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EDITORIAL

God’s Rationale for Redemption By Simeon Young Sr.

Holiness, Culture, and the Bible: Part 1 By David K. Bernard

Church in a Day: We Build the Church

Exposure Breeds a Burden

What It Means to Be a Church Planter

A Call to Home Missions

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EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

God’s Rationale for Redemption et us therefore fear, lest, a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it. For unto us was the gospel preached, as well as unto them: but the word preached did not profit them, not being mixed with faith in them that heard it. For we which have believed do enter into rest, as he said, As I have sworn in my wrath, if they shall enter into my rest: although the works were finished from the foundation of the world. For he spake in a certain place of the seventh day on this wise, And God did rest the seventh day from all his works. And in this place again, If they shall enter into my rest. Seeing therefore it remaineth that some must enter therein, and they to whom it was first preached entered not in because of unbelief: again, he limiteth a certain day, saying in David, To day, after so long a time; as it is said, To day if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts. For if Jesus had given them rest, then would he not afterward have spoken of another day. There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God. For he that is entered into his rest, he also hath ceased from his own works, as God did from his. Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief. For the word of God is quick, and powerful, and sharper than any twoedged sword, piercing even to the dividing asunder of soul and spirit, and of the joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. Neither is there any creature that is not manifest in his sight: but all things are naked and opened unto the eyes of him with whom we have to do. Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” (Hebrews 4:116, emphasis mine). My reason for including the entire fourth chapter of the Book of Hebrews in

this article is that I wanted to highlight the words therefore, then, and for in order to show how they are intertwined throughout the sixteen verses of this chapter. These three connective words, used in the sense of because, tie the writer’s thoughts together into coherent sentences. Idea is piled upon idea to give God’s rationale for His plan of redemption. The writer explains the why and wherefore and how of God’s sweeping

the believers in Ephesus, “For through him we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father” (Ephesians 2:18). Later in the same book Paul wrote, “In whom we have boldness and access with confidence by the faith of him” (Ephesians 3:12). The moment that we through faith access God’s grace, His help will be available to us. And the moment we come boldly to the throne of grace to obtain mercy and find

The moment that we through faith access God’s grace, His help will be available to us. And when we come boldly to the throne of grace to receive mercy and find grace, God’s help will be available. scheme of redemption. For instance, we should not come short of entering into God’s rest because the gospel has been preached to us as well as to the ancient Hebrews who entered into their rest. Because God spoke of a rest beyond the seventh day, there remains a spiritual rest in the Holy Ghost to the people of God. And then, because we have a great high priest who can be touched with the feelings of our infirmities, we are encouraged to hold fast the profession of our faith. And because of that, we can come boldly to the throne of grace to obtain mercy and find grace to help in our time of need. The writer piles wherefores on top of therefores to build a convincing case for God’s people to boldly approach God for the grace and mercy we all need for salvation. Following his systematic approach to the theology of justification by faith, Paul wrote to the Roman believers, “Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ: by whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God” (Romans 5:1-2). Paul wrote to

grace, God’s help will be available. Yes, the Word of God is living and powerful and sharp and piercing. Yes, God’s Word lays bare the thoughts and intents of our hearts. And yes, everything about us is open and naked to the eyes of God. But “seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast our profession. For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.” The Word is living and powerful and piercing, but we have a high priest. God’s Word exposes our very thoughts, but because Jesus was tempted, we can touch Him. Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

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PENTECOSTAL HERALD | FEBRUARY 2014 Fundamental Doctrine

EDITOR

Simeon Young Sr.

The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

The One True God

PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain CREATIVE DIRECTOR Abraham LaVoi DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laura Merchant, Dennis Fiorini EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Brooke Rosser COPY EDITOR Patrica Bollmann The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2014 by United Pentecostal Church International. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com Single Subscriptions (USA) $25.00 Single Subscriptions (Canada) $35.00 Single Subscriptions (Foreign) $44.00 Bundle Subscriptions (USA) $2.00 each for 2-5 copies; $1.75 each for 6 or more copies Bundle Subscriptions (Canada) $3.00 each for 2-5 copies; $2.50 each for 6 or more copies Bundle Subscriptions (Foreign) $4.00 each for 2-5 copies; $3.50 each for 6 or more copies

We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes, and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

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USPS 427-240 United Pentecostal Church International GENERAL OFFICIALS

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney* GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Jerry Jones* DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell* DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton L. Coon Sr.* EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston GENERAL SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR Steve L. Cannon GENERAL YOUTH DIRECTOR Michael Ensey SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Dan Batchelor

GENERAL PRESBYTERS

Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton L. Coon Sr., Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Daniel Fleming, Edward Goddard, Scott Graham, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, Wayne Huntley, Darrell Johns, J. Mark Jordan, Ron Lichtle, Arnold MacLauchlan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Mark Morgan, Arthur Naylor, Trevor Neil, Gordon Parrish, Kevin Prince, John E. Putnam, Stephen P. Spite, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, C. Patton Williams, Richard A. Wittmeier, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

GENERAL EXECUTIVE PRESBYTERS Gary Gleason* Aaron Soto* Kevin Borders* Kevin Cox* Daniel Garlitz* Marty Johnson* Bernard Elms* Brent Coltharp* Raymond Woodward*

HONORARY PRESBYTERS

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J.R. Blackshear, Ernest Breithaupt, W.L. Clayton, B.S. Cole, Daniel Garlitz, Arless Glass, John Grant, Tommy Hudson, James Kelley, Carrol D. Kennedy, Carl Lagow, Roger Lewis, R.J. McIntyre, John D. Mean, James Merrick, Paul Price, Paul Reynolds, J.M. Russell, Harry Scism, Scotty Teets, T.F. Tenney, B.J. Thomas, Wayne Trout, G.L. Vittitow, Ted Wagner, David O. Walters, R.D. Whalen, Jesse Williams, Jack Yonts * Member of the Executive Board

EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

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ASSOCIATE EDITOR

P. Daniel Buford

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA] Columns

North America— By All Means Possible! 8

3 | Editorial

Carlton Coon Sr.

Simeon Young Sr.

7 | The General Superintendent Speaks

David K. Bernard

12

Building Living Hope in Washington D.C.

Pentecostal Life

Church in a Day— We Build the Church

Visions of a 36 |  Cheeseburger

Jerry Staten with Nadika Perera and Samuel Zenobia

17 | Faith & Culture

8

18

Eugene Wilson

Donna Myre

Bill Hobson

23 | Worldline Bruce A. Howell

33 | Apostolic Man

34

Penn State Campus Ministry Scott and Aimée Patterson

38

Exposure Breeds a Burden Mark Brown

Mark Johnson

50 | Letters to the Editor

18

Scott Sistrunk

Steve Cannon

49 | Launch Your Ministry

What It Really Means to Be a Church Planter

28

Donald D. Hanscom

41 | Sunday School: Children’s Evangelist

Lorin L. Bradbury

Donald D. Hanscom and Liane R. Grant

Jerry Dean

37 | Multicultural Ministries

No Hay 44 |  in the Manger

MISSIONS—á la Montréal

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31 | Bible Bee Contest

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A Call to Home Missions Tim Bizelli

AYC Miami (North American AYC Trips) 42

Savannah Kolger and Jacob Montag

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THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS BY DAVID K. BERNARD

Holiness, Culture, and the Bible: Part 1 ost Christian movements have initially placed great emphasis on a biblical lifestyle distinct from the world, teaching believers to pursue holiness in attitudes, conduct, speech, amusements, and dress. Practical teachings of this nature were prominent in ancient Christianity of the first three centuries, medieval revival movements, the Protestant Reformation, the nineteenth-century Holiness movement, and the twentieth-century Pentecostal movement. Today, however, Oneness or Apostolic Pentecostals are among the few groups to maintain the importance of holiness in adornment, dress, and amusements. Other groups typically argue that these teachings are outmoded or must be modified greatly because of changes in culture. How relevant to the church today are biblical instructions on these subjects? Should we modify them in light of cultural changes? We base our answer on two important points: (1) The Bible is the inspired Word of God, and as such it reveals moral and spiritual truth to us. (2) It is God’s will for us to embrace the message and experience of the first-century apostolic church as recorded in the New Testament. The teaching and practice of the apostles is authoritative and normative. (See Matthew 28:20; Acts 2:42.) The Bible instructs us in salvation, Christian living, and Christian service. It teaches us what is right and corrects us when we are wrong. Paul admonished Timothy, “Continue in the things which you have learned and been assured of, knowing from whom you have learned them, and that from childhood you have known the Holy Scriptures, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, thoroughly equipped for every good work” (II Timothy 3:14-17, NKJV). Consequently, our understanding of truth must be grounded in Scripture. We

do not have the liberty to import our ideas and philosophies into the text. Instead of adapting the Bible’s message to fit our preconceptions, we should seek to understand what it says in its grammatical, historical, and cultural context and then apply its message to our cultural context. Because we are dealing with divinely inspired Scripture, we must allow for greater implications or fulfillments than the original authors realized, for enduring and fresh significance in situations far removed from the original context, and for applications in a wide variety of circumstances. Nevertheless, these implications, fulfillments, and applications must be rooted in the grammatical, historical meaning of the text.

ed in II Timothy 3:14-17 cannot be fulfilled. On the other hand, Scripture is not bound to a specific cultural or historical setting. As the eternal Word of God, it teaches principles for every age, culture, society, and country. The Word of God “liveth and abideth for ever” and “endureth for ever” (I Peter 1:23-25). “The counsel of the Lord standeth for ever, the thoughts of his heart to all generations” (Psalm 33:11). “His truth endureth to all generations” (Psalm 100:5). The Bible is relevant to everyone. Jesus and the New Testament authors quoted Scripture in order to make new applications in their day. Jesus cited David’s eating of the shewbread and the priests’ ministry in the Temple on the Sabbath to demonstrate that legitimate human needs in the pursuit of God’s will could supersede ceremonial law. From this basis, He argued that His disciples could pluck a small amount of grain on the Sabbath to satisfy hunger and that the Son of man is Lord of the Sabbath. (See Matthew 12:1-8.) He used Old Testament texts to address contemporary issues far removed from the original stories. To avoid arbitrary or false interpretation, we should first seek the original meaning of a passage in its context before expanding its significance to other situations. We should seek the primary meaning of a text before making applications. Of course, applications of a text must not violate or contradict the primary meaning of the text but must be logical extensions of it. The truth of Scripture is relevant to our day. We can and should apply its teachings on holiness in our own culture. When we do, God will enable us to live a holy life by the power of His Spirit. For further discussion, see Understanding God’s Word and Practical Holiness by David K. Bernard, published by Word Aflame Press.

The main point is that we must diligently seek the contextual meaning of Scripture and let it speak to us. We can and should discern principles in the biblical text in order to make new applications. For example, Jesus quoted God’s statement to Moses, “I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob,” to demonstrate the truth of the resurrection of the dead. This point was not the original purpose for the statement, but Jesus made a valid deduction from the statement and applied it to a new circumstance. (See Exodus 3:6; Matthew 22:23-32.) The main point is that we must diligently seek the contextual meaning of Scripture and let it speak to us. Instead of bending the message of the Bible to our desires or culture, we must allow it to inform and mold our thinking. In seeking to understand Scripture and apply it to the twenty-first century, we must recognize that each passage has one primary meaning but can have manifold significance and many applications. If a passage does not have a definite, identifiable meaning, then God’s purposes for giving Scripture as stat-

David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International. FEBRUARY 2014

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

North America — By All Means Possible! C A R LT O N C O O N S R .

he vision for North America is grand—full of challenge and potential. It is a vision that sees every individual in North America having access to a truth-proclaiming local church where they can hear the gospel, have opportunity to repent, be baptized in Jesus’ name, and receive the Holy Ghost. But this overarching vision can be obscured by barriers that come in various forms: our own flawed perception, distance, language and culture, or social dynamics. Flawed perception: North America is well-churched. When confronted with this misconception, some unknowing saints might say, “But I thought everybody in North America had access to a Pentecostal church with padded pews and a hightech sound system!” Think again. A few examples are Quebec City with almost 900,000 souls and not a single United Pentecostal Church. Boston and Seattle each have only one UPCI church within the city limits. North Carolina has fifty-nine counties with no United Pentecostal Church, and Mississippi has ten such counties. Distance. Ninety percent of church attendees travel less than fifteen minutes to arrive at their church. On the other hand, rarely does a lost person living beyond a fiftten-minute radius get the opportunity to be discipled. Distance matters! Think “McDonald’s” as a strategy: if the goal is to get more people to Heaven, then we should have more churches in every town or city. Language and culture. Occasionally a largely Caucasian or African-American congregation will effectively reach into the Hispanic, Korean, or 8

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Burmese community and then assimilate that group into the existing church. But it is relatively rare. The easily identifiable challenge is language, but beyond language there are nine additional aspects to defining a culture. (See “Characteristics of Culture,” Palomar College, http://anthro.palomar.edu/culture/ culture_2.htm.) For example, the majority of our Filipino churches in North America have church in English, but a primarily Filipino congregation is generally more effective at evangelizing additional Filipino people. Why? Culture! Cultural differences create barriers. The simplest way to break the barrier is to establish a preaching point designed specifically to reach another culture. Social dynamics. The socioeconomic context and lifestyle of certain people make it difficult for many of us to even imagine reaching them. One specific difficulty may be to reach those in poverty or the unsaved who are “up and out.” Perhaps it was social dynamics that reduced the disciples’ impact on Sychar to a minimum. Because of the cultural barrier, the disciples couldn’t see Sychar’s residents as prospects for the Kingdom. However, the woman Jesus met at Jacob’s well had no such limits. She hurried to Sychar saying, “Come see a man who told me all things that ever I did!” The entire community responded. In North America’s great cities social dynamics change as one travels even two blocks. Long Island, New York, can be as socially distant from Queens, New York, as it is from Little Rock, Arkansas. Each social dynamic needs attention. Our lack of adaptability and vision should doom no soul to an eternity without God.

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1000-1100 word article INCLUDING THE BIO.

The vision for North America is a vision that sees every individual in North America having access to a truth-proclaiming local church where they can hear the gospel, have opportunity to repent, be baptized in Jesus’ name, and receive the Holy Ghost.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

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Effective missionaries establish a work, develop leaders, empower the leader to lead, and repeat the process. The Reality: North America Is a Mission Field Why invest money and people in North America as though it were a mission field? Because North America IS a mission field! • If Louisiana had the same church/population ratio as currently exists in Northern New Jersey, the entire state of Louisiana would have only nine churches. If the nine churches were located in Louisiana’s largest communities—New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Lake Charles, Monroe/ West Monroe, Shreveport, Lafayette, Alexandria, Metairie, and Denham Springs—then what about the lost souls who live in Deridder, Leesville, Ruston, Houma, and other such places? Those towns would have no United Pentecostal Church. Thousands of communities the size of those mentioned have no church. • Your unsaved relative who lives in the capital city of Madagascar is more likely to have a saved co-worker than your unsaved relative in Washington, D.C. Your unsaved relative who lives in El Salvador, the Fiji Islands, the Philippines, or thirty-four other countries is more likely to live near a United Pentecostal Church than someone who lives in most of North America. • According to the New York Post (Nov. 13, 2013), over 50 percent of the households in New York contain at least one person who is foreign born. All across North America, “It’s a small world after all.” Examples: -- The largest Bosnian enclave outside Eastern Europe is in St. Louis. -- The Middle Eastern population in Detroit rivals the largest cities in the Middle East. -- Smaller communities like North Pole, Alaska, have an influx of immigrants. The mission is to have a church within fifteen minutes’ travel time, to have ethnically multiplying churches in settings where there is only one church, and to establish churches so as to effectively eliminate cultural, social, and language barriers that might keep souls from being saved.

What Has Worked Establishing a new church is the most effective method of adding unsaved people to the body of Christ. Research across denominations indicates that the average church will convert more un-churched people in the first twelve years of existence than in the remainder of that church’s life span. Of course, there are exceptions, but those exceptions are far too rare to take comfort in. So what is working? 10

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Daughter Churches and Preaching Points The five-step process offered below is original to Pastor Phil DePriest (Murfreesboro, Tennessee) and was taught at a North American Missions Board of Directors meeting in August 2011. A five-step process works: 1. Teach Home Bible Studies in an unchurched area. 2. The study becomes a small group. 3. Small group grows into a preaching point (church at least monthly). 4. The preaching point becomes a daughter church (weekly church). 5. The daughter church becomes autonomous. When the process is complete, the baby church and the mother church both do it again. To view several “how to” strategies on preaching points and daughter churches visit the namupci.com website. • Church Planter Raul Orozco and the daughter churches established in Southern California average over seven-thousand in regular Sunday attendance. • In Chicago, Metro-Daughter Church Planter Ric and Vicky Gonzales regularly have nine-hundred souls in the daughter churches. • In Montreal, the church led by Paul Graham has seven services in their building on Saturday and Sunday, and they’ve launched at least six preaching points and daughter churches. On an average Sunday eleven-hundred souls attend the services. • Phil DePriest and the “family of churches” around Nashville will exceed 700 in regular attendance. Several daughter churches now have daughters of their own.

Preaching points and daughter churches are the most effective model Intra-Cultural Missionary Evangelists A language or culture missionary like Darrel Collins (Spanish), Edwin Forkpa (African Immigrants), Stanley Wilt (Native American), or Kash Nathan (Asian Immigrants) assists an existing church in establishing a preaching point to reach a designated culture. In four years Darrel and Cynthia Collins have assisted English-speaking congregations in starting over a dozen Spanish preaching points. The Intra-Cultural missionary evangelist is available at little financial cost if the church and pastor have a high level of commitment to establishing a new culture or languagebased preaching point. Information can be gained at namupci.com or by contacting Director of Multi-cultural Ministries Donald Hanscom at Dhanscom@upci.org. Career Church Planters People who live to plant another church are career church planters. Paul was a career church planter. Such people have been keys to establishing many churches that now exist. The principle of “career church planter” has been effectively used by Global Missions – we call them simply “a missionary.” A missionary might be considered relatively ineffective in reaching a country if he establishes one lone church, no matter how large

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The principle of “career church planter” has been effectively used by Global Missions— we call them simply “a missionary.” Effective missionaries establish a work, develop leaders, empower the leaders to lead, and repeat the process. that church becomes. Effective missionaries establish a work, develop leaders, empower the leader to lead, and repeat the process. It works in North America as well. Ron Roberts planted churches in New England, Utah, and now a third church in Nevada; Jerald Staten planted churches in the Southwest, then Maryland, and now Washington, D.C.; Frank Bounds planted churches in West Virginia, Salt Lake City, and now Parkersburg, West Virginia. The idea of people who will be a church planter for their entire ministerial life is being renewed. North America – Forward and Metro Missions Career Church Planter support this effort. For information on being a career church planter or to be a financial partner visit namupci.com. Christmas for Christ Each year significant funding to assist church planters comes through Christmas for Christ (CFC). CFC started as church planter Jack Yonts led his baby church to give an offering of $1,000 to help plant another church. The idea took hold, and from that modest beginning 2013 saw a record offering of $2.91 million. Christmas for Christ has made a huge impact. CFC Missionaries total in the hundreds. The list includes Jack Cunningham, Wayne Huntley, Omar Jolly, Jesse Forteleza, David Bernard, Mark Foster, and Doug Davis. Christmas 2013 is past but you can still give Jesus your biggest Christmas gift! To see the most current Christmas for Christ videos go to namupci.com.

In 2014, Apostolic Youth Corps will offer two destinations in North America, a first for the program.

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

Participants will join missionaries David and Monique McGovern in ministering to the Los Angeles area. Los Angeles has a rich apostolic history; home to Azusa Street, Arroyo Seco, and the great revivals of the early twentieth century. Many regard it as the birthplace of modern Pentecost and Jesus Name baptism. We believe it is time for another miraculous Holy Ghost downpour in this city!

NEW YORK, NEW YORK

New York City will never be the same because AYC will join church planter and trip hosts Omar and Lisa Jolly. We will participate in evangelism and neighborhood outreach. We will minister in new church plants, reaching into several diverse communities, especially the Hispanic and Caribbean communities. Our participation in AYC NYC will expose us to an “Empire State of Mind” and the melting pot of the world. For more information about these trips please visit www.apostolicyouthcorps.com.

To obtain further information about any of the activities of North American Missions please visit us at the namupci.com or email me directly at ccoon@ucpi.org. APOSTOLICYOUTHCORPS.COM Carlton Coon Sr. is the general director of North American Missions.

ALSO ON FEBRUARY 2014

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

Building Living Hope in Washington, DC J E R R Y S TAT E N

he move from Lexington Park to Washington, DC, in the spring of 2006 was an incredible change for my wife and me. We were accustomed to the small town atmosphere where we had pastored for twenty-five years. Now we had moved into an apartment in the inner city of our nation’s capital. Our four children now had lives of their own and the grandchildren were growing. It was comfortable in many ways, but as the missions director for the Maryland/DC District of the UPCI I was not comfortable that we had no church inside the beltway of Washington DC. I wept as I prayed and worked to get someone in the city. As my children now felt their call to spe12

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cific ministries I was stirred to convince someone, somewhere that we could make a difference in this city. Little did I know the miracles that were in our future and the success of our sons and daughters in overcoming obstacles and arriving at the place where they are today, honorable vessels in the kingdom of God. My wife is an incredible soldier of the Cross, and even as many things were changing in our lives, she remained steadfast. Often others give credit to me but my wife and our children have contributed so much. Where to start was the early challenge. Within a few days of arriving in DC I was contacted by Franklin Howard and asked to oversee the small group he and his wife had developed. The church in Lexington Park agreed to make us a daughter work and has invested thousands of dollars in our efforts. Our district prayed for us

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A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

and raised funds to provide for us as we labored in the city. Through these times we were in contact with David Wiseman who was the UPCI representative for Metro Missions and we submitted our application to become the first Metro daughter work. The UPCI youth rallied around us, and youth came from all over America to help us evangelize. Some came as short-term interns, and others came for longer periods of time helping us with street evangelism, teaching Bible studies, and offering up much prayer. I weep now to think of the many pastors, churches, and youth groups that have helped us get a foothold in the darkness of this city. Some contacts came because of miraculous intervention and others were just a lot of hard work—we walked the streets, rode the subway, and constantly talked to people. We met in our apart-

ment, then in the community room, a room in the National Baptist Church, in an auditorium at the National Baptist Church, and finally we moved into our own location just ten blocks from the capitol building in SW DC. Even with all of these spaces, finding the people to come was an effort of reaching out continuously. My attitude was, How can we miss? People are everywhere! As we worked we connected with multiple cultures and languages. There were signs and wonders. Seven years ago Jesus called Jerry and Linda Staten to Washington, DC, with a vision of bringing a home fellowship group to each neighborhood, with a vision to include every nationality found inside the beltway. with a strong leadership team, they shepherd a FEBRUARY 2014

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Building Living Hope in Washington, DC:

Home Bible Studies and Street Services NADIKA PERERA It is wonderful to see new souls won to the Lord. Washington, DC, is not the most welcoming city. I know this because I displayed the same unwelcoming spirit before knowing the Lord. The spirit of this city is resistant to the Spirit of the Lord. When Pastor Staten came to start a work in the city, teaching Bible studies was one of the main ways he won souls to the Lord. I remember spending four hours a week with him learning about the Word of God. The people who participated in this Bible study were hungry to know the Word. After several studies and understanding the love of Christ, our whole Bible study group was baptized in the name of Jesus and received the Holy Ghost. Pastor Staten then trained us to teach our own Bible studies to other newcomers to the church. His vision was not just to win souls to the Lord, but to implant the mission of the church—evangelism— within our hearts. The Bible studies not only taught us the Word of God, but helped us to fall so much in love with Jesus that it wasn’t hard for us to want to tell others about this amazing God of ours. Our church has mainly grown from the people who were invited to the Bible studies. I absolutely loved street services. Every Saturday afternoon before the five o’clock church, we had street service in the park across from our church’s previous meeting location. We took musical instruments and sang praises to the Lord. For every 250 cards we passed out we had one new visitor to the church. But this wasn’t the easiest thing to do. We always had the spirit of the devil pushing against us. We had people complain about the noise at 12:00 pm on a Saturday, but these same people did not mind living next to clubs that partied till 2:00 am. People threatened us with knives or cursed at us simply

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for giving them invitation cards to come to church. But these situations did not stop us from evangelizing—they encouraged us more. Many have been won to the Lord through the street services. Many received the Holy Ghost in the park. The majority of the people won through the street services were from the Hispanic community. Due to the increased amount of Spanish-speaking individuals, Esperanza Viva was born. This daughter work—the first of many to come—is pastored by Rick and Rita Garza. Throughout these seven years of evangelizing in Washington, DC, we have won many souls to the Lord. Many have come and stayed and many have come and gone. But the memories will always remain in our hearts—memories of many giving their lives to the Lord, miraculous healings, and the love of Christ that broke the chains off of many people. Looking back at these seven years, I can say Jesus has blessed us with the fivefold ministry. We have been blessed with amazing leaders who are anointed by the Lord. The Lord has blessed us abundantly and continues to bless us at our new facility. We are forever thankful. Nadika Perera is a first-generation Pentecostal. She was born half Catholic and half Buddhist, but was receptive to all other religions. She was a professional cultural Indian and Sri Lankan dancer. She was baptized on June 17, 2007, and received the Holy Ghost evidenced by speaking in tongues the same day.

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Building Living Hope in Washington, DC:

Small Group Evangelism SAMUEL ZENOBIA

Spend a week in DC, and it’s obvious there is a constant deluge of negative voices. Talking heads, pundits, and politicians pack the airwaves with tragedies, dire predictions, and sling mud over social media. A Washingtonian’s mind probably leaks more bad news in a day than others hear in a week. In the wake of these voices, standards erode, dreams dull, and hope dies. So what is the remedy? Truth. Swiss author H.F. Amiel once said, “Truth is violated by falsehood but it is outraged by silence.” If standards are to be rebuilt, dreams renewed, and hope revived in our city—in our nation—truth must speak. Therefore, the herald of truth—the church—must be built. Living Hope in DC adopted this mission at its founding. Over time, our construction methods evolved from a street-service style of evangelism to focused outreach through home fellowship groups, and recently the acquisition of a new, dedicated facility. This past spring God energized us with a vision for the church in DC—“A home group in every neighborhood.” With more than one hundred twenty neighborhoods in DC alone, Luke’s account carries new urgency and inspiration: “The Lord added to the church daily such as should be saved” (Acts 2:47). Just as in the first church, we consider home groups the primary medium for building the church in DC for two reasons. First, home groups offer a living, breathing testimony of the gospel. People not only vocalize their faith; they sincerely practice it. The secular realm reduces Christianity to church on Sunday and a set

of rules. But when people come in contact with authentic Christian community they see people in unity acting out of love and concern for one another, bearing one other’s burdens, and propelling one another toward Heaven. This is a powerful witness. Second, home groups breed leaders. Home group leaders are expected to function as under-pastors who care for the needs of those in their home group. They also transmit this sense of responsibility to leaders in training. As a result, every believer in the home group becomes activated to evangelize the lost and care for one another. God continues to bless our home groups as we pursue our vision. Last March the number of groups hovered near eleven, and the average weekly attendance struggled for forty. Several initiatives breathed fresh life into our home groups. A revamped lesson structure added room for discussion and ministry among the members. Moreover, we completed a hands-on leadership training series in the summer and doctrinal training series for our leaders in the fall. These sessions instilled confidence in our leaders to facilitate ministry among their group and to field doctrinal questions that arise. As a result, the number of groups has reached sixteen, with average weekly attendances poised to reach one hundred. The diversity of our groups has also expanded. Recently, we added a children’s home group to our Spanish/English bilingual groups. We see this success as the beginning and anticipate even greater testimonies as we continue building God’s church in DC. Samuel Zenobia moved to Washington, DC, in the summer of 2010, after completing his schooling. He currently works for the US Navy. Samuel and his wife, Kristen, coordinate Living Hope DC’s Home Fellowship Groups. They are expecting their first child next July.

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FAITH & CULTURE BY EUGENE WILSON

A Miracle in Smithville ecently I had the honor of ministering at New Life United Pentecostal Church of Smithville, Tennessee. Pastor Dwayne Cornelius leads this growing congregation. When the Cornelius family assumed the pastorate seven years ago New Life’s average attendance on Sunday was in the fifties. Today, Sunday attendance routinely averages around two hundred. In 2011, facing a need for additional classroom space, the church began to explore its options. An off-price department store named Ross went out of business. The thirty-six thousand square foot building is located adjacent to the church property. A miracle unfolded: the church was able to rent the building for five hundred dollars per month for ten years, with an option to purchase the building on the backside of the lease. New Life invested just over five hundred thousand dollars in renovations. The building houses New Life’s recently opened daycare, church offices, men’s and women’s exercise rooms with state-of-the-art equipment, gymnasium, kitchen and dining hall, as well as various classrooms and mini-auditoriums for youth and children. To say that New Life is the “happening” place in Smithville is an understatement. The church hosts various community functions, ministries, and events. The church is also a trendsetter for area denominational churches—several churches have adopted or embraced a more exuberant style of worship. Recently a former United Methodist pastor and his wife in Smithville joined the leadership team of New Life after having received the revelation of Jesus Name baptism and being filled with the Holy Ghost. Surprisingly, New Life does not exist in a thriving community. Located seventy miles east of Nashville, Smithville is off the beaten path. The city population is only fifty-six hundred people and the county population is twenty thousand. In addition, the median income for a household in Smithville is $22,482, whereas the

Principles work regardless of the location, situation, or circumstances. median household income for Tennessee is $43,989, and $52,762 for the United States. And yet, despite these odds, New Life is a thriving congregation. Pastor Cornelius is routinely asked what the church does for outreach. What programs has his church implemented? What church growth formula do they follow? Most people are surprised with his answer. Although home Bible studies are taught, people are invited, and various events are held that bring an awareness of the church to the community, no specific plan of action for outreach has been implemented. And yet the church has grown. After interacting with the leadership team, ministering in the church, and developing a close friendship with Pastor Cornelius, I believe I can offer some insight into the growth of the congregation. Principles are both timeless and universal—principles work everywhere, at all times. I have witnessed the same principles embraced at New Life UPC (a rural church) work effectively at growing churches in heavily populated areas. God is not a respecter of persons. He is the same yesterday, today, and forever. Church growth is not limited to churches located in cities. Rural churches can experience growth too. Principles work regardless of the location, situation, or circumstance. What seldom works is the programs adopted from another church of a different culture and context. What may work well for a church in a city may not be doable in a rural church. Different cultures call for different methods. Principles, however, work regardless the culture or context. The challenge with principles is that they are not easy to come by. There are no one-two-three steps to be taken. Furthermore, building around principles takes time; it is not an overnight fix. The dividends, however, are well worth the effort.

So what are some of the principles I observed at New Life? For one, the leadership team at New Life is hungry to learn and grow, especially in the area of leadership. They do not believe they know it all. They are content but in no way complacent. Consequently, there is a high level of quality as well as a commitment to growth within the leadership team. There is openness to change. As a result, leaders are encouraged to try new things and to learn from what does not work and try again. Leaders are encouraged to express their thoughts, to share their feelings, to speak up. Consequently, a high level of trust exists among the group, and a spirit of camaraderie is apparent. I also observed a willingness to welcome others within the team and an eagerness to support one another. Hebrews 10:24-25 (NKJV) says, “Let us consider one another in order to stir up love and good works, not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as is the manner of some, but exhorting one another, and so much the more as you see the Day approaching.” Although emphasis is commonly placed on not neglecting to meet together, we must not neglect the rest of that Scripture verse. We must stir up one another to love and good works. And we must not neglect to encourage one another. This is the environment of New Life, and this environment is a result of leaders who embrace principles. What works in Smithville can work anywhere.

Eugene Wilson and his wife, Kerri, are active in the training of leaders. They live with their two children, Kade and Jaelyn, in Olive Branch, Mississippi.

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

Church in a Day— We Build the Church BILL HOBSON

hurch in a Day began as a dream of James Lumpkin, Arkansas District superintendent, and O.D. Crabtree, Arkansas District Home Missions director. In 1990 the dream became a reality as the Arkansas District built the first Church in a Day in the UPCI. Little happened with CIAD until 1997, when the national Home Missions director, Jack Cunningham, approached the General Board about making CIAD a National Home Missions Ministry. From then until now, over 140 projects have been undertaken, from renovations of existing buildings to new construction of complete buildings. Currently, the plan for Church in a Day is for each district to develop a CIAD team that can build the prototype 34x84 CIAD building consisting of 2,856 square feet of flexible space. This facility is primarily designed to house a sanctuary with seating of at least one hundred. The plans are negotiable to accommodate up to three Sunday school classrooms, a pastor’s office, and a baptismal changing room. CIAD equips a local church with a fully functional, completed building in our design/build plan. The footprint plan of 34x84 is standard, but all of the interior walls are flexible and can be rearranged to fit the needs of each congregation. North American Missions, under the leadership of Carlton Coon, has developed a national team including a director, a promotions director, and regional coordinators. These men are equipped to go into a district and help prepare a district board, NAM director, and prospective pastor and tradesmen to learn the hows and whys of CIAD. The plan of CIAD, nationally, is to implement qualified teams of tradesmen and laborers ready to build CIAD projects in each district as the need arises. It is the plan of NAM CIAD to keep these teams ready in each district to build a project and to assist neighboring districts as they are able. Our long-term goal is to see no less than one CIAD project go up every month somewhere across our fellowship. 18

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Who qualifies? CIAD is a national program supported and funded by NAM. NAM missionaries who own property or are in the process of acquiring property can solicit a national CIAD application from their district NAM director. Once completed, it is submitted for national review and processed as any other NAM fund request. The maximum amount currently available to a qualified NAM missionary is a loan of up to $50,000. This loan is secured through proper paperwork and an interest-free repayment plan is approved. As the funds are paid back they become available to loan to new CIAD projects. The plan of the NAM board is for each district to develop its own CIAD team. This team will stand ready when the need arises for the next project. Several districts have chosen their team and implemented policy for assistance to pre-existing churches in their district in construction areas in the event no NAM missionary is ready to build. This helps the district CIAD team to stay sharp and focused on its goal of assisting local churches in their construction needs inexpensively and quickly. Once a team has been established, a plan of action has been put in place in a district, and a candidate for construction has been approved, the CIAD team goes into action. CIAD teams across our fellowship begin the task of site work, design planning, state approval of plans, superintendent meetings, and the construction of the beautiful new Church in a Day. Months of preplanning, weeks of site-development, and the final week of construction prep work culminate in a twenty-four-hour period of whirlwind excitement and amazing progress. In about twenty-four hours a church building with an average insured appraised value of in excess of $300,000 is stick-framed and finished on site for roughly $128,000. Most often over three hundred laborers donate their time and talent. Typically there is no mark-up on the majority of materials installed. The building is built in a day. Keys to a fully functional church with lighting, sound, audio/video equipment, network wiring, heated baptistery, carpeted floors, two restrooms, and a sanctuary are handed over to the recipient pastor.

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There is little a district in the United Pentecostal Church can do that will bring a greater sense of purpose and a more unified effort for their evangelistic thrusts than Church in a Day. With the recent emphasis Carlton Coon and Bill Hobson have placed on CIAD nationally, North American Missions within the last twenty months has completed projects in Ohio, Arkansas, New Jersey, Iowa, Texas, Indiana, and Oklahoma. Church in a Day stands ready to equip NAM missionaries with a tool that has potential to propel them forward several years. CIAD buildings are functional, easy to remodel and to add on to. The building is designed so only the exterior walls bear weight—all interior walls are removable. The national CIAD team has available site plans, plans for the CIAD proptype building in PDF files and CAD files for architects. CIAD National also has expansion plans available for review for churches that have been built and need additional space. North American Missions and the great men and women of Church in a Day are ready to partner with your district and train your skilled labor force. The men and women in our churches who have abilities and skills can bless the kingdom of God. All they need is the direction, and CIAD provides that. Visit our website, www.ciad.us, to view pictures, files, and important documents pertaining to application and design of CIAD. You can follow our national builds on our website by clicking on our live stream tab. You can stay up to date with our progress from site to site by following us @CIADNAM on Twitter, or by joining our private Facebook group, CIAD NAM. These sites are designed to equip you to become a part of Church in a Day. Our National CIAD director, Terry Long, is available to answer questions or give guidance in planning or prep work. He is accessible through any of the sites mentioned above or at lacpastorlong@ gmail.com. Give a gift that keeps on giving by donating to Church in a Day. Church in a Day funds are loaned interest-free to approved church planters and are made available again as they are paid back. Contact Brian Hord at Bhord@ upci.org to donate. Bill Hobson is the general secretary of North American Missions.

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Equipping present and future church planters. • Modules on an array of subjects from spiritual warfare to the long-term strategy of church multiplication. • Modules that offer practical, real-life instruction that can be applied in each individual’s harvest field. • Instructors such as David Bernard, Carlton Coon, and Tim Gaddy.

namupci.com

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Opening March 10, 2014: • Online Registration • Hotel Reservations • Exhibit Space Registration

A VANCE KINGD M SAVE THE DATE

St. Louis, Missouri • America’s Center Tuesday, September 30 - Friday, October 3, 2014

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WORLDLINE

925-1000 word article INCLUDING THE BIO.

BY BRUCE A. HOWELL

North America Reaching the World hile we are focusing in this issue of the Pentecostal Herald on reaching the great and worthy field of North America, I am so happy to report to you at the same time that North America is reaching the world. Not only are missionaries being sent from North America, but they are training ministers in nations that are sending out their own regional missionaries. I want to share a few testimonies from around the world with you. Steve and Kari Shirley wrote from the Dominican Republic: “Jerry and Andrea Powell led the Western District Youth Missions trip. Five received the Holy Ghost during their trip. This group worked on the Bible school in the city of Santiago (painted, put up dividers for classrooms, and did Sheetrock for an office division), attended and preached a service in an outlying area of Santiago, attended and helped with children’s camp activities, and preached and sang at the church in El Millon and also another local church in the capital. For our national convention, our special speakers were Mark and Karla Christian. Sister Christian preached the ladies service and their daughter Courtney sang. Eleven received the Holy Ghost at the convention! Including this number, our national evangelism director reports 153 filled with the Holy Ghost in crusades during eight months’ time! This does not include those filled in local church services. We give God the glory! During this time, we have also continued to pastor the local church in El Millon.” Richard J. and Andrea Carver wrote from Papua New Guinea: “An absolute miracle happened to us last week. Just out of the blue, a stranger from Kansas City, USA, rolled into town. He was coming to PNG with a bore-well drilling machine as part of his community help project. He was coming to drill three wells as part of a training project, which he would perform at one-tenth of the regular price. After the three training well digs were complete, the price would go back up. “He had never heard of us (nor vice versa), but by chance he stayed at accommodation owned by a friend of mine, who informed him that we had a need for water at

Not only are missionaries being sent from North America, but they are training ministers in nations that are sending out their own regional missionaries. our Bible school. Out of the whole country, we were one of only three compounds selected for the low cost of drilling. There was enough sub-surface water flow to supply the water needs for our whole compound. This is a real miracle.” Let me also take the opportunity this month to highlight some of our lady missionaries. Lynne Jewett sent me a report from Guatemala: “Our orphanage project H.O.M.E. International has taken off. Things have happened so much faster then we could have ever imagined. We have the perimeter wall up, one renovated building, four homes with roofs, doors, and windows, and the administrative building up with a roof on. Since the beginning of the year a total of six groups have come to work on the project from Florida, Louisiana, California, and Alabama. These past few months it has felt like the windows of Heaven opened and poured out multiple blessings upon blessings.” Meanwhile, she continued, “the Bible school certainly is the heart of the work in this country. At present we have 368 students enrolled throughout the country in nine schools.” About the same time, Crystal Reece wrote from Tonga: “I received news that my book, Island Splashes, is being published by Westbow Press, a division of Thomas Nelson. I pray this new venture will bring glory to the Lord as well as promote missions in story form, while deputation continues and while I am in Tonga. After one recent deputation service I had the privilege to sit down with two young ladies who aspire to missions. I was able to talk one-on-one, an-

swering their questions about AYC, the Next Step program, and AIM. I promote each of these everywhere I go because I count it an honor to have served on AIM for seven years. Anytime I have the opportunity to talk about missions, especially to young people, I count it a joy.” Finally, missionary to Korea E. J. Kim wrote from the deputation trail: “During Illinois family camp meeting, District Superintendent Brent Coltharp preached a strong and beautiful Apostolic message. I was impressed by the Lord to invite him to Korea to strengthen our brethren with that kind of message. Right after the service, I invited him to Korea for our Pastors and Wives Seminar next year. He was very happy and willing to come. The last night, Brother Coltharp called me to the pulpit to present my needs. Of course, he did not know what I was going to do. I did not talk about raising my PIMs, but I asked the people if anyone wanted to send their district superintendent to Korea to teach and preach to our Korean brethren. I gave a short testimony and then told them I would like to raise the roundtrip airfare for him to go. Since I was asking, I was the first person to give, and I showed my check. Within about five minutes, it was all raised and more than what I asked for, so it turned out that they could send Sister Coltharp as well. We cannot outgive God!” Bruce A. Howell is the general director of Global Missions, which sends missionaries from North America and onward from other nations as well. FEBRUARY 2014

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

MISSIONS— à la Montréal D O N A L D D. H A N S CO M A N D L I A N E R. G R A N T

It is always refreshing to experience the exuberant worship and anointed preaching in this church where the lights rarely go out.

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ome to metro Montreal for a weekend and step onto a mission field of almost four million souls, only three established churches, four home missions churches, and a few daughter works. The future of any missions work is its Bible school. At Montreal’s Purpose Institute campus, over fifty students receive intensive training one weekend each month. Bible knowledge, leadership skills, and practical ministry involvement in the local church and community are emphasized in a concerted effort to train laborers for the harvest that awaits. Many of these young people are international students. With four universities here, the student community of 200,000 is a mission field in itself. Several weekly Bible studies are held on campus, and students from many nations are being saved here in Montreal. Vanessa, Shamira, and Nancy were high school classmates in the country of Gabon. One by one, they came to Canada for university training. Shamira was saved in Saint-Laurent UPC in Montreal, and she invited Nancy to service. At first Nancy thought the church was crazy but later she was baptized in Jesus’ name and received the Holy Ghost. Vanessa also came to Montreal, not knowing her friends were there. Nancy made contact with her through Facebook and brought her to church. Having been raised by a Lutheran father and a Jehovah’s Witness mother, Vanessa wasn’t really sure what she believed. But God touched her heart too, and

1000-1100 word article these three young ladies are now Bible INCLUDING school students. THE BIO. Ministry experience credits are required for their diploma, so they are planning a missions project, pooling their funds to send Vanessa back to Gabon for a couple of weeks with French Bible studies and discipleship materials to reach out to their families and friends. The church in Saint-Laurent was started in 1964 by a former missionary to Sri Lanka. Under the leadership of the current pastor, Paul Graham, it has grown to several hundred members representing over fifty nations. It is always refreshing to experience the exuberant worship and anointed preaching in this church where the lights rarely go out. Scheduling is a feat in logistics: in addition to services in multiple languages (English, French, Spanish, Tamil, Farsi, and so forth), there are children’s and youth ministries, as well as dozens of home fellowship groups all over the city. On Sunday evenings, all of the members come together for a bilingual celebration. When the worship team launches into “Freedom,” the flags often come off the walls as people hold high their country’s emblem and wave it in gratitude to God for the freedom, both physical and spiritual, they have found since immigrating to Montreal. Dieudonné Kahozi found freedom here, arriving in 1991 from the Congo as a refugee. After studying aeronautic construction and being actively involved in political activities to improve the situation in his homeland, he met Jolie and they were married. He had been raised Catholic, but they both found salvation at Saint-Laurent UPC. Kahozi later became pastor of the French daughter congregation, growing it from about thirty people to over three hundred in just over a decade. He loves to teach Bible studies and has been responsible for many university students coming to the Lord. He has returned home to the Congo twice on ministry trips, and so far over sixty A photo caption could go here, if have beenneeded. baptized and filled with Can be changed to white the Holy Ghost. Pastor is and placed over aKahozi dark image. depesndscoordinator on the design. now theJust national of French Evangelism for Multicultural Ministries.

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Other daughter works are located in Saint-Jérôme and Côte Saint-Luc, as well as one in Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, which was started by Benjie and Julie Terrible. Julie was raised in a Catholic family in the Philippines, but had an evangelical experience while at university. She came to Canada hoping to improve the economic situation of her family, but fell away from God. In the midst of emotional pain caused by her empty lifestyle, she cried out to God and went searching for a church. She came to Saint-Laurent UPC, was filled with the Holy Ghost, and rebaptized. Julie returned to the Philippines to witness to her family and was instrumental in having a church started in her home village. While she was there, she witnessed to Benjie, an old friend whose life had become a nightmare of alcohol and violence. He gave his heart to the Lord, and Benjie and Julie were married and came to Montreal. Benjie Terrible later became the assistant pastor in St. Laurent. He has made five trips back to the Philippines, and as a result over three hundred have received the Holy Ghost! Gholamreza Dehghani has a Farsi daughter work in St. Laurent. Raised Muslim, he escaped from Iran and converted to Christianity in Europe. He began evangelizing Muslims, but because of threats against his family, he brought them to Montreal. He visited Saint-Laurent UPC but did not agree with the teaching. However, he agreed to a Bible study with Benjie Terrible and Dieudonné Kahozi and as a result, received a revelation of the oneness of God and was baptized in Jesus’ name. He began an Internet outreach to Muslims and already there have been hundreds of converts. The new believers take a vacation to a safe country in order to be baptized by the resident missionaries or by Dehghani himself on one of his missions trips. He is now the national coordinator of Middle Eastern Evangelism for Multicultural Ministries. Great things are happening in other parts of metro Montreal. In Pointe Claire, over thirty nationalities gather for worship. The children often have to go down to Sunday school at the beginning of service because the sanctuary is filled to overflowing. Like most Montreal churches, they need a bigger facility, but so far zoning constraints have hindered them. Municipal issues such as parking requirements make church planting a challenge, as experienced by the Filipino church in Côte-des-Neiges, but they are reaching out to their community and the church is growing. Since approximately two-thirds of Montreal residents are first-language French, knowing the language is key to effective outreach. But besides English, many other language groups are represented in the city. In Laval and Park Extension, weekly services are held in Punjabi, Hindi, and Nepalese. These beautiful people from Nepal may be short in stature, but they stand tall in their love for Oneness doctrine. There are two Nepalese daughter churches in Joliette, one of which resulted from an entire church being rebaptized in Jesus’ name. Pedro Patrick also has an open door into a church of another denomination. A native of Nigeria, he came to Montreal four years ago to plant a church in Lachine (named for “China”). His wife is still waiting for permission to emigrate from Africa, but in the meantime, she is keeping busy learning French and doing children’s ministry. The Lachine congregation rents another church facility on Sunday afternoons for services. When the pastor of that church passed away recently, Pedro Patrick was asked to preach on Sunday mornings and has been doing so for months now. Hearts are being touched by the gospel! Across the river in the South Shore is Montreal’s metro missions work. The church members in the South Shore are from various 26

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Gholamreza Dehghani has a Farsi daughter work in St. Laurent. Raised Muslim, he escaped from Iran and converted to Christianity in Europe. He began evangelizing Muslims, but because of threats against his family, he brought them to Montreal. countries such as Togo, Burundi, Madagascar, Jamaica, and El Salvador, but French is the language that allows everyone to communicate. Career church planters Scott and Liane Grant also pastor the church in Trois-Rivières ninety miles away. Even though that city is predominantly French, the church congregation includes many Swahili and Spanish speakers. It is the only established UPC church in the province of Quebec outside of metro Montreal. With a population of over eight million people, this province is the most under-evangelized area in North America. In the east end of Montreal is a French daughter congregation that has already outgrown the former adult bookstore they transformed into a sanctuary a couple of years ago. Several Purpose Institute students serve in this new church. Some will go back home to win their families overseas, but while they are here, they receive solid doctrinal training. Solange came from Burundi to Montreal to study at one of the universities. She was baptized and filled with the Holy Ghost. Initially, her family was thrilled because her former party lifestyle had been a great concern to them. However, when they realized she was now “always at church,” they felt she was going overboard and insisted that she return home for a while. Solange went back to Burundi where her family mocked her commitment to holiness, but she stayed faithful to God and was able to study the Scriptures with them. Her sister received the Holy Ghost and her mother embraced a holiness lifestyle. Solange is now in Montreal, enrolled in the Bible school and reaching out to others. From overseas to Canada, then reaching back into their native countries, that is Missions à la Montréal! Liane Grant and her husband, Scott, serve the UPCI as metro missionaries to Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Donald D. Hanscom serves the UPCI as the general director of Multicultural Ministries.

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

What It Really Means to Be a

Church Planter SCOTT SISTRUNK

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orting out fact from fiction is always a challenge. Church planting is one such subject that is plagued by myth and misunderstanding. Myths are often much more exciting and interesting than the truth. Conventional wisdom is always simpler than reality. In this article I will peel away some of these misunderstandings, dispel a few myths, and overturn some conventional wisdom. Here are a few insights I have gained from eighteen years of church planting. Church planting is lonely. Half true. It can be but doesn’t have to be. There are some church planters reading this who have experienced loneliness and are puzzled when I say that it doesn’t have to be. In our past, acts of courage and sacrifice were necessary in order to evangelize North America. I thank God for these home missionaries and honor their sacrifice. However, just because our great, great grandparents may have crossed the prairie in a covered wagon doesn’t mean we have to. To continue to make the same sacrifices when they are not necessary would be the equivalent of someone traveling from St. Louis to San Francisco in a covered wagon be-

cause Grandpa did. Too many spiritual battles need to be fought to waste valuable time and energy battling loneliness. I encourage every church planter to follow the Book of Acts model to be strongly connected to the larger church body, and to never “go it alone.” Careful attention should be given to cultivating supporting relationships in the planning stages. In my opinion, every new church plant should begin life as a daughter work. Great personal sacrifice is required to plant a church. Not true. Again, this may surprise you. Let me explain. We must all be crucified with Christ. Self-denial is a part of spiritual growth no matter what area of ministry we are called to. We must understand that Jesus paid the price at Calvary for every church plant. The shedding of my blood, the sacrificing of my children, or any other personal sacrifice I make will not save one soul in my city. You may experience many things in church planting that will mold and shape your character, but you would have traveled that road to your own personal Calvary regardless. The cross cannot be avoided if you are going to follow Jesus. Don’t blame it on church planting. God has to build a man or woman before he can build a church. Church planting is expensive. True. In every list of why businesses fail, somewhere in the top three reasons will be under-capitalization. FEBRUARY 2014

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Jesus taught that our attitude about money and our handling of it reveal our priorities. If we believe in church planting we will finance it. Reaching North America will not be done on the cheap. It will cost all of us. For the prospective church planter, it should be a good indication to you that you do not have much solid support in your endeavor if you can’t find any investors. “Atta boy” and “go get ‘em tiger” are poor substitutes for “I believe in what you are doing and I will pay your rent for the first year.” In the emotion and excitement of your desire to plant a church you should examine carefully who is willing and who is not willing to partner with you in your endeavor. Those who are unwilling to invest with your efforts may be shrewd investors of God’s money and may feel they have good reason not to invest in you. Someone has to finance revival. Paul deputized, worked, cultivated benefactors, and sent fund-raising letters in order to carry the gospel to the Gentiles. We have had great success overseas in large part because we have had a sound capitalization structure. We have had less success in North America because we have an inadequate financial structure. Sadly, many church planters exhaust themselves, burn out, and cause harm to their families, not because God required it, nor because they were battling spiritual enemies, but because they failed to count the cost. What does counting the cost look like? Have low or no personal debt. Get a job. It is always easier to quit a job because it is interfering with your outreach than it is to exhaust your finances and then be desperate to get a job. Don’t go it alone. If you can’t find a pastor or district to partner with you financially,

then you may be about to make a big mistake. Did I mention that the number-one reason businesses fail is because they start for the wrong reason? Individuals plant churches. Not true. Do you recognize any of these phrases? “Brother So and So went to that city and dug out a work,” “Boy, they really paid the price for that church,” or “Well, I don’t know if he has what it takes to build a church.” Such phrases reveal our rugged, entrepreneurial, individualistic attitude toward church planting. Such a concept is not common in our foreign missions culture. Church planting is the cooperative work of the church, not heroic feats of individuals. No flesh will glory in the presence of God. Jesus said He was the church builder. In my opinion, the romanticizing of the “lone church planter” is a major (if not the greatest) obstacle to North American expansion. Every pastor and every local church should be involved in helping a North American church planter fulfill the Great Commission. And no church planter should be indifferent to the necessity of unity and cooperation in the body of Christ. Church planters are not building a monument to individual accomplishment; they are the tip of the spear wielded by God’s church against the kingdom of darkness. Scott Sistrunk is a UPCI Metro career church planter to Detroit, Michigan. He has been involved in establishing several churches in the Detroit Metro area over the last eighteen years. 

What is Compassion Sunday?

Compassion Sunday is February 23, 2014. It is a day set aside to help Compassion Services International prepare to answer the calls for help that are sure to come in the new year.

Why Give to Compassion Sunday?

When you give to Compassion Sunday, you enable CSI to respond immediately whenever disaster strikes. Compassion Sunday also helps fund medical mission trips and humanitarian efforts around the world. In 2013 CSI responded to several disasters in places like Oklahoma, Colorado, Cambodia and The Philippines. A medical team traveled to Liberia to work in a CSI sponsored clinic and funds for humanitarian aid efforts were sent to Africa, Greece, and more. Your donation to CSI on Compassion Sunday will ensure that CSI is ready to answer the call for help sooner rather than later.

twitter.com/1_CSI

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

Jessica Manley,

UPCI pastor’s daughter in Salinas, California, wins a $25,000 first prize in the Bible Bee PRESS RELEASE

en year-old Jessica Manley is a special girl. Not only has she memorized over five-hundred Bible verses since June 1, 2013 she was able to use her knowledge to win the top prize of her age division—$25,000! Over three hundred contestants from across the nation in three age groups (ages 7-18) demonstrated their extensive biblical knowledge through scripture recitation and intensive study of multiple books of the Bible. From those contestants, the top fifteen went on to semi-finals with a single-elimination recitation round. And the five finalists in each age category went on to recite scripture and answer knowledge questions in front of an audience of thousands. Contestants began their journey to the national competition by participating in a local Bible Bee in August 2013. They took a written test on a book of the Bible that they had been studying all summer long; then they recited as many as twenty memory passages in ten minutes before a panel of judges. The top-scoring one hundred contestants in each of three age groups were invited to attend this year’s national competition. Families traveled hundreds of miles to participate. In Jessica’s case, she traveled all the way from California to compete – a distance of over two thousand miles. The winners received prizes worth over $270,000! Young people interested in participating in next year’s Bible Bee should visit www.BibleBee.org for more information. PRIMARY DIVISION WINNERS (ages 7-10) 1. Jessica Manley, Salinas, California 2. Adam Willard, Pace, Florida 3. Andre Lehman, Odon, Indiana 4. Jarrett Chew, La Palma, California 5. Abigail Brown, Battle Creek, Michigan

SENIOR DIVISION WINNERS (ages 15-18) 1. Ryan Sinni, Germantown, Maryland 2. Lucy Alessio, Oakland, Michigan 3. Bethany Xiques, Miami Springs, Florida 4. Rionna Flynn, Cupertino, California 5. Anna Floyd, Bath, Pennsylvania

JUNIOR DIVISION WINNERS (ages 11-14) 1. Katherine Forster, Lutz, Florida 2. Katrina Baergen, Leslie, Michigan 3. Everett Chew, La Palma, California 4. Olivia Davis, Salem, Oregon 5. Andrew Adams, Clive, Iowa

For more information about the Bible Bee, visit www.BibleBee.org.

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Media Contact Name: GraceAnn Westfahl Phone: (937) 382-7250 Email: g raceann.westfahl@ shelbykennedy.org

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APOSTOLIC MAN BY JERRY DEAN

Apostolic Man Ministry at Work in Panama City, Panama was glancing over a missionary’s report when something caught my attention. Missionary Larry Decker was soliciting funds to complete the Bible school in Panama City, Panama. He was just what we were looking for. Men’s Ministry in Louisiana is always looking for another opportunity for an overseas construction project.  Although men’s conferences across North America had become life-changing meetings, several years ago our Men’s Ministry president, Mike Williams, began encouraging our District Men’s Directors to go beyond hosting a men’s conference. He motivated us to provide an avenue that would give these men an opportunity to put their hands into the harvest. The Church in a Day program had proven that our churches are full of gifted men who can make a difference with their unique talents. A vision was cast in our district to partner with Global Missions and make a difference beyond North America. In the beginning I wondered if this was even doable. Would there be enough men who were willing to take time off from their jobs, cover their own expenses, and take time away from their families to work on overseas construction projects? I quickly discovered the answer was absolutely yes. I found a group of men who were not only willing but eager to make this sacrifice. To date, Louisiana Apostolic Men’s Ministry has taken eleven of these trips. Beyond this, two of our local churches have organized their own trips to construct both the Hodge Home and the DeRidder Home on the Guatemala Children’s Home campus. I immediately emailed Missionary Larry Decker and asked him if he would be interested in a group of men from Louisiana coming to work on the Bible school in Panama. We had already raised sufficient missions funds at the Men’s Conference in Tioga, Louisiana, to cover the cost of materials. Missionary Decker was elated and the dates were set. The Bible school we would

work on was actually a memorial to one of our own from Louisiana, Fred Foster. The Pentecostals of the Twin Cities, pastored by Mark Foster, provided the funds years ago to purchase the property and fund the majority of this project. Under the oversight of Pastor Kent Rhoads, fourteen men traveled to Panama. These men slept on mattresses on the floor of the Bible school. The Deckers, with help from some of the locals, prepared the meals. To illustrate how much was accomplished during this week, I share with you an email sent from Alan Goss, a layman from Bossier City, to all the men who participated. Alan Goss organized the crews and planned the work. “What a great trip. We experienced things we have not had the privilege of experiencing before—a central sleeping location, for one. I hope you have had the opportunity to take a few minutes and reflect on the things God has used you to accomplish. To recap some of the job details from a work point of view: “Scrape and sand down all the walls on first and second floors; prime all the walls; two coats of paint on all walls including the stairwell; demo four metal stud walls with sheetrock; extend the wall at the stairwell; extend the wall separating the large meeting room from the guest quarters; build a closet, install shelves and rod in closet; sheetrock, tape, float, texture and install a door in previous rooms; install vanity with sink; run plumbing and drain to ceiling space below floor; assemble cabinets and install the plumbing fixtures in sink; run forty amp

circuit to inline water heater from panel below and install new shower head; install new ceiling tile for entire building upstairs and downstairs; install ceiling grid and tile from start in one room; repair existing damage in grid; trace out electrical wires that turned up to old receptacles in demoed walls; bust out concrete, drill a hole through concrete to first floor ceiling, install three receptacle floor boxes and re-pour quickset concrete around boxes; demo old lighting conduit that was feeding lights from old office switches and pipe and pull wire so the room worked off of two three-way switches; fill in top of exterior wall with foam, wire and liquid foam to keep dust and pests out; remove old ceramic tiles and prep for new tile; install trim around door; case out two vertical I-beams.  I may be missing some items but you get the point. It was a lot of work.”

This quick overview explains why our missionaries were overjoyed at the conclusion of this productive week. Apostolic Man Ministry is making a difference not only at home, but abroad. Thank you for your support.  Jerry Dean leads Apostolic Man Ministry in the Louisiana District. He and his wife, Gina, have served The Pentecostals of Bossier for twenty-five years. He also serves on the Global Missions board. NOTE: There are several Apostolic Man missions trips videos available at www.apostolicman.com.  

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

Penn State Campus Ministry S C O T T A N D A I M É E PAT T E R S O N

nticing music pulsates within earshot of the students milling in the halls. A presence emanates from Heritage Hall, and curiosity tugs at hungry hearts. Students enter the room inquiring of the activity within. Upon entry, they come face to face with a God who is bigger than their hurt, bigger than their every need. He is meeting and communing with each willing heart. Tears course down cheeks, encouragement goes forth, prayers are lifted up, comfort and refreshing is poured out. Hungry souls are fed. Is there a greater joy than to witness the Creator interacting with His most prized creation? Five souls who have never experienced the Holy Ghost speak in tongues for the first time, and two are buried in Jesus’ name in water baptism! The kingdom of Heaven has just expanded a little bit more. Deeper 2013 took place on the campus of Penn State University September 26-28. Hyphen young adults and college students gathered for three days to dig into the Word, worship, share with PSU students, and experience God in a very big way. Raymond Woodward brought the Word of God Thursday evening and Friday morning. Then Tim Greene challenged our faith to deepen on Friday evening and Saturday morning. Both men imparted spiritual truths and understanding so we would be more able to impact our world. Our student leadership was stretched as well, concerning the details that surround a large conference and the paperwork involved to utilize Penn State University. But the kingdom of God was increased and all else fades in comparison. Representation from eight states, financial supporters, a partnership with Faithworks for a graphic designed logo, as well as backing from the Pennsylvania District and General Youth Division helped propel Deeper into a realm it had not touched. Strongholds were broken, unity was fostered, prophetic words went forth, and hungry souls were filled. All this occurred on the campus of a secular university. Many spiritual strongholds were torn down across the State of Pennsylvania during Deeper 2013. This was due to the worship of the one true God, the Word of the Lord preached, and the prayers during the conference. Could it be that the spiritual strongholds in our districts are seated on our university and college campuses across North 34

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America? Strongholds are mindsets, and through Deeper they are being challenged on campuses. It is interesting to note that the city of Pergamos was a place of learning. It had one of the largest libraries of the time period. Yet in Revelation 2:13 Jesus told the church of Pergamos they were in the seat of Satan. “I know thy works, and where thou dwellest, even where Satan›s seat is …” Jesus said in verses 14 and 15 that He had a few things against them for following the false doctrines of Balaam and of the Nicolaitans. God hated the idea of false doctrine then and He hates it today. I believe it’s more than just coincidence that the seat of Satan was in the city that had the largest place of learning. The church needs to realize that many of the strongholds in our districts could be more connected to places of higher education than we’ve previously thought. This is not something we as Apostolics need to run from. Rather, we need to have greater Apostolic presence on our campuses and universities to tear down the spiritual strongholds and false doctrines that are being taught. The United Pentecostal Church International, with God’s help, is just the vehicle to do that. Where can you find the General Youth Division, North American Missions, and Global Missions merging together for the cause of reaching the masses? Find them in the backyard of many North American churches—the colleges and universities. How? Through Campus Ministry International. When we began this journey a few years ago, we were leading a campus ministry group at Pennsylvania College of Technology in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, under the direction of Apostolic Pentecostal Church of Williamsport pastored by Roger Betterley. The General Youth Division then asked us if we would consider being

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Strongholds were broken, unity was fostered, prophetic words went forth, and hungry souls were filled. All this occurred on the campus of a secular university.

A photo caption could go here, if needed. Can be changed to white and placed over a dark image. Just depesnds on the design.

full-time campus missionaries. We had felt the call not only to continue the local chapter at Penn College, but also to start a campus ministry at Penn State University in State College, Pennsylvania. The local church in State College, Pennsylvania, was a home missions church at the time, pastored by Mickey Cluster. While having our weekly Bible studies and special events we were connecting with students from all over the world. The world’s brightest and most educated young adults come to North America to further their education. (The two baptisms that took place during Deeper 2013 were international students.) But most exciting to us was the hunger expressed by a Chinese student we have been working with directly for the past two years. It was precious to be able to pray with him and be there as he stepped into a relationship with Jesus Christ through baptism in Jesus’ name and the infilling of the Holy Ghost through the evidence of speaking in tongues. When a church decides to reach into the local campus they are reaching the world. Likewise, when international students graduate

and return home they have the potential of taking the gospel with them. God has already been sending preachers from North America all over the world to preach truth to them. However, could it be that God is not only sending us to reach the world through Global Missions, but that He also is sending foreigners to North America as students so we can reach them right in our own backyards? Do you want to see strongholds fall? Impact your generation? Do you have a heartbeat for North American Missions? Want to reach into a foreign field? Let your Apostolic presence be heard. Get involved with Campus Ministry International and change your world. Scott and Aimée Patterson are the first full-time appointed campus missionaries under the direction of the General Youth Division. They work under the leadership of their pastor, Mickey Cluster of Centre Pointe Church, State College, Pennsylvania.

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

Visions of a Cheeseburger DONNA MYRE

here he stood at a busy intersection in Dallas, Texas, holding a sign. It is fairly common to see needy people standing at intersections with signs. Generally the signs read, “Will Work for Food.” However, this middle-aged man’s sign was different. It read, “Homeless with Visions of a Cheeseburger.” My heart ached and I felt deep sympathy for him. There he was, supposedly without a place to live yet all he dreamed of having was a cheeseburger. Seemingly it would take so little to bring his vision to fruition. For some time I pondered the man’s sad plight. Then it occurred to me that maybe his homelessness was due to his lack of vision. When a person is without a place to live it seems his vision should be somewhat larger than a cheeseburger! I began thinking his lack of vision might well be a factor in his homeless situation. After all, one cheeseburger will appease hunger for only a short time; then the poor man will be right back where he started. It seemed to me what he really needed was a job. A job would not only make his visions of a cheeseburger a reality but also provide shelter under which to enjoy eating it. The Bible says, “Where there is no vision, the people perish” (Proverbs 29:18). God sees what we have the potential to become. Not only does He see, He has the ability to make us into that person. The big problem is that much of the time God’s vision and our vision are not concurrent. Gideon was hiding behind the wine press, terrified of the Philistines, when “the angel of the Lord appeared unto him, and said unto him, The Lord is with thee, thou mighty man of valour” (Judges 6:12). The angel of the Lord was speaking of Gideon’s potential. Maybe we should ask God to help us get our vision in line with His. We might be sitting in a corner somewhere munching on a cheeseburger, feeling rather common and insignificant while God is seeing us on the front line of leadership in His kingdom, performing mighty acts of valor. Donna Myre and her husband, Bob, pastor in Paris, Texas. She is the Ladies Ministries president of the Texas District.

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MULTICULTURAL MINISTRIES BY DONALD D. HANSCOM

Ministering to the Amish and Mennonite ccording to the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown College, the Amish population of North America more than doubled in the twenty-one years from 1992 to 2013. Amish communities are located in thirty states and the Canadian province of Ontario. Researcher Joseph Donnermeyer of Ohio State University indicates the Amish are one of the fastest-growing religious groups in North America. An estimated 282,000 Amish live in the US and Ontario; 64 percent of the total US Amish population live in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Indiana. It is harder to estimate the number of Mennonites, as those of the Old Order do not record their membership. One source estimates 800,000 in North America, including dozens of sub-groups. In 2010 the largest Canadian concentrations of urban Mennonites were in Winnipeg, Vancouver, Saskatoon, and Kitchener-Waterloo, drawing from large nearby rural Mennonite communities. Winnipeg has one of the largest Mennonite populations in the world. The Mennonite sect evolved in the sixteenth century from a group called Anabaptists. Menno Simons, a Dutchman who had been a Catholic priest, strongly objected to several of the traditional church’s practices, including infant baptism and transubstantiation. A century later another voice was heard, that of Jakob Ammann who felt the Mennonites had become too lax. He called for spiritual renewal and re-evaluation of the group’s identity, which to him meant living separate from the world and “shunning” those of their group who did not. They became known as the Amish. These two main groups split, and eventually the largest Mennonite group moved to the opposite end of the spectrum, assimilating into the surrounding culture in both appearance and practice. “Assimilated Mennonites” now comprise about two-thirds of the present-day Mennonite population. Unlike the Amish, they accept the use of technology and modern conveniences, operate colleges and seminaries, and even get politically involved.

Old Order Amish live simply and wear plain clothing of solid, dark colors. They avoid picture-taking tourists, ride in horsedrawn buggies, wagons, or bicycles, and grow or raise much of their food, using horses and plows. They do not have insurance; rather, their communities take care of their own needs. They help each other build houses or barns, quilt, sew, and can food. They do not use electric lights or appliances. They have church in homes by turn in their “circle” every other week on Sunday morning. Songs and sermons are conducted in German. After church there is a potluck meal, games, and visiting. “Off Sundays” are for visiting family and friends. Old Order Mennonites have somewhat similar lifestyles but are not as limited as to dress and practices. Amish young people usually wait until their late teens or early twenties to join the church. Candidates kneel and answer the bishop’s questions about commitment to living a Christian life. They renounce the devil and the world and accept the “Ordnung” of the church district. The deacon then pours water through the bishop’s hands over the candidate’s head in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. If after being baptized the Amish leave the faith, they are shunned. They are not allowed to buy, sell, or eat with other Amish people. Leaving often means losing family, friends, a job in an Amish business, their home if owned by Amish, and school if children attend an Amish parochial school. Mennonites, on the other hand, practice all forms of baptism: immersion in a river, lake, pool, or baptistery, or sprinkling or pouring from a pitcher or bowl. To them the act is more important than the form. Today many Mennonites accept into their congregations those of other faiths who were baptized as infants without requiring rebaptism. They do not practice shunning as the Amish do. They worship in church buildings instead of homes. Some of their congregations sing in four-part harmony accompanied by musical instruments. Considering this broad range of lifestyles, winning the Amish and Mennonite

requires a variety of approaches. Most important, however, is showing appreciation and respect for their culture and offering your friendship—although developing friendships with those of the Old Order takes patience and time, as they don’t readily accept “Englishers” into their lives. Amish and Mennonite people make wonderful friends and neighbors once you have gained their trust. This can be achieved by frequenting their businesses and visiting their homes in a friendly, non-threatening way. When the time is right, they will welcome prayer and some eventually will allow a Bible study in their homes. They will enjoy genuine fellowship at church functions such as fish fries, sing-alongs, or other socials, but they seldom will visit other church services. Their faith is strong, but many don’t have a close personal relationship with God or His Word. They need to hear the whole gospel and obey Acts 2:38. They are sometimes open to receiving the Holy Ghost, but will balk at being rebaptized, which, for the Amish, will result in excommunication and shunning. We are called to embrace the mission of Jesus who came to seek and to save the lost of all races, cultures, and religions. It is our responsibility to pray for all peoples and share His love with them. Let us pray and carry the gospel to our entire world. In addition to developing contacts and friends among the Amish and Mennonite peoples, you can become involved by partnering with the Amish-Mennonite Evangelism Network (AMEN) through prayer and monetary support. Monthly support will underwrite printed material and other tools that are being developed. You may send offerings to Multicultural Ministries, specifying “Amish-Mennonite Evangelism (Project 145640).” For further information please contact Donald Hanscom at dhanscom @upci.org. Donald D. Hanscom is the director of Multicultural Ministries.

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

Exposure Breeds a Burden MARK BROWN

y pastor, Jim Sleeva, instilled in my heart the idea that “exposure breeds a burden.” That is why I am where I am today. I was born and raised in the south suburbs of the Chicago area and had never heard of South Dakota. While at-

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tending Indiana Bible College people told me unbelievable stories of a far-away place called South Dakota. I listened because I wanted a good laugh. During my senior year at IBC God placed it in my heart to go to South Dakota. I contacted the South Dakota District and told them God was dealing with me and that I would move to any city they suggested. When Gary Legg asked me to pastor and grow a church in Watertown, South Dakota, I was puzzled. I was almost twentytwo and recently married. I talked to my former pastor, the late Terry Cox. He told me the need there was great and he believed in finding the greatest need and meeting it. I talked to others but none of them encouraged me to go. I heard things such as “South Dakota is a graveyard for ministers,” “You’re too young,” “Be a youth leader,” “Try student pastoring,” “Go somewhere where there are people,” and “Find someplace warmer.” I was presented with opportunities that would be more suitable in terms of pay and comfort. Despite all this, I decided to obey God and my pastor. On graduation day, the day my graduation cap came off, my wife and I jumped into the ’89 Fox Volkswagen that had no air conditioner, no power steering, and no emergency brake and putt-putted our way to South Dakota. I had no idea what I was getting in to. That was probably a good thing.

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South Dakota was nothing like the Chicago area; it was like another country. For the first time in my life I felt alone and isolated. South Dakota’s six churches were separated by fields and cows, hours apart. Few people were coming to church. I had wept over cities like Chicago, but never for a rural “Podunkville”! The naysayers were right about one thing—I would die out here. I did die. But I needed to. God had to kill who I was in order for me to do what I was called to do. God gave me I Corinthians 16:8-9: “I will tarry at Ephesus until Pentecost. For a great door and effectual is opened unto me, and there are many adversaries.” God seemed to blur out the “Ephesus” part; all I could see was “Watertown” in its place. That day I became a stubborn Holy Ghost-filled South Dakotan. I am going to tarry in Watertown until Pentecost! We have experienced great moves of God and souls have been baptized in Jesus’ name and filled with the Holy Ghost. The reason there are so many adversaries is that there are many souls behind that open-door revival Paul talked about. We have only begun to see what God is able to do in our city and state. My prayer is that God will bless our church to bless our district. I want our church to be a church-planting church. We now have four licensed ministers in the Jesus Church of Watertown. We support seven missionaries and AIMers. We continue to increase in our giving to missions, to Christmas for Christ, and to Sheaves for Christ. Other denominations have abandoned these parts. For a while I was preaching at three Methodist churches because they had no one to fill their pulpits, but I was so busy I had to walk away from that. We are suffering here from the same problem Hezekiah faced in II Chronicles 29:34—“The priests were too few …” In South Dakota, as it was in Hezekiah’s time when there were not enough priests, there are not enough preachers. I am convinced that God is dealing with thousands of church planters, but for some reason they are not heeding the call. Many are called but few have good reception. “The priests were too few.” The church planters are too few! In those days, we had little wisdom, little money, no experience, no staff, and no people. The stakes were too high to be analytical. I was scared to be twenty-two and faced with the challenge of growing a church. What did I know? I was just a kid. Paul told Timothy, “Let no man despise thy youth” (I Timothy 4:12). But our problem today is many young preachers despise their own youth. I was determined to grow a church despite my youth. When I was twenty-two I had the privilege of teaching an attorney a Bible study in his office for five years. He was in his fifties, but he didn’t know the Bible. People don’t care about your age if you have the answers they are looking for. My heart is on fire for South Dakota. A revival is coming where people will hear of the magnificent work of God in the Dakotas. Exposure breeds a burden. Mark Brown is pastor of the Jesus Church of Watertown, South Dakota. He is also the South Dakota youth president. He is married to Jordan Brown. They have two children, Noah and Grace.

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

TIM BIZELLI

A Call to Home Missions n the mid-1800s, Louisiana, Missouri, was a premiere center for commerce. It was the agricultural hub of its time in northern Missouri. Located directly off the Mississippi River, this city developed a formidable reputation and became the home to business owners, including but not limited to farmers, schoolteachers, riverboat captains, furniture store owners, shipmen, fishermen, and ministers of several different Christian denominations. Louisiana, Missouri, experienced an economic blow when the railroad was built and routed directly to St. Louis. Before the railroad Louisiana was one of the foremost trade centers for Missouri, due to its favorable river access. By the early 1900s, Louisiana had a diverse economy because of the industrial revolution. Despite the implementation of the railroad Louisiana boasted a population of six thousand residents that were passionate for economic growth. The city was also passionate for more of God. This river city was also touched by the gospel of Jesus Christ, His death, burial, and resurrection according to I Corinthians 15:1-4. C. Emnuich, a minister from St. Louis, preached the first recorded revival in 1914. He preached Acts 2:38 to residents of Louisiana, and history records that Pally Burbridge, Jessie Kidson, and Wilford Eldon Kidson were the first to be baptized and filled with the Holy Ghost (Pentecostals of Louisiana Memoir). W.E. Kidson founded the Pentecostal church shortly after he received the Holy Ghost in 1914. Eldon Kidson referred to himself as a promoter of Pentecost (Louisiana Press Journal, 1978). This church was founded in a store building in Louisiana, Missouri. W.E. Kidson became the church’s first pastor. As pastor, W.E. Kidson formed a committee including Ben Blunt and James Wagner, which comprised the first board of trustees to hold office at the Pentecostal Church. By 1923 property was purchased at 501 Nebraska Street and a church was built. At the age of seventy-eight, W.E. Kidson told the Louisiana Press Journal that he had founded a Bible school at the Pentecostal 40

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Church located at 501 Nebraska Street. He said he had talented students who played instruments and preached God’s Word every Saturday night at the Planter’s Hotel. As many as four hundred people would fill the hotel’s auditorium to experience powerful moves of the Holy Ghost. W.E. Kidson reported baptizing forty-five or more in the Mississippi River during one service. He said over one thousand people watched in astonishment as he baptized new converts on the riverfront located off of Georgia Street (Louisiana Press Journal). Through the ministry of W.E. Kidson the Pentecostal Church Incorporated was established at his local church, and as it grew it moved to a large building off of South Carolina Street. W.E. Kidson was the managing editor of the Apostolic Herald that was already reaching across our nation and around the world. In October 1933, the first general conference of the Pentecostal Church Incorporated was held in Louisiana, Missouri (Apostolic Herald, 1933). Although W.E. Kidson was from the Louisiana, Missouri, area he moved with the Pentecostal Church Incorporated headquarters to their second location in Dallas, Texas, in 1934. After W.E. Kidson made his home in Houston, Texas, he traveled to Louisiana periodically to see the church and to renew friendships (Louisiana Press Journal, 1978). Since W.E. Kidson’s time the church has had the following pastors: Young, Giant, McDaniel, Samuel Latta, Lewis Mitchell, Hewitt, Cecil Cox, Martini, Eugene Wilson, Jim Richards, and currently Tim Bizelli. The Pentecostals of Louisiana have witnessed many Acts 2:38 conversions in almost every decade since 1914 to the present day. Many of the churches in Northern Missouri have been pioneered or heavily impacted by our church and its legacy. In the 1920s the church attendance was well over three hundred people—they had multiple service times. The Pentecostal Church was renamed the Pentecostals of Louisiana approximately three years ago. Though our church is no longer as big as it was in the 1920s (minus the Bible college), God is not finished with this town in Pike County, Missouri. In 2007, God stopped me as I was mowing

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925-1000 word article SUNDAY SCHOOL INCLUDING THE BIO.

According to the 2006 census Pike County has around 20,000 residents who need this gospel. Our ministry staff and I believe that God has a greater revival in store for this area than in times past. This message still works and has not lost its power, relevance, or efficacy in 2014. my yard and showed me a vision of prodigals making their way out of the hills of Pike County back to a Pentecostal church. This vision was before I was educated on the history of the Pentecostals of Louisiana. For six years I fought my calling to Pike County until I made up my mind in 2012 that I was going to start a church in a neighboring town of Louisiana in Pike County. Around this time the previous pastor, Jim Richards, was led by God to call me and I was voted in June 2012. I am currently the pastor of this wonderful church. In less than a year and a half we have reestablished midweek Bible studies. Our assistant pastor, Kevin Hearn, has established valuable contacts in the court system of Pike County and we have ten to twelve members attending a Life in Focus Drug and Alcohol program. Our attendance is growing and we have retained prodigal families and individuals. According to the 2006 census Pike County has around 20,000 residents who need this gospel. Our ministry staff and I believe that God has a greater revival in store for this area than in times past. This message still works and has not lost its power, relevance, or efficacy in 2014. Many people in this town have connections and ties to our church. God has a mighty plan for us. Our ninety-three-year-old building is being completely remodeled and our plan is to have the remodeling finished by March 2014. God has miraculously opened this door for our church to walk through. As we move ahead, we are planning to add to this church’s history. We want to leave a legacy of this precious truth that will last another one hundred years. I believe the vision God gave me will be fulfilled and that hundreds of prodigals and new converts will be saved.

BY STEVE CANNON

Phil Wagoner Children’s Evangelist 623 Young Street Paris, IL 61944 Cell Phone: (217) 822-7914 Home Phone: (217) 466-5375 Full Time Nature of Ministry:` • Storytelling • Object Lessons • Gospel Illusions • Puppetry • Sleight-of-Hand Comedy • Audience-Participation Action Songs • Balloon Ministry Subjects Taught: • Gadgets, Gizmos, and God • Whom Do Children Say That I Am • Teaching Children in the Present Day • Helping Children to Rise Above • Constructing Confidence in Your Children

Tim Bizelli currently works for Centerpointe Hospital, is founder of Turning Point Ministries (Turnptministries.com), and pastor of the Pentecostals of Louisiana Missouri.

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[MISSIONS IN NORTH AMERICA]

AYC Miami APOSTOLIC YOUTH CO

RPS

AYC Miami: The Blessed Experience S AVA N N A H F O LG E R AYC Miami was a life-changing week in many ways. Our group of thirty young people witnessed healings and financial blessings, and created inseparable bonds with each other. AYC Miami helped deepen my calling and gave me an understanding of where God is taking me on this journey called life. On Monday morning, July 22, I headed to the Atlanta airport for my first plane ride. I was excited to be going to Miami, but anxious to see what the following week was going to be like. I boarded the plane and prayed for God’s protection and a speedy flight. We landed two hours later in Fort Lauderdale. On the flight, I sat next to a kind gentleman. He told me about his family and his business, and asked me about the missions trip. I told him this was my first time flying, and he responded, “Well, then, I’ll look out for you because I would want someone to do that for my children.” As little as that may seem, that was my first miracle on AYC Miami. God sent an angel to watch over me and to help me endure a rough landing. Finally on the ground, he guided me to collect my baggage and I found the rest of the AYCers. Our first day in Miami was an exciting adventure! Mark Hattabaugh took us to his church, Pentecostals of Cooper City, to learn a few songs for the week ahead. We started with prayer, asking God to completely saturate us over the week and to perform miracles in the churches of Miami. On Tuesday night we went to a Jamaican church pastored by Donald King, and people welcomed us with open arms. One girl received the Holy Ghost that night. The other days, we ministered in Spanish churches. At Pastor Rene Rubio’s church on Wednesday, we could feel the presence of God the moment we walked 42

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through the doors. The hunger for God from those people was strong; people cried and poured their hearts out to God during the worship service. After the preaching, they all came back to the altar. We prayed for more than an hour, with tongues and interpretation. Sunday was by far my favorite day. Who doesn’t love spending all day in God’s house? We started off going to Pastor Santy Jimenez’s church—in a nightclub building. They told us they had to clean up from the party that took place the night before. Later that afternoon we went to Pastor Antonio Marquez’s church in a local high school band room. Their congregation responded in the worship service and after the preaching, we had two separate altar calls. It was apparent they desired to live for God and wanted nothing except the presence of the King. I believe chains were broken in every service. About ten people received the Holy Ghost. Trips like AYC Miami open your eyes and allow you to see life from a new perspective. I came into a much deeper dimension with God. It humbled me. It taught me the value of ministry and outreach. I was honored and privileged to have the opportunity to go on this trip. Our leaders, the McCoys, and our hosts, the Hattabaughs, will forever have a special place in my heart. I know God has mighty things in store for Miami, Florida! Savannah Folger is seventeen years old. She is a pastor’s daughter from Augusta, Georgia. She serves in her local church as a music director. This was Savannah’s first AYC experience in Miami, Florida.

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AYC Miami: Empowerment J A CO B M O N TA G Approximately twenty youth and young adults were called by God to Miami, Florida, to help the Ft. Lauderdale area experience revival. Many great things took place during the week. People receiving the Holy Ghost and public recommitments to be faithful to the church made the week miraculous. The participants of the trip were also changed, and to leave that part of the story untold would render it incomplete. My AYC experience began at Ft. Lauderdale International Airport as I was introduced to the other students involved in the trip. It was clear from this first meeting that everyone was there for various reasons, but we were all craving to see God move in ways we had not seen. After meeting Pastor Mark Hattabaugh (the king of hyperactive) and reacquainting myself with Pastor Brian McCoy, the Texas District youth president, we ate at a Cuban restaurant. We then went to Pastor Hattabaugh’s church, the Pentecostals of Cooper City, where we began to organize the week and prepare to minister. This afforded us the chance to pray and consecrate. On Tuesday morning we visited an alligator park to learn more about the area. We then followed up with shopping at a local mall and sharing meals, all the while growing closer together as a group. As the day came to a close we prepared to attend a Jamaican church, pastored by Don King, who is a kind and giving man. As we sang and ministered many lives were touched. God filled one person with the Holy Ghost and the church was encouraged by God’s presence. Wednesday we spent on a boat tour of upscale homes and Pastor Hattabaugh expounded on how money does not equate with peace or abundant life. That night we went to Pastor Rubio’s church and the power of God fell mightily. A man confessed his sins, rededicated himself to church, and proclaimed healing from diabetes. On Thursday we drove down to Key West, Florida, the southernmost point in the United States. After touring the area and enjoying each other’s company we had great church. God’s power swept over Pastor Gilbert Font’s church. By now the AYC participants had become best friends, enjoying and encouraging each other. On Friday, when we went to the Seaquar-

ium, we found ourselves visiting more than looking. The unity of the group was demonstrated by the cooperation during the talent show, which was a hilarious success. During the park service on Saturday several people received the Holy Ghost. It was inspiring to see the people connect with various pastors. On Sunday, we visited Pastor Jimenez’s church where God filled several with the Holy Ghost. In the afternoon, we visited Pastor Marquez’s church. Rhese Morgan preached, the youth responded, and there was a mighty move of God with many being filled with the Holy Ghost. On Sunday night we were refreshed by the church’s music and preaching of Luke Levine. The move of God was powerful; it was beyond words to describe. Our journey came to an end on Monday, July 29. It was difficult for us to say good-bye because we had formed deep bonds of friendship. There were tears from everyone as we had given each other unconditional acceptance and brotherly love. God changed my life and empowered me to do ministry because of this trip. My fellow AYC participants now feel like extended family to me. The week I spent in Miami was priceless. I may never return to an AYC trip because life moves on and responsibilities come, but I will never be the same. My life is richer and fuller because of God and the AYC experience. Everyone should experience an AYC trip if possible. I highly recommend it as a life-enhancer. Jacob Montag is twenty-one years old and serves as staff technician and drummer at The Jesus Church under Pastor Alvin Kight, sectional Hyphen leader of the Central Coastal Bend, South Texas District UPCI, and a founder of Aftershock Campus Ministries. This was his first AYC experience. FEBRUARY 2014

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[ P E N T E CO S TA L L I F E ]

No Hay in the Manger LORIN L. BRADBURY

“Where no oxen are, the trough (manger) is clean; but much increase comes by the strength of an ox” (Proverbs 14:4, NKJV). aving grown up on a farm in a northern climate where animals had to be housed indoors in the winter, I think this is a polite way of saying, “Where there are no oxen, the gutter is clean.” In other words, “Where there are no oxen, there is no hay in the manger and consequently no manure to shovel.” But if you want a future, you need the strength of the ox. If you are to benefit from the strength of the ox, it will require work, and at times, inconvenience. The title of this article has the ring of Christmas, but it’s actually about the importance of the next generation. All of the sources I consulted concerning this proverb described the importance of the care and humane treatment of animals. But this is a proverb, and as such it has nothing to do with oxen. Instead, it has everything to do with the perpetuation of our faith. One of the first things that comes to mind in the perpetuation of a society or a culture is the rearing and training of children. A society that is void of children has little future. So, to have a future, we must be willing to tolerate the less desirable aspects of childrearing, such as dirty diapers, sleepless nights, and fingerprints on the walls. If a church is going to have a future, it will have to tolerate, to some extent, interruptions in services by crying babies, and noisy toddlers who have not yet been properly disciplined. There will be frustrated parents who will miss portions of any given church service while ministering to their children. (Keep in mind that bringing children to church, teaching them how to behave in church, stepping out of the sanctuary to correct them, and learning to worship with one eye open is a ministry 44

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to those children.) How we value our children in the present makes a difference in what they become later. Jesus placed a high value on children. When some of His disciples tried to chase the children away from Him, he rebuked them and stated, “Let the little children come to Me, and do not forbid them; for of such is the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 19:14, NKJV). If the church is to have a future, children will be the key. We cannot squelch their enthusiasm for the things of God today and hope they will become examples of godliness eighteen or twenty years later. Instead, we must incorporate our children into whatever we are doing, including the life of the church. It is time for the church to speak of its teenagers as young adults and use them in the work of the church as greeters, ushers, piano players, and yes, even as preachers. “But much increase comes by the strength of an ox” (Proverbs 14:4, NKJV). “Where no oxen are, the trough is clean” (Proverbs 14:4, NKJV). As frustrating and interrupting as children may be, a church without children has no future. The hay in the manger (and the manure in the gutter) represents the work required to train and shape children into godly adults. Training a child is going to be work. Children can be taught to sit and behave properly in church. “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it” (Proverbs 22:6, KJV). According to Dr. W.A. Criswell, “The word ‘train’ (chanak, Hebrew) comes from a root meaning ‘to put something into the mouth’ or ‘to affect the taste’ and thus was used to describe the process by which nurses gave infants the food which they had prepared for them by their own [chewing]. A related Arabic word was used to describe the process of putting date syrup into the mouth of the suckling. Training goes beyond teaching or imparting knowledge to indicate molding the child into a behavior pattern”.

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A quick review of Scripture passages related to disciplining a child lets you know that at some point, and maybe many points along the way, much work will be required: “Chasten thy son while there is hope, and let not thy soul spare for his crying” (Proverbs 19:18). “Foolishness is bound up in the heart of a child; the rod of correction will drive it far from him” (Proverbs 22:15, NKJV). “Withhold not correction from the child: for if thou beatest him with the rod, he shall not die. Thou shalt beat him with the rod, and shalt deliver his soul from hell” (Proverbs 23:13-14). The key to training is expectation. If the church has no expectations concerning the behavior of its children, its children are likely to meet those nonexistent expectations. If a church expects and tolerates misbehavior, the children will likely meet those expectations. And if a church expects its children will grow up and backslide, there is a good chance they will. On the other hand, if we expect them to walk in truth, that alone increases the likelihood of them walking in truth. The children sitting on the pews with us today will be the leaders of the church tomorrow. But we must recognize that they are the church of today. Proverbs 14:4 is telling us that all the work and effort put into our children is a good investment. The “strength of an ox” refers to the dividends we can expect tomorrow from all the work put into our children today. Children are the hope of tomorrow and the future of the church. “Lo, children are an heritage of the Lord: and the fruit of the womb is his reward. As arrows are in the hand of a mighty man; so are children of the youth. Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them” (Psalm 127:3-5). According to the psalmist, the arrows you are forming and shaping today will become the medium for transmitting values into tomorrow. How straight and far those arrows go depends on the work that goes into shaping them today. What has just been said about children is applicable to all souls. The Lord desires to do more than just save people, or for them to remain mere infants or toddlers in the church. He wants those He saves to grow and produce fruit. It would be tragic for a Christian to always remain a spiritual infant. However, to grow into spiritual maturity, there must be teaching and training. The church can expect that much effort will be required to develop a saint of God. The process of growth is not always going to be neat and tidy. Mature saints must never be like Jesus’ disciples and drive the children (new converts) away. Instead, they should be excited that there are babies in the house; they should be excited that there are toddlers in the house; and they should be excited that there are teenagers in the house. The mature saints can assure new converts that they are welcome in the house of God and that God has a ministry for them. A barn is going to smell like a barn if there are oxen in it, and a church that smells like a museum is not the church Jesus intended. A growing church will always be in the process of confronting sin and repenting of sin. Consider and compare Paul’s two letters to the church in Corinth. When Paul wrote his first letter, he confronted them with these words: “It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and such sexual immorality as is not even named among the Gentiles—that a man has his father’s wife!” (I 46

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Corinthians 5:1, NKJV). But by time he wrote his second letter, the Word and the Spirit had accomplished their task—repentance. “For observe this very thing, that you sorrowed in a godly manner: What diligence it produced in you, what clearing of yourselves, what indignation, what fear, what vehement desire, what zeal, what vindication! In all things you proved yourselves to be clear in this matter” (II Corinthians 7:11, NKJV). “Where no oxen are, the trough (manger) is clean; but much increase comes by the strength of an ox” (Proverbs 14:4, NKJV). Children, both natural and spiritual, are the future of the church. We must make room for them in our churches and be willing to tolerate some of their immaturity as we lead them to maturity. It is going to require work. But we must attempt to see every soul from God’s point of view. The kingdom of God is about people—all kinds of people. They will require much work, but just as children properly trained grow into godly saints, the church’s future is in souls that are still in the rough. Forty years ago, J.T. Pugh, V.A. Guidroz, and J.R. Ensy (1973) authored a home missions study course that is as relevant today as it was the day it came off the press: When all the accounts have been settled after the final chapter of the living church is written in the climactic events of the end time, —When the church makes her appearance in Heaven to be dined and crowned by the Savior, —When the question answered by ‘Well done, enter into the joys of the Lord’ is asked finally, —Then we will all understand and know— …that our task of world evangelism was much more urgent than we considered, …that we waited too long to begin, thinking that centuries were stretched out ahead of us, … that we did not pray enough, care enough, give enough, go enough, … that we often let our great treasure, The Spirit and Truth, lie unused in earthen vessels (p. 3). Oh God, help us to see the treasure in earthen vessels. Help us to recognize that the smell of the oxen is a good smell. Lorin L. Bradbury is the pastor of the United Pentecostal church in Bethel, Alaska, and a licensed psychologist in private practice. He serves as the Alaska-Yukon district secretary and as the Northwest Regional NAMAC director. NOTE: This lesson was originally taught as a midweek Bible study at the United Pentecostal Church in Bethel, Alaska, on December 1, 2010. An expanded outline of the study is published in Starting Points, a compilation of fifty-two sermons, available through the Pentecostal Publishing House.

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Febru


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EVERY TUESDAY WITH CARLTON COON MISSION North America is a weekly webcast. Leadership training, preaching & teaching resources, evangelism strategies, and current church-planter events are featured. Tune in every Tuesday at NAMUPCI.COM Archives available on demand

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LAUNCH YOUR MINISTRY BY MARK JOHNSON

Pastor, I feel a call to ministry. How do I become a minister? was sitting this week with a young man who is pursuing a business degree but also feels God calling him into ministry. He asked, “How do you move into ministry?” I responded, “It is all about the process. You move through stages, and how quickly you move through those stages is up to you.” I would identify the stages as feeling the call, acknowledging the call, accepting the call, preparing to answer the call, and finally, stepping out in faith into the ministry. How do you prepare yourself for ministry? The answer to that question depends on what area of ministry you feel drawn to. An evangelist must have the ability to be led by the Spirit and preach to draw the lost; a pastor needs to preach, teach, and lead. A missionary needs to do all of that and also be able to blaze new trails for ministry, along with learning a new language and adapting to a different culture. Each ministry has varied educational requirements. Ask people you know how they moved through the various choices to get into ministry and what they did to prepare themselves. You might be surprised at the variety of answers you receive. Much learning is caught by being actively engaged. Ministry is both art and science. You can learn much about ministry by studying, but some things are learned best through the act of ministry itself. You can study extensively how to be an elementary schoolteacher, but if you never have tried to teach a class of six-year-olds, you could end up sounding like a teenager telling parents how to rear their children. I recommend Bruce Wilkinson’s book 7 Laws of the Learner: How to Teach Almost Anything to Practically Anyone to anyone going into ministry and wanting to stand up in front of people and teach them. Bruce Wilkinson teaches that what is learned is what matters, not what is taught. Starting from the learner’s per-

spective—their current understanding and abilities—will improve your ability to transfer information to the student. My advice to the young man mentioned earlier in this article included activating his ministry in concrete ways. As he gains experience he will improve his abilities. Following are some active learning opportunities that I recommended to him, but if you are interested in moving into ministry, please understand that this is certainly a very limited selection of the many opportunities available in every city. Active Learning Opportunities Home Bible Studies: Finding and teaching new people about the gospel is what ministry is all about. Camp Supervisor: Few things are more hands-on in ministry than being a church camp supervisor. You are with kids four to five days—when they are tired, happy, praying, and grouchy. Being a supervisor gives you ample opportunity to influence them for good and for practicing ministry. Prison Ministry or Juvenile Detention Center: Many youth and young adult correctional facilities need volunteers to teach and help residents learn life skills. Be aware that directors of these facilities are people who cooperate with the policies of the system. Avoid getting into an adversarial role with any incarceration facility. Their rules are for safety reasons. Learn to adapt and be flexible.

Sometimes it takes awhile to completely understand your calling. Don’t wait until you fully understand to begin activating your talents under the guidance of your pastor. Let him or her direct you because they know you best and have the interest of the Kingdom at heart. Proverbs 18:16 spoke to me when I was a young minister: “A man’s gift maketh room for him, and will bring him before great men.” If you develop your talents, doors will open for your ministry. No one tries to keep a great guitar player from playing when he is anointed. No one keeps great preachers out of the pulpit. There is plenty of room in the world for more pastors and evangelists. Many cities need a church, or a second church, or even a fifteenth church. There is room for church planters. General Superintendent David Bernard said, “Every city with over thirty thousand people ought to have a second church. We should work to have one United Pentecostal Church per thirty thousand people in every city in the country.” We have a long way to go before we reach that goal. God is calling men and women into the harvest field. If He is calling you, begin developing yourself. Find ways to minister to others. Today is the best day to move forward toward God’s future for you.

Mark Johnson serves as pastor of Life Tabernacle in Elkhart, Indiana. He is also the secretary of the Indiana District.

Youth Work: Develop a team approach to youth ministry. You don’t have to be the leader to help make your youth group fun and effective. Be an asset to your team. Don’t get lost in what you would do differently—that creates division. Work to fulfill the leader’s vision; make him or her better by picking up the slack. FEBRUARY 2014

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Letters to the Editor

God Does All Things Well The December editorial (“The World’s Most Wanted Words”) The World’s Most Wanted Words was insightful and inspiring. In the 2013 General Conference report I was disappointed to read a three-line reference to the message preached by Raymond Woodward on Thursday evening. I heard this comment: “We have never heard preaching on the Jesus Name Oneness message at a General Conference on this wise.” People around me were weeping and praising God, because this message was so profound. Hopefully, the editorial board has already considered printing Raymond Woodward’s message in a future issue. God bless you for your dedication and contribution to this fellowship. —Dwayne Christensen EDITORIAL

BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

through him. For if, when we were enemies, we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, being reconciled, we shall be saved by his life” (Romans 5:6-10). Swiss theologian, Karl Barth, was one of the most brilliant intellectuals of the twentieth century. A reporter once asked Barth if he could summarize what he had said in all his massive volumes on the meaning of life and faith. Barth thought for a moment and said, “Jesus loves me, this I know, for the Bible tells me so.” John said, “God so loved the world.” Not just a nation. Not just the good people. Not just those who love Him. An encyclopedia of meaning is packed into the little two-letter, one-syllable word so. So in this context means “to such a great extent, extremely, very much.” Augustine said, “God loves each one of us as if there was only one of us to love.” Love is more than a mere characteristic of God; love is the very essence of His substance, the core of His being, the reality of His existence. Jesus said, “I love you” on the cross, and He’s still saying it two thousand years later. God says, “I forgive you.” John said, “If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say that we have not sinned, we make Him a liar, and His word is not in us” (I John 1:8-10). The story of the woman caught in adultery is one of the most beautiful stories in the Bible. I was disturbed when I heard several years ago that this story was not in some of the early manuscripts. The omission of this real-life story is regrettable. I discovered the reason for its omission was that some of the post-apostolic church fathers were afraid its inclusion in the canon of Scripture would encourage adultery. How dare anyone gut the gospel of this redemptive story of forgiveness! Who has the right to diminish God’s gracious forgiveness? If we start down that dangerous road,

where do we stop? If we start editing out examples of mercy and forgiveness, it won’t be long before our own sin is excluded from God’s grace. The story of the forgiveness of the adulterous woman belongs in the Bible. God is “faithful and just to forgive.” Paul said, “All have sinned, and come short of the glory of God; being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus: whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God; to declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus” (Romans 3:23-26). I awoke one Sunday morning several years ago with the words, “the evidence of forgiveness” on my mind. Throughout the day I pondered the possible meaning of that incomplete sentence: “The evidence of forgiveness …” I asked myself, “What is the evidence of forgiveness?” I eliminated my own human feelings as the evidence that I have received God’s forgiveness. And then I eliminated human forgiveness as the evidence that God has forgiven me. Before the end of the day, I knew that the proof of forgiveness is the promise of forgiveness. John said, “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (I John 1:9). God says, “Supper is ready.” At the end of a long work day, the call to supper is filled with the promise of rest, food, and fellowship with those we love. As John wrote, “Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb” (Revelation 19:9), the child of God hears one of the world’s most wanted phrases and is thrilled with the promise of sharing supper with Jesus.

Till Christ Be Formed in You:

Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald.

DECEMBER 2013

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Spiritual Disciplines

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Editor’s response: Thank you for your email. Due to space constraints, the only General Conference sermon we publish in the Pentecostal Herald is the general superintendent’s annual general conference sermon. DVDs of sermons preached at the General Conference are available at upcimedia.com.

EDITORIAL

difference between praise and worship. In “What Does Worship Look Like? Sound Like” the author uses Psalm 150 as a blueprint for worship, but the chapter is referring to praise, not worship. Please understand I believe that enthusiastic praise is essential. How can we feel joy unspeakable without unbridled praise? But worship goes beyond praise and lifts us up to a closer relationship with God. I feel we are losing some of our most memorable moments in our communion with God when we forget how to worship. —Robert Downing

Count the Worshipers By Simeon Young Sr.

The Doctrine of God in Early Church History By David K. Bernard

Worship and the

I thoroughly enjoyed the November issue of the Pentecostal Herald. The articles concerning praise were thoughtfully done and effective. However, each article reflects a trend that is becoming more prevalent in our church services. Our churches are becoming less aware of the distinct

EDITORIAL

everal years ago Vital Ministry—a preacher’s magazine—printed the results of an unusual Gallup poll in which the participants in the poll were asked, “What word or phrase would you most like to hear sincerely uttered to you?” Here are the words people most want to hear sincerely spoken to them: “I love you”; “I forgive you”; “Supper is ready.” Vital Ministry said those words are “the most wanted words in any language.” Everyone needs to hear God speak those words. The gospel message is embedded in the world’s most wanted words. The gospel says the very things humans long to hear. God says, “I love you.” The gospel is first and foremost the grand message of God’s love. William Barclay said, “All great men have had their favorite texts; but [John 3:16] has been called “Everybody’s text.” Someone famously said this verse is the Mount Everest of the Bible. This northstar verse of the Bible points us to several crucial things about God and about salvation. For one thing, God took the initiative in our salvation. John said, “Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins” (I John 4:10). John also said, “God is love” (I John 4:8) and “We love him, because He first loved us” (I John 4:19). Our salvation started with God. Before a person takes his first halting, hesitating, faltering step toward God, God has already taken the first step toward him. John Wesley called this “prevenient grace.” Prevenient grace is grace that goes before any human action. Paul said, “For when we were yet without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly. For scarcely for a righteous man will one die: yet peradventure for a good man some would even dare to die. But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, being now justified by his blood, we shall be saved from wrath

The World’s Most Wanted Words By Simeon Young Sr.

The Doctrine of God in Early Church History By David K. Bernard

Meditation:

A Work of Gladness

In Jesus’ Name: The

General Superintendent’s Message December 2013 11-12.indd 1

The “Spiritual Disciplines” articles published in the December issue of the Pentecostal Herald challenge us to delve deeper and stretch higher, to gain that more sure ground while walking with God. Each writer described in a scholarly way what we can suppose will be expected of us, that is, if we aspire to attain that level of consecration the Lord desires for us. He holds a high standard. Blessings! —Peggy Jenkins

11/12/13 1:18 PM

I purchased a subscription to the Pentecostal Herald for my grandmother. I want to verify that this is not an electronic subscription only. My grandmother is eighty and though she has email, she may find it difficult to navigate thorough the online version of the magazine. Please let me know what our options are if this is an online subscription only. ­—Karen Edwards Editor’s response: Thank you for purchasing a subscription to the Pentecostal Herald for your grandmother. Subscribers receive only the paper version of the magazine unless they specifically request the online version as well.

Millennial Generation

All of Life Is

Worship The Pentecostal Life

> An Interview with Ken Gurley > God Does All Things Well

Send letters for possible publication to:

syoung@upci.org, brosser@upci.org, or Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road • Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299.

Letters may be edited for style, grammar, punctuation, or length.

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g the n i r u o p ‘new t a u o d s e i e h n t ly we ays of e r d u y l S r a … e y l e s.” er th g n a e n e i p l d r l a a u e c o r 46 e nd ere “I r a w , nuar y 19 s a s J e r , u e ld g a p r e a n lH tal p our to , Pentecosta s e l h u T , o n s Pentecos o r rspo on ou ’ e .T. Withe r i f W – f o touch

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NOVEMBER 2013

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Pentecostal Herald February 2014