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Profiles of the Young Church

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18 Keeping

Your Children in Church

22 Influencing the

Church of Tomorrow

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EDITORIAL BY SIMEON YOUNG SR.

The Day I Decided Not to Pray egular readers of this column know that I grew up in a Pentecostal preacher’s home. Dad and Mom taught me much of what I know about God and the Bible. Church attendance for our family was not an option—we attended church regularly. I was taught to read and study the Bible for myself, and we read the Bible together at our family altar. We also prayed together as a family. My parents prayed about everything. A trip away from home was always preceded by “a season of prayer.” And more than once an anticipated trip was cancelled after prayer because one or both of my parents sensed that we should not make the trip. As a child, I neither understood nor appreciated the value of my parents heeding those prayerful premonitions. But even though I had misgivings about my parents’ premonitions and cancellations, praying before leaving the house followed me into adulthood. As evangelists, Curtis and Dorothy and I (“The Young Evangelistic Trio”) always prayed before traveling to our next revival. And then after Janice and I married, I continued that same practice of prayer. But despite the fact that prayer before leaving the house has been a spiritual discipline all of my life, one day I decided not to pray. My decision was conscious … deliberate … intentional. I believe there is a significant difference between neglecting to pray and deciding not to pray. Neither, of course, is advisable. But deciding not to pray seems to me to be much more egregious than neglecting to pray. Alas, my decision on that fateful day was not to pray! Here’s the story of the day I decided not to pray. My wife and I were living in Houston, Texas, where I served at Stonewall Pentecostal Church as O.W. Williams’ pastoral assistant from January 1967 until January 1969. My schedule called for me to be in my office every weekday morning at a set time. Every morning as I was about to leave the house I would kneel and pray. But on the day

Despite the fact that prayer before leaving the house has been a spiritual discipline all of my life, one day I decided not to pray. My decision was conscious … deliberate … intentional. There is a significant difference between neglecting to pray and deciding not to pray. I decided not to pray, as I was in the process of kneeling to pray the words, Silly, that’s just a hangover from your childhood came unbidden to my thoughts. Unfortunately, I obeyed that impulse. I walked out of the house, got into our new Ford Galaxie 500 LTD (advertized as “quieter than a Rolls Royce”), and drove away. I had gone less than one block from our house when our brand-new car was rear-ended. The body and especially the frame of the car were seriously damaged. Even worse, I sustained an injury to my lower back that still causes me problems. The instant I was rear-ended I said to myself, Silly, you should have prayed. Was the accident a judgment from God? Or was it merely a coincidence? I’ll leave it to brighter minds than mine to answer that question. What I can say is at the very least if I had taken the time—even a few seconds—to pray that morning, I would not have been at the intersection when I was there, and thus I would not have had an accident. I am not suggesting, of course, that praying before we leave our homes assures us that we will never have an accident. But what I am saying is that it never makes sense to decide not to pray. The accident that morning was all it took for me to go back to what I had been taught growing up. A song that seems to have gone out of style nowadays comes to mind. The song conveys a biblical truth that will never go out of style:

What a Friend We Have in Jesus What a friend we have in Jesus, all our sins and griefs to bear. What a privilege to carry everything to God in prayer. O what peace we often forfeit; O what needless pain we bear, all because we do not carry everything to God in prayer. Because I decided not pray that day over four decades ago I forfeited hours and days and weeks of peace of mind. And to this day I bear the needless pain of lower back problems. Job said the wicked ask, “What is the Almighty, that we should serve him? and what profit should we have, if we pray unto him?” (Job 21:15). Perhaps James had those questions in mind when he said, “The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective” (James 5:16, NIV). After saying that, James cited Elijah’s (“a man with a nature like ours” NKJV) prayers as proof that prayer is both profitable and powerful. If indeed prayer is profitable and powerful—and certainly it is—then the decision not to pray makes no sense whether or not I wreck a new “Quieter-than-a-Rolls Royce” Ford Galaxie 500 LTD and injure my back for life. Simeon Young Sr. is the editor of the Pentecostal Herald. MARCH 2013

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PENTECOSTAL HERALD | MARCH 2013 Fundamental Doctrine

EDITOR

Simeon Young Sr.

The basic and fundamental doctrine of this organization shall be the Bible standard of full salvation, which is repentance, baptism in water by immersion in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ for the remission of sins, and the baptism of the Holy Ghost with the initial sign of speaking with other tongues as the Spirit gives utterance. We shall endeavor to keep the unity of the Spirit until we all come into the unity of the faith, at the same time admonishing all brethren that they shall not contend for their different views to the disunity of the body.

The One True God

PRODUCTION MANAGER Larry Craig PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Jina Crain CREATIVE DIRECTOR Abraham LaVoi DESIGN SUPERVISOR Tim Cummings GRAPHIC DESIGNER Laura Merchant ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Rebecca Miller PROOFREADER Patrica Bollmann The Pentecostal Herald (USPS-427-240) is published monthly by the United Pentecostal Church International, 8855 Dunn Road., Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. It is the official publication of the United Pentecostal Church International. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Pentecostal Herald, 8855 Dunn Road, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042-2299. ©2013 by United Pentecostal Church International. Web address: www.pentecostalherald.com Single Subscriptions (USA) $25.00 Single Subscriptions (Canada) $35.00 Single Subscriptions (Foreign) $44.00 Bundle Subscriptions (USA) $ 1.75 for 6 or more copies; $2.25 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Canada) $ 2.50 for 6 or more copies; $3.00 each for 2-5 copies Bundle Subscriptions (Foreign) $ 3.50 for 6 or more copies; $4.00 each for 2-5 copies

We believe in the one ever-living, eternal God: infinite in power, holy in nature, attributes and purpose; and possessing absolute, indivisible deity. This one true God has revealed Himself as Father; through His Son, in redemption; and as the Holy Spirit, by emanation (I Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; II Corinthians 5:19; Joel 2:28).

An international publication published monthly. VOL. 89, NO. 3. Periodicals postage paid at Hazelwood, Missouri, and additional offices. Official publication of the UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH INTERNATIONAL

Our Vision:

The Pentecostal Herald in every Pentecostal home

Our Mission:

To publish a Pentecostal magazine that strengthens the hands of Pentecostal pastors, encourages and challenges Pentecostal believers, and reaches beyond the doors of Pentecostal churches

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The Pentecostal Herald (or UPCI) assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of claims of advertisers or for the quality of their service or products.

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Letters to the Editor

GENERAL OFFICIALS

Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or to: Pentecostal Herald 8855 Dunn Road Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299.

GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT David K. Bernard* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Stan O. Gleason* ASSISTANT GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT Paul D. Mooney* GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER Jerry Jones* DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MISSIONS Bruce A. Howell* DIRECTOR OF NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS Carlton L. Coon Sr.* EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston GENERAL SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR Steve L. Cannon GENERAL YOUTH DIRECTOR Shay Mann SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Dan Batchelor

GENERAL PRESBYTERS

Customer Care Send subscription and renewal requests and inquiries to pentecostalherald.com or email Becky Miller at bmiller@upci.org.

Dennis L. Anderson, Elvin Anthony, G. Terry Brewer, Ronald L. Brown, Steven Carnahan, Steve D. Carrington, Brent Coltharp, Mike Conn, Carlton L. Coon Sr., Floyd E. Covill, Kevin Cox, Jack Cunningham, Steven D. D’Amico, J. Stanley Davidson, Devon Dawson, Dean M. Dickinson, Andrew Dillon, Alonzo Dummitt, David Elms, Daniel Fleming, Percel T. Graves, Ken Gurley, Billy Hale, John W. Hanson, Arthur E. Hodges III, Gary Hogan, Jerry T. Holt, David Hudson, J. Mark Jordan, Daniel McCallister, Richard McGriffin, Scott D. Marshall, Matthew Martin, Ronnie Mullings, Arthur Naylor, Gordon Parrish, John E. Putnam, David A. Robinson, D.R. Russo, William J. Singleton, Jesse Starr, Jay Stirneman, Rick Stoops, Robert Stroup, Melvin Thacker, David Tipton Jr., Jerry Tipton, David Trammell, H.E. Wheatly, Steve Willeford, C. Patton Williams, Richard A. Wittmeier, Raymond Woodson Sr., Chester Wright

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J.R. Blackshear, Ernest Breithaupt, W.L. Clayton, B.S. Cole, Daniel Garlitz, Arless Glass, John Grant, Tommy Hudson, James Kelley, Carrol D. Kennedy, Carl Lagow, Roger Lewis, R.J. McIntyre, John D. Mean, James Merrick, Paul Price, Paul Reynolds, J.M. Russell, Harry Scism, Scotty Teets, T.F. Tenney, B.J. Thomas, Wayne Trout, G.L. Vittitow, Ted Wagner, David O. Walters, R.D. Whalen, Jesse Williams, Jack Yonts * Member of the Executive Board

EDITOR IN CHIEF Robin Johnston

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ASSISTANT EDITOR

Lee Ann Alexander

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Columns

[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

3 | Editorial

Simeon Young Sr.

8

7 | The General Superintendent Speaks

10

David K. Bernard

Profiles of the Young Church Lee Ann Alexander

The Culture of the Young Church Tes Stewart

13 | My Hope Radio

Tiffini Countaway

14

17 | Faith & Culture

18

Keeping Your Children in Church—A Q&A Discussion Submitted by Jerolyn Kelley

Vance Bowman

28 | Letters to the Editor

22

29 | Worldline

Nick Seniour

37 | Multicultural Ministries Gholamreza Dehghani

41 | Sunday School

Pentecostal Life 26 | The Beautiful Day Explanation D  onna Myre 48 | Preserving the Family Brent and Rachel Coltharp

50 | A Challenge to Pray Every Day for at Least Twelve Minutes Anita Sargeant

Influencing the Church of Tomorrow Richard M. Davis

24

Bruce A. Howell

33 | New Start

Susanne Downs

Eugene Wilson

23 | Book Review

How Will the Church of the Future Look?

30

Church Assimilation Kent Elliott

Bible Study—Old Methods Still Work for a New Generation Ryan N. Franklin

34 When “Good Enough” is Not a Good Thing Nicole McCoy

36 Singing Old Favorite Hymns Without Guilt,

Conviction, or Discomfort

38 The Value of Youth in the Future of the Church Amber Huizar

42

Seek First the Kingdom S. C. McClain

46 My Conversion Experience Ey Ja Kim

MARCH 2013

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Coming Spring 2013

A NEW six-session small group resource from General Superintendent David K. Bernard

Other small group resources available now:

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7:30 AM

THE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT SPEAKS BY DAVID K. BERNARD

Launch Your Ministry veryone has a ministry. What is your ministry in your local assembly and in the body of Christ? Is it time for you to become involved or to expand your involvement in the kingdom of God? Some think that “ministry” is only for preachers, but the word ministry simply means “service.” Everyone in the body of Christ is called to serve—to serve God, to serve people, and to find places of service in the church. In the Middle Ages, the biblical view of ministry became distorted. The medieval church made a sharp distinction between clergy (religious professionals) and laity (everyone else). The clergy performed the work of the church, while the laity were mostly bystanders. Ordinary people did not read the Bible but depended upon proclamation by priests. Ordinary people did not confess their sins directly to God but confessed their sins to the priests in the so-called sacrament of penance. The Protestant Reformation caused a significant change by emphasizing the priesthood of all believers. Every believer has direct access to God through the mediatorial sacrifice of Jesus Christ. While the Reformation brought renewed emphasis on a personal relationship with God, many people still continued to think of a sharp distinction between clergy and laity. God does call some people to a special form of service—the ministry of proclamation, or preaching and teaching. This ministry typically involves a leadership role as well. Along with this responsibility comes spiritual authority. Thus Paul taught, “Let the elders that rule well be counted worthy of double honour, especially they who labour in the word and doctrine” (I Timothy 5:17). Those who hold leadership offices in the church are not the only ministers, however; they are not the only ones called to serve. Instead, their job is to prepare the other members of the church for service. “And He Himself gave some to be apostles,

some prophets, some evangelists, and some pastors and teachers, for the equipping of the saints for the work of ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ” (Ephesians 4:11-12, NKJV). God has given the church the fivefold ministry of apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors, and teachers to equip and develop all believers for service in the church. When everyone works together, fulfilling his or her role of service, then the body of Christ is built up. As a pastor, I wanted everyone who regularly attended our church to find some place of involvement and service. For leadership and public ministry, I asked people to implement biblical teachings of stewardship and holiness as examples for the entire church to follow. Even for those who had not yet made all these commitments, however, I still tried to find a place of service, for everyone needs to be connected and involved. Participation and commitment help people to grow into maturity. Therefore, I challenged our church to consider our unemployment rate. I asked the leaders of each age group from youth to seniors to consider their group’s level of involvement in the church. In society, an unemployment rate of ten percent is unhealthy. What about the church? In short, every local church needs to cultivate a culture of service (ministry), a culture of training (discipleship), and a culture of involvement (commitment). Discipleship is not just for new converts but for everyone. Ministry is not just for preachers but for everyone. Every member of the body has gifts and talents that he or she should exercise as part of the body’s operations. (See Romans 12:3-8; I Corinthians 12:4-11.) Different members have different roles and offices. For instance, all Christians should pray, study God’s Word, give financially, witness to unbelievers, and encourage believers, but some have special ability in one or more of these areas. If you are not a preacher, you still have a ministry. Do you have an active role in

your local church? If not, it is time to seek God in prayer, take inventory of yourself, and consult your pastor. It is time to have meaningful involvement in the church. If you are called to the preaching ministry, are you actively pursuing that call? If not, it is time to obtain the training you need, seek God for direction, and consult with your pastor. You should participate in some form of outreach, such as a Bible study, a home friendship group, an institutional ministry, visitor follow-up, or new convert care. Perhaps it is time for you to initiate or assist the launching of a preaching point, a daughter work, or a home missions church. If you are a pastor, are you expanding your ministry and are you training those whom God has entrusted to your care? If some in your church are called to preach, are you equipping them and encouraging them to pursue their ministry? Training tools are available at www.launchyourministry.com. As a first step, local churches can issue a “Christian worker’s license” for approved ministry under the supervision of the senior pastor. This level is often helpful and sufficient for those who need recognition for hospital visitation, jail ministry, and other institutional efforts. For those who are called to leadership and public proclamation, the next step is ministerial license with the United Pentecostal Church International, which comes by the endorsement of the senior pastor and approval by the district board. It is time to launch your ministry! We need every available worker for the endtime harvest. David K. Bernard is the general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church International.

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[LOOKING FOWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

Profiles of the Young Church LEE ANN ALEXANDER

n looking toward our future, the Pentecostal Herald surveyed eight young members of the church to find out what they believe lies ahead of us. Here’s what they said ….

NAME: KYLE MARTINCIC Age: 26 Location: Pana, Illinois Career: Paramedic/EMS educator Ministry Involvement: Preacher, support to the pastor, Sunday school teacher, worship leader On the future of the church: I am full of expectation regarding the future of Christ’s church. We have capabilities as never before to reach every nation and tongue. The future of the church is dependent upon individuals who have an immoveable love for Jesus Christ and an unshakable burden for lost humanity.

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NAME: CHANTELL SMITH Age: 30 (the new 20) Location: Athens, Georgia Occupation: Graduate research assistant, PhD student Ministry Involvement: Music, choir, Sunday school, nursing home On the future of the church: I see the church continuing to strive to reach people in creative ways, especially in the areas of community outreach and community service. Our generation has come to the realization that ministry truly begins outside of the four walls of the church. I also see the church becoming even more diverse and being able to meet the challenge of meeting the needs of people from all different walks of life.

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NAME: SARAH HENRY Age: 26 Location: Ada, Oklahoma Occupation: Call center representative Ministry Involvement: Music director, youth director’s wife, work in children’s ministry under the director, Sunday school teacher substitute On the future of the church: The Bible states in I Peter 2:9 that “ye are a chosen generation … ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light.” The world today has become dark spiritually, and as God’s chosen generation, we can dispel the darkness by letting His light shine through us at all times. I see the church becoming even stronger, mightier, and reaching more souls, simply because the darker the world is the brighter our lights will shine for Christ.

NAME: RICK PERRY II Age: 35 Location: Broaddus, Texas Career and Ministry Involvement: Evangelist, author On the future of the church: The church is to be as a bride that has made herself ready. The church, being prepared and ready, has a bright future—a future where we are ready for revival, ready for the harvest, and ready for whatever God has prepared.

NAME: CHRISEAN BOLLERS Age: 34 Location: Ocala, Florida Career: Law enforcement Ministry Involvement: Young adult minister, Hyphen leader, youth committee member On the future of the church: I see the future of the church with a more diversified church body. I have seen it in the church I have been attending for years now. The church body has become and continues to become more diversified in ethnicity, cultural background, and age. It has been a great thing to see how God has had His hand in this. I am reminded of the Book of Acts church where God showed that His Word was for everybody—not just a select few.

NAME: JARED MARCANTONI Age: 27 Location: St. Louis, Missouri Occupation: Architecture and planning professional Ministry Involvement: Guest care ministry On the future of the church: The ministry of Jesus consisted of spiritual teachings mingled with physical acts of compassion. I see the church continuing to meet the spiritual needs of its own members while increasingly showing God’s love to the larger community. I am very excited about some of the ministries already in place, and see incredible potential for the church to be the hands of Christ domestically as well as abroad.

NAME: ESTELLE PIÑON Age: 23 Location: Van Nuys, California Career: Nanny, student Ministry Involvement: Music and support in various ministries of the church On the future of the church: If we are not careful, there could be no future for the church. Building disciples and teaching the next generation (as well as my own) how to build a true relationship with the Lord is key. We cannot rely on religion alone.

NAME: BRANDON BORDERS Age: 23 Location: Norman, Oklahoma Occupation: Associate In Missions Ministry Involvement: Children’s ministry, pulpit ministry On the future of the church: I believe the church of the future will continue to be strong and vibrant as long as the upcoming generation realizes that the God who led our fathers and mothers will lead us. When the burden of leadership and ministry falls to the younger generation, it can be quite daunting. However, God anointed Moses and then He anointed Joshua. The church has not been led by talent or strength but by anointing, and the source of that anointing has never changed from generation to generation.

Lee Ann Alexander is the assistant editor of the United Pentecostal Church International. She attends The Sanctuary in Hazelwood, Missouri. Tim Dugas and Scott Graham are the pastors.

MARCH 2013

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[LOOKING FOWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

The Culture of the Young Church TES STEWART

n evaluation of our nation will confirm that we are living in the perilous times of which Paul warned. Our institutions appear vulnerable, crime and immorality are rampant, people are turning away from God, and what was taboo is now commonplace. Yet we have confidence that regardless of what happens there will be a triumphant church, a latter day revival. Jesus promised that the gates of Hell will not prevail against His church. There will be a vibrant church reaching, teaching, impacting, and spreading the gospel to the uttermost parts of the earth until Jesus returns. This bodes well not only for the church of today but also for the church of tomorrow. One of the church’s greatest challenges is managing inherent cultural shifts between generations. In many ways we are shaped by the sum of our experiences, evolving social realities, and rapidly developing technologies. The reality is that generational gaps are far more pronounced today than ever before, and the church must be equipped to address them. This not to say that there is not a timeless gospel, but the incredible cultural differences between those who wrote the gospel and those who live the gospel today illustrate the premise of this paragraph. One of the more critical responsibilities of the church is establishing a cultural climate in which our youth can be properly established and developed. This is critical to both the present and future health of the church. This culture must be relevant to our times but not dictated by our times. As our world drifts further into the perilous times, the discrepancy between popular culture and the Word of God continues to widen. Our approach must recognize popular culture enough to be pertinent, but resist popular culture enough to be effective. Understanding our new societal realities will be key. 10

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According to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, the number of Americans who do not identify with any religion continues to grow at a rapid pace. One-fifth of the US public (and 2011 North American Youth a third of adults under thirty) are Congress photo provided courtesy religiously unaffiliated today— of General Youth Division. the highest percentages ever in Pew Research Center polling. Thirty-one percent of respondents under the age of thirty said they doubted the existence of God, reflecting a fifteen-point increase in the last five years alone. The number of Americans who reject the Bible as the inspired Word of God is at an all-time high. To this point in our modern Apostolic church history, much of the Apostolic movement has been about taking those who were already religious to a great extent and simply adding greater revelation. There was already a level of Christianity and godliness to build upon. In past generations, the inherent belief in God, by extension, translated into an inherent belief in the man of God, the house of God, and the people of God. As we minister to generations that increasingly do not hold these beliefs, the paradigm has shifted and the opposite is true. Instead of us enjoying the luxury of having people believe in us because they believe in God, we are approaching a time when we will need to make people believe in us so they can believe in God. For the youth of today this requires genuineness. This generation is conditioned to question and reject social and religious institutions like none before them. But this is no cause for alarm because the Bible was inspired to reach people like that. A generation that rejects religious institutions will still respond to genuine encounters with God. I like to remind myself that religion is knowing a lot about Jesus, but relationship is knowing Jesus a lot. The culture that will attract and nourish the youth of this generation

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will ultimately be spiritual and organic. In other words, it will be Apostolic in the truest sense. The culture we create for our youth must be distinctive. It cannot be an adaptation or amalgamation of the cultures we are telling them they need to reject. We must remember that when young people in desperate situations reach out to the church, they are not looking for a variation of where they are—they are looking for an alternative to where they are. Our message must be clear. The Apostolic experience represents a transformation into who God wants us to be and not simply a modification of who we are. This speaks to the age-old struggle of the church as it seeks to reach young people whose culture seems foreign. An examination of this struggle reveals two common mistakes. Some churches react by attempting to avoid the cultures and people they fear or do not understand. This is a problem because it is an obvious negligence of our commission. Other churches make the mistake of attempting to become the culture to reach the culture. This is a problem because, while it may lead to winning young people to them, it rarely leads to winning young people to God. Being in the world but not of the world matters now more than ever. There must be a genuine passion to touch popular culture as well as a genuine conviction to not allow popular culture to touch us. In the evaluation of our methodology and youth culture we must remember what it means to label anything “Christian.” It has to mean

to be a disciple of Christ. We cannot follow popular trends and reduce being a Christian to being a generic adjective or genre. People today will be drawn to genuine Christians just like they have been in generations past. The younger generations are prone to reject conventional criteria and respond to any culture that appeals to them. The universal appeal of the urban culture is a prime example of this phenomenon in that it cuts across all traditional racial, socioeconomic, and cultural barriers. Similarly, the explosive, growing multicultural youth movement in the North American Christian church as a whole has demonstrated this in ways that can be of benefit to us. The key to success in the future will be in creating a culture within the Apostolic movement that can appeal and minister to young people of all backgrounds. Our youth leaders and pastors cannot be satisfied with simply co-opting and attempting to integrate existing cultures. Be creative. Allow God to lead you to become something unique. Young people who are looking for something genuine and distinct will respond and grow, and the church of the future will be secure. Tes Stewart lives in Houston, Texas, with his wife, Sheneka, and their son, Adan. He is an evangelist based out of Royalwood Pentecostal Church where Ron Macey is his pastor. He is also the son of veteran UPCI missionaries to Liberia, Albert and Tegeste Stewart. MARCH 2013

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MY HOPE RADIO BY TIFFINI COUNTAWAY

Three Minutes with Tim and Lana Chandler

ell us about your group. Our group consists of Tim, Lana, and daughters Tiffany (sixteen years old) and Lyndsey (eleven years old). We travel in the full-time ministry of singing and preaching from our home in Greenfield, Tennessee. We sing with a mix of soundtracks and accompaniment by Tim on keyboard and Lana and Tiffany on drum machine. Tim preaches and Lana exhorts. We are celebrating our twentieth year of ministry. What is the one thing that motivates your group to continue to travel and minister? We are fulfilling the calling God has placed on our lives. How do you keep your songs from getting old after singing them every weekend? The audience’s reception and response keep the songs fresh. It’s exciting to see how different crowds react to our ministry. Each church or concert setting is different and it adds variety to our delivery. Tell us a funny road story from traveling and singing. Lana fell up the platform steps at the Indiana camp meeting this past year. Tim’s keyboard fell to the floor in the middle of a song. Lyndsey’s mic cord fell out while singing. Several years ago we were singing at a church in Michigan. Our microphone stands had been left at the last church and didn’t make the trip with us. We borrowed stands from the church and Tiffany’s stand would not stay up. She was playing the drum machine, so both hands were busy. She had to stop playing, adjust the microphone, sing, and play again. This happened several times. Finally, someone came up and helped her at the end of the song. We have many more road stories.

What was and is the vision, purpose, and comprehensive message in your latest CD? The theme of our latest project, He Saved Me, brings forth a message of deliverance, faith, and salvation. The message of our song, “I’ve Cried My Last Tear” is about getting victory over the enemy. “This Time Tomorrow” speaks of faith that God can miraculously provide. What specific themes do you cover in your songs? Why? Our themes cover several areas, from the Cross to daily living. People need to hear a message about how to make it through today and not just the joy we’ll have when we get to Heaven. Many are living in horrible situations down here and they would just like to make it another mile. Do you write your own songs? We write most all of our own songs. Many times I get an idea, begin writing, and then get with Tim and tell him to start playing something on the keyboard. That’s how most of my songs come. Tim usually does his own songs with me putting in a word or two. Tiffany is also a tremendous songwriter. She wrote her first song at age seven. She wrote two of the songs on our latest project and is planning to record her own solo album by the end of the year. Also, my father gives me many ideas and I go from there. He gets credit for two of our title cuts from two projects: “He Will Come Through” and “He Saved Me.” What do you feel is the most rewarding aspect of your ministry? Seeing souls uplifted, renewed, restored, and receive the Holy Ghost for the first time. There is nothing more rewarding than praying with someone who receives everything they have been asking God for. Our ministry focuses on reviving and encouraging people; our motto is “Music and Ministry for Life.”

What is one of your musical dreams or goals you would love to see come to pass? We want to see our ministry expand to more than two hundred invitations each year.

Fun Stuff What would your group do with a million dollars? Pay tithes and give to missions. Then buy a bus, record a couple of more projects, buy a house, buy Tiffany a car, and hit a ton of discount stores! :o). If you had to change your band name, what would it be? The Chandlers What country would your group like to have a concert in? Australia What is one of Tiffany’s goals? Play the drums on an Indiana Bible College recording while she’s attending there in a couple of years. What is one of Lyndsey’s goals? To be a music director in Groves, Texas, after she finishes Bible college. Who do you want to send a shout out to? To all of our friends and family who pray for us and support our ministry. Where can we listen, purchase, and connect with your group? Readers can do all that by going to: timandlanachandler.com, Facebook.com/ timandlanachandler, pentecostalpublishing. com, Youtube, and Twitter@timlanachandler. Tiffini Countaway is the producer of MyHopeRadio.com.

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[FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

How Will the Church of the Future Look? SUSANNE DOWNS

remember my life as a ten-year-old girl. Each day, as the sun would rise I would walk across the icy grass to the paddock to milk the cows. They weren’t our cows. My parents were very poor and we worked on different farms milking cows, fixing fences, potato picking, or repairing barns. Whatever work there was my brothers and sisters and I were expected to help. In those early days, fear was my constant companion. Fear of doing things wrong, fear of the next beating, fear about the future, and fear of something worse. The cows seemed like my only friends. I often talked to them about my fears and prayed, asking God for help. As time went on, fear was overtaken by a determination to somehow have something better. I didn’t know then how it would happen, but now I see that God had a plan. Some years later I was invited to a Pentecostal meeting in a home. The very first verse of Scripture I heard spoke peace into my life: “I am the good shepherd, and know my sheep, and am known of mine” (John 10:14). The Good Shepherd! He knew my voice! Every prayer I had cried out to Him was heard! Something stirred in my heart—hope of something better. That evening I heard a message in tongues and the interpretation. Even though I did not understand anything of Pentecost and thought the family was speaking among themselves, when the interpretation came I knew God was speaking directly to me. It spoke of things about my life only God could know. Not long after this I was taken in by a loving foster family. My new parents pastored a United Pentecostal Church in Melbourne, Australia, and I had the privilege of being accepted for who I was, not what my past dictated. I was nurtured for the first time in my life, not only physically, emotionally, and mentally, but also spiritually. It was here I felt the call of God and understood God had a plan for my life. My foster family provided refuge and fertile ground for me to flourish in my calling. I had a hunger for all the things of God. Christian churches at that time were experiencing a Pentecostal awakening with a renewed passion for miracles, signs, wonders, and the moving of the Spirit. There were demonstrations of the 14

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spiritual gifts in the services and people were excited to see the evidence of the power of God in their midst. At this exciting time of my life I met the man who would become my husband. After marrying, we both felt the call of God on our lives, initially assisting my foster father in Melbourne before relocating to Canberra to take up the pastorate there. Today, after pastoring for almost thirty years, I see a church that is desirous for even more of God. Our church in Canberra is a multicultural church with people who are hungry for the things of God. This generation is not content with being told about the things of God, but rather desires to see, feel, and experience them. Because of this they are moving on to even greater things in God. I am at the stage of life when I have the joy to see my children and grandchildren saved and serving God and taking ownership of this precious gospel. The church of the future will be strong. I now find myself in an interesting season in my life. In looking to the future my husband and I are about to step aside as pastors of the church in Canberra. To our delight, the church board and the congregation have chosen our son, Jonathan, and his wife, Melanie, to continue in our place. Yes, I have mixed feelings. We have worked hard in this field. We have seen some mighty victories and deliverances. Will Jonathan and Melanie be capable? Will they be able to go the distance? Will they also be able to raise their children with a love for the ministry and church? I have come to the conclusion that, yes, they will do it. The church of the future has been born out of spiritual awakening, opposition, the Pentecostal experience, and a desire for more of the Word of God. This is fertile ground for a mighty move of God. The new generation will still proclaim the timeless message. I am aware

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Leonard Ravenhill said, “I am sick and tire of only reading about church history; let’s make some by the grace of God.” The same Jesus who came in power to an upper room and filled His disciples with His Spirit has not now left us to our own devices. Jesus is still alive and working. March 2013

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the church of the future will be different in some ways. Methods will change and I may not always be able to keep up with all the new methods. However, when I consider the future I realize the important role the older generation has in mentoring and supporting this current generation. Let us remember the warning we find in Judges 2. Moses’ generation that had experienced great deliverance had passed away. Joshua’s generation that had seen all the great works of the Lord had passed away. After them came another generation that knew not the Lord or the works He had done for Israel. We cannot afford a generation gap. When I think about the church of the future I see a church ready for battle. We are beneficiaries of unfulfilled prophecies, and I Timothy 1:18 calls us to war according to the prophecies which went before. When I think of the church of the future, I see …

In looking at the future of the church, I think of the words of Leonard Ravenhill who said, “I am sick and tired of only reading about church history; let’s make some by the grace of God.” The same Jesus who came in power to an upper room and filled His disciples with His Spirit has not now left us to our own devices. Jesus is still alive and He is still working in His church through His Holy Spirit. He still can do today what He did back then. Jesus will have a great church and the same power we read about in Acts 2 is promised to us and our children and the generations to come. Susanne Downs is the wife of John W. Downs, general superintendent of the United Pentecostal Church of Australia. She is the mother of Jonathan and Ruth and the grandmother of Sarah, Hannah, Lachlan, Olivia, Lucas, and Jessica.

• a church of mighty signs and wonders (Romans 15:19); • a church that has God’s Word hidden in their heart (Psalm 119:11); • a church of purpose and destiny (Jeremiah 29:11); • a church taking up the challenge (I Corinthians 15:58); • a church with a spiritual hunger for the real thing (Matthew 5:6); • a church with renewed understanding of the importance of mentoring (Psalm 71:18); • a church interested in a relationship with God (Daniel 11:32).

A Message from the Editor We have received so many requests for extra copies of the January 2013 issue of the Pentecostal Herald (“100 Years of the Jesus Name Message”) that we decided to publish a special centennial issue (undated) to be released at General Conference 2013. This special issue will contain all of the centennial articles from the January issue, plus all of the centennial articles from February 2013 through September 2013. We need to know how many copies of the special issue to print. If you are interested in receiving copies of this historic issue of the Pentecostal Herald, please contact our administrative assistant, Becky Miller at bmiller@upci.org. Or you may call her at 314.837.7300 (411).

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FAITH & CULTURE BY EUGENE WILSON

God-Centered or Self-Centered Culture? atastrophic events cause people to want explanations, and many people are willing to offer an answer. In response to the school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut, former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee was quoted as stating, “For 50 years we have systematically attempted to have God removed from our schools, our public activities, but then at the moment we have a calamity, we wonder where He was?” The reaction to Governor Huckabee’s statement was strong. While many sang his praises, many others, including some religious leaders, did not. Some accused him of having suggested God was not there with the twenty-six people who lost their lives at Sandy Hook. In response, Huckabee stated, “I’ve said some controversial things from time to time, but none which prompted such a backlash as when I stated that the horrific shooting in Connecticut of school children and teachers couldn’t be blamed on God because we’ve systematically marginalized God out of our culture by removing Him from all aspects of the public square.” Governor Huckabee continued, A specific act of violence is rarely the result of a specific single act of a culture that prompts it. In other words, I would never say that simply taking prayer and Bible reading from our institutions or silencing Christmas carols is the direct cause of a mass murder. That would be ludicrous and simplistic. But the cause and effect we see in the dramatic changes of what our children are capable of is a part of a cultural shift from a God-centered culture to a selfcentered culture. I believe Governor Huckabee is correct in maintaining that we are experiencing a cultural shift from a God-centered cul-

Rather than blame secularism, liberalism, consummerism, materialism, we need to get closer to God. ture to a self-centered one. He is also right in suggesting that a self-centered culture negatively impacts the way people live their lives. Huckabee went on to state, We have glorified uninhibited self-expression and individualism and are shocked that we have a generation of loners. We have insisted on a society where everyone gets a trophy and no one loses and act surprised that so many kids lack self-esteem and feel like losers. We dismiss the notion of natural law and the notion that there are moral absolutes and seemed amazed when some kids make it their own morality to kill innocent children. We diminish and even hold in contempt the natural family of a father and mother creating and then responsibly raising the next generation and then express dismay that kids feel no real connection to their families or even the concept of a family. We scoff at the need for mothers and fathers to make it their priority to train their children to be strong in spirit and soul and responsible for right and wrong and exalt instead the virtue of having things and providing expensive toys, games, and electronics that substitute for parenting and then don’t understand why our kids would rather have ear buds dangling from their ears, fingers attaching to a smartphone, and face attached to a computer screen than to have an

extended conversation with their family at dinner. And we don’t teach them there is a Creator God who sets immutable rules, a God who is knowable, and to whom we are ultimately responsible. Instead we teach that God was not involved in our origins, that our very lives are biological happenstances and in fact are disposable should they be inconvenient to us, and that any outrageous behaviors are not sin, but disorders for which we should be excused and accommodated. Unfortunately, many people fail to recognize subtle shifts in culture. As Christians, it would behoove us to be aware of what is taking place. It is also important that we understand how easy it is for us to be negatively influenced by our culture, and resist it. This is the message Paul was conveying in Romans 12:2. We are not to be conformed to this world. We are not to allow this world, the way it thinks, its values and mindsets, to become ours. Instead, we are to be transformed by the renewing of our mind. We are to think differently. Finally, rather than blame secularism, liberalism, consumerism, materialism, or any other ism for the present state of our culture, perhaps we would be better served by getting closer to God. If we will humble ourselves, pray, seek His face, and turn from wrong, God promises to forgive us of our sin and heal our land (II Chronicles 7:14.) Eugene Wilson lives in Olive Branch, Mississippi.

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[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

SUBMITTED BY JEROLYN KELLEY

Keeping Your Children in Church— A Q&A Discussion

ooking over the program for the 2012 Nordic General Conference, I was intrigued by a panel that was scheduled to deal with the subject of keeping your children in church. I assumed this would be formed by a panel of parents, but to my surprise it consisted of six outstanding young people. Some of these young people were from church members’ homes and some were from preachers’ homes. As we listened to the discussion some profound answers came forth. I was impressed with the quality of these young people who came from Sweden, Norway, and Finland. They have a firm grip on their walk with God and have been well established in the faith by things their parents did right. Their lives have not been a bed of roses, but because of the good foundation that has been given them by their parents they are strong and stable Apostolics. Following are the questions and answers that came forth in the discussion:

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All parents would like to know how to keep their children in church—how not to lose their faith. What would you say to parents are the most important things they can do? It starts with parents and their personal relationship with Jesus. Parents need to have a prayer life and their kids need to see them pray, read the Bible, live the gospel, and not be a hypocrite. Parents should demonstrate their love for Jesus and portray that living for Jesus is a joy, not a burden. It is very important to be faithful and committed to your church. Attend each service and don’t leave your children at home. Never leave the children the option of staying home from church. As long as they are fed and have a roof over their heads in your home, they need to abide by your rules. Only speak positive about your church, the saints, your pastor, and the leadership. Your children will not respect spiritual leadership in their lives if you constantly criticize and speak negatively about your pastor, the way he/she preaches, and their manner of operating the church. Even if you get hurt by someone in the church or your pastor, don’t share it with your kids. Rather

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It starts with parents and their personal relationship with Jesus. Parents need to have a prayer life and their kids need to see them read the Bible, live the gospel, and not be a hypocrite.

take it to the Lord and He will help you forgive. Kids who hear their parents constantly criticize or belittle spiritual leadership will have great difficulty allowing a spiritual leader in their lives as adults. Make Christ the center of your home and allow Christian values to be the driving force in your home. Have family Bible studies and family prayer time. Talk about the things of God, what He is doing, your testimony, Scripture verses, and so on. Engage your children in these conversations and encourage them to talk about Christ, the Bible, and what great things Jesus is doing Cultivate a strong relationship with your kids. Get interested in what they are interested in. Don’t expect them to enjoy your hobbies. If they aren’t interested in what you like to do for fun, find out what they like and participate in that activity with them on a regular basis. Your kids are bombarded with the false answers on life issues, their origins, the meaning of life, why we are here, and how to live. Their friends, their school, and the media bombard them with answers that are anti-biblical. You have the correct answers in the Word of God. If you want to provide your kids with these life-saving answers, you first want your kids to come to you

with their questions and thoughts. In order for this to happen, you must invest in spending time with them. You can’t always push the correct answers on your kids. There are situations where they will have some deep and serious questions. If your relationship isn’t strong and if they don’t feel they can come to you with anything— even uncomfortable questions or questions you may not know the answer to—they will go to their friends and other places that will provide them with the wrong answers. Your children need to know that you love them no matter what. Your love should not cease when they disobey you or even if they should backslide. If you reject them when they fall into sin, how will they believe the grace of God is enough for them? If you are not demonstrating unconditional love and grace to your children that Christ has bestowed upon you, then you may be the greatest hindrance to them ever coming back to the Lord. Live what you preach! You can show and live out unconditional love and grace without compromising the truths about living righteously and in a way that brings honor to Jesus. Emilie Smith (P.K. and pastor’s wife) Stockholm, Sweden MARCH 2013

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How have you managed to stay focused on God and the church in a time of so much disturbance and temptation? There is not just one answer to a question like this. Contrary to what people might believe, the solution doesn’t come when the problems arrive as teenagers. Problems start much earlier. I grew up learning that I needed to develop my own relationship with God. From a very young age, I knew that I needed the Holy Ghost. I needed to be baptized. Every day we prayed that I would get the Holy Ghost. It was never a question of if; it was when. A child is not too young to hear God’s voice, to receive the Holy Ghost, or to understand. I received the Holy Ghost and was baptised when I was six. I’m going to make a confession that I believe all kids who have grown up in church will agree with. My mom always made us do devotion before we left for school or wherever, and sometimes I didn’t want to do the same thing we had done the day before and the day before that. However, as I grew older I learned to appreciate a day-today relationship with Jesus—not just a relationship on Wednesdays and Sundays. It also helped me develop my own relationship with God. When the temptations and disturbances started to arrive, I knew to put God first. My mom always told me, “What keeps you from church keeps you from Heaven.” If I had to choose between church and a birthday party or some other activity, there was never a question what I would choose. Basically, what I’m trying to say is, “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it” (Proverbs 22:6). Miriam Hvass Kristiansand, Norway What was the most important part of your upbringing that caused you to stay in the church? A lot of answers could be given, but I feel certain things were foundational and essential to staying in church. To properly answer the question, I must share insight as to where I’m coming from. I must admit that I have made a lot of mistakes and had phases of rebellion and struggle, perhaps even more so than some young people. However, I never had a desire to leave the faith. I think there were some things that were key to this. You can divide it into two categories: love and fear. From a young age, I learned to love God, love the truth, love the church, and fear my pastor’s wife (smile). Seriously, from a very early age, I was taught to love God and was told that I could know Him and get the Holy Ghost. At seven years of age, I already understood what this meant and received it.

I cannot emphasize enough how important I think it is to have kids understand this. Teach your children at home. They need to hear the truth at home. Our house was filled with an atmosphere where it was natural to praise and worship. We didn’t leave that at church. We sang, praised, prayed, and even danced at home. I remember as a young boy crying in the presence of God. As a result of feeling His Spirit even at home, it stayed with me. I was taught the truth at church and at home. I was taught how to know Jesus and what He wanted for us so I could obey Him. I was taught what was right and wrong and was educated not only about rules but about principles and consequences. Though I had my problems and struggles, I never wanted to leave truth. That was never an option in my mind. I loved Jesus too much to ever want to leave Him. The Holy Ghost was the greatest feeling ever. The body of Christ was what I wanted to be connected to. By example, teaching, and instruction I was taught to love God and want the Holy Ghost, love the truth passionately, and seek to live by it. I knew it was not only right, but it was best for me to love the kingdom of God and the church. Alexander Hvass Kristiansand, Norway How much has fellowship with other youth meant to you? When I look back, I realize that fellowship with other youth has meant a lot to me. It is important for youth to have a safe place—a place where they can be themselves and where people understand them and their views. When I first started to attend our youth group I was the youngest one in the group, which meant that the other youth had to take care of me. This gave me the opportunity to have the older youth as role models. It is vital for youth to have a role model or someone to look up to in church. If they don’t have that, they will find role models elsewhere. The older youth helped me to find my place in church. They helped me to get involved in church and God’s work. Aaron Davis Oslo, Norway How do you feel that questions and pressures from outside have influenced your choices? I believe the questions have made me stronger. If you’re not challenged in your faith, it’s easier to fall away. It is one thing to believe in how God created the world, but what happens when someone

It is the earnest desire of every God-fearing parent that his children will walk in truth and holiness. I believe it is very important throughout life to guard our children’s friendships and relationships. We cannot control our adult children; however, we can guard their friendships and relationships with prayer. 20

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says we’re descendants of the apes? The pressure helps us get a depth in our faith and it also helps us understand it. The most important part of this pressure and the questions that come is that it helps us learn to defend our beliefs. You cannot defend something if you don’t know what you believe. Aaron Davis Oslo, Norway

parents and my pastor, because if I had not received that early training, I wouldn’t be where I am today. Candace Alphin, M.K./AIMer Helsinki, Finland

In our movement, we are known to put a lot of emphasis on the Word of God. How can you say that this has helped you stay in the church?

Respect is the most important thing to have in a relationship with your parents. It is one of God’s commandments and something we have to follow. For those who have parents who are not in the church and find yourself in a situation where you do not agree with choices they make, you should talk to your pastor to get advice on what to do. It is always good to be in communication with your pastor, for he is the man of God and can help you when you do not know what to do. Whatever outcome you have in your life, always be respectful! My dad is my pastor, and I always talk to him if there is a choice to make in my life. My dad’s opinion means a lot to me and I will always respect that. Also, prayer and fasting are very important in any choices I make. Charlotte Andreassen (pastor’s daughter) Oslo, Norway

I believe that it has helped me immensely. Proverbs 22:6 says, “Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.” I grew up in the church; I received the Holy Spirit and was also baptized at four years old. When I was a child, my parents led a kid’s Bible study class every Wednesday at our church. We were taught Bible doctrines and principles in a way that we, as small children, could understand. I believe that it is such an important matter for a child to understand why. I am a very persistent person and I’m also very curious. I want to know why and how things work. I’m not afraid to ask and will not stop asking until my question is answered. Many people in my generation, and the younger generation, are like that, I believe. We want to understand. I believe that my understanding has helped to ground me in God. When I think of why we do what we do, they are not rules to me. Outward and inward holiness, fruit of the Spirit, respect for the elders, obeying the Ten Commandments . . . I do not look at these things as rules. I know that when I do these things, it pleases God. That is what I want to do—please God because I love Him. This is all because of the training I received when I was young. Because I understand why, I am willing to do it in praise to God. In Bible times, the Jewish children were taken to the Temple at an early age to learn God’s commands. By the time they were in their early teen years, they had memorized the entire Torah. Yes, Israel messed up a lot, and there were some that fell away. However, those who had taken the time to place God’s Word in their heart never wavered. Even with all their mistakes, they realized that children needed to learn and understand God’s Word. Psalms 119:11 says, “Thy word have I hid in mine heart, that I might not sin against thee.” This is the key: if you do not take God’s Word and place it in your heart, you will surely fall away. The Bible and His Spirit go hand in hand. You cannot have one without the other; they create the perfect balance. If you do not have God’s Word in your life, you might as well not have a relationship with Him. Is that harsh? Yes, but it’s true. The Bible is our guidebook; it is our map to Heaven and an eternal life with God. Psalm 119:105 says, “Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.” When we follow God’s Word, we are on the right track. Even better, when we combine the Bible with God’s Spirit and God begins to work through us, we become an unstoppable force. Parents, if I can leave you with one thing, it is this: Teach your children God’s Word. Children are never too young to learn about God. Most important, help them understand His principles and work to cultivate within them a desire to please God. It is not enough to tell them they need the Holy Spirit and they need to be baptized. They also need to understand why. They need to understand that this is serious. Salvation is a serious thing, and we must make sure this generation and the next will be saved. I am incredibly grateful to my

How do you balance the making of your own choices and have parents who have been strict?

It is the earnest desire of every God-fearing parent that his children will walk in truth and holiness. I believe it is very important throughout life to guard our children’s friendships and relationships—even with relatives. I realize we cannot control our adult children; however, we can guard their friendships and relationships through prayer. Nothing or no one can stop the effectual, fervent prayers of parents! It has been said that our children are the only things we can take with us to Heaven. May all parents realize the solemn responsibility and put into practice a lifestyle that will cause their children to want to imitate them. Imitation is the highest form of a compliment. No doubt you can think of some children you know who are saved because of their parents. Don’t ever let it be said of your children that they are saved in spite of their parents. Our children and grandchildren are the greatest treasures we have!

Jerolyn Kelley and Robert Kelley have been missionaries for twenty-nine years. Robert Kelley is the area coordinator for Northern Europe. The Kelleys’ children and grandchildren are involved in the ministry.

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[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

Influencing the Church of Tomorrow RICHARD M. DAVIS

y wife was raised in the home of an Apostolic preacher. Her father pastored Pentecostal churches all her growing up years. The nuances of being Pentecostal are the only thing she has ever known. I, however, was not raised in the Oneness movement. I received the Holy Ghost in 1969 shortly before my sixteenth birthday. Becoming Pentecostal was a dynamic change for me. Having been raised in a conservative, denominational church, I certainly loved the Lord and was serving Him in the way I knew at that time, but the Pentecostal experience opened an entire new vista previously unknown to me. Everything in my life changed, and I embraced it all enthusiastically. I gladly accepted the biblical doctrines of the church, including holiness standards, though I had never given them much thought. I went on to study for myself the Apostolic doctrines so I could be confident in my newly adopted beliefs and lifestyle. Clearly, much has changed in the culture of the Pentecostal church over more than forty years. In contemplating the many cultural changes the church has incurred, consider the change in the way we sing worship songs in our church services. Back then, we sang mostly from the Pentecostal Praises hymnal; today, we often sing contemporary praise choruses from a projection screen. From knowing by heart the words of every song we ever sang, as well as the page numbers in the hymnal, we have moved into a cultural time in which sometimes we do not even know the songs we are singing. Times and cultural practices change. If our church culture has changed over the past forty or fifty years, does it not stand to reason it also will change over the next half 22

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century, if the Lord tarries? Clearly, as Francois de La Rochefoucauld stated, “The only thing constant in life is change.” My concern is not so much as to whether the church of tomorrow will change; it will. Rather, my concern is how we may best positively influence and shape the changes that will come to the church of tomorrow. The best way I know to shape and influence the future changes of the church is to provide sound, systematic, biblical, apostolic teaching in the church today. Someone has said, “We have what we preach.” May I add to that, “We have what we teach”? If we cease to teach the Apostolic doctrines of Scripture, we eventually will lose the Apostolic message and practices. We must teach our people regularly, biblically, and systematically. “We will not hide them from their children, shewing to the generation to come the praises of the Lord, and his strength, and his wonderful works that he hath done. For he established a testimony in Jacob, and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers, that they should make them known to their children: that the generation to come might know them, even the children which should be born; who should arise and declare them to their children: that they might set their hope in God, and not forget the works of God, but keep his commandments” (Psalm 78:4-7). This strong conviction is one reason I have spent three decades of my ministry involved in producing Sunday school curricula for our Apostolic people. I firmly believe we must teach those things we desire to see replicated in our children. It must happen in the home, and it must happen at church. If we expect Apostolic results, especially long-term, we must plant the seeds of Scripture both through Apostolic preaching and teaching. Richard M. Davis is the editor of Word Aflame Publications, which produces Sunday School curriculum for the United Pentecostal Church International..

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BOOK REVIEW BY VANCE BOWMAN

Amazing Grace

William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery By Eric Metaxas illiam Wilberforce’s life spanned the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It was certainly an uncommon life. Elected to the House of Commons on September 11, 1780, Wilberforce, a gifted orator, sat for the first time as a member of Parliament on October 31 of the same year, at the ripe old age of twenty-one. That day was the first day of a marvelous, worldchanging career. Eric Metaxas has captured the epic life and awesome impact of William Wilberforce on the world in an excellently written biography, Amazing Grace. From his privileged birth to his amazing conversion to his extreme passion for the abolition of slavery, Metaxas eloquently pens the words that describe Wilberforce’s remarkable life. In order for things to change, someone had to stand up for those who could not stand up for themselves. The world in the days of William Wilberforce was an extremely cruel world. It was a world where thousands upon thousands of slaves were bartered for, sold, and transported on hellishly cruel slave ships. The slaves would arrive on the shores of the West Indies to be belched out of the belly of those ships, if they survived the voyage, only to work their lives away on sugar cane plantations. Death was usually very cruel, and often very swift. As I read Metaxas’ description of the condition, treatment, and end of millions of slaves, I was moved, even changed. How could any sensible human beings allow such evil treatment of other human beings to be carried out? How could they possibly condone these actions? How could their consciences tolerate the knowledge of such cruelties? The answer is summed up in two words: spiritual apathy. England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries had experienced a spiritual awakening. But by the mid-eighteenth century, their religion had slipped into a ritualistic

form that allowed people to be Christian in word, yet not in deed. It was a time in which almost everyone belonged to the church, but few truly belonged to Christ. Metaxas, and history, paint into this spiritually apathetic world young William Wilberforce. He would, as a young man, be very much a member of this society, his actions and attitudes conciliatory with its thinking, but something happened to him. Metaxas calls it “The Great Change.” In October 1784, Wilberforce embarked on a journey to spend the fall and winter on the French and Italian Rivieras. His companion on the trip would be a behemoth of a man by the name of Isaac Milner. Wilberforce stood just over five feet and had the torso of a child. These two men who were strikingly different in stature found something in common. On one of their trips that winter Wilberforce picked up a copy of a book by Philip Doddridge titled The Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul. The subsequent reading and discussion of Doddridge’s writings by Milner and Wilberforce would begin a great conversion in the life of young William, and he would never be the same. Here is a short excerpt of Metaxas’ words concerning this great conversion: He seems to have wanted to know what was true, but until now had been unable to find out to his satisfaction. He knew if he discovered a truth to his satisfaction he would have no choice but to embrace it and act upon it. Just as he wouldn’t sign the paper assenting to beliefs he didn’t hold, he knew that if he held a belief he would be obliged to act upon it, and not just in small and isolated instances, but in all his life. He knew that the tiniest mustard seed can grow and grow and become a tree in which

the birds of the air make their nests. Ideas have far-reaching consequences, and one must be ever so careful about what one allows to lodge in one’s brain. Now, as the conversation with Milner continued, Wilberforce could almost see the birds of the air looking domestically in his direction. Wilberforce was blessed by God to have amazing connections. He was a great friend of William Pitt (the youngest prime minister in English history) and John Newton the writer of the song Amazing Grace. Wilberforce also corresponded with and met John Wesley; an outstanding letter of encouragement written by Wesley to Wilberforce is in the book. The crowning achievement of Wilberforce’s life was the abolition of the slave trade in England. Metaxas describes this penultimate event so outstandingly and with such clarity that I almost felt as if I were there. Tears filled my eyes and coursed down my cheeks as I read of the final tally of votes on that historic day. After twenty years of putting forth a bill for the abolition of the slave trade—year after year being defeated—it finally passed by a vote of 283-16. At that moment Wilberforce was “awake inside his own dream.” Amazing Grace, William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery is the story of a man who changed the course of history, a man who was a hero to Abraham Lincoln, a man who was a servant to humanity. All civil rights heroes stand on the shoulders of William Wilberforce. If you love a heroic tale, you’ll love this book. Vance Bowman serves as the pastor of the United Pentecostal Church in Shawnee, Oklahoma. MARCH 2013

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[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

Church Assimilation KENT ELLIOTT

n 1998, God allowed us to build a new 8100-square foot facility. It was a BIG deal for us. After overcoming many obstacles that come with any new building project there was a collective sigh of “we have arrived.” For the previous twenty-five years Faith Tabernacle had been in the same building. Our new building was so “BIG”! Why wouldn’t we want to stay there forever? We were overwhelmed with space. In the beginning we barely filled up half the sanctuary. What could be done to shake the mindset of contentment? What would stir up a passion to continue reaching for the lost? It took almost two years, but the passion was caught and revival began to happen. We began to see a tremendous growth and an influx of new converts. At this point the challenge before us was to retain the people who had just experienced the new birth. It was at this time I felt to have Art Schnitzer come to our church to speak on outreach and teaching home Bible studies. Art was an important part of the outreach in the church I had grown up in. He made one statement that weekend that I will never forget. “God will not send you anyone if you will not be a good steward of their soul!” My perspective and thinking changed that day. Almost immediately I began to establish a process to disciple everyone who walked through our doors. On June 26, 2010, we again moved, this time into our current facility of 24,700 square feet. Before we even stepped through the doors we began to think of how we could improve our strategy of assimilating people. Learning from the past, we knew we had to be ready for another wave of new souls. We didn’t want to be unprepared to disciple and retain each individual. We are constantly looking at our process and how to improve it. One book we found was Fusion by Nelson Searcy. This book played an integral role in enhancing our assimilation process. Following are overviews of our assimilation processes:

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Guest Process: 1. Each first-time guest receives a bright red bag (this is code for our members to attack with kindness) with a letter from the pastor and a branded coffee mug. 2. Sunday bulletins have a connection card insert that the entire church fills out. Not just our guests but every faithful member as well. (This helps us take attendance). • We retrieve the basic information plus ask if they are a first-, second-, or thirdtime guest or a regular attendee. • On the back of the card are check boxes where there are action items regarding the sermon, or where they can request information on volunteering or home Bible studies, and write prayer requests. 3. On Monday morning, our volunteer team springs into action. • Emails: first-, second-, and third-time guests receive scripted emails Monday mornings. • Note cards: first-, second-, and third-time guests receive handwritten note cards on Thursday. Inside the first card is a five-dollar Dunkin’ Donuts gift card. (This goes with the coffee mug they have already received). Inside the second card is a five-dollar Subway gift card. These are just small tokens for them to remember us by. • Surveys: Each email that goes out has a survey for them to tell us about how their experience was as a guest. • Missed you letter: If a first-time guest does not return for four weeks they receive a follow-up letter from the pastor. Connection cards are a key piece of communication for our staff. The questions that are asked on the back of the card help us move people to the next assimilation level. Some questions asked:

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• Would you be interested in a personal Bible study? • Would you like more information on receiving the gift of the Holy Ghost or being baptized in Jesus’ name? • Are you interested in volunteering? These questions help us identify individuals who maybe did not respond at the altar call and follow up with them. They simply might be new to Pentecost and full of questions. If they respond with a yes regarding a Bible study or more information about the new birth experience, their information is forwarded to the appropriate pastor who follows up with them the same week. Discipleship Process A personal Bible study is the first step of our discipleship process. Once a person is in a Bible study, he or she can enroll in our discipleship process consisting of eight classes over a five-semester period. Our full discipleship process takes about three years. We are intentional when it comes to the length of this process. We do not want to rush anyone through. We believe the length of the process is part of the strength of the assimilation. The discipleship classes occur as breakout classes during our mid-week service. A BIG win for us is when a new believer moves from being a Sunday morning only attendee to consistently attending our mid-week service for their classes.

Volunteering Process Another key to retaining people is to allow them to feel a part of our congregation right away. For volunteering, we have three areas new people can start getting involved in right away. They simply check that they are interested on the back of the Sunday connection card. The volunteer coordinator calls them within the week. One example is our ministry of serving at the local homeless shelter. At the completion of each of the discipleship semesters, students fill out a form that lists new volunteer opportunities available. Superglue So how do we keep track of the processes? We use “Fellowship One.” Fellowship One is a Web-based church management software system. It fits any size church and is easily customizable to track your different assimilation processes (guest, discipleship, volunteering, etc.). The tool provides a 360-degree single view of the families in our church, their attendance, volunteering, classes, and interests so we can personalize their care. There are many Web-based church management systems on the market. If you are not using one I encourage you to shop for the best company that will fit your church and budget. At our church everything we do goes through Fellowship One. This is how we track our first-, second-, and third-time guests, as well as each letter, email, and note card. Fellowship One tracks them all the way through the whole assimilation process and beyond as a church member. As we take care of and prove to be good stewards, I believe God will continue to send us more souls! To begin your own assimilation process for your local church I highly recommend you read Fusion by Nelson Searcy. Kent Elliott is the senior pastor at Faith Tabernacle in Manchester, Connecticut. He is also president and lead consultant of FAITHWORKS Image Consulting.

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[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

The Beautiful Day Explanation DONNA MYRE

he hospital elevator in downtown Dallas was about to close when in stepped a distinguished elderly gentlemen. The weather outside that day was absolutely perfect. The hot days of summer were being overtaken by the cool gentle breeze of autumn. As the gentlemen came into the elevator, a lady made a positive comment concerning the lovely day. In an upbeat and unassuming professional voice, he responded to her comment by giving a scientific explanation about all the factors that had contributed to bringing about such a beautiful day. I cannot remember all of the terms he used in his explanation because his words are not part of my vocabulary. Nor had any of that type information ever been filed away on the shelves of my brain. Since that time I have often wished we had not been limited on time in a crowded elevator, so I could have asked him to repeat his profound reply for me to record on paper or my phone. After the gentleman finished his educational explanation I responded, “I suppose you must be a retired science professor.” He smiled and replied, “Actually, I was a nuclear physicist.” 26

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How did I know the elderly man’s vocation had something to do with science? What led me to think he probably had a number of college degrees behind his name? I quickly came to that conclusion simply because of his self-confidence, his vocabulary, and his choice of subject material. Since that day I have become more conscious of the fact that the words of my mouth speak volumes about who I am. My demeanor and my choice of subject material is of great importance and significance. Though I do not possess a number of science degrees I am a representative of Jesus Christ. My responsibilities include offering hope, spreading cheer, being an encourager, promoting righteous principles, living in victory, and sharing the plan of salvation. I partner with Jesus in helping to bring light and truth to a world filled with darkness and deceit. On the elevator that day I sensed the elderly man was pleased that I had recognized and mentioned his field of education. So may it be that by my actions, words, and choice of subject material those around me will respond, “You must be a Christian.” Donna Myre lives with her husband, David, in Paris, Texas, where he serves as pastor. Donna serves as the president of the Texas District Ladies Ministry.

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GC A


Online Registration Opens March 13, 2013 New Expanded Seminars for 2013!

Church Leadership

O O O O

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Pastors Church Administrators Sunday School Teachers Youth Staff

O O O O

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Music Ministers Tech Directors Tech Team Members Outreach Directors

SAVE THE DATE St. Louis, Missouri Tuesday, October 1 - Friday, October 4, 2013

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2ND ANNUAL

Letters to the Editor

revivAL & growth coNfereNce MAY 22 - 24, 2013 PortLAND, or

Carlton L. Coon Sr.

David K. Bernard

Jimmy Toney

Mark Morgan

Specific direction, anointed ministry, practical solutions and new inspiration to rise to the challenge of planting, growing and developing churches in the great Northwest. This event is sponsored largely by Christmas For Christ funds. SCHedULe TiMeS

Wednesday Service

7:30pm

Thursday Sessions Service

9:00am 7:30pm

friday Sessions Service

9:00am 7:30pm

ConferenCe & Lodging

Sheraton Portland Airport Hotel 8235 Northeast Airport Way Portland, OR 97220-1398 1 800 325 3535 room block: United Pentecostal Church International Parking: Free Airport Shuttle: Use courtesy phone in baggage area, go to Island 2, take yellow van marked Sheraton Hotel directions: Click here or go to www.sheratonportlandairport.com/ drivingdirections

I commend you for the fine issue of the Pentecostal Herald covering 1913 to 2013 (January 2013 issue). The younger generation of the United Pentecostal Church International needs to know about our roots. It did seem odd to me that there were several quotations from versions other than King James Version. Our early pioneers used only the King James Version. I wonder if other readers noticed this. —Lloyd Dean I absolutely LOVE the Pentecostal Herald! —Bobbi Morehead I appreciate the practical Christianity focus of the Pentecostal Herald. The articles are consistently articles we can use. The people at our church look forward to receiving their copy. —Timothy C. Mitchell I am interested in ordering copies of the January 2013 edition of the Pentecostal Herald. Will I be able to do this? And how much would each copy cost? Our church wants to do this as a reach out. —Daniel Salvadori Editor’s response: We have sold out of the January 2013 issue of the Pentecostal Herald. We plan to publish a special (undated) issue of the Herald to be released at General Conference. This special issue will include all of the centennial articles from the January issue plus all of the centennial articles from February thru September. Please let me know if you are interested in copies of the special issue.

Send letters for possible publication to: syoung@upci.org, bmiller@upci.org, or Pentecostlal Herald 8855 Dunn Road Hazelwood, MO 63042-2299. Brittany n. McMurray Administrative Assistant bmcmurray@upci.org | 1 314 837 7300 ext 333 russell Garrett NAM Administrative Assistant rgarrett@upci.org | 1 778 229 6657

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WORLDLINE BY BRUCE A. HOWELL

World Reports PAIN: We were so blessed to spend this past summer in Spain getting to know the church and country. The work was established in 1994 by Missionaries Gary and June Sones who were our hosts. They have done such an awesome work for God in Spain, and we appreciate them. Many souls received the Holy Ghost in the weeks we were there. It was a privilege to be present at the graduation ceremony for the very first graduating class of their full-time Bible school. Sofia also had the opportunity to minister at a ladies conference in the Canary Islands and organize a kid’s service in Madrid. I had the opportunity to visit the work in Bilbao in the north of the country and Badajoz on the border with Portugal as well as be present at the Youth Conference held in the city of Zaragoza. –Wayne and Sophia Monday REPUBLIC OF CROATIA: In August we had our first evangelism conference in Zagreb. We had ten new visitors, who were very interested in what was going on. They felt the mighty presence of God, heard the good news preached by Missionary Mark Shutes, and a few were willing to be prayed for. They commented on how happy everyone was. We were joined by several other missionaries, national ministers, and our regional director, Brother and Sister Tuttle. Five, who had traveled from the east of Croatia, received the Holy Ghost. There was much rejoicing! –Radovan and Tanya Hajduk PAKISTAN: A number of exciting changes have been implemented at New Life Theological Seminary (NLTS) for this year. We are now offering a two-year Associate Degree following the course guidelines of the Global Association of Theological Studies. We are also preparing for the grand opening of our new building.

We are most excited about having a new group of young men joining our college. In the past, our graduates have become pastors and district superintendents; even our national bishop is a graduate of our school. Only the Lord knows where these young men will take the gospel for the first time. God has given us an incredible opportunity to mold twenty-seven young men into His image. This is our largest class in the six years since we began working at NLTS. Three of our students (members of the Episcopalian church, Salvation Army, and a Trinitarian Pentecostal work) all indicated that their pastors were adamant that NLTS is the best place to learn the Bible in all of Pakistan. These local leaders know our teaching is from the Scriptures! Pray with us that all of these young men will be transformed by the Spirit and be set free to preach this gospel in His name. –Curtis and Amanda Scott EL SALVADOR: Two new modular schools have been opened since our last report. The Instituto Bíblico Pentecostal of El Salvador is growing. In the last few months we have made major strides in updating the curriculum and bringing the school within international GATS guidelines. Sixty-two courses are currently being taught; fifty books have been updated and/or written; twelve more are in process; three levels of diploma have been instituted; and 150+ students are enrolled in this school year. The modular school in Santa Tecla began classes on Saturday, October 20, with thirty students enrolled. Morale is up, and we are very excited about the great progress we are seeing. –Ken and Kay Burgess

gentina. Joey Bir, missionary to Paraguay and president of the church in Paraguay, was the guest speaker and did an outstanding job in presenting the need for a passion for the lost. As the commission was given and the ministry laid hands on the graduates a tremendous presence of God began to flow. The students wept as they felt the gentle urging of the Holy Ghost to reach their country for the name of Jesus Christ. It was a beautiful time of worship, a serious time of the realization of the need in Argentina, and a time of thanksgiving as the twenty-one graduates left for the harvest field. –Michael and Miriam Sponsler NEW ZEALAND: A thankful heart reaps many blessings, bringing joy both to the giver and receiver. We are thankful to share the blessings of your giving for God’s glory in multicultural New Zealand. The challenges are many but the blessings are more. Over twenty nationalities were represented at our recent national conference. We experienced such an intimacy with God. Let me share one instance: After Brother Borders gave a heartfelt message admonishing us not to “miss the boat,” four children asked their grandmother if they could be baptized in Jesus’ name! God’s Spirit swept over the people in waves of repentance and Holy Ghost infilling. –Bob and Judy Addington Bruce A. Howell is the general director of Global Missions for the United Pentecostal Church International.

ARGENTINA: A wonderful presence of the Lord filled the building as the Instituto Biblico Apostolico (Apostolic Bible Institute) celebrated the graduation of the class of 2012. Twenty-one students received their graduation diplomas and were sent out in the harvest field of ArMARCH 2013

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[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

Bible Study— Old Methods Still Work for a New Generation RYAN N. FRANKLIN

s we were nearing the end of lesson nine and her husband had just finished reading a Scripture verse in Acts, I watched as the revelation came to both of them. Tears began to stream down her face as she realized for the first time that she needed to be baptized. A year and a half later they are still growing in Christ. Today’s world is faced with many problems—marital, financial, emotional, and many others. People are seeking answers from a variety of sources, but the church is still the hope of the world. God gave us an amazing, supernatural, living book. This book creates a framework for our thinking and our acting. It explains exactly why we’re here and where we’re going. Wouldn’t it be great if the Bible were something we could take like a pill and instantly absorb the benefits? The reality is that it’s just not that easy. There are no shortcuts or substitutes. Knowing and living the Bible takes work. To get the help we need it takes reading and studying. And for many, it takes knowledgeable Bible teachers sitting down with them in Bible study. If we don’t direct people to an all-knowing, all-powerful God and His Word, who will? We have a mandate from God to “Go ye therefore, and teach all nations.” In order to fulfill that commandment, we must go and teach. We must seek the lost (Luke 19:10) and share the treasures that lie within the Word of God. 30

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Today there are many different resources and many different methods of teaching the Word of God. There are CDs, DVDs, and MP3s. There are podcasts, blogging, Facebook, and Twitter. There are webcasts, webinars, and simulcasts. There are computers, tablets, and smartphones. Let’s face it; times have changed and I am one of the biggest advocates of new technology. But just as a child’s direct contact with an elementary school teacher is still one of the best methods of learning, I believe personal Bible study makes one of the most important impacts on a student of the Word. This method that started many years before Jesus was born was still effective in reaching my family more than fifty years ago. This same method that gave me a biblical foundation over fifteen years ago is still successful in reaching and teaching today’s generation. One-on-one or in small groups, Bible study continues to be an effective method of teaching the Word of God. At the Pentecostals of Alexandria, our pastors, Anthony Mangun and Terry Shock, encourage all groups and ministries to incorporate the “Big Four.” They believe that prayer, the Word, personal involvement, and fellowship are the four main ingredients that provide the glue to make an individual stick. Not only is personal Bible study a part of the “Big Four,” it also includes each of the four elements. Many times while teaching I have seen faces light up with amazement as the Lord gave a student new revelation from His Word. Starting and ending every lesson with prayer is effective in introducing prayer into a student’s life. And sometimes the Lord will even interrupt at special moments as His Spirit moves in and overwhelms

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the lesson. Occasionally even small opportunities for personal involvement will surface throughout the Bible study process. The last component—fellowship—is one of the most important elements of Bible study. Personal Bible study with an individual or a small group of individuals creates a unique bond. I have made great lifelong relationships with many people just by spending a little time teaching the Word and loving them. At the POA we are very missions minded. We feel that we must go and get the Word out into the lives of the people of our community. Showing grace and love and the gospel to a community is what is most important. Evangelism was a priority in the birth of the church, so it must be a priority in our lives today. We must go and teach and make disciples. Wherever we are in life we need to figure out how to get into the lives of unbelievers. Some of our methods have become too impersonal (I’m guilty!). We must be able to look an unbeliever in the eye with love and a sincere interest in his or her life, develop a relationship, and perhaps eventually obtain the privilege of sharing the Word of God. It’s an old method, but it still works for this new generation. Two thousand years ago, Jesus walked up to a few men and said, “Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men” (Matthew 4:19). Put yourself in their shoes. They were normal people with jobs, family, social lives, and hobbies. Yet, Acts 17:6 says, “These that have turned the world upside down.” Simple obedience to Jesus’ model, despite their busy lives, turned the world upside down. In today’s fast-paced society one-on-one teaching comes at a high cost, but it has a very valuable payoff. It is difficult these days to carve

out an hour in a week to teach or to be taught. This is probably the reason that many churches and people have moved away from this personal approach. I too am very busy with church, family, and just life, but I try to find creative ways to always have a Bible study in progress. To see a person go down into the water in the name of Jesus Christ makes it worth the effort. To see an individual being filled with God’s Spirit is amazing. To witness the continued spiritual growth of a disciple of Christ inspires me above anything else I could ever do. Finding time to teach Bible studies is not easy but the benefits far outweigh the cost. This old method of personal Bible study still works! If you are a new teacher, it is helpful to choose a proven published study such as The Bible Made Simple to initially simplify your teaching process. The Bible Made Simple provides a concise study of the Bible and man’s history in a thirteen-lesson format. Also, you should always be prepared with a one-lesson study on salvation, such as Salvation Made Simple. If you feel you have only one opportunity to teach someone, this study will get to the root of the matter. Both of these studies are available at www.pentecostalpublishing.com. Ryan N. Franklin is a licensed minister, teacher, and pastor’s assistant at The Pentecostals of Alexandria in Louisiana. Ryan has been in full-time ministry for over eight years. He is a long-time Bible study teacher and writer. Ryan’s published works include The Bible Made Simple and Salvation Made Simple. MARCH 2013

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NEW START BY NICK SENIOUR

Retired from Retirement ven thinking about speaking made me nervous. My focus was on business and making money. Preaching was inconceivable. But when I was thirty-four a friend asked if I would preach at a New Year’s Eve service. I reluctantly accepted and started the most exciting phase of my entire life. Seven years later my wife and I planted a church in Bean Blossom, Indiana. In sixteen years God blessed us to build a sanctuary, fellowship hall, and Sunday school annex and leave it debt free. After these were complete, the Lord asked me to resign. “But, Lord,” I said, “we just finished building; can’t I relax and enjoy the fruit of our labor?” His answer was no! However, He also said, “Your latter years will be greater than your former.” Eighteen months later, we were enjoying traveling, fishing, and overseas missions work when I was asked to help a church gasping for survival. Twenty-two months later the church was on its feet and we went back to traveling. In 2005, we were asked to consider another challenge. Days before, I had prayed, “God any door you open, I will walk through.” How could I say no? We arrived on Sunday as interim pastor at a church we’d never even visited. There were thirteen people in much pain. We cleaned and filled the baptistery and started seeing people born again. In that year twenty-six were baptized and twenty-four received the Holy Ghost. When we left that church in someone else’s hands, it was progressing. Through the years, I had maintained a profitable business that allowed me to plant churches. The recession in 2007 wiped out the business. I wasn’t pastoring, so now what? It hit me that I had not seen fulfillment of the promise that my latter years would be greater than the former. It affected me to the point that I ended up in the hospital with what was thought to be a heart attack. Thank God, it was not. The idea of finishing

For years we had shopped in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, without seeing one Apostolic person. An Apostolic church plant was needed and God told me to go. My response was, “God, we are too old to do this. If you want us to start a church, you will have to give us a family to help.” In a matter of weeks we had two families. without having seen what God had promised was devastating. For years we had shopped in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, without seeing one Apostolic person. An Apostolic church plant was needed and God told me to go. My response, “God, we are too old to do this. If you want us to start a church, you will have to give us a family to help.” In a matter of weeks we had not one family but two! Unretirement has been thrilling. Mother’s Day, with an all-time low of seven in attendance, we focused our prayer on getting new contacts. Shortly, a man walked in with a name and phone number. He said, “If you call this man, he will come to church.” We called and he came. He is now a faithful member of our church plant. I had prayed, “Lord, you sent us here. We don’t know anyone. Please open the door. This is your business, not ours. At sixty-nine years old I don’t have a lot of time left, so we are going to have to get on with it.” Two days after I prayed that prayer, a young lady stopped by the church in need of financial help. I told her the church was new and without funds, but that her real need was God. We prayed together. Jill returned on Sunday with her family and grandfather. We have had a home Bible study ever since. Jill was baptized in Jesus’ name on July 1.

Pam, a backslider, soon came in with her children and sister. The very next Sunday, Tom, who had been backslidden over twenty years, came. Tom brought Kim. The following Sunday morning four backsliders were speaking in tongues. Then Pam’s two teenage daughters received the Holy Ghost. On July 8, Pam’s granddaughter, Emmalee, was baptized. The following Sunday, Pam’s husband was baptized. Billy Cole used to say there was nothing special about what he did. He said, “I simply find the will of God and show up.” In unretirement that is the way I feel. I simply found the will of God and showed up. God has allowed me to see the words He spoke to me come true. I’m thankful I chose to retire from retirement. Nick Seniour has pastored multiple congregations and is currently planting a church in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Note from Carlton Coon: Perhaps you are in a stage of life where you are being called to un-retire to plant a church. North America has thousands of towns like Lawrenceburg, Indiana, that need a church planter. Ready for the challenge? Contact your District North American Missions director for a target city today. MARCH 2013

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[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

When “Good Enough” Is Not a Good Thing NICOLE MCCOY

n a time gone by when most of the western world operated with a strict caste system, wealthy parents would send their sons to the influential colleges of the day with the hope of expanding their already powerful networking circles. These sons of money would often devote more time to building friendships and alliances than actual academic studies. The results were bonds between aristocratic sons, halfhearted scholastic endeavors, and the gentlemen’s C. The gentlemen’s C was all the young blue bloods were expected to achieve in their studies because it was good enough to graduate. Some were even given this passing grade when failure was more deserved. As time passed and the caste system weakened, the gentlemen’s C became extinct. Today’s academic culture is much more fierce, and students wishing to secure jobs strive for grades closer to perfection. Furthermore, the hunger for excellence has permeated everyday life and now dictates much of what society listens to, watches, and does. With this in mind, note that preachers never stand at the pulpit and speak to their congregation of the “good” ministry of Peter or Paul. “Good enough” is not an acceptable measure for their commitment to Christ. Spreading His gospel was an all-consuming act that the early disciples delved into with tenacity. Likewise, American historians don’t refer to the contributions of the founding fathers as “good.” Their actions were legendary, heroic, even epic. It would be an understatement to say they had done merely a good job. We understand that their success was dependent on devotion and passion beyond what was simply good. While mainstream culture obsesses with perfection and passion, modern Christians are often content with a spiritual status that is “good enough.” The church body can easily be placated with small 34

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victories and fear of an enemy can keep Christian soldiers hidden from battle. Nevertheless, the church is headed in an epic direction despite the good, bad, or lackadaisical decisions of members. The role Christians play in the fate of man is monumental and souls hang in the balance. Even the effects of indifference are of huge consequence. Christians can either save those who walk easily into its fold—thus achieving the gentlemen’s C for effort—or reach beyond sanctuaries and comfort zones to change the world as Jesus did. The body of Christ becomes a community and subculture within its larger circumstance. Admittedly, having a strong connection with fellow Christians is important and necessary. The issue comes when Christians are so deeply submersed in a culture outside of mainstream life that they become a protected unit more concerned with self-preservation than outward mobility. Any football coach or military commander will admit that playing a great defense without offense won’t bring victory, only prolonged defeat. Luke 19 gives an account of Jesus visiting Zaccheus, a wealthy tax collector, at his house. In chapter 15 of the same book, Jesus is reprimanded by Pharisees for communing with unsavory tax collectors and sinners. He responds to their admonishments with a parable of a shepherd leaving his ninety-nine sheep to retrieve a lost one. The message is clear. Followers of Christ must not simply reach for the lost from a safe distance but go get them, sometimes on foreign turf. Staying with the flock and hoping the lost one wanders by is not the story Jesus presented or the strategy indicative of His life. Matthew 10:16 says, “Behold, I send you forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves.” Jesus is not comparing His disciples to sheep being set upon by wolves but rather as sheep being sent to the wolves. It is imperative that disciples step beyond comfortable boundaries and deliver

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the gospel to the world. To be a disciple one must boldly go among the wolves. In the twenty-first century the church is challenged to achieve more than preservation of its subculture but declaring its relevance to all mankind. Christ’s sacrifice is as relevant today as it was two thousand years ago, but culture has delegated religious beliefs as ineffectual in the modern world, limiting Christians’ reach and influence. The only response to this belittling of the church’s message is to demonstrate the power God’s truth has over everyday life. Spiritual convictions must be present in daily actions and occupations lived out in mainstream culture. Godly living can’t only be “good enough.” Education, marketing, music, visual arts, politics, and science greatly contribute to culture’s way of thinking and moving. These industries have largely been relinquished by Christians and are now predominately controlled by secular factions. It is deemed dangerous for Christians to enter these fields because they may become seduced by overwhelmingly secular opinions and lose their Christian worldview. Fear of widespread secularism is one reason why much of the church has turned inward and withdrawn from the world around it. Many Christians have perfected adverting their eyes in an attempt to protect the flock, but this does not impact the world at large.

Jesus and His disciples did not operate in a Christian culture. The original believers lived in a world that vehemently denied Christ’s claim as the Son of God either because they clung to a more traditional Jewish view of the coming King, or perhaps they were Gentile and served a pantheon of gods. Still Christ urged believers to go into this culture and preach the gospel. He challenged the apostles in Matthew 28:19 to “make disciples of all nations.” The stage is global, the stakes are high, and Christians cannot accept that they are culturally irrelevant. Today’s disciples have a responsibility to journey into the world and impact it for Christ with every step. This journey is not necessarily made only by missionaries traveling to far off lands but by a student studying to be a scientist, a photographer working at a magazine, or a politician running for office. The sojourners must be firm in the Word, hungry for a relationship with God, and dedicated to a love for people. The founding fathers’ efforts before the Revolutionary War were, by many standards, good enough. They had diplomatically pleaded their case with King George III and fulfilled their duty as government officials and citizens. Fortunately for the United States, their sense of patriotism didn’t end there. Even after the war and victorious independence, America’s forefathers continued to labor for a stronger country. MARCH 2013

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Christians can either save those who walk easily into the fold— thus achieving the gentlemen’s C for effort—or reach beyond sanctuaries and comfort zones to change the world as Jesus did. We must not be content with a spiritual status that is “good enough.”

Likewise, Peter and Paul’s devotion to Christ and spreading the gospel extended beyond what many would have called good enough. They preached through persecution, imprisonment, and exile. Today’s church is changing. Not because members are losing convictions or succumbing to the wiles of a secular culture, but because they are finding the strength and courage to be sheep among wolves. Some modern disciples are discovering the boldness to step out from the shadows and interact with a culture that would prefer Christians to be silent and scared. They are daring to live for Christ with the depth of passion equivalent to the epic stakes, no longer content with the gentlemen’s C. Nicole McCoy lives in downtown St. Louis, Missouri. She is a selfemployed online image consultant, part-time adventurer, and full-time Christian still learning how to make it all work together. She attends The Sanctuary in Hazelwood, Missouri. Tim Dugas and Scott Graham are the pastors.

[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

Singing old favorite hymns without guilt, conviction, or discomfort. • “Amazing Grace, How Interesting the Sound”
 • “Praise God from Whom All Affirmations Flow”
 • “Pillow of Ages, Fluffed for Me”
 • “When Peace, Like a Trickle”
 • “What an Acquaintance We Have in Jesus”
 • “Blest Be the Tie That Doesn’t Cramp My Style” • “I Surrender Some”
 • “Standing on the Premises”


• “Sweet Minute of Prayer”
 • “Blessed Insurance” • “Come We That Like the Lord”
 • “Onward, Social Workers”
 • “Avoid the Good Fight”
 • “The Gold-Plated Cross”
 • “Some for Jesus”
 • “I Have My Own Way”

Adapted from “Preaching Now” website. Used by permission. (http://www.preaching.com). 36

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MULTICULTURAL MINISTRIES GHOLAMREZA DEHGHANI, WITH LIANE R. GRANT

My Journey from Islam to Trinitarianism to the Apostolic Church uddled in a trailer aboard the docked ship, my heart pounded as I heard the barking dogs approaching. Trained to assist port security, these animals would sniff out any suspicious cargo, human or otherwise. It was 1997 and I had fled Iran the only way I knew how in order to join my wife and son in Europe. Raised in the Muslim faith, I didn’t know anywhere else to turn for help. As I prayed to the only god I knew, the man crouching beside me whispered mockingly, “Why are you praying like that? This is the land of Jesus, so pray to Him.” In my desperation, I decided it was worth a try, and for the first time in my life, I called out to Jesus Christ. Miraculously, the security dogs were unable to catch our scent inside that trailer. My family and I were reunited and we settled in Holland. I was so impacted by the miracle that God had performed in protecting me that within a few months I became a Christian. By 2004, I had become a Trinitarian minister and was evangelizing in Holland, Norway, Belgium, and other parts of Europe. Because of my zeal in reaching out to Muslim people, I began to receive threats against my family, so we left Europe and moved to Montreal, Canada. When I arrived in Montreal, I began to look for a church to attend. A man I met invited me to the Saint Laurent United Pentecostal Church, and I attended there for the first time in May 2006. Since the preaching was contrary to what I believed, I decided that I would not return. Shortly afterward, the assistant pastor, Benjie Terrible, called to ask if he could visit me to discuss the Word of God. I agreed, thinking that I could open his eyes to see that what the UPC taught was wrong. Pastor Terrible arrived with Dieudonné Kahozi, the French pastor from the church, and we began to study the Word of God together. I read the Scripture verses they showed me and the Lord revealed to me that

I was the one who believed and taught an unscriptural doctrine. God opened my eyes to the truth of baptism in Jesus’ name and the oneness of God. That weekend, I decided to be baptized in the powerful name of the Lord Jesus Christ. Since that day, I have had a burden to reach not only Muslim people, but also Trinitarians. There is only one God and His name is Jesus; there is only one baptism and that is baptism in Jesus’ name! The Lord opened the door for me to use the Internet to reach my people, as well as Afghans who speak the Farsi language. By preaching over the Internet, we have been able to reach Muslim people in Iran, Turkey, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Afghanistan, countries in Europe, and many other Muslim countries. We have online services seven days a week at different times in different countries with an average weekly attendance of four hundred. As a result, we have been able to start house churches all over the world, inside and outside of Iran. Periodically, we travel overseas to baptize the new converts and connect them with local pastors and missionaries. Since the beginning of our Internet ministry, we have baptized hundreds of Iranians, Kurds, and Afghans in Jesus’ name. For example, great things have happened in the country of Turkey as a result of our Internet outreach. One of our converts in Turkey was previously a popular singer in Iran. When I went to Turkey the first time, I baptized him in Jesus’ name. Last year he was granted permanent immigrant status by the Canadian government and is now in Montreal working as my assistant. During my first two trips to Turkey, we baptized one hundred eighteen people and another forty-two were baptized by someone else we sent overseas at Christmas time. During these three trips, which all took place in the space of one year, ninety-five received the Holy Ghost. My senior pastor, Paul Graham, has helped us start an Iranian service on Sunday

afternoons in his church here in Montreal, but we are also excited about the opportunity to expand our ministry beyond our local church. As coordinator for Middle Eastern Evangelism Ministry under Multicultural Ministries UPCI, my burden is to share Apostolic truth with the six million Middle Eastern people who live in North America. We need your prayers and support for this vital ministry so that we can see Muslim people saved and brought to the knowledge that Jesus Christ is the only Savior. Please contact us if you would like more information about how to become involved with this ministry by visiting our website www.upciran.com or emailing me at maten992000@yahoo.com. We are available to train, assist, and equip others to reach out to Middle Eastern and Muslim people in the United States and Canada. Through resources such as tracts in Farsi (Persian) and Arabic and books such as Farhad Majdi’s Handbook of Ministry to Muslims for Apostolic Pentecostals you can gain insight concerning cultural practices, religious traditions, and methods for creating connections. Please join the many Apostolic ministers around the country who have realized the need to reach out to the Middle Eastern community. As more become involved, the number of Apostolics with Middle Eastern backgrounds increases exponentially. Gholamreza Dehghani is the national coordinator of Middle Eastern Evangelism Ministry under Multicultural Ministries. He also serves as pastor of a daughter church (Farsi United Pentecostal Church) in Montreal, Quebec, under the direction of Pastor Paul Graham.

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[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

AMBER HUIZAR

The Value of Youth in the Future of the Church ne’s youth could be looked upon as a clean slate, a new beginning. This is the time in which young people are looking to find their identity and purpose in life, not just secular, but spiritual as well. Yes, it is a time where flippant choices for a momentary pleasure or satisfaction can cost a lifetime of payback. However, youth also affords second chances. I was raised in a pastor’s home by two godly and loving parents who instilled in me godly morals and values. My dad did not merely practice what he preached—he preached what he practiced. My dad is a man of integrity who lives out what he believes. My mother is a prayer warrior and has always been a role model for me to look up to. At the age of twelve, the battle for my soul began. I began to like someone in the church my parents didn’t approve of. Of course, I didn’t understand their disapproval because all I could see was that he came to church. I thought that should be good enough, but my parents could see his lack of character. I broke the rules my parents made for me. I convinced myself I could control sin because I was a good girl. However, lines I thought I would never cross were crossed, and things I valued were lost. I was left feeling broken and hopeless. I felt my life no longer had value. I felt that all of my wrong choices disqualified me from ever being used of God. That is, until I heard my mom praying. I thought I was alone in the house, but I heard something coming from upstairs. I made my way up the stairs and noticed the sound was coming from my parents’ room. The door was ajar, and what I 38

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saw would be forever etched in my mind. My mom was lying prostrate on the floor interceding for me. The carpet was stained with her tears. Hearing my mom battling in the Spirit for my soul made me realize there was still hope for me, because she still believed in me and was fighting for me. During this rebellious period of my life, which lasted until I was seventeen, my parents didn’t focus on my failures or what I was going through—they focused on what I could be. They remembered hearing me when I was four years old praying in my closet. They remembered how sensitive I had always been toward God and how much I desired to be used by Him. This is exactly how God sees the value of young people. It is not measured by their mistakes, but by their potential. God saw years down the road how He could use me, despite my shortcomings. At the age of twenty, I became the first female youth pastor at my local church. I was privileged to lead a thriving youth group. Eight years later, I married my prince charming, and I experienced the joy of doing ministry alongside my husband. Five years after that, we became the associate pastors in Pasadena, California. Throughout the Scriptures, we see the love God has for young people and how He used them in some of the most vital roles in the unfolding of His marvelous plan of redemption. Let’s reflect upon some striking examples that demonstrate God’s confidence in youth. David, a young shepherd boy, used a simple stone and sling to destroy Israel’s greatest enemy, a Philistine giant named Goliath. Samuel, as a young boy, ministered to the Lord in the presence of Eli, and during that time, Heaven opened up and God’s voice was once again heard clearly. Joseph was hated by his brothers and sold into slavery. But God was using him as a providential instrument for the preservation of the Hebrew nation. A teenage girl named Mary was used to birth the Savior of the world. In each of these cases it is evident how much confidence God places in young people to fulfill His purpose and plan. Also,

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these stories should remind us that young people—who are properly trained—are capable of courageous faith and considerable usefulness in God’s kingdom. God not only strategically placed the above young people in the Bible days, but two thousand years later He is still raising up young people to fulfill His purpose in the last days. This is confirmed in Acts 2:17: “And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions.” Young people are part of God’s plan for revival. It is our responsibility as parents, pastors, youth pastors, Sunday school teachers, and so forth to recognize the potential in our youth. We must look beyond their present circumstances and see their potential and value

to God’s kingdom. We must communicate our love and belief in them. It is imperative that we not overlook our Apostolic youth— their value is priceless. Finally, we must mobilize them to reach their God-given potential. God has strategically placed His young people on school and college campuses around the world where they rub shoulders with thousands of young people from different walks of life as well as different ethnic backgrounds. This is their mission field, and they can turn their world upside down. Amber Huizar is married to Assistant Pastor Amado Huizar of LifeChurch in Pasadena, California. Her father, Art Hodges, is the SoCal district superintendent. MARCH 2013

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S.C. MCCLAIN

Seek First the Kingdom very once in a while, you meet an incredibly interesting person in the most unlikely place. Recently I was wandering among the file cabinets in the Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism (formerly known as the United Pentecostal Church Historical Center) and I ran into a man who captivated my attention. S. C. McClain was that man and this book tells his story. In the late 1960s, A. L. Clanton began the research that eventually became published in his book United We Stand, a history of the organizational development of the United Pentecostal Church. Clanton had corresponded with S. C. McClain to obtain a firstperson account of the emerging Oneness movement. McClain sent Clanton some notes on the various organizations of which he had been a part, notes that perhaps he had developed to help Fred Foster with his earlier book, Think It Not Strange. Included in the McClain file was a handwritten autobiography he had sent to Brother Clanton. It is unclear whether he was submitting it for publication. I could find no record of its publication. But the story is so rich and the content so inspirational that it needed to be shared with a wider audience than just those who happened by the Center for the Study of Oneness Pentecostalism. I have done my best to leave McClain’s story intact. He was just months shy of seventy-seven when he wrote this manuscript. 42

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His penmanship was a little shaky but he possessed a keen mind. This story pulled McClain back into the previous century and on into the early days of the twentieth century. I do not think that you can understand a person apart from their context. Language is part of that context. McClain will use language we no longer use. For example, a number of times in the story, he refers to African-Americans as colored. This was the common practice of the time. I have also tried to keep as much as possible the format in which McClain submitted his manuscript. The chapter divisions are his, so, too, are the sections into which he divided the chapters. Some of the chapter titles have been changed. Some of the changed titles were suggested by Bethany Sledge. A few are mine. In 1948 S. C. McClain published a small book he called Highlights in Church History. Fifty-seven years later it is still in print. Over the years, it has been reprinted fifteen times. McClain was an extraordinary person who possessed a wide range of gifts. He was an evangelist, church planter, pastor, organizational leader, builder, writer, and editor. But this is not a story of his giftedness, rather it is a story of a person completely committed to the kingdom of God. He truly did “seek first the kingdom.” I invite you to pull up a chair and listen as S. C. McClain takes you back to another time and inspires you to give your best for the Kingdom. –Robin Johnston

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Toward the Fullness of Light Our First Gospel Tent When I sold my farm I received a small down payment with which I bought my tent. My father came with some private advice. “Sammy, don’t you think you are doing the wrong thing to sell your farm? Why not keep the farm and try preaching. Then if you don’t like it or find it too rough, you could return to your farm.” I said, “Papa, that is what I don’t want to do. I want to burn every bridge behind me so I can’t turn back.” So I have been somewhere in meetings all this time with no time to lose. I did not marry until I had seven years’ experience on the field. I wanted to be free to go and come, to spend all day in the mountains without giving any account of my whereabouts. One time I had come into my father’s home, holding prayer meetings at nights in different homes and baptizing all who saw the light. After I baptized his daughter, my oldest brother’s wife, one neighbor thought by some to be a bad man declared, “Sam McClain is going to die today.” He had loaded his gun with buckshot, laid it across his saddle, and on horseback went looking for Sam. But at daybreak I was awakened from sleep. That small, still voice, that those who are led by the Spirit know so well, said, “Go to the woods and pray all day.” I did not tell Mother where I was going, I only told her to not fix breakfast for me. Well, I was having a blessed time with the Lord and His Word while the man on his horse with his gun was going from place to place, inquiring, “Have you seen Sam McClain?” By 1915 Brother Goss had his church in Hot Springs going well and made an effort to open a church in Little Rock. He opened a mission in a storefront at Ninth Street and Marshall. In June of 1915, Brother Goss and Brother E. N. Bell called a ministerial council to warn against what they then considered an erroneous teaching on the West Coast, where they baptized in Jesus’ name. At the close of this council, Brother Goss asked me to remain in Little Rock to keep the fires burning until a work could be on foot. Only a few services with so few coming to the mission persuaded me to put up my new tent. After trying to get different choice lots for my tent meeting, I failed to contact the owners. But every time I would pass the new state capitol, my eyes fell on choice lots that were still unimproved near some oak trees west of the statehouse. But something seemed to whisper, “The governor will not let you have those lots for a Pentecostal meeting.” Finally, I parked my bicycle against the state capitol steps and, to my joy, got the use of the lots. I had never put up a tent nor even seen one put up. I put up a sign announcing services to begin that night under the tent. My only help was a small, frail-built young man who was but little help. We finally got it up and seats arranged. About two hours before service time, dirty, tired, and worn out, we had gone to our room to clean up and dress for church when someone came running in, saying, “The wind has blown down your tent.” How sickening! I ran down and got there just when a company of railroad shop men came up. One was a man who had followed a circus and knew all about putting up a tent. He took the men with him and within thirty minutes put the tent up better than Titus and I had done working hard all day.

God Sent New Help Our first night we had a tent full. On the fourth day, Rev. George Joyner and wife and another young man came, saying God spoke to them in Galveston, Texas, to come to Little Rock. He also had ordered a much larger tent than mine, and it was being shipped to Little Rock. Brother and Sister Joyner were lovely singers. He was a really good evangelist. The crowds grew and soon were standing at least ten feet deep around the tent. The big, new tent arrived, and many more seats brought into use. A new altar was built to accommodate nearly forty, which was soon filled. All of July and August up to camp meeting time, was a great time of revival. It seemed Little Rock was stirred; churches were stirred. “Jesus is coming soon” was a stirring message. Our tent was flooded with printed leaflets inviting everybody to come. The pastor in a nearby church was going to prove that Jesus is not coming for hundreds of years. But his teaching only caused more to come to the tent. This pastor finally went to the governor, who ordered us to move. But we had laid the foundation in two months with our tent on the choice lot in Little Rock. After I pulled down my tent, I began cottage prayer meetings with some of my acquaintances in South Highland who were not attending the big tent meeting. We soon had a starter for a church MARCH 2013

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Brother Goss was one of the many preachers who were baptized in the name of Jesus Christ at the close of the big camp meeting in Little Rock in 1915. He had an evangelist conducting a revival in Hot Springs and baptizing many in Jesus’ name.

in South Highland in Little Rock. I think we baptized about fifteen out there. Then on August 20, 1915, the big camp meeting began in South Highland. I handled buying supplies and finding places for the camp meeting folks to sleep. The Truth of the Godhead and Jesus Name Baptism Preached I regret that I did not see this great truth during this camp meeting in August 1915. The late Rev. L.C. Hall, the songwriter, was the camp meeting evening speaker. Brother E.N. Bell, editor of our Assemblies of God paper, The Evangel, and Brother H.G. Rodgers of Jackson, Tennessee, who had recently been baptized in Jesus’ name, along with Brother L.C. Hall, I am sure, were the only ministers at this camp meeting who had been baptized in Jesus’ name. It seemed agreeable to all but a very few that Brother Hall preach this truth. Brother Hall, almost every evening, used Colossians 2:9-10 for his text: “For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily. And ye are complete in him, which is the head of all principality and power.” His messages were discussed among the preachers, some accepted and some rejected, and many were left undecided. My Marvelous Dream But Wrong Decision The last day of this camp meeting one of the speakers who was a decided trinitarian said that in every revival of his, he always preached one sermon on the Godhead, showing that God the Father is the “first person” and “Jesus the Son is a second person” and that the “Holy Ghost is the third person in the Godhead.” God had tried to show me in a dream the truth Brother Hall was preaching. In the dream, Brother Hall took a large, long stick of white crayon. With the chalk in both hands, he made a three-inch white mark down through the middle of the campgrounds the full length of the grounds down to the cook tent. Then walking back up the line, he cried out with a loud voice, “Everybody who is going through with God, toe this line.” I seemed to know we had to accept the truth that he was preaching, but others influenced me. When the minister preached that he always preached one sermon on the Trinity, I decided, “That is what I am going to do.” Hemmed in by a Young Convert After camp meeting, I pitched my tent in Sheridan, Arkansas, and took two other young men who also were standing for the Trinity. God was merciful and gave us a good revival with several converts and some filled with the Holy Ghost. We were to have a baptismal service on a Sunday afternoon, so on Saturday night I preached my sermon on the trinity, making it clear with no scriptural reference that God the Father is the first person, Jesus the Son the second person, and that the Holy Ghost is the third person. 44

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Early before service Sunday morning, there came a lady, one of our new converts, with her Bible, having her finger on Matthew 1:18 and 20. “Brother McClain, didn’t you preach last night that God the Father is the first person and that the Holy Ghost is the third person?” I had advised all new converts to read the New Testament before reading the Old Testament, and here I had a new convert stalled before she read one chapter. I said, “That is right. The Father is the first person, and the Holy Ghost is a third person.” She said, “How can it be that Mary was found with child of the Holy Ghost? Is the third person the father of the second person?” Then she pointed to the twentieth verse. My only answer was like others to whom the identity of the Father and Son has not been revealed, Matthew 11:27. I soothed her inquiring heart and mind by saying, “Don’t let that bother you. Nobody has ever understood the trinity and the Godhead, and never will.” I didn’t know that Romans 1:20 and so many other scriptures were in the Bible, but there was left a big question in my mind and a remembrance of the dream and the words of Brother L. C. Hall, “Everybody who is going through with God, toe this line.” The next few nights were revival time under the tent. Our tent was entirely too small. A devil-possessed man, known in the town as the “bad man,” at my invitation had knelt at the altar. I knew nothing about casting out devils, only examples of Jesus and some of the apostles. A Brother Billinger, who himself had been delivered of a demon, was helping me pray. This devil-possessed man looked me in the eyes and said, “Let me go.” I didn’t know it was the evil spirit talking through him. I said, “In a minute.” Brother Billinger quickly said to me, “You should have said, ‘Hold your peace and come out of him.’” Within sixty seconds, the afflicted man jumped up and bolted through that big crowd standing around and took a straight beeline for home, screaming, “What’s got me?” Brother Billinger and I followed him. He jumped ditches and a creek going through a pasture to his home. We explained to his excited wife, asking her if he had not been an awfully bad man. She consented for us to cast out the demon spirit. He fell across the bed, rolling back and forth, saying, “What’s got me?” I got up on the bed on my knees, Brother Billinger on the other side. Soon he opened his eyes and said, “Where am I?” We told him. He invited us to sit on the porch and tell him all about it. “What about the meeting; is it still going? I want to go back and tell that crowd what God has done for me.” We went back, and he walked to the platform and preached about ten minutes. The churches organized a big union meeting in a big brush arbor downtown and sent committees with papers to be

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signed at every house in town, getting them to promise to attend their own revival and to leave the strangers and their strange religion at that tent alone. We didn’t have to stay; we had more calls than we could fill. Our Tent up in Logging Camp On November 1, 1915 another young Trinity preacher and I and rode a log train out to the logging camp. What a revival and what rough men! One morning we found our tent ropes cut and the tent lying on the seats. We soon had it up again, and a good number prayed through as we preached under the anointing of God. November 29 the Spirit said, “Pull the tent down and put it in the dry.” Three times we had the same presentation before I finished preaching. I closed by asking all to take out their seats and to help us. At midnight it began to pour down rain, and the rain continued until after a cyclone passed near that would have destroyed our tent. We learned that the man who cut the tent down had planned to cut it down and burn it with gasoline. Still Running from God, But Soon Cornered Brother Goss was one of the many preachers who were baptized in the name of Jesus Christ at the close of the big camp meeting in Little Rock in 1915. He had an evangelist conducting a revival in Hot Springs and baptizing many in Jesus’ name. I passed through Hot Springs but never attended Brother Goss’ revival. I intended to hold a few days’ revival back in an isolated community in the Ozarks, where we had established a church the year before. I became very sick with a cold and high fever and ­started back to my father’s home, only sixty miles but too far to drive a team in one day. So I stopped in Hot Springs, not intending to see Brother Goss, but feeling that I should call phone number 1732. Brother Goss answered, “Where are you?” I said, “In town.” “Come on over. We are having one of the greatest revivals ever in this church.” I said, “I am too sick.” He said, “Everybody prayed for has been healed.” I went and was instantly healed. The revival closed that night, and Brother Goss insisted that I stay and assist Brother Bell while he was away for another revival. Before leaving, Brother Goss tried to show me in the Word the truth concerning baptism in Jesus’ name and the Godhead. It really seemed foolish, I thought. He was trying to bring God the Father from His presence everywhere and crowd Him into the man Christ Jesus the Son. Many others of our Assemblies of God ministers and teachers of the trinity have been choked and never sought to know the truth in the Word. I began to pray and study. After Brother Goss returned, I went home determined not to preach again until God showed me the truth for or against. The revelation came, “Matthew 11:27,” but not as I thought Brother Goss was teaching it. I went back to Hot Springs to straighten Brother Goss out of his error, only to find I had the truth exactly as he had it. It was January 16, 1916. I was baptized in Jesus’ name along with many others.

The year 1916 was busy with revivals, prayer meetings, and preaching and teaching in homes. Almost everywhere we baptized believers in the wonderful name of Jesus. From a cottage prayer meeting, we went to the creek or anywhere we found water to baptize. Some, having faith, received the Holy Spirit baptism in the water. If we expect Acts 2:38 to be literally fulfilled, “ye shall receive the gift of the Holy Ghost,” if we expect candidates to receive Him, we preachers must preach repentance and preparation for receiving the Holy Ghost when one is baptized in that all-powerful name. Benton, Arkansas, was a hard and tough place. The first gospel tent there was burned. A church was built, but not a single window glass was ever left. City officials didn’t seem to care. It was nothing unusual that, while we were preaching, rocks were thrown on and against the building or something was thrown through the windows. One time a kitchen stove crashed through the window. Another time, a live billy goat was thrown in a window; then the building was burned down. We cleared away the ashes and raised the tent on the church lot. I determined we must have protection by law officers. Some argued to not go to law with anybody, just trust God. One evening while I preached, a young man came running in and up to the middle of the tent, shook his fist at me, and cursed a very bitter oath. He was chased down, an officer called, and he landed in jail. I got a few to go with me to bear witness. The judge seemed surprised when I showed my credentials. He said, “Reverend, you have as much right for protection as any church in town.” He told the young man how great a fine he could impose and how long a sentence in jail he could give him. The boy turned pale. In the scuffle the night before, the boy’s face got skinned and bruised. The judge asked if I would let him off if he would act nice when at church and warn all others that this judge, from this time on, was going to crack down on any and all who disturbed the church any more. The young man promised, and we let him off and had peace. Thereafter, we assisted in buying three lots and building another church. But having another pastor, we did not promote the building. This building was also burned later. Samuel C. McClain (1889-1969) was a pioneer of the Oneness Pentecostal movement. Perhaps his greatest legacy was the host of churches he pioneered across the Southwest. He also served as an editor, writer, educator, and church official. This article is excerpted from the book Seek First The Kingdom by S.C. McClain and edited by Robin Johnston. The book is available at www.pentecostalpublishing.com.

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[LOOKING FORWARD: THE CHURCH OF THE FUTURE]

My Conversion Experience EY JA KIM

raise the Lord! What a privilege to serve Him as my Savior and my Lord! I was an atheist and did not know there was a living God until a sister in the Lord witnessed to me at the company where we worked. For about three years I did not accept her invitation. When I first went to the United Pentecostal Church in Arlington, Virginia, in March 1982, Mike Meadows was preaching the revival service. The very first night God spoke to my heart, and I repented of my sins. During the service, I cried out so loud that I was interrupting the preaching. After the sermon was finished, Brother Meadows asked me if I would like to be baptized. I told him I was a sinner and was not qualified to be baptized. He told me I had repented of my sins; therefore it was OK to be baptized. I told him in that case I wanted to be baptized. That night Pastor James Kelley baptized me in the name of Jesus Christ for the remission of my sins. The next day I went to work and asked my boss if he was baptized in Jesus’ name. I told him he ought to be baptized in Jesus’ name. Throughout that day our firm partners, managers, seniors, and staff were dropping by my office to get my signature in order to receive petty cash advances to go to a client. Before I gave out my signature I told them they ought to be baptized in the name of Jesus 46

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Christ. In fact, I did not give my signature until they heard me out. That evening I went to church and was filled with the Holy Ghost after Evangelist Meadows preached and gave an invitation to come to the altar to receive the Holy Ghost. I did not know what the Holy Ghost was and did not know how to receive it, but I wanted to receive whatever God had for me. I stood up and took about four steps and then I was lying between the pews. The Lord filled me with the Holy Spirit and I spoke with other tongues as the Spirit gave me utterance. Ever since that day I have been serving the Lord with joy, gladness, and a thankful heart. My Call to Christian Service I am a naturalized citizen of the United States of America. I went to the States when I was twenty years old to attend college. I was admitted to college on a probational basis because I did not pass the admission test. Nevertheless, the admission department gave me a chance to prove myself. It was not easy studying for my classes, plus I was working two part-time jobs to support myself. When I graduated from college I got a job at Arthur Andersen & Co. in Washington for about eighteen years. My pastor, who was the superintendent of the Virginia District at the time, asked me to audit the district’s books. I held that position for about three years.

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All my family—seventeen in total—are in the United Pentecostal Church in Korea. I give all the glory to our Lord Jesus! I taught the young adult class at our church for a while and then I was called to go to Korea. When I came to Korea I witnessed to my Buddhist family, which I hadn’t seen since I left Korea in 1963. I took a leave of absence from my job for one year. The first two months I prayed three times a day for my family’s salvation. Within two months they all repented of their sins and were baptized in the name of our Lord Jesus for the remission of their sins. And they all received the Holy Spirit. My family brought friends and neighbors and filled my room where I had services every Sunday. After one year it was time for me to go back to the States, but the Lord spoke to my heart to build a church for this congregation. I called my boss in the States and asked him to send me my profit-sharing money. Of course, by withdrawing the money, I was terminated from my job. But when I went back to the States my boss rehired me with a better position. I had my own office with a computer and a printer in 1987. I worked for them again for a while and then I came back to Korea as a missionary.

Then the Lord spoke to me to start a work in the city of Changwon. We now have a strong church in Changwon. After four years, I went back to the States for deputation and when I came back to Korea the Lord spoke to me to start a work in the city of Okpo. With the help of the Lord, I started the church. After one year, during our 2000 general conference, our ministers elected me to serve as the Bible school president. I have been in that position ever since. Eleven of our Bible school graduates are pastoring local churches. My brother is a pastor and one of my sisters is married to a pastor. All my family—seventeen in total—are in the United Pentecostal Church in Korea. I give all the glory to our Lord Jesus! Ey Ja Kim is a UPCI missionary to South Korea, a member of the board of trustees, a member of the general board of UPCK, president of the UPCK Bible school, and a professor in the UPCK Bible school. MARCH 2013

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[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

BRENT AND RACHEL COLTHARP

Preserving the Family An Argument for the Biblical Ideal of Marriage and Family

n order to preserve a family, one must first have a family worth preserving. Tragically, the moral decay of our contemporary society has decimated the family unit. Historically, when one mentioned the family unit, one was referencing a home in which two parents of opposite sex dwelled with their children. Television shows such as The New Normal have been launched in an attempt to redefine the American family altogether. Quoting from the show’s website, “These days, families come in all forms—single dads, double moms, sperm donors, egg donors, onenight-stand donors … It’s 2012 and anything goes” (www.NBC.com/ the-new-normal/about). The tragedy of this new normal is observed in the gender confusion, poverty, juvenile delinquency, and numerous other social maladies of our day. More than ever before, the biblical definition and ideal of marriage and family “as one man and one woman, married by law, in accordance with all biblical injunctions; and all offspring of such a couple, biological or adopted” is a family unit worth preserving. (See “The Biblical Ideal of Marriage and Family,” UPCI Position Papers). The difficulty is not found in a resistance toward preservation, seeing that our culture is fanatical about preservation. They are fanatical about the preservation and conservation of animals, the environment, abortion, and so forth. However, when it comes to the preservation of the traditional and biblical ideal of marriage and family there is little interest, as has been exemplified by the adoption of same-sex marriage initiatives in several states during our most recent election season. The preservation of the biblical ideal of marriage and family is not only a worthy endeavor; it is a biblical mandate for the Apostolic church in general and the UPCI in particular. In Paul’s letter to 48

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the church at Ephesus, he gave considerable attention to the divinely instituted family unit. Chapters five and six in particular provide us with pragmatic instruction concerning how we are to live out our faith as redeemed disciples of Jesus Christ in the context of familial responsibility. Paul said, “This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and the church” (Ephesians 5:32, NKJV). Paul was using the family unit to deepen the Ephesians’ understanding of the church’s relationship with Christ. It is the conviction of the authors that one of the greatest evangelistic opportunities of the Apostolic movement is to preserve strong families that worship God through the fulfillment of individual familial roles. As our society is decimated by the teachings and philosophies of the world, biblical families will increasingly be a light and a beacon of hope as these social experiments continue to fail. Guidelines for Preserving Our Families The nation of Israel, after standing against the onslaught of numerous adversaries throughout the ages, provides an example of preservation. Yet they have been able to maintain their identity regardless of the distance from the land. The modern day struggle with regards to preserving Jewish heritage is observed in the 1964 musical, based on the book by Joseph Stein, Fiddler on the Roof. Tevye, the father of five daughters, is desperately trying to maintain his family and Jewish religious traditions against outside influences. The musical epitomizes the struggle that has taken place beginning immediately after the Israelites began occupying the Promised Land. While we are aware that there have been periods when Israel fell away from the divine mandate, a remnant has always remained true.

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There have been periods of national renewal due to their adherence to and the passing down of their doctrines and traditions to ensuing generations. Israel understood a truth that appears to have been lost in the contemporary church. The responsibility of preserving biblical teaching concerning God-honoring families does not rest alone on the shoulders of the ministry within the local church. The primary responsibility of preserving our families and maintaining Apostolic doctrine and identity rests on the shoulders of parents. The familiar proverb, “Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it,” is the trait of the wise parent in contrast with the fool (Proverbs 22:6). Contemporary society, possibly in response to the increasing acceptance of the concept of a nanny state, has expected the public school system to train their children in the ways of the world and the church to train them in the ways of God through Sunday school and student ministries. While these institutions influence our children, with the public school system having a ten-to-one advantage over Sunday school and student ministries, they are not divinely approved substitutes for parents. Paul said the role of the local church—and the fivefold ministry in particular—is “for the equipping of the saints for the work of ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ” (Ephesians 4:12, NKJV). A proper biblical view of Apostolic ministry is to recognize that ministry begins at home. If one is not properly ministering at home, this disqualifies him or her from ministering elsewhere. (See I Timothy

3.) It is the responsibility of parents to ensure that their children are not being “tossed to and fro and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, in the cunning craftiness of deceitful plotting” (Ephesians 4:14, NKJV). Pastors and teachers must equip parents to train their children in the doctrines and distinctives of the Apostolic doctrine. Historically, families have preserved their histories through photo albums, through the perpetual recounting of stories that make up a family’s narrative, and through tracking their ancestry with tools such as a genogram or modern websites such as ancestry.com. There is a divinely designed innate desire within individuals to know who they are and where they come from, both biologically and historically. This is evidenced in the adopted child who begins to bombard his or her adoptive parents with a litany of questions concerning these factors. God intended parents to be guardians who preserve their families after being equipped by their pastor to teach, train, instill, ingrain, and imprint into their families who we are as Apostolics, where we come from, the doctrines, distinctives, values, and a worldview that will empower us to maintain our identity regardless of the onslaught of our society. Brent and Rachel Coltharp serve as lead pastors to the First Apostolic Church of Aurora, Illinois. They are diligently attempting to disciple their four children: James, Reagan, Lincoln, and Grant. MARCH 2013

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[PENTECOSTAL LIFE]

A Challenge to Pray Every Day for at Least Twelve Minutese ANITA SARGEANT

hile vacationing, my friends and I decided to visit a church we had heard about. “Let’s go in time to visit the prayer room before church,” my friend decided. “OK,” I replied and then said to myself, “I hope this church has a prayer room they use regularly.” As we entered the church a smile came to my face when I spotted a sign, “Prayer Room” with an arrow indicating which direction to go. We felt a rush of excitement as we contemplated visiting a church where leadership felt passionate prayer before service was essential. Though we were forty-five minutes early, the sound of fervent prayer drifted through the doors, drawing us in. During the service four received the Holy Ghost and one was baptized in Jesus’ name. Obviously prayer is the central theme for that church. The Power of Speech We make life-changing decisions every day. Our decision to pray consistently can guard against complacency and mediocrity. No program or schedule can take the place of fervent and consistent prayer. In her book The Power of Speaking Positive, Joy Haney quotes a leading neurosurgeon regarding the effect of speech on the human brain: “Dr. Cho, did you know that the speech center in the brain rules over all the nerves? According to our recent findings in neurology, the speech center in the brain has total dominion over all the 50

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other nerves.” When we make a decision and voice it to ourselves and others, we are likely to succeed. Can We Eat Enough on One Day to Last All Week? It would be ridiculous to think we could eat enough in one day to last all week. In the spiritual realm no spiritual experience is sufficient to satisfy us for an extended period of time. No special church service can provide enough spiritual food to last the rest of the week. Spiritually speaking, whether we simply prepare a small bowl of rice or a gourmet meal, the only answer to spiritual strength and maturity is to eat regularly. Startling Facts Regarding Meditation, Prayer, and the Human Brain Leading research analysts have discovered some startling facts regarding the effects of meditation and prayer on the human brain. In their book, How God Changes Your Brain: Breakthrough Findings from a Leading Neuroscientist, Andrew Newberg, MD, and Mark Robert Waldman reveal the following: “If you contemplate God long enough, something surprising happens in the brain. Neural functioning begins to change. Different circuits become activated, while others become deactivated. New dendrites are formed, new synaptic connections are made, and the brain becomes more sensitive to subtle realms of experience. Perceptions alter, beliefs begin to change, and if God has meaning for you, then God becomes neurologically real.” It has been proven that we are healthier and happier if we follow simple directives regarding consistent meditation and prayer. We are not complete in ourselves—we need God.

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If we begin praying for at least twelve minutes every day, we learn to love our personal prayer time. Even when the flesh is weak, the spirit is willing and the flesh can be overcome. Let’s overcome and crush the devil through the power of the Spirit.

Motivation At times we need some motivation to help us comprehend the seriousness of the hour. If we understand that we have Heaven to gain and Hell to shun, we will always find time in our day for prayer and Bible reading. Exploring the 12-Minute Prayer Challenge As we focus on arranging our lives to include consistent prayer, let’s observe another portion of Newberg and Waldman’s observations: “If you stay in a contemplative state for twenty minutes to an hour, your experiences will tend to feel more real, affecting your nervous system in ways that enhance physical and emotional health. Antistress hormones and neurochemicals are released throughout the body, as well as pleasure-enhancing and depression-decreasing neurotransmitters like dopamine and serotonin. Even ten to fifteen minutes of meditation appears to have significantly positive effects on cognition, relaxation, and psychological health, and it has been shown to reduce smoking and binge-drinking behavior.” This amazing observation regarding prayer and meditation from a clinical standpoint brings further motivation and drive for us to pray consistently. As we read God’s Word, set our mind upon it, pray, and believe God to transform us into His image, we are transformed. Newberg and Waldman recommend twenty minutes to an hour of meditation daily; however, they conclude that even ten to fifteen minutes is effective. When we spend between twenty minutes to an hour in prayer it is as if we have indulged in a full meal. When we pray for at least twelve minutes it is as if we have partaken in a spiritually sustaining snack.

Twelve-Minute Prayer Challenge I will pray every day for the next thirty days for at least twelve minutes. I will read at least one chapter in the Bible. I plan to renew that pledge at the end of thirty days and to do that again and gain for the rest of my life. If we accept the Twelve-Minute Prayer Challenge, in one year we will have prayed 4380 minutes or seventy-three hours. This is an effective way to grow spiritually. Consistency is the key to success. Learning to Love Prayer If we begin praying for at least twelve minutes every day, we learn to love our personal prayer time. Even when the flesh is weak, the spirit is willing and the flesh can be overcome. Let’s overcome and crush the devil through the power of the Spirit. Anita Sargeant has a passion to see lives transformed by the power of God. She has worked for Pentecostal Publishing House in Hazelwood, Missouri, promoting Apostolic literature since the year 2000. She attends Lighthouse United Pentecostal Church in O’Fallon, Missouri. Brandon Buford is the pastor. Her book, 12 Minute Prayer Challenge, is available at www.pentecostalpublishing.com.

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15Pentecostal Herald March 2013  

Pentecostal Herald March 2013

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