a group of pastors created Launch Your Ministry (LYM) in partnership with the World Evangelism Center of the UPCI. LaunchYourMinistry.com is a website with a variety of ministry training that can be used to develop leaders. General Superintendent David K. Bernard has created twenty-four video lessons that are currently available. Soon we will have at least 108 lessons developed for developing ministry teams. The lessons are introductory courses on spiritual and practical leadership, each anywhere from twelve to thirty minutes long. This tool assists pastors and other church leaders in training the next generation of leaders. Lessons are available at no cost. We are developing a guided approach through all of the classes to create a com-

plete, well-rounded approach to teaching ministerial leadership. This will appear soon on the website. Lessons on the website can be streamed to a laptop and watched by a group of leaders. Or they can be viewed independently by each member of the group and followed up with discussion. The carefully prepared introductory lessons, combined with the pastor’s heartbeat, and shared in a group setting will create a powerful combination of Word and Spirit that will solidify young leaders. The challenge is to follow Christ’s lead and pour faith and burden into leaders behind the scenes and away from the clamor of needs. When the winds of adversity blow, leaders will have the truth of God’s Word and Spirit united with the pastor’s relationship to guide them and to keep them from falling. Paul said, “The things that thou has heard of me among many witnesses, the same commit thou to faithful men, who shall be able to teach others also” (II Timothy 2:2). Paul said to find faithful men and pass on to them a deep understanding of the gospel. Pastors and other church leaders can use Launchyourministry.com to help instruct leaders and add their insight to the lessons. Life rushes past us, but we may find the time we sit down with those who will change the next generation may be our most productive time of all. Mark Johnson is married to Marci Johnson. The Johnsons have three sons who are followers of Christ, and their greatest joy. He pastors Life Tabernacle in Elkhart, Indiana.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 15

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

15

11/29/12 3:26 PM


A Century of Revelation: G.T. Haywood and the Oneness Message MATTHEW SHAW

n early spring 1915, Glenn Cook, an elder from the Azusa Street Mission who had accepted the revelation of the mighty God in Christ and baptism in the name of Jesus arrived in Indianapolis, Indiana, and was received by Garfield Thomas Haywood and his congregation at 11th and Senate. In March 1915, G.T. Haywood and four hundred and sixty-five members of his church were baptized in Jesus’ name in Eagle Creek, marking the first Apostolic baptisms east of the Mississippi River. J. Roswell Flower, the general secretary of the Assemblies of God and an avid opponent of the Oneness movement, sent a telegram to Haywood warning him of Cook’s “error.” The message arrived too late and Haywood, fully convinced of the veracity of Cook’s message, became one of the most avid and effective proponents and propagators of Oneness theology. Haywood’s early alignment with the Oneness camp during the difficult years when the “New Issue” was dividing the Pentecostal movement along doctrinal lines, is a well-known chapter in our unique history. Undoubtedly, nearly every Apostolic knows the name of Garfield Thomas Haywood. From the time of his baptism G.T. Haywood maintained an uncompromising stand for the Oneness of God and Acts 2:38 salvation. A revered Bible teacher, apologist, and hymn writer, Haywood led a powerful church that was destined to become the epicenter of Oneness revival. G.T. Haywood had received the baptism of the Holy Ghost on a snowy evening in February 1908. The makeshift church was a converted tin shop and was led by Henry Prentice, who had 16

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 16

|

First Apostolic baptisms east of the Mississippi River in 1915.

Left: G.T. Haywood, 1912 Right: Ida Haywood, 1914

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


Exterior of Christ Temple

The Voice in the Wilderness, published by Haywood’s church.

received the baptism of the Holy Ghost at Azusa Street Mission in Los Angeles. In this humble setting G.T. Haywood and his wife, Ida, were filled with the Spirit and began the spiritual training that would burgeon into a lifetime of devoted Pentecostal ministry. In 1910, Haywood’s church began publishing The Voice in the Wilderness. After 1915, this became one of the most influential Oneness circulars and was the official organ of the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World (PAW), which followed Haywood into the Oneness movement. The PAW was formed in 1906, and Haywood became the first presiding bishop of the organization, when it converted to the episcopal polity in 1925. He served in that capacity until his untimely death in 1931. In 1924, construction was completed on Christ Temple, the final edifice undertaken by Haywood. This church, located on Fall

Annual PAW convention, 1919

January 2013 Herald.indd 17

Creek Boulevard, still stands as a beautiful testament to God’s increase and the faithful ministry of Haywood. The interior includes several original artworks by Haywood, a talented painter and illustrator. Banners hung on the platform declared: “Jesus Only” and “Jesus is God”—evidence of Christ Temple’s strong commitment to Apostolic truth. Christ Temple epitomized many of the original values of the earliest years of Pentecostal revival. The congregation was thoroughly integrated, with whites and blacks worshiping side by side. The church maintained a large degree of interracial unity even after the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World suffered a racial divide in 1924, and convention photographs well into the 1930s depict multiracial crowds. Bishop Haywood’s legacy is most evident in his articulate apologetics and hymnody. Through powerful publications such as The Finest of Wheat, The Birth of the Spirit In the Days of the Apostles, The Victim of the Flaming Sword, and Before the Foundation of the World, a Revelation of the Ages, G.T. Haywood expounded the principles of the Apostolic faith—the deity of Christ, the plan of salvation, and Bible holiness. Despite fierce opposition in the greater

JANUARY 2013

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

17

11/29/12 3:26 PM


Pentecostal Assemblies of the World building in Indianapolis, Indiana, 1920.

Oneness movement and beyond, Haywood unflinchingly stated the truth: “The term ‘three persons’ is erroneous and unscriptural. The personal, visible form of God was Jesus Christ, and today the Christ with us and in us is ‘that Holy Spirit.’” He was a stalwart proponent of water and Spirit salvation: There cannot be two ways to be saved. Jesus says, “By ME if any man enters in he shall be saved.” And again, He that believeth, and is baptized, shall be saved … By honest observation of these scriptures we are bound to admit that to be “born of water and the Spirit,” to enter by “ME [Jesus Christ]” to “enter by the Door,” and to “believe and be baptized” mean exactly the same thing. There is but one fold and one door, and both Jew and Gentile must enter alike … On the day of Pentecost the way of entrance was presented to both Jew and Gentile (proselytes, Acts 2:10) alike, “Repent and be baptized, every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost.” Further, Haywood composed Stream beautiful anthems exalting the name, I See a Crimson person, deity, and salvific work of         Christ. “Baptized into        Garfield Thomas

  =115    



Cal - ’vry’s 1. On no 2. To - day and 3. When gloom we when 4. And

 

    

       



rays of soul from look a ran - somed

  

hope His way hosts’



for to sal to grand

of crim - son stream

                     

 

   

A He’s And Will

mor - row va - tion, Je - sus, fi - nal

    

 

  





Jesus the Son of

  =110     

laid. stay. say: frain.

1. Do 2. God 3. O 4. If 5. Then

I

  you gave who you some

- va - ry, flows from Cal

throne of God,

  

sweep-ing o - ver



   

God. God? Its God,

Cal - va - ryGod

me.

            

How I

know Him, a would re will ac day from

Similarly, the refrain of Haywood’s “The Lord of Lords” says: He’s Lord of lords and King of kings The Beginning and the end The Father, Son and Holy Ghost The dying sinner’s Friend If you will hear His voice Be buried in His name Then the Comforter will come to abide

   

O sweet

|

    

 

a - dore Thee!





   

Won - der!

                  O how I

as Haywood, circa

O sweet



His fa - vor? Spir - it to hov He would not take - er; Him? nev - er pre - cious will leave Him; and ho - ly,





Je - sus the Son Je - sus the Son of Je - sus the Son of Je - sus the Son of Je - sus the Son of of

                  

 

       Won - der!

                         love Thee!

Je - sus the Son Je - sus the Son of Je - sus the Son of Je - sus the Son of Je - sus the Son of of

                             shared of

 

1914

             

Je - sus, Our Lord, our ran - som, Our Sav - ior, souls to re ject Him, De - cov cept Him And - spise or for - sake - er; Him, trust and be Heav - en, On clouds of brigh - lieve Him, t glo - ry,

Have you ev - er His blood made us seen Him, Or wor - thy His O who Your soul ev - er sought Him, And Will come will ex - alt Him, And for His jew - els, Most

             

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 18

God. God.

o - ver me.

Public Domain Cyber Hymnal™ Courtesy of the

Two hymns written by G. T. Haywood

Preach in Jesus’ name, teach in Jesus’ name Heal the sick in His name and always proclaim It was Jesus’ name in which the power came Baptize in His name, enduring the shame For there is vict’ry in Jesus’ name

God

Garfield Thom

    

                                      God?

Refrain

Are

    

18

And My I The

Refrain



     It

paid, way pray,” reigns,

 

 

  

     



the Body” proclaims the essentiality of the baptism of the Holy Ghost. “Do All in Jesus’ Name” resounds with true Apostolic resolution:

Haywood, 1920

                                    God.          God. God

, stream of blood

God,

 

were cross our path to my heart in to tells me He this glad re be

 

blood,

the throne of waves which reach

       

  

    



  



    

   

                           see a

de - mands were sin’s Where to turn a bides to A d— no use “You’ve sinne for-ev - er life Where

sor - row hill of - tion con - dem - na -per, sad - ness whis- tal por reach the

Je - sus the Son of

God;

            

Je - sus the Son of

Pioneers like Garfield Thomas Haywood, who chose to follow the pillar of truth, should inspire us to be faithful to the Apostolic message, holding up the banner of Jesus’ name and proclaiming the Acts 2:38 message until Christ comes for His glorious chuch.

A century later, nearly every Apostolic believer is acquainted with the legacy of Haywood. Undaunted by opposition, he led a powerful congregation and helped form the Pentecostal Assemblies of the World into an influential Oneness body. Christ Temple was a veritable “mother church” producing evangelists, pastors, and missionaries that advanced the Apostolic faith around the world. As we celebrate the centennial of the Oneness movement we must remember the sacrificial work of the generation of the revelation. Pioneers like Garfield Thomas Haywood, who chose to follow the pillar of truth, should inspire us to be faithful to the Apostolic message, holding up the banner of Jesus’ name and proclaiming the Acts 2:38 message until Christ comes for His glorious church. Matthew Shaw is a librarian and teaches English at Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana. He attends River of Life Church in Muncie. John Martin is the pastor.

God.

                      Public Courtesy of the Domain Cyber Hymnal™

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


BOOK REVIEW BY VANCE BOWMAN

In Case You Were Wandering By Travis Miller

he 2012 presidential election is history! One of the target groups that both the Democratic and Republican parties were seeking with much of their campaigning was young voters. Sources say that the youth of America had significant impact on the 2008 presidential election. No doubt young voters had an effect on the election in 2012 also. Youths who were fourteen to seventeen years old in the 2008 election were eligible to vote last year, as long as they were registered. Interestingly, eighteen-to twenty-one-year olds who voted in 2008 are now twenty-two, twenty-three, twenty-four, and twenty-five years of age. I wonder how many of them are wandering. Travis Miller’s new book, In Case You Were Wandering, addresses many of the challenges facing young adults today. In Case You Were Wandering offers waypoints and a compass to assist twentysomethings along the path to the destination God has designed for them. In the spring of 1991, I graduated from Texas Bible College. I was twenty. Armed with three years of classroom experience and a theology diploma, my soon-to-be wife and I set out to accomplish goals and see dreams fulfilled. I wish we had had a copy of In Case You Were Wandering. God has been good and our ministry has been blessed. However, in reading this book, I see mistakes we could have avoided had we had access to a book like this. The present generation of twentysomethings is talented and blessed. The enemy of the church would love nothing more than for this group of incredibly gifted young adults to waste the energy of their twenties aimlessly wandering. The purpose and goal of In Case You Were Wandering are aptly summed up in its own words. Here’s an excerpt from the close of chapter 1: The kingdom of God cannot afford to lose the rich, inspiring talents harbored within the lives of this generation. In response,

this book’s goal is to assist Christian twentysomethings to embrace the process of life-discovery without getting lost within that same process. Personal growth, understanding distinct strengths and weaknesses, and recognizing individual interests and passions are a natural part of the human life-cycle. Yet, this is just one stage of the life-cycle. This is a process­—not a destination within itself. Christians are called to pass through this time of discovery on their way to a Godordained destination. We are encouraged to recognize and develop the many excellent gifts God has given each of us in a manner that keeps our destination before us. Our discovery should propel us to our ultimate goal. To do so, we must discover our own values and then discern which aspects of discovery enhance those values, and which aspects would instead lead to aimlessness. In the chapter titled “Where Is God Leading?” the author writes: Sometimes we get so focused on “the next step” or “what do I do now” that we lose our focus on simply becoming better Christians. We forget that God’s priority is to transform our individual lives. His priority is to make us better people. Then as that takes place, we learn

God’s will for our lives. Understand that God is more interested in what we become than where we are going. Following are several of the chapter titles: “Explorer or Wanderer?” “What Are My Values?” “Why Should I Follow God?” “Where Is God Leading?” “Who’s Going My Direction?” “Where Do I Go from Here?” “Discernment and Judgment” “Ignoring Accountability” “Wasting Time” In Case You Were Wandering is available with a five-session small-group curriculum that contains a DVD resource and a facilitator’s guide. I have seen the DVD lessons and read through the facilitator’s guide and I highly recommend them to anyone who teaches young adults or college-career classes. Vance Bowman serves as the pastor of the United Pentecostal Church in Shawnee, Oklahoma. In Case You Were Wandering is available at pentecostalpublishing.com. JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 19

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

19

11/29/12 3:26 PM


[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

Waiting for God Is Worth the Wait LAJOYCE MARTIN

n life’s report card, I’ve never made an A+ in waiting. Nor have I won any blue ribbon for patience. Waiting tries my patience! I want answers to my prayers right now. Return mail. Overnight. Express. Or a fax might be better. If God doesn’t answer my prayer in five minutes and seven seconds, I’m off to try to find my own answer. Sometimes when I pray, I hang up after the first ring! Patience, said a mechanically minded man, is the ability to idle

20

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 20

|

your motor when you feel like stripping your gears. Ours is an impatient generation. The July issue of a magazine comes out in June. Next year’s model (appliance, car, wardrobe) is offered for sale in the fall of the previous numbered year. How many years of our existence have we spent waiting? “On hold” on the telephone. “All representatives are busy helping other customers. Please do not hang up. Your call is very important to us and will be answered in approximately six/ten/fifteen minutes.” The IRS (in April) and the airlines (during daytime hours) are the worst. Stop lights. (I think we have history’s “longest” red light in our area.)

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


Many of the most beautiful things that happen to us in life come only after a long wait. You cannot force a rosebud to open without ruining its beauty. Grocery lines. Invariably, the person in front will have a whole month’s worth of items stacked in her cart, and the cashier must call for a price check. Railroad crossings. Have you ever counted the cars on a slowmoving freight train? The doctor’s office: You might as well grab three of the outdated magazines. . . . And the list goes on. On his eightieth birthday, a man who had kept very careful notes of his life computed his time. He had spent five of his years waiting on people! Impatience isn’t confined to century twenty-one. Some of our ancestors were bitten by it. Sarah, in Genesis, couldn’t wait for God’s perfect plan: a son for Abraham. Her hormones had gone into hibernation, and she decided to take matters into her own hands. Hagar, a surrogate mother—what a great plan! Not! She got herself, Abraham, and the rest of us in a fix because she didn’t wait on God. Isaac was God’s plan all the time. An old fable tells of a certain man who was led into God’s executive offices, and among the other wonders, he beheld a room marked “Delayed Blessings Office,” where God held certain requests until the proper time arrived to send them. Ah, there was his own petition in the process of completion! If we could but learn—! Even as we cry and plead and wheedle, God is engineering what is best for us. We would pluck our blessings green, but God offers them only ripe and sweet. And then there’s a nothing-but-true story about a man named Saul. The prophet Samuel was due to say a blessing over the upcoming battle with the Philistines, who had thirty thousand chariots and six thousand men on horseback. Seven days passed—and no Samuel. My soldiers are scattering, considered Saul. I can’t wait any longer for a tardy prophet. “Bring me a burnt offering and a peace offering,” ordered Saul. And he performed the ceremony himself, which wasn’t in his job description. He wasn’t a priest, a prophet, or a preacher. He was an earthly king. No sooner had he finished than up showed Samuel. “What have you done, Saul?” Samuel asked. “Because you were late and my soldiers were defecting, I did your job.” “What a foolish thing you have done, Saul, and it will cost you your kingship.” He lost everything by not waiting. In the upper room, 120 believers waited ten days for the outpouring of the Holy Ghost. What unusual event happened on the ninth day of their wait? Absolutely nothing. The Israelites marched around the walls of Jericho for the twelfth time. What happened? Absolutely nothing.

Naaman, the leper, dipped six times in Jordan. What happened? Absolutely nothing. Yet each of these was on the threshold of victory! You too have had your ninth-day, twelfth-round, sixth-plunge experiences. Revivals and miracles and answers come to the faithful who have waited on God when nothing has happened. Of the fruit of the Spirit, patience isn’t my favorite. If I suffer, I want to do something about it. But I must remember that wounds heal by degrees. During a storm, a ship was driven aground. Rescuers tried to push it, then pull it. They removed cargo. Nothing worked. “There is only one thing to do,” said a wise, old sailor. “We must wait for the tide to come in.” Sure enough, the tide freed the ship. Sometimes we must wait “for the tide to come in.” And we find that when we accept God’s timetable, we are free. The century plant thrives in dry, desert sites. For years, the sixfoot plant puts out no flowers. Then, all at once, a bud shoots up at a rate of seven inches a day to an eventual height of twenty to forty feet. Then it crowns itself with blossoms. Many of the most beautiful things that happen to us in life come only after a long wait. You cannot force a rosebud to open without ruining its beauty.

LaJoyce Martin is a pastor’s wife from Morris, Oklahoma. This article is excerpted from LaJoyce Martin’s new book, Life’s Little Lessons Learned the Hard Way. She may be contacted for books at 918-650-0560 or 7010 Fox Run Road, Henryetta, Oklahoma 74437 JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 21

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

21

11/29/12 3:26 PM


[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

Mist on the Windshield CYLINDA NICKEL

watched as my windshield transformed itself right in front of my eyes. The vapor changed to mist. The mist was overtaken by droplets. The droplets hugged each other and turned into rivulets of water. The tiny manageable mist suddenly took over my view until all that was seen was blurry. The things in front of me were lost due to the very thing I had ignored earlier—the sprinklings of rain. This experience prompted me to cry out to the Lord. How could I have let things slip in my relationship with God? I was busy pulling down cobwebs and dust and then I looked at one corner of my heart to see utter disaster. I wanted room to breathe, so I quickly ran to the other side to find the same thing. How had self managed to get a hold on me? How did my plans and my desires build such quick yet shaky foundations? I quickly heard the holder of my heart command me to clean out anything that God was not attached to—anything that bore the resemblance of Cylinda, her agenda, her lists, and her plans. There had to be a full cleaning, a scraping, a rebuilding. I hung my head in shame over the hurt and awkward humiliation that flooded my soul. It was becoming apparent to me that all along God had had a better plan. Once I got rid of me, and all my junk had been removed there was finally enough room—room for Him to step in to lift the load and to bring the balm of Gilead I needed. I stand alone, but not forgotten.
I stand cleansed, but with His coal of anointing on my tongue. I stand willing and ready for His perfect 22

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 22

|

will to be done in my life. I hated packing up all of my plans, my dreams, my aspirations and giving them back to Him. I had arranged them so neatly and had even basked in the homey way I had set them up just right. The journey of giving is one of life’s hardest journeys. Giving away a book, a misplaced toy, a discarded gift—that is not hard at all. But giving of one’s will? That’s a different story. It’s a story worth the read, for when God takes over He truly becomes the author and finisher of our faith.
May you stand triumphant in Him today. My prayer is, “Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a right spirit within me” (Psalm 51:10). Cylinda Nickel is the office manager for Missionaries Kids (MK) ministries.

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


FAITH & CULTURE BY EUGENE WILSON

Living Out Our Faith ecently, while visiting Haiti, I was awestruck at the sheer mass of poverty-stricken people. I had never seen anything like it. Evidence of the devastating earthquake that struck Haiti on January 12, 2010, was all too apparent. Thousands are still living in tents. Buildings lie in ruin, and the roads are a mess and difficult to travel. Trash is everywhere—in the streets and outside of homes and businesses. The primary purpose of my visit to Haiti was to speak at a leadership seminar held for pastors, church leaders, and Bible school students. However, Missionaries Ron and Terry Brian afforded me (along with Pastor Mark Barrick, our trip coordinator, and Adam Rios) the opportunity to hand out sacks of food to a small fishing village. It was one of the highlights of the trip. The village consists of about eighty huts made of sticks and mud. The huts have grass roofs. I was deeply moved. Because these people have so little, I have no idea how they survive. As one might imagine, there is a great need for humanitarian efforts in Haiti. Haiti’s unemployment rate is around 70 percent, nearly identical to what it was before the earthquake. There are hundreds of thousands, if not several million, throughout Haiti who are not much better off than those who live in the small fishing village where we passed out food.

right here in North America. You and I can be instrumental in making a difference in the lives of others all over the world. Although the need in Haiti is enormous, and our contribution was little, what we did mattered. Likewise, what you do, even though it may seem small, can help make a difference. In recent years I have witnessed a shift among the younger generation in particular, a positive one I might add.

Jesus said when we feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, and so forth we do it unto Him. Likewise, when we fail to do such things to “the least of these,” Jesus said we do it unto Him. (See Matthew 25:31-46.) In our ministering to those who are in need, we are ministering to Christ. Humanitarian work is no small matter. It is a big thing that matters. Serving Christ

Jesus came to serve, not to be served. (See Mark 10:45.) He taught His followers to serve others. (See John 13:3-17.) His teachings were countercultural. It went against the norm. Jesus said the greatest is the person who serves others, not the person who is served by others. If we want to follow Christ’s example, we must immerse ourselves in serving. One of the ways we can do this is by making a difference in the lives of others less fortunate than ourselves, many of whom are our own brothers and sisters in the Lord. Finally, we must be mindful that our participation in humanitarian efforts should flow out of our serving Christ. Failure to do so can cause us to become puffed up and filled with pride. Serving others can easily become about fulfilling our own purposes. If we serve others and fail to align ourselves with Christ’s example of humility, our efforts will be in vain. We must remember we live to serve Him. And it is our serving Him that causes us to serve others.

Proverbs 28:27 says, “He that giveth unto the poor shall not lack: but he that hideth his eyes shall have many a curse.” Just because there will always be poor people does not excuse us to stand by idly. It is not enough to pray for those who are in need; we must act on our faith.

We Can Make a Difference The need for feeding the poor, digging a well, or other humanitarian endeavors extends well beyond Haiti. There are people all over the world who are experiencing dire circumstances; some are

It appears that more people are becoming concerned for the downtrodden and destitute. Moreover, not only are they concerned, they are doing something about it. I applaud their efforts. Some people quote Matthew 26:11: “For you have the poor with you always” (NKJV) as if to say, we should not be concerned about ministering to people in need. However, Proverbs 28:27 says, “He that giveth unto the poor shall not lack: but he that hideth his eyes shall have many a curse.” Just because there will always be people who are poor does not give us an excuse to stand by idly. It is not enough to pray for those who are in need; we must act on our faith. (See James 2:14-18.)

Eugene Wilson lives in Olive Branch, Mississippi.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 23

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

23

11/29/12 3:26 PM


[THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT’S CONFERENCE SERMON]

The twentyfirst century challenges our identity

as Apostolic Pentecostal Christians. A few years ago, an oral survey was conducted of leaders, mostly licensed ministers, in classical Pentecostal churches. The most important question of the survey turned out to be, “Are you a Pentecostal?” The most important result was that most people paused before answering the question. They had to think about their identity. The survey administrators identified three types of responses. First were the “loyalists,” who said yes. Second were the “post-distinctives,” who explained that there was not much difference between them and non-Pentecostals. Third were the “post-denominationalists,” who did not identify themselves as Pentecostals. Do we believe the experience of the Day of Pentecost is essential to our identity? Do we believe in a truly apostolic ministry for today? We find direction in a first-century letter that was included in Scripture because it is relevant to us. It is addressed to the “angel” of the church of Ephesus, which in this context seems to be a human “messenger” like ministers today. Revelation 2:1-7 says: “Unto the angel of the church of Ephesus write; These things saith he that holdeth the seven stars in his right hand, who walketh in the midst of the seven golden candlesticks; I know thy works, and thy labour, and thy patience, and how thou canst not bear them which are evil: and thou hast tried them which say they are apostles, and are not, and hast found them liars: and hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name’s sake hast laboured, and hast not fainted. Nevertheless I have somewhat against thee, because thou hast left thy first love. Remember therefore from whence thou art fallen, and repent, and do the first works; or else I will come unto thee quickly, and will remove thy candlestick out of his place, except thou repent. But this thou hast, that thou hatest the deeds of the Nicolaitans, which 24

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 24

|

This sermon, The Missing Factor, was delivered by General Superintendent David K. Bernard at the 2012 United Pentecostal Church International General Conference in St. Louis, Missouri.

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 25

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

25

11/29/12 3:26 PM


I also hate. He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the tree of life, which is in the midst of the paradise of God.” We can claim the concluding promise. But if we do, we need to heed the accompanying instruction and warning. Six Commendable Factors We can identify six commendable factors of the church in Ephesus. 1. They had good works. They worked hard and they got results. 2. They labored (mentioned twice). They exerted effort, and they did so particularly for the name of Jesus. They not only worked, but they worked hard. 3. They had patience (mentioned twice). Not only did they work hard, but they worked long. 4. They had no tolerance for evil (mentioned twice). They did not tolerate evildoers, and they hated evil deeds. The Nicolaitans were an organized group with a specific doctrinal view. The implication is that the Ephesian church hated false deeds 26

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 26

|

and false doctrines. 5. They had discernment of false leadership claims.They were not easily impressed by charisma, talent, fads, or fashions. They did not naively follow those who claimed to be apostles, prophets, or church-growth experts, but they prayed, evaluated their teaching, and exercised discernment. 6. They had perseverance (mentioned twice in different words). They had “borne” many things, and they had “not fainted.” The Ephesian church worked hard, worked long, and did not give up. The Missing Seventh Factor These six factors describe an apostolic church. But there was one problem: they lacked an important seventh factor. My message is “The Missing Factor.” The missing factor in the Ephesian church outweighed all the others combined.They were not really an apostolic church after all; they had fallen. In fact, Jesus warned that if they did not repent,

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


judgment would come speedily. Because they lacked one thing, they would lose everything. What was the essential missing factor? It was love. According to I Corinthians 13 if we have all the gifts of the Spirit but don’t have love, we have nothing. If we do all manner of good works, give all our money to missions, and even sacrifice our lives for the gospel, without love all this effort profits us nothing. We can summarize everything that God requires in two commandments: love God and love people (Mark 12:28-31). What Is First Love? More specifically, Jesus told the Ephesian church they had lost their first love. What does “first love” signify? In 1978, at age twenty-one, I met a seventeen-year-old girl named Connie. I was a freshman in law school; she was a senior in high school. I moved to Austin, Texas, for school and began attending a small church of about forty people.When I walked into the church, my attention was immediately drawn to one of the praise

singers—a beautiful, blue-eyed, blonde, vibrant, vivacious, young woman who sincerely loved God. I soon invited her out on a date. Unfortunately, she turned me down. She didn’t like me. Our personalities clashed because I thought linearly and tried to organize everything, while she thought nonlinearly and didn’t necessarily want my type of organization. I didn’t give up so easily. The pastor asked me to teach Search for Truth to the church on Wednesday nights for ten weeks. I prepared notes, and Connie typed them for distribution. To reward her, at the end of the series I insisted on taking her out to dinner at a fancy restaurant I couldn’t afford. I had won—until she announced in the middle of dinner that she was sick and needed to go home right away. That was our first date. For the next year and a half we were friends in church but nothing more. She graduated from high school and obtained a full-time office job. Her job transferred her to Odessa, Texas, for six weeks; when she returned I told her, “I missed you.” To my surprise she answered, “I missed you.” By the way she said it, I knew something had changed. JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 27

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

27

11/29/12 3:26 PM


We started dating, and in a few months I asked her to marry me. She said, “Yes—but don’t tell anybody.” By this time I felt a call to preach. After a couple of months I said, “I will be graduating soon. I don’t have a future job, and I don’t know where I’m going, but God is leading me to leave town and enter full-time ministry. I’m either going with you or without you.” She finally agreed to announce our engagement in mid March. On April 30 I received a ministry job offer, on May 13 I graduated, and on June 6 we married. A week after our honeymoon we moved to Jackson, Mississippi, for full-time ministry. We now have three grown children and three grandchildren. I am surprised to be married to a grandmother. The reason is, when I think of Connie I think of a seventeen-year-old, blue-eyed blonde who loves God, who’s the life of the party, who makes me laugh, and who will let me know if I’m sounding too much like a lawyer. To me that’s first love—first appreciation, first respect, first friendship, first romance. First love is still fresh, still renewed, still growing. Three Characteristics Especially Associated with First Love 1. Love, especially first love, is a relationship. We cannot have love without relationship. In the context of Scripture, we’re talking about a personal relationship with God, who has revealed Himself in the Lord Jesus Christ. The first commandment is to confess the one God and to love Him with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength (Mark 12:28-30). We believe there is only one God, and His name is Jesus. But this knowledge of God is not just for the sake of knowledge; it’s for the sake of relationship with Him. We get excited in our worship because we dedicate our whole being to the one true God. 2. First love is also commitment. Many people are involved in relationships without commitment, but true love involves commitment. Jesus said, “If you love me, keep my commandments” (John 14:15). 3. First love signifies freshness, eagerness, zeal, or desire. It’s like the wonder of seeing a newborn babe or like taking a toddler to a park or a swimming pool for the first time. We see life through the eyes of that child; we see it as if we never saw it before. First love is the wonder of a bride and groom who experience life together for the first time. It’s bringing a first-time visitor to church or nurturing a new convert. Suddenly, we experience every aspect of church life in a new way. Similarly, in our relationship with God we must recapture the initial awe, the purity of emotion, the sincerity of response, the consecration, the devotion that we had in the beginning. To summarize, first love means going back to our first relationship, our first commitment, our first desire and the experience which flows from that desire.

First love doesn’t leave out works. When the Ephesian church returned to their first love they were also supposed to do their first works (Revelation 2:5). The implication is that without first love they didn’t truly have first works, but if they recovered first love they would also recover first works. The missing factor is first love. Pentecostal Identity There can be many applications of this message, but let’s discuss our Pentecostal identity. Our identity must be focused on Jesus. He’s the author and finisher of our faith, the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, the first and the last (Hebrews 12:2; Revelation 1:8, 17). We must have a relationship with Jesus, a commitment to Jesus, and a freshness of desire for the presence and purpose of Jesus. What is essential to Pentecostal identity? We find the answer in the early church throughout the New Testament, beginning with the Day of Pentecost in Acts 2. We also see the answer in the Pentecostal renewal of the early twentieth century. What was the first love and the first experience when people came into apostolic truth, first received the Holy Ghost, first understood the beautiful revelation of baptism in Jesus’ name, and endured rejection and persecution to follow God’s will? We can discern at least four important aspects of apostolic first love. 1. The work of the Holy Spirit. If we’re going to be Pentecostal, it can only be by the work of the Holy Spirit. We must preach the baptism of the Holy Ghost. We must have the expectation that when people receive the Holy Ghost they will speak in tongues. We must have signs and wonders. We cannot have first love or first works without the miraculous move of God. 2. Communion with God. Acts 2 describes church life after believers were filled with the Spirit. We find prayer, fellowship, worship, giving, participation, and life in the Spirit. Pentecostal identity is not just an initial experience; it’s not just speaking in tongues occasionally. It’s a new way of life. It’s walking in the Spirit, living in the Spirit, breathing in the Spirit. 3. The life of holiness. The pursuit of holiness separates us from the world. The world desires Christian virtues such as love, joy, and peace, but it doesn’t seek holiness. Holiness is not primarily about dress, but it is a way of life: the way we think, the way we relate to people, attitudes, spiritual fruit. Of course, it affects our use of media, dress, and speech, for these are ways we connect with the world around us. We find the message of holiness in Acts 2. Verse 38 presents the

The first commandment is to confess the one God and to love Him with all our heart, soul, mind, and strength (Mark 12:28-30). We believe there is only one God, and His name is Jesus.

28

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 28

|

Continued on page 31

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 29

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

29

11/29/12 3:26 PM


Comments on the Pentecostal and Holiness Movements Today Quotations from The Future of Pentecostalism in the United States (2007), edited by Eric Patterson and Edmund Rybarczyk, professors at Vanguard University: The experience of Spirit Baptism has become optional and not … for all believers.... This reconfiguring … results in a nearly uncritical acceptance of a view of salvation which reduces salvation to a “decision for Christ.” This reduction too easily leads to a doctrine wherein there is nothing else beyond that simple first step of mental assent.... This definition ... has led to a salvation in which there is no real conversion. Supernatural experiences are less and less likely to happen in Pentecostal churches.... They have moved the practice of divine healing (as well as conversion events and other experiences) out of the Sunday morning service. It is rare today to hear pastoral teaching on the baptism of the Holy Spirit from classical Pentecostal pulpits and even rarer to witness glossolalia in congregational settings.... There seems to be a crisis among many pastors credentialed with Pentecostal denominations about the very essence of the doctrine as well as its applicability in their congregations.... It is unlikely for Pentecostal pastors to preach about spiritual phenomena as they are increasingly concerned about scaring off “seekers” on Sunday morning. What made Pentecostalism distinctive in the twentieth century was its welcome of the supernatural in its churches—an interest that has largely waned. In contrast, American pop culture is obsessed with the supernatural, from Harry Potter to television series and

Quotations from “The Holiness Movement: Dead or Alive?” by Keith Drury, professor at Indiana Wesleyan University, citing eight reasons for the loss of holiness identity. We wanted to be respectable. We have plunged into the evangelical mainstream. We failed to convince the younger generation. We quit making holiness the main issue. We lost the lay people. We over-reacted against the abuses of the past. We adopted church-growth thinking without theological thinking. We did not notice when the battle line moved. Many of our people do not need to be sanctified—

30

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 30

|

movies about the occult. In the end, there will not be a twenty-first-century Pentecostalism in the United States, at least not in classical Pentecostal churches, unless that expectation is rekindled. [Around 1950] all Pentecostals, regardless of differences in holiness doctrine, practiced a substantial social separation.... By the end of the century, Pentecostal assimilation of pop music, movies, TV shows, and magazine articles caused them to identify with popular culture to such a degree that Pentecostalism as a whole could no longer be considered a practicing holiness movement by any stretch of the imagination. One rarely hears dialogue about how intimacy with Christ might affect personal choices regarding modesty of appearance, language, habits (addictions), and listening/reading/viewing material.... Key Christian disciplines such as prayer, tithing, water baptism, and regular participatory church attendance are largely absent from the discourse of many classical Pentecostal churches.

Survey of Trinitarian Pentecostal pastors (reported in same source): 70% agree or strongly agree that there has been a loss of spiritual gifts; 60% that there has been a loss of Pentecostal identity; 84% that the church needs revitalization.

they need to be saved! The doctrine at risk in many holiness churches is not entire sanctification but “transformational conversion.” Evangelicals have accommodated to divorce. “Worldliness” is seldom mentioned, and even then only in jest. Evangelicals now attend the same movies as the world does. They rent the same videos. They watch the same TV shows. Evangelicals watch things on television which they would have called “pornography” twenty years ago. Christian families are falling apart.... And evangelical churches are filling up with people who have never had a genuine experience of transformational conversion. They oozed in through the sociological assimilation process.

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


Continued from page 28

plan of salvation, verse 39 extends the promise to everyone, and verse 40 proclaims the need for holiness: “Save yourselves from this corrupt generation” (NIV). 4. The coming of the Lord Jesus. Historians say two things characterized the early Pentecostals: the baptism of the Holy Spirit and anticipation of the coming of the Lord. The New Testament mentions the reward for those who look for and love His appearing. (See II Timothy 4:8; Titus 2:13.) How would it change our worship, daily choices, conversation, pursuit of holiness, and evangelistic efforts if we felt the urgency of the coming of the Lord? Scholarly research shows that many Pentecostal and Holiness churches today are losing aspects of their historic identity. (See sidebar.) The authors I cite are Trinitarian, some of whom I know personally. I do not present this information to criticize or disparage

The United Pentecostal Church International is a great church, but we continually need to renew our first love. others but to help us examine ourselves. To what extent do these descriptions characterize us? To what extent could they characterize us if we lose our first love? The United Pentecostal Church International is a great church, but we continually need to renew our first love. We must renew our first relationship with God, our first commitment, our first desire, our first experience, our first works. “He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches” (Revelation 2:7). What is the Spirit saying? Is the Spirit telling us to emphasize apostolic preaching? Is the Spirit telling us to persist in prayer and fasting until signs and wonders accompany our ministry? First love means being passionate about winning souls, planting churches, and experiencing apostolic revival. We must go back to what God has called us to do. Holding a position is not a calling, but exercising ministry is a calling. We cannot lose our calling, our commitment, our desire. Lord, help us renew our first love! David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 31

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

31

11/29/12 3:26 PM


CFC Missionaries Greg and Rachel Downs Family

Thank you

for helping us fulfill

His Mission!

CFC Missionaries Weston and Cheryl Blankenship Family

437922_January CFC.indd 32 1 January 2013 Herald.indd

11/7/12 1:00 11/29/12 3:26 PM PM


ries hel mily

ries eryl mily

1:00 PM

NEW START BY CARLTON L. COON SR.

Is January Too Late?

No Way—Christmas for Christ Is Every Day hristmas is December 25; Christmas for Christ is year round! For some, Christmas may leave a bitter aftertaste of overused credit cards. Christmas for Christ is always as fragrant as hot chocolate on a cold winter day. Christmas for Christ is a July effort … an October effort … an all-the-months-inbetween effort. Far more than being about the money, Christmas for Christ is about the families it supports. A term I used to hear more often than I do now was, “This is Brother and Sister … , they are some of our Christmas for Christ missionaries.” We knew what that phrase meant. In some way the family was being assisted by Christmas for Christ as they started a new church. The Christmas for Christ assistance could come from a district or from a UPCI allocation. It could be training provided at a district retreat. Or it could be funding for the hard-working wife to attend a women’s conference. Christmas for Christ never stops its work. December 25 has gone, but Christmas

for Christ’s work continues. Christmas for Christ is the mechanism to give intentionally to help start new churches over North America. It never stops its work. That means you can still be involved in giving. Even in January you can still give your biggest Christmas gift to Jesus. Our deadline for the local church offering is January 20. Over the next few days you can make an investment that will multiply from now until Jesus comes. Christmas for Christ has always been about a personal investment in a common cause. Peter John is a twelve-year-old boy who is part of Pastor Roger Yadon’s church in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. Pastor Yadon and his predecessor, Ted Wagner, planted a tremendous burden for missions in their people. Last year the Whitehorse church gave a Christmas for Christ offering of over $32,000. The church’s gift for 2012 was not unusual—it was typical. The seed of giving beyond themselves has been planted by visionary men. By the way, the church in Whitehorse has about sixty people, and has started

a daughter church over two hours away. Doug Joseph, West Virginia’s director of North American Missions church observed, “One smaller-than-average United Pentecostal Church and its daughter church gave more than a number of entire districts!” The church in Whitehorse does not give for December 25, they give for a continuing cause. How can your Christmas for Christ investment happen—even in January? Peter John, the twelve-year-old mentioned earlier, decided to gather a coin collection for Christmas for Christ. His tally of pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, dollar pieces, and two-dollar coins totaled $112.23 cents. At a recent Christmas for Christ rally a child took a one-dollar CFC commitment card. The next day he put his change totaling one dollar into the envelope and brought it to his pastor to pay his pledge. On Sunday morning the pastor praised the child for doing this. It motivated other children to want to give. That day the same child took two more cards, a two-dollar card and a twelve-dollar card. His older sister took a sixty-one-dollar pledge card. She had been baking and selling brownies and saving the money to buy an iPad. Now she wants to give to North American Missions. These are the places where missions’ miracles take place. I know it is January, but Christmas for Christ isn’t over just yet. If you have not seen the compelling video presentations, please take a look at NAMUPCI.com. Churches are being planted because church planters receive the kind support of people like you. It is not too late to go … it is not too late to give. Carlton L. Coon Sr. is the director of North American Missions.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 33

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

33

11/29/12 3:26 PM


DANIEL L. SEGRAVES

Andrew D. Urshan: An Eastern Voice—A Suffering Voice ndrew D. Urshan’s contribution to Pentecostalism in North America was unique. He was the only influential shaper of early twentieth-century Oneness Pentecostalism who was not a Westerner. Urshan was influenced by the theological, spiritual, and cultural milieu in which he lived until his immigration from Persia to the United States of America in 1901. This early influence included the cultural perspective of the Church of the East and the Presbyterian lens of his home. After his arrival in the United States, other influences included Evangelicalism, the Brethren Church, The Moody Church, the Nazarene Church, and finally Pentecostalism. After Urshan’s withdrawal from membership in The Moody Church and baptism with the Holy Spirit, he founded a successful Persian mission in Chicago. This mission grew out of the ministry he had already begun as a member of The Moody Church. While serving as pastor of the Persian Pentecostal Mission, Urshan attended the 1913 Worldwide Camp Meeting at Arroyo Seco, near Los Angeles, California. While attending the Worldwide Camp Meeting, Urshan received a call from God to go on a mission trip to Persia. He arrived at his home village of Abajalu on March 1, 1914. From then until his departure from Russia in 1916, he faced untold hardship in connection with the beginning of World War I, the Armenian Genocide, and religious persecution. But in the midst of this adversity his ministry was accompanied by signs, wonders, and outpourings of the Holy Spirit, resulting in the establishment of Oneness Pentecostal churches that endure to this day. Upon his return to the United States in 1916, Urshan attempted to continue the ministry he had among Trinitarian Pentecostals when he left for Persia two years earlier. 34

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 34

|

In 1917 he was ordained by the General Council of the Assemblies of God. But in 1918, when he emphasized his understanding of the “absolute deity” of Jesus Christ during a successful seven-month campaign in Los Angeles, questions about his theological orthodoxy arose among other ministers attending the meeting. This resulted in Urshan returning his credentials to the Assemblies of God in 1919 and identifying himself unreservedly with the “New Issue,” also known at that time as the “Jesus Only” movement. His separation from the Assemblies of God was a painful episode in Urshan’s life. Urshan’s ministry among Oneness Pentecostals flourished, but the suffering he experienced during his mission to Persia and after his return to the United States was not the final painful chapter in his life. His marriage failed in 1935, temporarily ending his evangelistic ministry as he took the pastorate of a church in New York City to finish raising his four children. In 1950 Urshan remarried, moved to California, and resumed his evangelistic ministry. Although this signaled a new and hopeful day in his life, he was yet to face another experience of deep sorrow. In 1951, his youngest child, Andrew (Andy) died at the age of twenty-two. He had suffered for many years with muscular dystrophy. When Urshan died at the age of eighty-three in 1967, he was in the midst of a preaching campaign, a busy evangelist doing what he felt called of the Lord to do. He left a spiritual and theological legacy that continues to enrich Oneness Pentecostalism. Urshan’s influence was due not only to the abundance of his literary output, but also to his strength of character and depth of spirituality. Even those who disagreed with him theologically could not help but admire the genuine trust in God and the sterling courage that enabled him to face almost indescribable danger and hardship during his mission to Persia. Urshan’s unwillingness to compromise his beliefs was balanced by his love and concern for those with whom he

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


January 2013 Herald.indd 35

11/29/12 3:26 PM


disagreed. His reluctant departure from the Assemblies of God was made all the more painful for him because it signaled the end of his hope to build bridges of fellowship between Trinitarian and Oneness Pentecostals. He grieved over this until the end of his life. With Urshan we are dealing not merely with someone who developed a theoretical approach to doctrine and praxis, but with someone who had his faith tested by the most severe trials imaginable and who found his faith sufficient to sustain him through them all. He was not perfect, and he was the first to admit that. But he did not give up hope because of his personal imperfections. He found his God to be sufficient in the face of trials from without or struggles from within. Urshan was affiliated with the Pentecostal Assemblies of Jesus Christ at the time of that organization’s merger with the Pentecostal Church, Incorporated. The first time his name appeared in the ministerial directory of the United Pentecostal Church, Inc. was 1956, eleven years after the merger. Urshan died as a man who had cut a bold swath across the religious landscape not only of North America, but also of Persia, Russia, Norway, and Great Britain. He was not deterred by threats of death, suffering, rejection, or failure. Had he been born in an earlier

Andrew Urshan died as a man who had cut a bold swath across the religious landscape not only of North America, but also of Persia, Russia, Norway, and Great Britain. He was not deterred by threats of death, suffering, rejection, or failure. time, but not in another place, his name may have been found with another list of heroes, one that begins with Abel and ends with Urshan’s fellow-sufferers of another era. Daniel L. Segraves is professor of Biblical Studies at Urshan Graduate School of Theology. His PhD dissertation is titled “Andrew D. Urshan: A Theological Biography.”

The Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism he decision of the General Board of the United Pentecostal Church International (UPCI) to commemorate the centennial of the Jesus Name message underscores the call we Apostolics have to preserve our heritage. One way the UPCI accomplishes this calling is through the Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism. The center is housed at World Evangelism Center and contains the largest collection of Oneness Pentecostal artifacts and archives found anywhere. The Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism had its genesis in 1976 when General Superintendent Stanley W. Chambers appointed a committee of three members to study the possibility of collecting and preserving items of historical significance to the United Pentecostal Church. The study was presented to the General Board but no action was taken at the General Conference in 1976. However, in 1979 then General Superintendent Nathaniel A. Urshan asked J. L. Hall, who had served as chairman of the earlier historical committee, to make a new proposal to the Executive Board about collecting items of historical importance. The Executive Board accepted the proposal, and during this year several historical items were collected. In 1981, the General Board approved the establishment of the United Pentecostal Historical Center (now called the Center for the 36

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 36

|

Study of Oneness Pentecostalism) to be located in the headquarters building in Hazelwood, Missouri. In addition the General Board appointed members to serve on the historical committee that oversees the center and in its collection and preservation of items of historical significance to the twentieth-century Pentecostal revival, with a primary focus on the Oneness Pentecostal movement. The current members on The Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism committee include the following UPCI officials: General Superintendent David K. Bernard; General Secretary/Treasurer Jerry Jones; the two assistant general superintendents, Stan Gleason and Paul Mooney; General Director of Global Missions Bruce A. Howell; General Director of North American Missions Carlton Coon; and Editor in Chief Robin Johnston, who serves as chairperson of the committee. Other members are: John Smelser, who serves as director, David Fauss, and Timothy Mahoney. The first director of the Center was Calvin L. Rigdon, who served from 1982 until his retirement in 1991. At that time, J. L. Hall became both committee chairman and director of the Center. Sister Virginia Rigdon continued to work in the Center after her husband’s retirement and is responsible for collecting a significant portion of its archives. In 2003 Robin Johnston was appointed curator and he served in this position until 2010 when he was appointed as committee chair. In 2010 John Smelser was appointed as director and as part of his responsibilities he runs the gift shop/bookstore and oversees UPCI Media.

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


MULTICULTURAL MINISTRIES BY Mendy Olson

The Forgotten Culture listened as Darlene explained to me why she chose to come to our Pentecostal church. “It’s simple. You have a qualified interpreter with a burden for deaf souls. I had been a member of a Catholic church as long as I can remember. As a child I hated going to church because I never understood what was being said. As an adult it wasn’t much better, but I knew it was important for my kids to learn about God. “My son started going with his friend to your church and would come home and tell us what he learned. His secondhand message was hard for me to understand, and I still had no idea what was right or wrong. I tried to read the Bible but could not grasp it. I developed a desire to know. First chance I got I asked our priest if he could get me an interpreter for the Sunday services. His answer angered me: ‘I’m sorry. We can’t hire an interpreter for just one deaf person. It’s simply too expensive.’ “My jaw hit the floor and a flood of emotions rushed over me. I was so hurt, my mind went all over the place with thoughts: Deaf are not important enough to be saved. It’s an inconvenience for a church to have a deaf person in their congregation. Does God love deaf people? Does He love me? Does He want me to be saved? “I still went to church even though I didn’t understand a word that was being said. But the more I went the more upset I became. I sat there in total silence as I watched them raise money for a new sound system, new pews, and for remodeling the building. They even raised monthly pledges for missionary support. When I asked my husband what they were saying, he explained they wanted sponsors for foreign Bible college students so they could go preach to their culture in their native language. “WHAT? Are you kidding me? Don’t get me wrong. I’m all for multicultural ministry, but doesn’t that include the deaf? We are people too! I wanted to stand up and say, ‘I’m right here; what about me? Pay for an interpreter to teach me so I can reach the deaf

I received the Word of God in American Sign Language and understood for the first time what I must do to be saved. I thank God for a skilled interpreter who taught me the Word in sign language. culture right here in America. Who’s going to teach us? Where are the teachers in American Sign Language (ASL)?’ “What about the deaf? Are we the forgotten culture? It seems to me no one cares about our salvation. Who will reach us? We are right there in your back yard, in your cities, and in your communities. Yet less than 1 percent of us go to church. Out of that 1 percent, even less know the truth of the Word of God. “When I came to Christian Life Center in Neenah, Wisconsin, I never had to ask; you just provided an interpreter for me. This church accepted me with open arms and gave me the same treatment as a hearing person. Pastor John Bridges taught my hearing husband and me a Bible study while his daughter Mendy interpreted. I received the Word of God in ASL and understood for the first time what I must do to be saved. I thank God for a skilled interpreter who taught me the Word of God in sign language.” Darlene is one of those church members every pastor wants. Because we taught her the Word of God in ASL she became a born-again believer. Today over sixteen people are saved and in the church because of her. Those sixteen people are all hearing and are Sunday school teachers, board members, piano players, and even preachers’ wives. The United Pentecostal Church in North America has a total of five licensed deaf preachers. Is that enough? As much as we would like to set up a Bible college like the foreign fields do to teach the nationals the Word of God and then send them forth to reach their culture, this seems undoable in the United States. If you took all the deaf people in the world and put them together in one place, they would make up the third larg-

est nation in the world. As much as it pains me to say this, other denominations have seen this harvest field and are targeting this culture for mass revival. They have created DVDs of the Scriptures and other materials in ASL to spread their interpretation of the Word of God. It’s time for the people of the Name to stand up and proclaim to the deaf culture: You are not forgotten! The deaf ministry of the UPCI has a tremendous job to do and we need your help to do it! Pastors and church members, we need people with a burden to reach this forgotten culture before the trumpet sounds. If I told you I am developing a website that would teach someone from your church how to sign, would teach them how to set up a successful deaf ministry, and would give them all the tools they would need to bring souls into your congregation, would you support it? They could even get a theology degree without ever leaving your church to do it. We are globally minded and want to expand your congregation by reaching the deaf in your community. Help us to help you! Let’s do this together. Please contact me so we can partner together to reach the deaf culture. Mendy Olson has been a professional interpreter since 2005. She has served as the pastor of the Deaf Ministry of Christian Life Center in Neenah, Wisconsin, for the past five years. For more information on how you can become involved in Deaf Evangelism Ministry, contact Mendy Olson at mendy.olson@gmail.com, or Don Hanscom, director of Multicultural Ministries UPCI at dhanscom@upci.org. JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 37

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

37

11/29/12 3:26 PM


The Phenomenal Growth of Oneness Pentecostalism TALMADGE L. FRENCH

he whole gospel to the whole world, including baptism in the precious name of Jesus and receiving the Holy Ghost and the quintessential message of the Oneness of God, have been the passion of the modern Jesus Name movement for one hundred years. Frank Ewart, a pioneer participant, when searching for an adequate characterization of the events of early Oneness Pentecostalism, fittingly chose the title The Phenomenon of Pentecost. Indeed, the growth of the movement over the past century has been phenomenal, reminiscent of Jesus’ words in Matthew 16:18: “Upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.” The exciting story of the movement around the world has been, for me, an exciting passion and driving force behind two ma38

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 38

|

jor post-graduate degrees focusing academic attention, first, on the extent of the worldwide phenomenon, then on the rapid rise of the early movement at the turn of the last century. The steady march of exultation of the name above all names—the name of Jesus— has resulted in a continued growth phenomenon of the Jesus Name movement to the present time. Revival fires that flourished literally around the globe a century ago, spreading rapidly from nation to nation, now undergird the vast and varied elements of the contemporary Oneness movement. In the first historical wave of growth (1913-1931), ending with the G.T. Haywood era, more than a quarter of a million eager souls were swept into the movement worldwide within only eighteen years. Within little more than a year from the time of those first rebaptisms resulting from the erupting of the issue at the April 1913 camp meeting at Arroyo Seco, California, both the fledgling Assemblies of God and the flagship Pentecostal Assemblies of the World were swept headlong into the controversy. Amazingly, in less than five years the thoroughly interracial Pentecostal Assemblies of the

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


World (PAW) had navigated a complete transitioning from a Trinitarian to a Oneness organization. Equally significant is the fact that an astounding number of Oneness organizations were established in this brief time. By the time of Haywood’s death in 1931, not less than thirtyfive Oneness organizations had been established, nine of which were already highly functioning indigenized bodies outside the US, including a rapidly expanding Hispanic, Asian, and Russian presence. It becomes evident that the movement’s early commitment to the interracial international impulse contributed to a thorough-going missionary endeavor that expanded rapidly into more than thirty-two countries within this same period. The influential early Oneness periodicals, such as Meat In Due Season, The Voice In The Wilderness, and The Blessed Truth were all, first and foremost, missionary-facilitating publications. More than 164 missionaries or missionary couples are known to have been commissioned in this short time, many of which had come out of the Azusa Street Revival. During this period the missionary

and autochthonous segments of the early movement were so successful that only slightly more than a quarter of the Jesus Name movement was actually in the US at the time. It was global from its inception. Subsequent generations of Apostolics, standing on the shoulders of such giants of faith, have also continued to witness steady growth, with the ongoing research indicating that there are currently more than thirty million Oneness Pentecostals worldwide, taking into account seven hundred and fifty researched organizational bodies and an extensive number of separate independent church networks throughout the world. By any standard, this is phenomenal! In the first months of the emerging Oneness revival, though, it was said this new Jesus Name issue would soon “blow over.” Well, it did. It blew all over the world! The prophecies of Joel concerning the last days give voice to the promise of “the Lord your God” Peter would quote on the Day of Pentecost: “I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh” (Joel 2:28). It is this “all flesh” into “all the world” (Mark 16:15) comJANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 39

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

39

11/29/12 3:26 PM


mitment that has propelled and sustained the Oneness movement for one hundred years. Every region of the globe, and most nations, has Jesus Name churches, with six nations that must be considered as centers of Oneness Pentecostalism, with the highest concentration of churches and constituents. These are the US, followed by China, Ethiopia, Columbia, the Philippines, and Mexico. Currently, Nigeria, Uganda, and India appear to be developing as emerging centers as well. Oneness Pentecostalism, like the United Pentecostal Church International itself, remains ethnically highly diverse, with an enormously successful appeal to people of all races and nationalities, both in the US and globally. The US Jesus Name Pentecostals reflect this ethnic and interracial complexity in its diversity, with a current US constituency of 5.1 million, 60 percent of which, for example, is African-American. The 2013 Oneness Pentecostal centennial celebration certainly affords us the opportunity to contemplate the possibilities present-

ed to the church for the future proclamation of the gospel of Jesus Christ. However, it also challenges this current generation of Jesus Name Pentecostals to take another enlightening and exhilarating glimpse back into the phenomenal events of our heritage that have shaped us and privileged us to declare afresh, “O Lord our Lord, how excellent is thy name in all the earth!� (Psalm 8:1). Talmadge L. French serves as the pastor of Atlanta (South) Apostolic Tabernacle UPC located in Jonesboro, Georgia. His MA thesis (Wheaton Graduate School) was on the growth of the global Oneness Movement. His doctoral thesis (University of Birmingham in Birmingham, England) was on early Oneness Pentecostalism, G.T. Haywood, and the interracial Pentecostal Assemblies of the World.

UPCI FINANCIAL REPORT YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2012

2012 Consolidated Statement of Activity: Revenue and Support: Contributions Sales of literature and material Budget fees and affiliations All other Total Expenses: Missionary and ministry projects Cost of sales Salaries, payroll taxes and emp. benefits All other Total Total consolidated change in net assets

40

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

FinancialReportUPCI.indd January 2013 Herald.indd 40 1

|

Inc/Dec

2011

$ 32,265,847 7,517,481 3,409,050 3,788,933 46,981,311

$ 31,273,490 7,544,364 3,504,798 3,552,504 45,875,156

$ 992,357 (26,883) (95,748) 236,429 1,106,155

22,198,297 5,333,565 7,443,178 9,546,694 44,521,734

22,280,899 4,838,661 7,495,504 9,398,983 44,014,047

(82,602) 494,904 (52,326) 147,711 507,687

$ 2,459,577

$ 1,861,109

$

598,468

JANUARY 2013

11/21/12 3:26 11/29/12 9:10 PM AM


9:10 AM

WORLDLINE BY BRUCE A. HOWELL

General Conference 2012 Global Missions Service Report

hat a tremendous 2012 General Conference! There was great preaching in all of the services. General Superintendent David K. Bernard gave a certain sound on Friday night in his message to the conference. I am thankful to be part of this fellowship that continually stresses the precious truths and values that the Word of God has established. I believe this is a central ingredient in a recipe for long-term success. Of course, the best part of the conference for me was our Global Missions service. I am so glad to be able to write to all of you who joined us for a fantastic time in the service on Wednesday night. Thank you for your enthusiasm! Thank you for your response! Thank you for your sacrifice! The Lord met with us in a mighty way, and hundreds of people testified of receiving miracles. The Lord had awakened our speaker, Jeff Arnold, in the middle of the night with the message he preached. We cannot allow the real to be replaced with the imitation, he said, and we have got to insist on the real demonstration of the power of God. He declared that once we preach the Word of God we are also responsible to step out and allow God to confirm His Word. He preached and God emphatically did exactly that. Some of the most notable miracles that evening were when a blind lady was healed and when several came out of wheelchairs. Evangelist Doug Klinedinst prayed the prayer of faith and continued to encourage people to believe for the miraculous. Many more testimonies came from those watching on the Web. One lady who was in a wheelchair was healed as she watched the service. I give glory to God for it all! As Ryan O’Neil said in his presentation during the service, the man Christ Jesus “gave Himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time” (I Timothy 2:6, NKJV). There had to be One who gave Himself as a ransom, and then it had to be testified. We are saved because there was a mediator and

With the help of the Lord and because of your burden for world missions, we raised about fifty thousand dollars per month in PIMs for the missionaries. That is one-half million dollars per year and six million dollars for the average life of a PIM. Together, we are sending messengers back out into the field. a messenger. People are not waiting on the ransom. They are waiting on the messenger. As Norman Paslay and Scott Graham led us through an appeal for missions projects, all of you who were with us responded to the burden. With the help of the Lord and because of your heart for world missions, we raised around fifty thousand dollars per month in PIMs for the missionaries. That is one-half million dollars per year and six million dollars for the average life of a PIM. Together, we are sending messengers back out into the field. Because you gave, we were able to send three missionary couples back to the field from the conference: • Randy and Carolyn Adams—Benin, Gabon, and Togo • Mike and Lisa Long—Zimbabwe • Leonard and Ping Lan Richardson— Taiwan Not only this, but four new missionary families were appointed at the conference:

May the Lord bless you for your generosity! Thank you for making it possible for messengers to take the whole gospel to the whole world. It takes the whole church. Our missionaries could not do what God has called them to do without you. I thank the Lord for a sending church. I assure you God will multiply every investment into His kingdom. By the time I report on next year’s General Conference service there will have been tens of thousands more added to the kingdom of God around the world. Praise God for what He did and for what He is preparing to do next! The Global Missions service at General Conference has catapulted global efforts foward year after year because it raises awareness, expectations, commitment, and support for the work of the Lord. Bruce A. Howell is the general director of Global Missions.

• Jacob and Mandy Palma—Uruguay • Eugene and Sherri Dominguez—Peru • Craig and Lyna Sully—French-speaking West Africa • Christopher and Penny Gibbs—Malawi I welcome these couples warmly as fully appointed missionaries. JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 41

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

41

11/29/12 3:26 PM


[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

God Saved My Daughter’s Life! JOHN HARGROVE

t was approximately 10:30 am on August 7, 2012. I had just sat down with the ministerial team for our Tuesday morning staff meeting at our church. I received a phone call from a gentleman, whom I later learned was a retired Dallas police officer, telling me my daughter had just been involved in an accident and that I should get there as soon as possible. I actually heard her in the background screaming, “Daddy, I’ve just been hit by an 18-wheeler!” As any parent would understand, I automatically began to imagine the worst, but was thankful I could hear her voice. I ran out of the building and jumped into my vehicle. Needless to say, I broke a few laws as I made my way down Highway 78. As I arrived at the scene I was totally devastated by the sight of an 18-wheeler blocking all of the lanes on the highway. My daughter’s car was sitting there and the roof was smashed flat. At that point, because of all of the emergency vehicles, they would not allow me to approach her car. Finally an officer took me to my daughter, and as I approached her she apologetically said, “Daddy, I’m so sorry! I’ve destroyed this car!” I said, “Baby, don’t worry about the car. It can be replaced. I’m just thankful you’re OK!” She began to weep and tell me she thought this was her last day to be alive. She told me that when she was about to head underneath the trailer, she knew she was going to die, and at the last second, she cried out, “Jesus!” Later, I learned the details of the accident. My daughter was headed southbound on Highway 78 when the 18-wheeler made a U-turn right in front of her. The problem was that he realized he didn’t have enough room in the turn lane so he swung out into her lane. With another gentleman driving in the lane next to her, she 42

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 42

|

had nowhere to go but under the trailer. She traveled all the way underneath the trailer, between the tandems and the safety bumper. The gentleman who was driving next to her stopped and came to help. As he got ready to pull her out of the car, he heard my daughter hollering at the top of her voice, “Praise Jesus! I’m alive!” Everyone said she just stood there for several minutes and thanked the Lord for sparing her life. A young lady who witnessed the accident told me that when my daughter’s car hit the trailer only one tire blew out, and that was the rear driver’s side. This seems to have allowed the car to drop down and possibly keep Heather from a critical injury. She went on to tell me, “When I saw your daughter go under the vehicle, I ran as fast as I could and as I approached the vehicle I had goosebumps. It was like walking into the presence of God. I knew right then that something supernatural was all around this girl.” Heather was transported via ambulance to the hospital, and after several CT scans and other tests they released her with no broken bones and no stitches. All she had was a minor concussion. God had supernaturally protected our daughter from what could easily have been a life-threatening accident. It was just another way of God showing us that His power is sufficient. The Bible says the Lord places His angels about them who fear Him. (See Psalm 34:7.) We are truly thankful to God for mercifully sheltering our daughter. We are expecting to see her do some beautiful things for the kingdom of God. Thank you, Jesus! John Hargrove serves as associate pastor at North Cities United Pentecostal Church in Garland, Texas. D.G. Hargrove is the pastor. NOTE: This article first appeared in the September/October issue of Endtime magazine. Reprinted here by permission.

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM

SFT B


e ! l b i B W NErd Aflameruth Study ™

Wo ch for T Sear The new Word

Available in brown or black

Aflame™ Search for Truth

Study Bible merges the King James Version text with the complete charts, lesson introductions, and outlines of Search for Truth 2 to create an effective evangelistic and discipleship resource. Using this Bible, you can gain a deeper personal understanding of Scripture and stay equipped for outreach wherever you go. 24484

Black

$29.99

24329

Brown

$29.99

Available now at www.pentecostalpublishing.com or by calling 866.819.7667.

King James Version text with the words of Christ in red

A durable Leathersoft™ binding gives this Bible a great look and feel

Includes a concordance and Bible maps

Full-color charts, lesson introductions, and outlines

SFT Bible January 2013 Ad 1-page.indd Herald.indd 43 1

11/29/12 7/23/12 9:25 3:26 AM PM


Letters to the Editor I really enjoyed the articles by Ken Stewart (“I Don’t Run”) and Abraham Lavoi (“How Much Do I Trust Him?”) in the November 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald. I’ve personally witnessed Ken “not running” in the rain. An excellent way to make a very good point. In Abraham’s article, I was particularly impacted by the paragraph on “We learned that faith means trusting the sovereignty of God.” In fact, I plan to quote him in an upcoming presentation. —Travis Miller

I would like to find out how I might go about ordering back issues of the Pentecostal Herald. Is it possible to obtain back issues online or are they available in hardcopy only? I would specifically like to order the September 2012 issue of the magazine—the “Women in Ministry” issue. If you could please notify me of the logistics of ordering I would be appreciative. Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to talking with you. —Sherrema A. Bowe (New Zealand)

What an outstanding and relevant issue: “Surviving Difficult Times” (November 2012)! I walked into our church office and the cover of the Pentecostal Herald caught my attention. I picked up a copy and retreated to my office. These articles are so needed in our churches. The article, “How to Be a Failure in Three Easy Steps” should be required reading for all Christians who are going through difficulties or attempting to be successful. Thank you for the consistent excellence of the Pentecostal Herald. I told our secretary to increase our subscriptions.  —David Fauss

Editor’s response: Thank you for your inquiry. Yes, dated copies of any issue of the Pentecostal Herald are available by emailing Becky Miller at bmiller@upci.org.

Thanks for the tremendous job you folks are doing with the Pentecostal Herald. Every issue seems to get better. I’m proud to make it available to our church family each month. I encourage our ministry team to read it for ongoing awareness and learning. We have three students at Texas Bible College. We mail the Pentecostal Herald to them each month. —L.C. Gore I wish I could personally thank the anonymous writer whose article “I Am a Soldier in God’s Army” was published in the November 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald. I have framed the article and put it on display with my son’s military medals, along with the American flag, as a constant reminder both of who we are and of the most vital war, which we must never stop fighting. Bravo on an excellent article that calls us all to duty, commitment, and loyalty to our commander Christ Jesus. —Cindy Adams

44

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 44

|

Could you email me a copy of the Teacher of the Month column in the November 2012 issue of the Pentecostal Herald? The article was about Marsha Mignery. I want to forward the article to my newspaper. —Dot Billingsley Editor’s response: We are forwarding you a PDF of the column. I completed my degree in theology here in Italy writing about the Oneness movement. The Pentecostal Herald was a well of wisdom for my studies. I would like to receive as complimentary copies the last three issues. —Dr. Luca Costantini (Italy) Editor’s response: We are delighted that the Pentecostal Herald was a good resource for your studies. We are sending you PDFs of the three issues you requested.

Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road | Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299. Letters may be edited for style, grammar, punctuation, or length.

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


SUNDAY SCHOOL BY STEVE CANNON

Ontario Children’s Crusades he dates for the Ontario children’s crusades were October 23-28, 2012. The inaugural children’s crusades took place across the Ontario District. The churches involved were Stittsville (Pastor Dwayne L. McCarty), Belleville (Pastor Shawn A. Stickler), Toronto (Pastor Timothy L. Pickard), London (Pastor Gordon D. Kierstead), Scarborourgh (Pastor Carlton S. Rigg) and Hamilton (Pastor Michael Shaw). The guest evangelists were Tim and Debbee O’Brien of Lincoln, Arkansas. General Sunday School Director Steve Cannon and his wife traveled with the evangelistic team. In these six crusades 102 were filled with the Holy Ghost, including ninety-eight children. God is doing great things in North America through Sunday school. These crusades were sponsored by your giving to Save Our Children. As one pastor said,  “This is Save Our Children funds working in the field!” Pastors, teachers, and leaders in Sunday school are excited about these results. Children’s crusades are planned in Missouri, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, and South Texas. Thanks for your support of the Sunday School Division and Save Our Children. Steve Cannon is the director of the General Sunday School Division of the United Pentecostal Church International.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 45

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

45

11/29/12 3:26 PM


DANIEL L. BUTLER

The 1913 Arroyo Seco Camp Meeting and the Dawning of the New Issue tarting in Los Angeles and spreading like an out-of-control California wildfire, the Holy Spirit ignited the blaze of Pentecostalism. The winds of passion for truth and fervency of the Holy Spirit drove the sacred inferno to the four corners of the earth. The amazing revival phenomenon began humbly in the Azusa Street Mission and lasted approximately one thousand days, rapidly growing into multiple congregations in the Los Angeles area and around the globe. However, in its third year the Azusa Street Mission’s fire dwindled. In addition, Pentecostalism spread and consumed clergymen, their congregations, and even the unchurched worldwide. Eager to coagulate and organize, the movement embraced seasoned leaders, the clergymen who could offer the infant movement direction. Soon gatherings occurred in a canyon north of Los Angeles that was carved by the Los Angeles River and had become a favorite camp meeting location for numerous denominations for many years. The serene and quiet beauty of the Arroyo Seco stood in stark contrast to Pentecostalism’s spiritual fervency. The early Pentecostal revival, which had germinated in Topeka, Kansas, sprouted into a tender plant, flourished in the Los Angeles area, and seemingly consolidated and took root in a spiritual garden in the Arroyo Seco, 46

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 46

|

which also naturally enjoyed beautiful boundaries. The native white bark of the birch trees emerged from the gentle growing grasses and stood out in striking beauty against the backdrop of cascading cliffs and brown soils of the jagged rises that geographically held the northern and eastern boundaries of the canyon. The Los Angeles River marked the western boundary for the camp meeting proper, and the less distinct southern boundary simply and slowly dissolved into less dense people population and activities. Presently, the Los Angeles County Park Service maintains the actual site as the Arroyo Seco Park, which today still enjoys the same natural dignity and beauty. Park visitors can easily imagine the 1913 Pentecostal camp meeting scenario: the placement of a four-foot high platform shaded by a tent canopy that likely was positioned against the backdrop of the cliffs and jagged rises. Scattered around the main meeting area, many private tents dotted the landscape. The birch trees, green grasses, Los Angeles River, and jagged cliffs could all testify to this day of the explosive events in early Pentecostalism’s revival inferno—the Arroyo Seco camp meeting. In the 1913 Pentecostal camp meeting, Robert E. McAlister from Ottawa, Canada, was asked to lead a baptismal service in the early afternoon. On the platform erected four feet above the sawdust-covered altar area, McAlister followed the scheduled agenda and spoke for a few minutes about baptism. Then he asked a simple question: Should they be baptizing that day as they did in the Book of Acts—in the name of Jesus Christ? Before he could continue with his speech, someone leaped from the ground, lit upon the platform beside the pulpit, took a step toward McAlister, and pulled him out

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


of the pulpit. Heated discussion obviously ensued on the platform and pandemonium proliferated across the audience and around the grounds. McAlister had hit a nerve! Somewhere, in late afternoon, a baptismal service occurred in the Los Angeles River, but not much more detail is known. The known reality: As a result of McAlister’s question, the controversy between baptism in Jesus’ name and baptism in the titles Father, Son, and Holy Spirit arose in startling, obvious disparity and laid the framework for the New Issue. As portrayed by Fred J. Foster in his book Think It Not Strange, after the disrupted baptismal service in the 1913 camp meeting, a troubled John Schaepe prayed through the night, emerged early in the morning, ran through the camp awakening many and shouting about the revelations he had received through his night of prayer, and a shot was fired “that was sounded around the world.” Hence, the fires of Oneness Pentecostalism and Jesus Name baptism had sparked, combusted, and become a blaze that would spread to consume 20 percent of Pentecostalism worldwide. Following the camp meeting, Frank Ewart, pastor of the church in Los Angeles started by William H. Durham, invited R.E. McAlister into his home for fellowship and discussion. Over the following months, Ewart entertained others, including G.T. Haywood and Glenn Cook. He contemplated the ramifications of baptism into Jesus’ name for the remission of sins, the name Jesus being the name of God, and the mighty God in Christ message that developed into the Oneness of God doctrine. On April 15, 1914, Frank Ewart baptized Glenn Cook into the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and

Glenn Cook baptized Frank Ewart. Shortly thereafter, as reported by Vincent Synan in his book, The HolinessPentecostal Tradition: Charismatic Movements in the Twentieth Century, Frank Bartleman embraced Ewart and Cook’s teachings and was rebaptized in Jesus’ name for the remission of sins. Accordingly, multitudes more, including clergymen, congregations, and even the unchurched followed and fulfilled the Acts 2:38 mandate being baptized into the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of sins. The Jesus Name movement continues to grow to this day. Daniel L. Butler has been an ordained UPCI minister for over three decades. He has served as pastor of the International Pentecostal Church in Bellflower, California, for over twenty years. JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 47

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

47

11/29/12 3:26 PM


[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

The Joel 2:28 Project APRIL PRUETT

received a phone call from a close friend who had an idea for ministry, something she would eventually call the Joel 2:28 Project. Meet Michelle Wire. Michelle is a twentynine-year-old student at Urshan Graduate School of Theology. She is a licensed minister with the UPCI. Michelle has a desire to see her generation used in the gifts of the Spirit. Our first meeting would be at Starbucks on a Saturday. Michelle led a devotional and encouraged us for the task to come. We would go out to a large park in St. Louis and ask people if they needed prayer. Now this took me out of my comfort zone. Going up to strangers makes me uncomfortable. Praying for them in public? Forget it! What if people reject me? I do not want to disrupt someone’s relaxing weekend with their family. These thoughts stayed with me as we closed with prayer and piled in Michelle’s car. We got to the park and Michelle’s plan was simple—we would walk around and greet people. If they seemed open, we would ask them if they would like prayer. We started walking, greeting people as we passed them. Our first encounter was with a mother and daughter taking pictures on a bridge. Michelle asked them if they would like her to take their picture—this way she could meet a need and start up a conversation. They said yes and Michelle took their picture. She then began to talk to them, and eventually asked if they would like prayer. They said no, so we said our goodbyes and moved on. Michelle had reminded me about the time Jesus sent His disciples out, warning them that some might not welcome their message. (See Luke 9:1-6.) I would have to understand that I was not guaranteed a “yes” from everyone and that rejection would come. We kept walking and met another mother and daughter. The mother sat on a blanket looking out toward the water, 48

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

January 2013 Herald.indd 48

|

and the daughter was in a wheelchair (with some type of muscle disorder). We greeted them with a hello and began making conversation. Did I mention that I had my baby with me? He was two months old. I lifted him out of his stroller and let the two ladies see him. We talked about our families, why we live in St. Louis, and about God. Before we left Michelle asked them if they would like prayer. Unlike the others before them, they said yes and wanted us to hold hands and pray right at that moment. There was a sweet presence of God, and as we left the mother told us that we made their day. Now my faith is starting to rise. I began to realize that some people still want God and believe in prayer. We walked down the trail and came across a couple on a bench. Michelle began to talk and tell them what we were there to do. She said we were there to share the love of Christ and offer prayer to those in need. We talked with them for a long time, just like we did with the mother and daughter before them. When Michelle asked them if they would like prayer they said yes, but also wanted us to pray over their five kids. One daughter had hurt her knee playing basketball, so I shared a story about my father who received healing from a similar situation. I enjoyed sharing a testimony and letting them know that God still heals people. I am still praying for this girl. I might not ever see this family again, but I want God to do the miraculous in their lives and bring salvation to their house. As I said, one thing I noticed is that some people still want God. Could it be that many Christians worry too much about what people think? That day more people wanted prayer than rejected it. Why was I so quick to think no one would want our message? A hungry world is waiting on us to share Jesus with them. They want us to talk and pray with them. I am glad I have a friend who is pushing me out of my comfort zone and encouraging me to share Christ with others. I expect many great things to come from the Joel 2:28 Project.

JANUARY 2013

11/29/12 3:26 PM


A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

Before we left Michelle asked them if they would like prayer. Unlike the others before them, they said yes and wanted us to hold hands and pray right at that moment.

April Pruett is a student at Urshan Graduate School of Theology. She and her husband, Greg, are small group leaders at New Life Center in Bridgeton, Missouri. Garry Tracy is the pastor. JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 49

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

49

11/29/12 3:26 PM


January 2013 Herald.indd 50

11/29/12 3:26 PM


HEALTH BY DR. CLAY JACKSON

The Gift of Rest : In an earlier issue, we discussed the so-called “energy drinks,” and you closed with a promise to address the ubiquity of fatigue. Would you like to pick up where we left our conversation? CJ: Ubiquity? Really? I’d like to pick up your thesaurus. Seriously, it fascinates me as a clinician that so many of my patients seem fatigued. We’ve previously addressed primary sleep disorders as part of what I call the “Big Three” that drive inflammatory and metabolic changes in the body. Q: The other two were mood disorders and chronic pain, right? CJ: Yes. Of course, many of my patients suffer from one of those three, which certainly explains fatigue. Q: Aren’t there other diseases that produce fatigue? CJ: Certainly. Anemia (a low red blood cell count) and thyroid problems are common causes. Q: What about fatigue in the absence of major disease? Do you see that often? CJ: All day, every day. This often happens among our Apostolic people as well. That actually concerns me a great deal, because I think we may be following our culture here, rather than transforming it. Q: How so? CJ: I think part of the reason we see increased fatigue in post-modern society is that we have bought into the ideas that bigger is better and more is moral. We live in a time when every marker of communicative activity is growing exponentially. As a result, we reserve little margin or reserve. Q: So you’re saying that there are human costs of increased productivity? CJ: Absolutely. They are multi-dimensional: the biologic, social, and spiritual spheres are all affected. Biologically, one of

the first markers for lack of margin is chronic fatigue.

day, we have underemphasized the Sabbath principle of regular, disciplined rest.

Q: But isn’t increased productivity a good thing? CJ: For organizations and societies, perhaps. But for individuals, there is a law of diminishing returns in that above a certain level of productivity one starts to see the individual lose capacity for longevity. That’s antithetical to the biblical model of living.

Q: Why do you suppose that has happened? CJ: Culturally, we live in a world that places top value on achievement and activity; that influence is a given.

Q: In what way? CJ: We could start with Paul’s injunction to “be not weary in well doing.” Although some might say that he was encouraging us to keep working hard, an apt application of those words would be that we are not to work ourselves into a state of fatigue, even if our goals are laudable. Q: Is there more scriptural evidence for your application of the Paul’s advice? CJ: Take the Genesis account of Creation, where we learn that God took a day off. How is it that an omnipotent God needs rest? Q: I would argue that He doesn’t. CJ: And I would agree. So we are left with the question. “Why did God rest?” Q: Perhaps to set the example for us? CJ: I think you’re right. Just as God (in Christ) submitted to baptism solely for our example, so He set the precedent for the Sabbath principle from the dawn of our world. Q: I’m reminded that the Sabbath made God’s top ten, and that the Old Testament penalties for breaking the Sabbath were steep. CJ: And for good reason. As we are part of a new dispensation, we have rightly abandoned the insistence that a prescribed day be kept separate and holy (a view supported strongly by Scripture). Unfortunately, in leaving behind the strict observance of a Sabbath

Q: Are there other factors? CJ: I think a more insidious one—and maybe the root cause—is an improper spiritual orientation. Q: What do you mean? CJ: I think we tend to view our relational value from a performance-based perspective, rather than being identity-rooted. We then use that skewed vision to approach our interactions with God and others. Q: So we work extra hard to measure up for God and others? CJ: That’s a no-win situation, right? I can never do enough if I can’t believe Him to help me be enough. Q: How do we escape the trap of narrowing margin and resulting fatigue? CJ: Here are two promises God left in His Word: “He gives His beloved sleep” and “He restores my soul.” If we find ourselves fatigued, and the diagnosis is spiritual, rather than physical, it may be time for a consultation with the Great Physician Himself. Dr. Clay Jackson practices in Memphis, Tennessee. NOTE: The contents of this article are intended to convey information, and should not be interpreted as medical advice.

JANUARY 2013

January 2013 Herald.indd 51

|

PENTECOSTAL HERALD

51

11/29/12 3:26 PM


January 2013 Herald.indd 52

11/29/12 3:26 PM

01Pentecostal Herald January 2013  

Pentecostal Herald January 2013

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you